Tag Archives: marathon

FA Cup mascot to run London Marathon

Farah takes on the FA Cup! Trophy mascot joins Mo on London Marathon start line

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Double delight: Farah won 10,000m and 5,000m gold at the London 2012 Olympics

Farah said: 'The whole point is to try and learn from it and my aim is to come out here, learn about the race and get used to the course so next year I'm ready to go. It's a no-brainer really. If someone's giving you a practice run, why would you turn that down There's a lot of criticism, but that's part of life. You can't keep everyone happy.'

And there is, he stressed, no chance of him going all the way to the finish line.

'I'm 25-1 to finish the race,' he added. 'That ain't going to happen. If anyone's got money lying around they can give it to the Mo Farah Foundation because I'm definitely not going to finish it.'

Teenage Cancer Trust will be joining in The FA’s 150th anniversary celebrations throughout the year, working together to raise the profile of the charity which plays an important role in transforming the lives of young people with cancer in communities across the country.

To find out more or to support Teenage Cancer Trust visit Adrian’s Just Giving page http://www.justgiving.com/adrian-wells.

Jessica Ennis becomes TV interviewer in park – VIDEO

Which Olympic champion turned TV interviewer with an impromptu workout in the park (she's not really a blonde)

and a dazzling gold medal winner, but she wasn't easily recognised when she put on a wig and took a microphone into Hyde Park.

For regular morning fitness fanatics the last thing you expect is to bump into Sheffield's finest, Jessica Ennis. But one runner got more than he was expecting when she stopped him for a chat – and then offered an impromptu workout.

Scroll down to watch the video

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Ennis initially donned a wig, grabbed a microphone and film crew and questioned runners in London's Hyde Park about their training habits.

Then, having revealed herself to one unsuspecting participant, the 27-year-old Olympic heptathlon gold medallist spent an hour showing him ways to improve his fitness.

Using equipment ranging from a medicine ball to a park bench, the amateur athlete is put through
his paces.

The video was shot as part of a new Powerade campaign: ‘You Have More Power Than You Think'.

And with Sunday's London Marathon fast approaching, what better time to pick up some last-minute tips

For more information and to download the training tips, click here.

Up close and personal: Ennis stopped unsuspecting runners to quiz them on their fitness regimes

Up close and personal: Ennis stopped unsuspecting runners to quiz them on their fitness regimes

Surprise: Ennis reveals her true identity to one runner before taking him through a workout

Surprise: Ennis reveals her true identity to one runner before taking him through a workout

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Paula Radcliffe may never compete again

Radcliffe: Foot injury that ruled me out of London 2012 may stop me from competing ever again

with a foot injury and she has not run since.

End of the road Radcliffe has been out injured for eight months

End of the road Radcliffe has been out injured for eight months

Finish line: Radcliffe may not compete again

Finish line: Radcliffe may not compete again

The Brit was hoping to compete in a 10km race this month but she has ruled out that possibility as she continues to suffer complications from her injury.

'Targets have gone out of the window,' Radcliffe told BBC Sport.

'I'm very much in that limbo where I know and accept that realistically it may not be possible.

'But at the same time I have a little window of hope and I would rather be able to finish my career in a race, rather than a race I can't actually get to the start line of.'

Radcliffe has world marathon champion in 2005 and has won two world cross-country titles.

David Weir interview: You have to be quite scary, give evil stares, says Paralympic gold medal hero

EXCLUSIVE: You have to be quite scary, give evil stares and tell them to get out of my way, says… the Weirwolf of London!

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UPDATED:

23:01 GMT, 10 December 2012

The man known as the 'Animal' of wheelchair racing, who won four gold medals at the Paralympic Games in London, is sitting in a cafe in Richmond Park, south-west London, sipping a coffee.

David Weir is quiet, humble and softly spoken, smiling tiredly as he talks about his 10-week-old daughter, Tillia Grace London. He still seems overawed by the scale of his achievements and how his life has changed since that glorious summer.

But when the conversation turns to sport — and, specifically, competition — Weir is transformed. His blue eyes become piercing and intense as he explains, with passion verging on venom, what it means to him to race in a British vest and the ruthlessness it takes to succeed.

Animal passion: David Weir wins gold in the T54 800 metres at the London 2012 Paralympics

Animal passion: David Weir wins gold in the T54 800 metres at the London 2012 Paralympics

It was a striking change that was noticeable during the Games, too, as this polite, mild-mannered man executed four tactically perfect finals in nine days.

Weir won the T54 800 metres, 1500m, 5,000m and marathon and now has a tattoo of the Greek goddess of victory, Nike, to match the insignia on the four gold medals which he removes carefully from their black velvet cases. Appropriately, the six-time London Marathon winner also has another tattoo on his chest which means ‘winner’ in Japanese.

‘You have to be quite scary,’ says Weir, ‘because if you’re not, people will box you in. So you give them some evil stares and tell them to “**** off and get out of my way”. They’re going to move. I wouldn’t move, but some people will.

‘On the track I just switch on to being a racer and winning. It takes anything to win. I wouldn’t say I would cause accidents but you have to be ruthless.

‘I do certain things on the warm-up
track that might unsettle the guys’ minds. I will wait until they’ve
gone past me and then start my warm-up lap, pushing at a good speed and
just sitting behind them. Then I go past them and look like I’m at ease.
Just to show them. When I was sprinting, my starts weren’t great and,
because you would be allowed one false start without being disqualified,
sometimes I used to false-start on purpose. Then I knew I would get
away as good as everyone else.’

Patriot: Weir celebrates his marathon victory

Proud day: Weir was awarded the Freedom of City of London at Guildhall last week

Proud patriot: Weir celebrates marathon victory (left) and was awarded the Freedom of City of London (right)

There are two distinct sides to ‘The Weirwolf’. After the Games the 33-year-old, an aspiring DJ, spent five days in Ibiza indulging his love of house music, yet he arranges our interview for 9am so he can spend the day with his family.

He was awarded the freedom of the City of London last week but still lives in ‘a two-bedroomed terrace’ on the ‘same council estate’ in Wallington, south-west London, where he grew up.

Weir was so painfully shy when he rediscovered athletics in 2002 that he took months to pluck up the courage to ring his coach, Jenny Archer, because he ‘didn’t want to bother anyone’. Archer, who worked with Wimbledon FC’s ‘Crazy Gang’ in the 1980s, has subsequently helped him become the greatest wheelchair racer of all by training with cyclists in Richmond Park.

His drive and toughness surface again when we discuss the BBC Sports Personality of the Year on Sunday evening, for which Weir has been nominated along with fellow Paralympians Sarah Storey and Ellie Simmonds. Weir says he does not normally attend because a Paralympic athlete has not been included on the shortlist since the then Tanni (now Baroness) Grey-Thompson in 2000. She came third but was unable to accept her award because there was no ramp to the stage.

So should there be a separate award to recognise the achievements of Paralympics GB ‘No, never,’ Weir says. ‘We want to compete against the best. All right, we probably won’t win it, but we want to compete.

Hometown hero: Weir still lives in his two-bedroomed house in Wallington despite his extraordinary success

Hometown hero: Weir still lives in his two-bedroomed house in Wallington despite his extraordinary success

‘I am just in awe of being in the top 12 with these great athletes, but I don’t think it should ever be separate because then you’re segregating it again and we don’t want that.

‘Sports Personality is about sport. We want to be branded as athletes. Speak to any Paralympian and they’ll tell you the same — and if they didn’t…’ His voice trails off and he takes a deep breath. God help anyone who dares to disagree with Weir in this mood.

‘I would hate to see it separated,’ he continues. ‘You’re a sports person and that’s what it is: sports personality. It doesn’t matter about colour, race, women, disabled — it’s all about sport and that’s all that matters.’

The quality of the sport, after all, was the most memorable thing about the 2012 Paralympics, the ‘perfect Games’ that Weir describes as being ‘like a storybook’.

‘It just feels like I’ve read a story on an athlete’s life,’ he adds.

The positive experience Weir had in London is even more moving when you consider his first taste of the Paralympics in Atlanta 16 years ago.

It was, as he puts it, ‘shocking’. The Athletes’ Village, the facilities, the crowds were all ‘very disappointing’. America did not — and still does not, to a large extent — ‘get’ the Paralympic movement, leaving a 17-year-old Weir thinking: ‘What’s the point’

Path to glory: Weir trains in Richmond Park with professional cyclists and credits beetroot juice for his success

Path to glory: Weir trains in Richmond Park with pro cyclists and credits beetroot juice for his success

‘I did nothing after Atlanta,’ he
explains. ‘No training. I couldn’t get a job, couldn’t do anything. I
struggled. I had left school at 16 and was on the dole, doing nothing.

‘Then I saw the Games in Sydney on TV four years later and that broke my heart a little bit. I thought maybe I would have been there, winning a medal. I thought, “What have I done” I just wanted to represent my country. I felt like I let my country down and a lot of other people down. I had missed the World Championships in ’98. I just didn’t turn up. I didn’t do enough training so I didn’t deserve to be there and I told them (the British team) that.

‘So when they did ask me to come back on the squad I felt like I was paying it back. I felt very proud after that.’

Weir’s pride in competing for his country shines through. He is not thinking about defending his titles in Rio in 2016 yet, but the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow is a real desire.

His willingness to discuss his patriotism is not sickly, but heartfelt — and fairly unusual for athletes in an individual sport who, in their blinkered pursuit of success, can appear selfish. Weir desperately wanted to finish London 2012 by winning his fourth gold in the marathon on the Mall, ‘with Buckingham Palace and all those British flags’ behind him.

Golden boy: Weir shows off his four medals from 2012

Golden boy: Weir shows off his medals

‘I was very conscious I was competing in a British vest,’ he says. ‘I saw all those British flags and people jumping up and down and just thought, “No way am I going to let anyone past me”.

‘I think the British public gets Paralympic sport and I think it was the first time (at a Games) we didn’t get treated as disabled. It was, “We’re going to watch David Weir, or Hannah Cockroft, or Jonnie Peacock”. It wasn’t because they’re disabled.’

Quite the opposite. Watching Weir in the distinctive red helmet Archer has spirited away for safe-keeping was a distinctly enabling experience. He was imperious and apparently unstoppable for that nine-day period, powered only, as Boris Johnson pointed out, by beetroot juice.

Weir drinks ‘litres of it’ — mixed with apple juice — three days before a race and then had a concentrated shot of the red stuff during the marathon. He seems a little miffed, however, that the Mayor of London decided to broadcast his ‘secret’ to the ‘whole world’ during the Team GB parade.

‘It’s a bit stronger than coffee,’ he says, laughing now. ‘It’ll give you a stamina shot all day.
‘I wonder if Boris went home and tried it.’

Paula Radcliffe won"t retire yet

Just to run with my kids would be enough, admits Radcliffe after triple operation

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 26 November 2012

On August 5, 2012 Paula Radcliffe sat in a London hotel room and watched Tiki Gelana of Ethiopia win gold in the women’s marathon in a time of two hours, 23.07 minutes, an Olympic record.

Tears start to form in Radcliffe’s wide, pale blue eyes at the memory. That was meant to be her race, in her country; her final opportunity to add Olympic glory to world championship success and world records of a glittering long-distance running career; her time to bury the memories of Athens and Beijing. And then the tears start to fall.

‘There’s a lot more suffering in the world and people put up with a lot more than me just missing a race,’ she says. ‘But, yes, it was hard. I think I could have handled that for one Olympics and maybe for two. But for three It just felt really unfair.

Tears: Paula Radcliffe finished the 2008 Olympic marathon in 23rd place

Tears: Paula Radcliffe finished the 2008 Olympic marathon in 23rd place

‘One of the most frustrating things was that I felt I was in good enough shape to run 2.19 or 2.20. That made me feel even sadder because it wasn’t as if they were miles ahead and I would only have been running for top five or top six. I could have been in there fighting for it.

‘You just think, why couldn’t the Games have just been six weeks earlier Sometimes it all felt like a bad dream and I would wake up to discover I could actually do it.’

While Great Britain basked in an incredible year of sport, the woman who has been a figurehead for so long was an outsider, looking in. Some 10 days before the Games, the cartilage between the navicular and talus on the top of Radcliffe’s left foot cracked; the repercussions of an undiagnosed stress fracture sustained in 1994 were taking their toll.

Recovering: Radcliffe's injured foot

Recovering: Radcliffe's injured foot

The bones in the foot were rubbing against each other, causing pain that was so bad Radcliffe was told she may never run again.

‘It was hard because it was the end of the Olympics for me,’ she says, her voice faltering again. ‘It was hard because it was the Olympics in London. Then to see what a brilliant atmosphere it was …it would have been amazing to be able to run in that.’

Instead, on August 22 in California, Radcliffe had three operations on her left foot: a bone graft to correct the stress fracture, a procedure to separate two bones that had fused together and a micro-fracture to stimulate the cracked cartilage.

She was ‘immobilised’ for 10 weeks and then forced to use a knee scooter to get down to the beach to go aqua-jogging to help her rehabilitation.

When we met last weekend in Barcelona, where the IAAF were holding the World Athlete of the Year awards, Radcliffe still could not run. She is hopeful she will be back jogging before Christmas, but there are no guarantees.

The 2013 London Marathon — 10 years after she smashed the world record in the race — is almost certain to come too soon. But she will battle on, as always.

Nobody could have criticised Radcliffe for calling time on her career at the age of 38.

She admits this was her immediate instinct, but two things changed her mind and forced her to have the operations. The thought of not being able to run — recreationally and with her children Isla, five, and Raphael, two — was unbearable.

All smiles: Radcliffe has had to go through extensive rehabilitation

All smiles: Radcliffe has had to go through extensive rehabilitation

‘I’ve always run,’ she says, simply. But Radcliffe is even more determined to ‘finish by finishing a race’. It does not necessarily have to be a major championship, although the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow or the 2014 London Marathon would be preferable, but she knows she has to sign off properly and on her terms.

She recalls: ‘I said to Gary, my husband, “That’s it. I’m not going to do this any more. It’s too many times I’ve been kicked down”. Then I got this feeling that I have to at least finish a race.

‘Even if I never manage to get back to elite level, I still want to be able to run with my kids. I’ve realised my potential and won world championships. It’s just the Olympics that’s going to be sad for me.’

New York Marathon cancelled

It's off! New York Marathon is cancelled following devastation of Superstorm Sandy

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UPDATED:

23:29 GMT, 2 November 2012

The New York City Marathon has been cancelled following mounting criticism for the decision earlier this week to go ahead with the race in the devastating wake of Superstorm Sandy.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said on Friday that this was not the time for Sunday's race to go ahead, with the region still recovering.

With people in storm-ravaged areas still without electricity, and the death toll in the city at more than 40, many New Yorkers were furious at the prospect of police officers being required to protect this major sporting event.

Marathon clear-up: Damage in the New York City borough of Queens, where fire destroyed around 100 houses and many more were flooded

Marathon clear-up: Damage in the New York City borough of Queens, where fire destroyed around 100 houses and many more were flooded

An estimated 40,000 runners from
around the world had been expected to take part.
The race had been scheduled to start in Staten Island, one of the areas to suffer most this week.

'We would not want a cloud to hang
over the race or its participants, and so we have decided to cancel it,' Bloomberg said in a statement.

High winds: Superstorm Sandy has forced the cancellation of the race

High winds: Superstorm Sandy has forced the cancellation of the race

'We cannot allow a controversy over an
athletic event – even one as meaningful as this – to distract attention
away from all the critically important work that is being done to
recover from the storm and get our city back on track.'

Bloomberg called the marathon an
'integral part of New York City's life for 40 years' and 'an event tens
of thousands of New Yorkers participate in and millions more watch'.

Flashback: The runners cross Verrazano Narrows Bridge in last year's race

Flashback: The runners cross Verrazano Narrows Bridge in last year's race

He maintained that holding the
race would not require diverting resources from the recovery effort, but
understood the level of friction.

'It is clear it that it has become
the source of controversy and division,' Bloomberg said. 'The marathon
has always brought our city together and inspired us with stories of
courage and determination.'

Superstorm sandy: New York marathon still on

New York Marathon still on as NBA and NFL stand up to Superstorm Sandy

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UPDATED:

10:52 GMT, 31 October 2012

The big hitters of American sport are refusing to be beaten by Superstorm Sandy with the NBA and NFL set to go ahead as planned over the next few days.

The New York marathon is also expected to take place on Sunday despite fears that many of the 50,000 runners will not be able to make it to the start at Staten Island.

Race against time: Runners need the Staten Island Ferry - but the terminal was forced to close

Race against time: Runners need the Staten Island Ferry – but the terminal was forced to close

It's back: The NBA returned this week and Brooklyn are set to face New York on Thursday night

It's back: The NBA returned this week and Brooklyn are set to face New York on Thursday night

The show must go on….

Fixtures on the east coast this week

NBA
31/10 – Philadelphia v Denver
1/11 – Brooklyn v New York
2/11 – New York v Miami
Boston v Milwaukee
Cleveland v Chicago
3/11 – Washington v Boston
Brooklyn v Toronto
4/11 – New York v Philadelphia

NFL
4/11 – New York Giants v Pittsburgh
Washington v Carolina
Cleveland v Baltimore

New York Marathon – Sunday, November 4

The subway is flooded and, along with most of the city's bridges and tunnels, was closed just five days before the 26.2-mile race through the five boroughs.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned that the underground system may not be running by the weekend but New York Road Runners president Mary Wittenberg said in a statement: 'The marathon has always been a special day for New Yorkers as a symbol of the vitality and resiliency of this city.

'We will keep all options open with regard to making any accommodations and adjustments necessary to race day and race weekend events.

'The city is rightfully focused on assessment, restoration and recovery.'

At least 22 people have been killed in New York with the total death toll hitting 50 as Sandy wrecked the Eastern Seaboard.

Hammered: Cars were left under water in the East Village as Superstorm Sandy devastated New York

Hammered: Cars were left under water in the East Village as Superstorm Sandy devastated New York

Flattened: Over 100 homes were lost as fire ripped through Breezy Point in Queens

Flattened: Over 100 homes were lost as fire ripped through Breezy Point in Queens

Ripped up: Trees came crashing down all over the Big Apple as Sandy hit the region hard

Ripped up: Trees came crashing down all over the Big Apple as Sandy hit the region hard

As the clean-up begins, the cost is expected to hit $50bn while President Obama described the storm as a 'major disaster'.

Almost 20,000 international runners hope to take part in Sunday's marathon and JFK Airport was due to reopen on Wednesday. It is unknown at this stage when LaGuardia and Newark would be back in business.

Runners who can't get to New York should have until Saturday instead of Wednesday to withdraw from the race and reserve a spot in the 2013 marathon. But they won't get a refund and will have to pay again next year.

Race organizers were expected to reschedule the elite runners' flights to get them in on time.

In basketball, the Nets play the first match at their new Brooklyn home against the Knicks on Thursday evening while the New York Giants entertain NFL rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday.

Bring it on: The Giants are due to play the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday

Bring it on: The Giants are due to play the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday

Baltimore Ravens had their training disrupted as they were forced to run off a generator after losing power but the Giants, Buffalo, Cleveland, Phildelphia and New England reported no damage despite the east coast of the country taking a battering.

Next year's US PGA Championship has also been hit as Oakhill Country Club in Pittsford, New York has lost several trees.

Phillips Idowu Lottery funding renewed by UKA

Rio funds for Idowu as triple-jumper ends UKA feud despite London 2012 flop

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 15 October 2012

Phillips Idowu's spat with UK Athletics appears to be over after he was lavished with warm words and the tangible gift of 75,000.

The triple-jumper kept his top-bracket Lottery funding for 2013 on the day marathon world record-holder Paula Radcliffe was among several senior athletes removed from the programme in UKA’s ruthless push for success at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Idowu's inclusion on 'podium' funding — up to 26,000 in living expenses, plus coaching, training, competition, medical and scientific support worth another 50,000 — comes despite his rift with former head coach Charles van Commenee.

Bust-up: Phillips Idowu feuded with former UKA chief Charles van Commenee

Bust-up: Phillips Idowu feuded with former UKA chief Charles van Commenee

The pair fell out over the way Idowu withdrew from the European Team Championships last year, with the stand-off doing neither any credit.

Idowu, 33, then refused to come clean about his injury status as the London Olympics approached and failed to qualify for the final, but now Van Commenee has departed.

After meeting Idowu, new performance director Neil Black said: ‘We both feel really positive about the future. We are going to work together.’

Cash blow: Radcliffe has been removed from the list of athletes befitting from Lottery funding

Cash blow: Radcliffe has been removed from the list of athletes benefitting from Lottery funding

There can be no argument with Radcliffe’s treatment. She is 39 in December and has suffered a litany of injuries, the latest of which — to her left foot — kept her out of the Olympics. Her chances of making Rio are slim, but she said: ‘Retirement is definitely not in any plans. I’m not doing all this cross-training and getting this foot healthy and strong for nothing!’

With Black saying the emphasis is on Rio, the inclusion of well-travelled triple-jumper Yamile Aldama appears odd. The former Cuban and Sudanese competitor will be 44 by then.

Leap of faith: Garabarz is one of those whose funding will be boosted

Leap of faith: Garabarz is one of those whose funding will be boosted

Other big names to be axed are: veteran sprinters Mark Lewis-Francis and Marlon Devonish, European 400m hurdles champion Rhys Williams, Radcliffe’s fellow marathon runner Mara Yamauchi, former European 800m silver medallist Michael Rimmer, Commonwealth 1500m bronze medallist Steph Twell and former world 400m silver medallist Nicola Sanders.

Sprint prodigy Adam Gemili, 19, is added to the podium list. Robbie Grabarz, Olympic bronze-medal-winning high jumper, returns to full funding.

Sports pictures of the day: October 14

Sports images of the day: Our picture editor's selection

UPDATED:

13:31 GMT, 14 October 2012

Each day, MailOnline sports picture editor Dave Muir will choose his favourite photographs from around the world in the past 24 hours.

Enjoy today's selection right here…

Come here! Tight end Matt Furstenburg (left) of the Maryland Terrapins catches the ball in front of safety Brandon Phelps (right) of the Virginia Cavaliers at Scott Stadium in Virginia

Come here! Tight end Matt Furstenburg (left) of the Maryland Terrapins catches the ball in front of safety Brandon Phelps (right) of the Virginia Cavaliers at Scott Stadium in Virginia

Whack: Brandon Rios (right) catches fellow American Mike Alvarado flush on the chin in Carson, California during their WBO Latino Super Lightweight bout

Whack: Brandon Rios (right) catches fellow American Mike Alvarado flush on the chin in Carson, California during their WBO Latino Super Lightweight bout

Crashing down: South Africa's Stephan Dippenaar (right) tackles Fiji's Manueli Taubale Lagai at the IRB Sevens tournament at Skilled Park on the Gold Coast

Crashing down: South Africa's Stephan Dippenaar (right) tackles Fiji's Manueli Taubale Lagai at the IRB Sevens tournament at Skilled Park on the Gold Coast

You shall not pass: Australia's Mo'onia Gerrard tries to stop England's Sara Bayman passing during their International Quad Series Netball game in Adelaide, Australia

You shall not pass: Australia's Mo'onia Gerrard tries to stop England's Sara Bayman passing during their International Quad Series Netball game in Adelaide, Australia

Low light: Amateur competitors run uphill from the Natural Energy Laboratory during the marathon section of the Ironman World Championship triathlon in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Low light: Amateur competitors run uphill from the Natural Energy Laboratory during the marathon section of the Ironman World Championship triathlon in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

UK Athletics prepare to reveal funding cuts ahead of Rio Olympics

Radcliffe among those set to miss out as UKA prepare to reveal funding cuts

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UPDATED:

13:49 GMT, 14 October 2012


Funding at risk: Paula Radcliffe

Funding at risk: Paula Radcliffe

UK Athletics will announce on Monday a reduced group of athletes who will receive lottery funding for next season, with the emphasis on those with major championship medal potential over the next four years.

The governing body have narrowed the focus for a place on their World Class Performance Programme from athletes with top-eight potential to those who are top-three contenders.

That will mean fewer podium-level funded athletes, the highest level of lottery support, which runs from around 13,000 to 26,000 and is in addition to non-financial help like access to coaches, facilities, medical staff and training camps.

Athletes who failed to achieve the targets set out for them at either the 2011 World Championships or this summer's Olympics or those not considered medal contenders at the Rio Games in 2016 could be cut.

That could mean experienced names like world marathon record holder Paula Radcliffe and former world 800 metres bronze medallist Jenny Meadows missing out.

Radcliffe, who is 39, missed London 2012 through injury and did not compete either at the World Championships in Daegu the previous summer.

Meadows, 31, was not selected for the Olympics and missed the entire 2012 season due to injury, while she failed to make the final in Daegu.

The likes of Commonwealth 1500 metres bronze medallist Stephanie Twell, former European 800m silver medallist Michael Rimmer, both of whom have been plagued by terrible problems, and 400m runner Martyn Rooney could also be under threat.

So too could be members of the men's and women's relay teams, including the likes of sprinters Marlon Devonish, Christian Malcolm and Harry Aikines-Aryeetey.