Tag Archives: lennie

Lennie Lawrence leaves Crystal Palace to join Dougie Freedman at Bolton

Lawrence leaves Crystal Palace to be reunited with Freedman at Bolton

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UPDATED:

14:06 GMT, 1 November 2012

Lennie Lawrence has left his role as Crystal Palace caretaker manager to join Bolton as assistant to their new boss Dougie Freedman.

The pair are reunited after working together at Selhurst Park from January 2011 until Freedman's departure for the Reebok Stadium last week.

Lawrence, 64, had been in caretaker charge of the Eagles for two games – a 2-1 win at Leicester and a 1-1 draw at Barnsley – alongside first-team coach Curtis Fleming.

Jumping ship: Lawrence (right) has joined Bolton while Fleming (left) takes charge of Palace against Blackburn on Saturday

Jumping ship: Lawrence (right) has joined Bolton while Fleming (left) takes charge of Palace against Blackburn on Saturday

Flying high: Lawrence took charge as Palace beat Leicester on Saturday (above)

Flying high: Lawrence took charge as Palace beat Leicester (above)

Freedman revealed on Tuesday that Palace had turn down an approach for the pair but compensation has now been agreed over the departure of former Cardiff and Charlton boss Lawrence.

A statement on Palace's website on Thursday read: 'Crystal Palace Football Club can confirm that assistant manager Lennie Lawrence has today joined Bolton Wanderers.

'The board of the club would like to put on record their thanks to Lennie for all his efforts during his time at Palace.'

Freedman is known to be keen to take Fleming with him as well but the former Republic of Ireland international will take charge when Palace welcome Blackburn on Saturday.

Fleming will be assisted by Palace development coach Jamie Fullarton as well as club captain Paddy McCarthy, who is currently sidelined with a groin injury.

Palace, who are flying high in fourth place in the Championship, are continuing their search for a new manager as Freedman prepares to take charge of Bolton for the first time when they welcome Cardiff on Saturday.

Crystal Palace reject Bolton approach for Lennie Lawrence and Curtis Fleming

Crystal Palace reject Bolton approach for caretaker coaches Lawrence and Fleming

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UPDATED:

10:37 GMT, 30 October 2012

New Bolton manager Dougie Freedman has revealed that Crystal Palace have turned down an approach from the Championship club for coaches Lennie Lawrence and Curtis Fleming.

Freedman left Palace for the Reebok Stadium last week and is keen to bring his backroom team of Lawrence and Fleming with him.

But the duo are currently in caretaker charge at Selhurst Park and it is thought Palace are unwilling to negotiate their departures until they have found a new manager.

Bid: Freedman (above) hopes to be reunited with Lawrence (below right) and Fleming (below left)

Bid: Freedman (above) hopes to be reunited with Lawrence (below right) and Fleming (below left)

Bid: Freedman (above) hopes to be reunited with Lawrence (below right) and Fleming (below left)

'In Lennie and Curtis's situation, they [Palace] feel that, right now, it's not the right time to let them talk to us,' Freedman told BBC Radio Manchester.

'We've made the call and it's been rejected. We'll just watch this space.'

Freedman added: 'There's been discussions but I want to do it the correct way and the professional way.'

Perfect 10: Palace extended their unbeaten run with a 2-1 win at Leicester on Saturday

Perfect 10: Palace extended their unbeaten run with a 2-1 win at Leicester

Lawrence, 64, and Fleming, 44, have guided Palace to a win and a draw from their two games in caretaker charge so far, extending an unbeaten run that started under Freedman to 10 games.

Palace currently sit in fourth place in the Championship, 14 places and nine points clear of Bolton, who welcome Cardiff on Saturday in what will be Freedman's first game in charge.

Leicester 1 Crystal Palace 2 match report: Peter Ramage scores winner

Leicester 1 Crystal Palace 2: Ramage does the damage as Eagles make it 10 unbeaten

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UPDATED:

16:54 GMT, 27 October 2012

Two first-half goals from Damien Delaney and Peter Ramage kept up managerless Crystal Palace's impressive start to the npower Championship and ended Leicester's unbeaten home record.

Defending a 100 per cent sequence at the King Power Stadium, Nigel Pearson's side were second best against a slick Palace side under the stewardship of caretaker boss Lennie Lawrence following the departure of Dougie Freedman this week.

The visitors could have been ahead in the first minute but Yannick Bolasie spurned a chance from just yards out.

Perfect 10: Palace kept up their unbeaten record

Perfect 10: Palace kept up their unbeaten record

Match facts

Leicester: Schmeichel, De Laet, Morgan, Whitbread, Konchesky, Knockaert (Schlupp 77), Drinkwater (Marshall 63), King, Dyer (James 32), Vardy, Nugent.

Subs Not Used: Logan, Waghorn, Moore, Futacs.

Booked: Vardy, De Laet.

Goals: King 90.

Crystal Palace: Speroni, Ramage, Delaney, Ward, Parr, Bolasie, Dikgacoi, Garvan, Jedinak, Zaha (Moxey 90), Murray (Wilbraham 89).

Subs Not Used: Price, Blake, Easter, O'Keefe, Moritz.

Booked: Moxey.

Goals: Delaney 23, Ramage 28.

Attendance: 23,646

Referee: Andy Haines (Tyne & Wear).

Latest Championship table, fixtures and results

It was a rocky start for Pearson's
Championship leaders but Julian Speroni – making his 250th league start
in goal for the Eagles – had to be alert to save a Dave Nugent effort as
the Foxes briefly threatened at the other end.

A header from Andy King cleared the bar as the hosts rallied, but Kasper
Schmeichel did well to hold on to a Wilfried Zaha cross as Palace –
nine games unbeaten in the Championship – displayed all their attacking
intent in the opening stages.

And Lawrence's men took the lead after 23 minutes. Schmeichel failed to
deal with a Mile Jedinak corner, feeling he was impeded as he went to
claim the ball, and Delaney rattled home from 12 yards out.

Zaha tried his luck from 30 yards out, but Palace did not have long to
wait for their second as Ramage headed home from six yards out after 28
minutes, latching onto Bolasie's assist.

It had been a poor start from the hosts, who went into the game boasting
six successive home wins, but it got worse 13 minutes from the break
when an injured Lloyd Dyer was replaced by Matty James.

Pearson would have hoped for a decent start to the second half but much
as his team huffed and puffed, Palace were always a threat at the other
end of the field, and a third for the visitors would have ended the
Foxes' hopes.

Jamie Vardy would have hoped for a better connection with a header that
sailed harmlessly over the bar from close range 10 minutes after the
break, and Leicester were forced into a tactical change after 63 minutes
when Danny Drinkwater was replaced by Ben Marshall.

Time was running out for the hosts and a speculative shot from all of 35
yards from James showed how well Palace had snuffed out the Foxes'
threat.

With 14 minutes left Anthony Knockaert was replaced by Jeff Schlupp, and
Leicester finally registered in added time when King headed home.

But the Foxes were second best on a day when Palace showed true
promotion potential and the legacy left them by former boss Freedman.

Armstrong competes in another triathlon in Maryland

Armstrong competes in another triathlon in Maryland

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UPDATED:

18:51 GMT, 7 October 2012

Lance Armstrong competed in a triathlon on Sunday after organisers dropped USA Triathlon sanctioning so he could take part in a race that raises money for cancer.

Armstrong is banned from events that follow World Anti-Doping Agency rules after he chose not to fight USADA charges of doping.

Crossing the line: Lance Armstrong finishes the triathlon

Crossing the line: Lance Armstrong finishes the triathlon

Armstrong finished the 70-mile swim, bike and run in 4 hours, 16 minutes at the Revolution3 Half-Full Triathlon, racing in a wave of about 50 fellow cancer survivors.

'This was a race that was built and designed to race money for cancer. So it was an easy decision,' said Brock Yetso, president of the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults.

'We had two individuals who decided
they did not want to race based on our decision and 300 who said they
wanted to. So I think numbers speak for themselves.'

Livestrong
CEO Doug Ulman founded the Ulman Cancer Foundation. 'He's led this
organisation to where it is today,' Armstrong said at the finish line of
Ulman's impact on Livestrong.

Tough challenge: Armstrong swims during the triathlon

Tough challenge: Armstrong swims during the triathlon

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency stripped
Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles in August for allegedly
using performance-enhancing drugs. He denies the charges but chose not
to continue fighting them.

Sunday's
race results will not count toward national rankings. College
competitors are still able to use the race as a national qualifier
event.

An estimated 62,000
in proceeds from the event will benefit the Ulman Cancer Fund, Yetso
said. A speaking event with Armstrong on Saturday night raised another
18,600 from ticket sales and a live auction.

Helping hand: Cancer survivor Jessica Protasio picks up Lance Armstrong after he competed

Helping hand: Cancer survivor Jessica Protasio picks up Lance Armstrong after he competed

'I think he's a great inspiration for anybody,' said Lennie Phillips of Kensington, Maryland, who survived brain cancer and competed in the special wave alongside Armstrong.

'All of these allegations, whether they're true or not, I don't know, but he still had to go through all the treatments.'

Stuart Broad interview: England captain hasn"t forgotten his roots

EXCLUSIVE: From Melton Mowbray to the furnace of Colombo… Broad goes back to his roots

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UPDATED:

23:41 GMT, 20 March 2012

Stuart Broad may be an England captain these days, but there seems little chance that he will forget his roots. Egerton Park CC, in the Leicestershire town of Melton Mowbray, is the club he still calls home.

It's where he learned the value of grinding it out for a draw, of getting side on to bowl the away-swinger – and of hitting the ball into the River Eye to get rid of the shine. It's where he learned patience, aggression and cunning.

And it's where, even now, club regulars regard him as one of their own: the local lad whose enthusiasm caught the eye of the Under 11s coach Lennie Hunter and went on to become a linchpin of the Test attack and England's Twenty20 captain.

Back home: Broad at Egerton Park CC, where he started his cricket caree

Back home: Broad at Egerton Park CC, where he started his cricket career

Melton Mowbray, it turns out, really does deserve to be known for more than its pork pies and Stilton.

'The thing I remember from Egerton Park was you always had a beer with the opposition – win, lose or draw,' says Broad, who took three wickets in Colombo on Tuesday against a Sri Lanka Cricket Development XI and is confident of shaking off an ankle niggle in time for Monday's first Test in Galle.

'The youngsters, such as myself, would be sent out to pick up the boundary flags and lock up the scoreboard while the adults would get a few drinks in.

'Once we'd come back, the bar would be full of lads in their whites talking about cricket. It was invaluable.'

Broad was not always the splice-jarring fast bowler who, in his last two Test series – against India and Pakistan – took 38 wickets at 16. He started as a bowler of gentle away-swingers and compiler of steady 30s and 40s. Then, in his mid-to-late teens, came the growth spurt that changed his life.

Iain Lees, who first kept wicket to Broad when he was 12, recalls: 'To be honest we've had stronger 2nd XI sides over the years and he wouldn't have got in. He helped make up the numbers in those days. Then he grew…

Family ties: Stuart's dad, Chris, watches his son play in a match at Egerton Park (and below)

Family ties: Stuart's dad, Chris, watches his son play in a match at Egerton Park (and below)

Family ties: Stuart's dad, Chris, watches his son play in a match at Egerton Park (and below)

'He came back one summer and he must have shot up from being about 5ft 7in to over 6ft.

'Progressively in that first over, with the ball whizzing by, I was forced to stand further and further back. Not long after that, he moved into the first team, and then Leicestershire came knocking.'

If Broad's bowling would eventually come naturally to him, batting was a different matter.

He says: 'I was one of these dogged openers who couldn't hit the ball off the square. But playing adult cricket as a teenager is quite a valuable lesson.

'They'd be grinding it out for 40 or 50 overs to save the game, not giving it away and they'd be furious if they did. And you always had opposition who would see a young cricketer, and they'd try to throw their weight around. That really helps you develop as a character.

'I'd get nice fifties off 30 overs, but I never kicked on. Then one Saturday, I scored my first hundred. I was about 16, which was quite late. I got another one on Sunday, and two more the following weekend.

Young hopeful: The 15-year-old Broad Broad (above) and making an appearance in the paper (below)

Young hopeful: The 15-year-old Broad Broad (above) and making an appearance in the paper (below)

Young hopeful: The 15-year-old Broad Broad (above) and making an appearance in the paper (below)

'In between, I got 190 for Leicester Under 17s, so that was five hundreds in eight days. It was the breakthrough I needed.'

Then there was the sense of camaraderie, an all-for-one atmosphere in which prima donnas would not have been tolerated.

John Bailey, the former Egerton Park chairman, says: 'Even now, the fact that this lad with the baby face is the captain of England – well, it doesn't mean anything. He's just Stuart. He's the same: he hasn't changed.'

Broad agrees. 'The England team is very similar to my experience of club cricket. It's not a lease car – it's very much our team: we drive it our way. We still enjoy a beer if we've had a good victory. We still have the dressing-room banter.'

Not surprisingly, Broad is still the talk of the town.

In the wickets: Broad took three scalps against a Sri Lankan Development XI on day one in Colombo

In the wickets: Broad took three scalps against a Sri Lankan Development XI on day one in Colombo

'We're all avid supporters of him,' says Nick Newman, who captained Broad in two first XI games.

'When he plays for England, we're all at each other's houses or watching at home and we text each other afterwards and say, “There's our lad”.

'It's such a buzz for the club to have an international cricketer who does recognise his roots.'