Tag Archives: limerick

Harpsy Cord falls at final fence in Tim Duggan Memorial Handicap Chase at Limerick

No laughing matter at Limerick as Harpsy Cord falls at the last having led from the front

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UPDATED:

17:56 GMT, 27 December 2012

There was agony for backers of Harpsy Cord in the Tim Duggan Memorial Handicap Chase as, after leading all the way, he crashed out at the final fence when five lengths clear and seemingly having the two mile three-and-a-half furlong race at his mercy.

That left course specialist Jack Absolute (16-1) in front and he had to be kept right up to his work to hold off Tullintain by a length-and-a-quarter and land the 21,000 prize.

It was not what Harpsy Cord deserved as he had jumped brilliantly in the hands of Keith Donoghue but after pecking on landing at the second-last he got in too tight to the final fence to gift victory to the John Walsh-trained nine-year-old in the hands of Brian O'Connell.

Going... Harpsy Cord clips the final fence at the Tim Duggan Memorial Handicap Steeplechase

Going… Harpsy Cord clips the final fence at the Tim Duggan Memorial Handicap Steeplechase

Going... Harpsy Cord clips the final fence at the Tim Duggan Memorial Handicap Steeplechase

Going... Donoghue is sent flying over the top of Harpsy Cord as he fails to regain his footing

Going… Donoghue is sent flying over the top of Harpsy Cord as he fails to regain his footing

Going... Donoghue is sent flying over the top of Harpsy Cord as he fails to regain his footing

Gone: Both horse and jockey (who were OK after the fall) hit the deck and kiss goodbye to their hopes of winning

Gone: Both horse and jockey (who were OK after the fall) hit the deck and kiss goodbye to their hopes of winning

Gone: Both horse and jockey (who were OK after the fall) hit the deck and kiss goodbye to their hopes of winning

Walsh said: 'That's his eighth win and his sixth around here so it's definitely a case of horses for courses.

'Today was the plan and you can't beat a bit of luck!'

The Earl of Harrington Memorial Maiden Hunters Chase will also live long in the memory for the wrong reasons after the attritional conditions resulted in 13 of the 16 runners failing to complete the course.

The race was won by 11-2 chance Goonyella who slogged through mud best of all to come home a distance clear of Survival, with Thetalkisover (pictured) the only other finisher back in third. The win provided a welcome fillip for trainer Tom Dreaper who had been so luckless earlier in the afternoon with Harpsy Cord.

Conditions took their toll on John Gleeson-trained Thetalkisover who refused to jump the final fence at the first time of asking but finally consented to clamber over and take third place despite being exhausted.

Third time lucky: Thetalkinisover initially refused to jump the final fence in the Hunters Steeplechase

Third time lucky: Thetalkinisover initially refused to jump the final fence in the Hunters Steeplechase

Third time lucky: Thetalkinisover initially refused to jump the final fence in the Hunters Steeplechase

Third time lucky: Thetalkinisover initially refused to jump the final fence in the Hunters Steeplechase

Third time lucky: Thetalkinisover initially refused to jump the final fence in the Hunters Steeplechase

Katie Walsh was feared to have suffered a shoulder injury when Pocketfullapennies came down at the seventh-last but later tweeted she was 'fine just sore!!'.

Kevin Kilbane column: Media work brings different pressure and nerves to playing

Media work isn't as nerve-racking as making your debut as a player… but it's not far off

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UPDATED:

00:41 GMT, 15 December 2012

I played at Everton for three years and made more than 100 appearances for David Moyes.

I’ve lost count of the number of games I have watched at Goodison Park as a player, spectator and a pundit.

Last Sunday, just a day after finally announcing my retirement, I walked into the ground in my new job. And with that came an entirely different pressure, and plenty of nerves. Not as bad as making your debut as a player, but pretty close.

New pressure: Kevin Kilbane says life as a pundit will bring different stresses

New pressure: Kevin Kilbane says life as a pundit will bring different stresses

I’ve worked with BBC Five Live and Newstalk as co-commentator while still playing and always enjoyed it, it’s one of the reasons I’m happy with the choice of new career.

For the record I don’t see the career taking me to Limerick as manager just yet. I’ve always said I wouldn’t rule out a return to coaching but when I landed in Dublin yesterday to read about my pending appointment at Jackman Park, it was as much of a surprise to me as everyone else.

The club did make contact for the first time yesterday afternoon and I wouldn’t rule out talking to them in the future, if they are serious.

As a player, as soon as you put down the headphones and head home, you start worrying about the day job and training on Monday morning. That security was gone now.

I love watching football – I was at Preston North End v Crewe Alexandra on Saturday just to see my old club – and I’ve always analysed games the same way, and want to put that over in the commentaries.

Particularly at Hull last season I started to really study the opposition and analyse formations, teams and players, so I’ll use that as the basis of the information I’ll bring to the listeners.

I’ve always tried to be honest, but of course, while still a player yourself, at the back of your mind is the fact you might say something that might upset a former team-mate or fellow professional. I’m not going to go daft and say things for the sake of it but I’ll say it as I see it.

In attendance: Kilbane was at Goodison to see Everton score a late winner and beat Tottenham 2-1

In attendance: Kilbane was at Goodison to see Everton score a late winner and beat Tottenham 2-1

The reaction to last week’s announcement has really surprised me, and fans from all the clubs I’ve played for, and from Ireland, have said some very nice things.

There have been one or two less favourable ones and my personal favourite was a tweet from a Sunderland fan who said 'I thought he retired when he was playing for us.'

Yes. I’m on Twitter, and the first week has certainly been interesting.

I know a lot of players use it now but I was never really comfortable joining while I was still a professional footballer representing a football club.

While I will still be careful about what I say, and won’t be using it to provoke furious debate, I am freer now to express my views and enjoy it.

It’s really nice to interact with fans and answer their questions, send on any retweet requests, and pass on any little tips. Just don’t be fooled by this week’s success!

I can use it to raise the awareness of the Downs Syndrome Association and without Twitter I might not have found out about the campaign to save Preston Bus Station. It’s part of my childhood (is it right for a man to be proud of his town’s bus station). They can’t knock it down.

Whatever apprehensions I had about hanging up the boots disappeared the moment it was out. Finally I could answer questions about my future and look forward to that first game at Everton.

Good times: The Irish international retired from football last week

Good times: The Irish international retired from football last week

And since then the phone hasn’t stopped. It’s been incredible really, and of course I know it will calm down, but the offers of work have naturally been very welcome.

I was asked to stand in at the last minute for Question of Sport. And bumped into Robbie Savage as he left following the first recording. 'They let any old riff-raff in here.' Yes, Robbie Savage.

Played on Phil Tufnell’s team and met Irish champion jockey Richard Hughes, which was a real honour. I had to put our snap on Twitter.

If there’s one commitment I am nervous about, it’s my first appearance on The Late Late Show. It’s an Irish institution. And just to put my mind at rest the fellow guests are Dohmnall Gleeson, The Dubliners, Catherine Jenkins and Billy Connolly.

I do keep asking myself what I’m doing there.

Coleman's coming through

Everton reserves manager Alan Stubbs first brought Seamus Coleman to my attention.

He’d just signed from Sligo Rovers and Stubbsy mentioned him because he liked the look of him straight away and he looked like he was going to become a good footballer.

So I kept an eye on him and I know he was an integral part of the Blackpool team which gained promotion.

They wanted to sign him permanently but David Moyes recognised that loan spell was an important part of his progression and he had plans for him at Everton.

In his first season he mainly played in midfield but for the last two has been competing with Tony Hibbert for the right-back slot.

Tony is a very good defender, and not much gets past him, but doesn’t give as much as Seamus going forward.

Impressed: Kilbane rates Seamus Coleman and is pleased with his progress

Impressed: Kilbane rates Seamus Coleman and is pleased with his progress

Tony’s injury has given Seamus his chance, which he has really grasped. He was excellent against Tottenham last week and you can see his defensive game is improving. He has made mistakes but the good thing is, you can see he is learning from them.

I really believe that Seamus’s long overdue regular place in the Republic of Ireland team is behind his form this season.

It should have happened two years ago but now he is established in the squad, he has grown in confidence.

He could have gone the other way after missing out on the Euro finals, and I know that must have hurt him. How many players get the hump and don’t make themselves available You have to earn the right to play for your country.

Seamus has been on the peripherary but always made himself available, turned up when selected, not moaned when he hasn’t played. He just wants to play for Ireland.

He’s turned up, worked hard, played well for his club and got his call-ups. His performances can only be good news for Ireland, Everton and Seamus.

My part in Arsenal’s downfall

I got a text message from my former Hull team-mate Matt Duke on Tuesday, wishing me all the best for retirement.

I asked what he was up to and he texted: 'All good, got a game against Arsenal tonight.’

Clearly it inspired Matt to his heroics in the penalty shoot-out Capital One Cup win over The Gunners.

Matt, who’s now coaching at Bradford too, has fought back from testicular cancer, and his harsh release from Hull in the summer of 2011.

And I can’t think of many lads who deserve a night to cherish for the rest of his life as much as Dukes.

Kevin Kilbane is a columnist for The Irish Daily Mail

Owen Farrell wants to play at No 10 for Saracens

Farrell wants to be a perfect 10 after wayward kicking display against Munster

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 9 December 2012

Owen Farrell fixed a kicking glitch just in time to snatch a vital bonus point for Saracens in their 15-9 defeat to Munster at Thomond Park on Saturday, then revealed he has held talks with the club over his limited access to the No 10 shirt.

Seven days after playing a central role in England’s epic win against New Zealand at Twickenham, where he ran the show at fly-half, the 21-year-old reverted to centre in Limerick.

However, when Charlie Hodgson was replaced during the second half of this blood-and-thunder encounter, Farrell carried out the conductor’s duties with considerable aplomb, in a late rally by the visitors.

Tough day: Owen Farrell's kicking form was erratic for Saracens

Tough day: Owen Farrell's kicking form was erratic for Saracens

It would be in the national interest
for him to play regularly at stand-off, rather than at outside centre,
but he has started just four games there for Saracens this season. ‘I
want to do my job for the club, first and foremost,’ said Farrell.

‘I’ve had a sit-down with Mark
(McCall, director of rugby) and we’ve put a plan in place. I will play
some games at 10 and some at centre, but I don’t think it really matters
because when I play at centre at the club; I’m playing like a second
fly-half anyway.’

Farrell’s goal-kicking was wayward at
Thomond Park, with a final return of three out of seven. The last miss,
from a promising position five minutes from time, suggested Saracens
would leave Ireland with nothing, but when another chance came with a
minute to go, Farrell scored to ensure his side took a point to go into
the return tie at Vicarage Road on Sunday tied with Munster at the top
of Pool One.

Showdown: Farrell (left) admitted to holding talks with the club

Showdown: Farrell (left) admitted to holding talks with the club

Edin Dzeko unlikely to leave Manchester City – Roberto Mancini

He's not Edin anywhere! Mancini claims striker's exit unlikely

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UPDATED:

14:47 GMT, 6 August 2012

Staying put Edin Dzeko is likely to stay at Man City

Staying put Edin Dzeko is likely to stay at Man City

Edin Dzeko is unlikely to leave Manchester City over the summer according to his boss Roberto Mancini.

The Bosnian forward has been linked with a move away from the Barclays Premier League champions because he is beneath Sergio Aguero, Mario Balotelli and Carlos Tevez in the pecking order.

But the striker scored twice against
Limerick in City's 4-0 friendly victory on Sunday and Mancini revealed a
move was not in the pipeline.

‘It’s pretty unlikely he will leave,’ Mancini told Sky Sport Italia.

‘He is right to say it’s no fun being on the bench but when you join a big club then competition is normal.’

Fantasy football 2012

Dzeko himself previously offered
different indications, having been linked with AC Milan as a replacement
for new PSG signing Zlatan Ibrahimovic.

‘I always follow the Italian league and one day I’d like to play in it,’ he told the Manchester Evening News.

‘I also know that Milan has sold two of its best players.

‘For
now I am a City player, but to be sure I will stay here I will have to
wait until the end of the month. I’ll see what happens, and if someone
else comes.’

Munster appoint Rob Penney as head coach

Munster turn to Kiwi Penney to replace McGahan as head coach

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UPDATED:

13:13 GMT, 2 May 2012

Munster have announced the appointment of New Zealander Rob Penney as their new head coach.

The 48-year-old will move to Limerick
from Canterbury, where he has been head coach since 2006, and replace
Tony McGahan, who is taking up a coaching co-ordinator's role with the
Australian Rugby Union.

Impressive record: Rob Penney

Impressive record: Rob Penney

Penney will take charge of the New Zealand Under-20 squad for this summer's World Cup in South Africa, before starting his Munster duties during July.

Penney guided Canterbury to their fourth straight national provincial title last season, and he has previously served as Canterbury Crusaders assistant coach during a successful Super 12 campaign.

'We conducted a thorough search to find a replacement for Tony McGahan and were delighted with the calibre of the candidates,' Munster chief executive Garrett Fitzgerald said.

'Rob Penney's record speaks for itself, and we look forward to welcoming him to Munster.'

JP McManus: I didn"t back my Gold Cup winner

Legendary punter McManus admits: I didn't back my Gold Cup winner

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UPDATED:

22:44 GMT, 17 March 2012

For a legendary punter it was a
startling admission. Leading owner JP McManus did not back any of his
five winners at the Cheltenham Festival last week.

Not even his Gold Cup hero Synchronised.

'But that doesn't take away the pleasure of watching my horse land the big race,' he said.

Gold standard: AP McCoy (left) and trainer Jonjo ONeill give Gold Cup hero Synchronised a treat

Gold standard: AP McCoy (left) and
trainer Jonjo ONeill give Gold Cup hero
Synchronised a treat

'He has his own way of doing things and I told my friends they could do worse that have a few quid on him. I got every encouragement to back him from his trainer Jonjo O'Neill and jockey AP McCoy. We thought he had a chance.'

McManus spends most of the year in Switzerland, playing the world's financial markets. But he never misses the Festival because gambling and horses remain at the core of his life.

'From a very young man I was always gambling and became addicted to it,' he said.

'At first the horses were just the means and my betting was always on the edge.

'Then you try to change the addiction from gambling to winning. So winning became the addiction.

'I still love gambling, but like to think I'm disciplined.'

Golden moment: JP McManus (left) celebrates with McCoy and O'Neill

Golden moment: JP McManus (left) celebrates with McCoy and O'Neill

He started out earning 10 a week driving a bulldozer for his father near Limerick and, at 19, he worked on an estate called Martinstown, now a magnificent home to the McManus family.

Every Saturday, he punted his wages in Alf Hogan's betting shop.

'That was my kick for the week,' he said. 'We paid betting tax of 5p in the pound on win bets and no tax on doubles and trebles.'

But new legislation changed his life.

Staying on: Synchronised (left) jumps the last upsides The Giant Bolster (centre) and Long Run

Staying on: Synchronised (left) jumps the last upsides The Giant Bolster (centre) and Long Run

'The tax shot up to 20 per cent on all bets. I quit overnight. You could say finance minister Richie Ryan did me a favour.'

He then changed sides and became a bookie at the age of 20.

It was the start of an extraordinary saga that led to untold riches founded on gambling and now derived chiefly from the markets.

McManus is now Cheltenham's leading owner, with 37 winners, and he added: 'I've had so many great moments here, but Synchronised stands out as the best.'

Kauto Star was back in public on Saturday, 24 hours after dropping out of the Cheltenham Gold Cup.

He was applauded as he led the parade through the streets of Ditcheat, Somerset, followed by stable mates Big Bucks and Rock On Ruby, who both won at the Festival.

Star turn: Kauto Star goes walkabout through Ditcheat

Star turn: Kauto Star goes walkabout through Ditcheat