Tag Archives: karlovic

Andy Murray beats Lukas Lacko in Japan Open second round

Murray marches on as Scot sweeps Lacko aside to reach third round of Japan Open

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UPDATED:

11:00 GMT, 3 October 2012

Andy Murray dropped only three games as he brushed aside Lukas Lacko in less than an hour in the second round of the Japan Open.

The British No 1, top seed for the tournament in Tokyo, built on his opening straight-sets win over Ivo Karlovic with another convincing performance.

Murray had spoken to this morning's Independent about the improvement in his general play and mindset since winning his first grand slam at this summer's US Open, his last tournament prior to this week.

Still winning: Andy Murray is through to the third round of the Japan Open after beating Lukas Lacko

Still winning: Andy Murray is through to the third round of the Japan Open after beating Lukas Lacko

He said: 'Because winning a slam was
so important to me I felt sometimes that I was focusing on the next slam
rather than on every tournament and every match.

'Now I feel I can hopefully concentrate better throughout the year and not take my eye off the ball at any tournaments.'

That was in evidence as he broke to
love in each of Lacko's first two service games to race into a 5-0 lead
in less than 20 minutes.

The Slovakian staved off a love set
at the last opportunity and made Murray work hard to serve out the set,
but the Scot came through 6-1 in 25 minutes.

Another break in the third game of
the second set put him further in control and one more was to follow,
Murray taking all four of his break points as he wrapped up a 6-1, 6-2
win.

Sports pictures of the day: October 2, 2012

Sports images of the day: Our picture editor's selection

UPDATED:

13:56 GMT, 2 October 2012

Each day, MailOnline sports picture editor Dave Muir will choose his favourite photographs from around the world in the past 24 hours.

Enjoy today's selection right here…

Josh Sheehan of Australia performs the opening jump in the Botanical Garden of Sydney in front of the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House to announce the final stage of the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tour on Cockatoo Island

Josh Sheehan of Australia performs the opening jump in the Botanical Garden of Sydney in front of the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House to announce the final stage of the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tour on Cockatoo Island

Italian driver Michele Cinotto and his co-driver Fulvio Zini of the Dessoude team compete in their Nissan Buggy during the Pharaons International Cross Country Rally near the Giza pyramids on the outskirts of Cairo

Italian driver Michele Cinotto and his co-driver Fulvio Zini of the Dessoude team compete in their Nissan Buggy during the Pharaons International Cross Country Rally near the Giza pyramids on the outskirts of Cairo

Alize Cornet of France hits a shot during her first round match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus at the China Open in Beijing

Alize Cornet of France hits a shot during her first round match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus at the China Open in Beijing

Dallas Cowboys linebacker DeMarcus Ware (94) causes Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) to fumble the ball during the second half of an NFL football game in Arlington, Texas

Dallas Cowboys linebacker DeMarcus Ware (94) causes Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) to fumble the ball during the second half of an NFL football game in Arlington, Texas

Andy Murray shakes hands with Ivo Karlovic after winning his first round match at the Rakuten Open at the Ariake Colosseum in Tokyo

Andy Murray shakes hands with Ivo Karlovic after winning his first round match at the Rakuten Open at the Ariake Colosseum in Tokyo

Andy Murray beats Ivo Karlovic at Japan Open

Murray starts off where he finished at US Open with victory over Karlovic in Japan

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UPDATED:

09:45 GMT, 2 October 2012

Andy Murray reached the second round of the Japan Open with a straight-sets victory over Ivo Karlovic in his first match since winning the US Open.

Karlovic entered the tournament as a lucky loser after Murray's scheduled first-round opponent Gael Monfils withdrew due to injury.

Go for the the Croat: Andy Murray had enough to get beyond Ivo Karlovic

Go for the the Croat: Andy Murray had enough to get beyond Ivo Karlovic

Defending champion Murray had won all four of his previous
meetings with the giant Croatian, most recently in four sets at
Wimbledon this summer, and was rarely troubled as he made it five from
five.

The Scot failed to take any of his three break points in the first set but eventually prevailed in a tie-break.

Tall order: Karlovic towers over Murray as the pair shake hands at the end of their match

Tall order: Karlovic towers over Murray as the pair shake hands at the end of their match

The second set was progressing in a similarly serve-dominated manner until the 10th game, when Murray went up 0-40 to set up three match points.

Karlovic saved two, the first with a second-serve ace, but Murray took the third to wrap up a 7-6 (9/7), 6-4 win having not faced a single break point in the match.

He will face Lukas Lacko in the second round after the Slovakian hammered Spain's Albert Ramos 6-0, 6-2.

He's done it: Murray celebrates winning a point in his victory over Karlovic

He's done it: Murray celebrates winning a point in his victory over Karlovic

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray banishing entitlement thoughts

Murray not counting his chickens as he prepares for Tsonga semi test

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UPDATED:

16:10 GMT, 5 July 2012

Andy Murray will go into Friday's Wimbledon semi-final against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga confident after a fine fortnight but banishing any thoughts of entitlement.

The world No 4 will start a grand slam semi-final as the favourite for the first time since reaching his second Australian Open final at the start of last year.

On that occasion he beat David Ferrer, and it was the Spaniard who Murray defeated again on Wednesday in a very tough four-set clash to set up the meeting with fifth seed Tsonga, who he has beaten five times in six matches.

Centre of attention: Andy Murray is totally focussed on the job in hand

Centre of attention: Andy Murray is totally focussed on the job in hand

The British No 1 has certainly had to do it the hard way, beating Nikolay Davydenko, Ivo Karlovic, Marcos Baghdatis and Marin Cilic just to reach the last eight.

Murray said: 'When you start each tournament, you want to try and win. Obviously now that I'm in it, I'm not thinking, 'Great, I'm in the semi-finals'. You want to try and go further.

'But I know how hard it is. Everyone kept telling me I had such a hard draw and how tough it was going to be to get through. I managed to do that. I've beaten some very good players. It's been a good tournament so far.

'But I want it to continue. I'd be disappointed if I lost before the final in any tournament, but I don't just expect to get there. It's a very difficult thing to do. You need to make sure you perform properly.'

Big challenge: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

Big challenge: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

Since that Melbourne victory over Ferrer, which was followed by a humbling final loss to Novak Djokovic, Murray has reached four more semi-finals and lost each one, three times to Rafael Nadal and once to Djokovic.

Of the top three of Djokovic, Nadal and Roger Federer, the Spaniard is the only player Murray has beaten at a grand slam, once at the US Open and once in Australia.

But Nadal has also been Murray's grand slam nemesis, beating the Scot six times, including the last two years here, both times in the semi-finals.

Murray was quick to reject claims he is happy not to be facing Nadal again, though, saying: 'Just because I lost to him a few times, it doesn't mean I'd never want to play against him.

'I don't mind playing against Rafa. I've won against him in slams before. It's obviously a challenge, and he's played some very good tennis when we have played each other here.

'But Jo's a tough opponent. He's served very well so far this tournament. It's a very different match to playing against Rafa, but he's one of the best grass-court players in the world, that's for sure.'

Tsonga can certainly not be underestimated. He has been a consistent improver since making his senior breakthrough in 2007 and then reaching the final of the Australian Open the following year, where he lost to Djokovic.

Last year he became the first player ever to beat Federer from two sets down at a grand slam in the quarter-finals of Wimbledon with a brilliant display of power tennis.

Both players are looking to make their first Wimbledon final, and Murray said: 'I'll draw on the experience of my seven years on the tour.

'Having played Jo quite a lot of times, I know him well. We played a lot in the juniors, so I've known him for a long time.

Put through his paces: Ivan Lendl is getting Murray in the best shape possible

Put through his paces: Ivan Lendl is getting Murray in the best shape possible

'Rather than focusing on it being the semi-finals of Wimbledon, I need to focus on it being a match against him and what I do well against him and what's worked against him in the past.'

This is Murray's seventh Wimbledon, and for most of that time he has been Britain's only hope of ending the now 76-year wait for a home winner in the men's singles.

Eye on the ball: Murray is gunning for his first Wimbledon crown

Eye on the ball: Murray is gunning for his first Wimbledon crown

He deliberately avoids all media coverage, and will continue that policy as the country holds its collective breath to see whether this time he can reach the final.

Murray said: 'Subconsciously I'm probably extremely stressed out right now, but I try not to feel it. When the tournament's done, there's normally a pretty big release of that. I just don't want to be on the court for a few weeks.'

The 25-year-old, meanwhile, revealed he has taken inspiration from American basketball star LeBron James, who finally ended his wait for an NBA title this year with Miami Heat.

Murray said: 'There's a lot of people out there that didn't want him to win. There's a lot of people that said he would never win. There's a lot of people who said he never played his best in finals. In the fourth quarter of games he never steps up.

'Then you see how he played the whole of the finals, the whole of the play-offs. Sometimes it takes guys a bit longer than others.'

Wimbledon 2012: Roy Hodgson watches Andy Murray v David Ferrer

Court report: Roy doesn't miss a trick as England's boss stays for the full Andy show

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UPDATED:

22:44 GMT, 4 July 2012

With William and Kate and Andre and Steffi, there were many esteemed guests in the Royal Box. But most of them dashed off for a cream tea (a lazy assumption — maybe they served tacos) after Roger Federer and Mikhail Youzhny had finished. That meant the majority of guests missed the start of the Murray match.

One who didn’t was Roy Hodgson. The England manager, a keen tennis fan, stayed and chatted to Michael Parkinson.

Royal box: England manager Roy Hodgson (right) greets Prince William

Royal box: England manager Roy Hodgson (right) greets Prince William

Low road pays off

Murray knew that if he fed Ferrer an afternoon of bouncing top-spin groundstrokes, the Spaniard would excel and endlessly thump angled forehands back past him.

So the British No 1 made a concerted effort to keep the ball as low as possible, using plenty of backhand slice and keeping his forehand fairly flat and low over the net — meaning the bustling Ferrer had very little to work with.

Murray: Serving up a treat once again

Murray: Serving up a treat once again

He’s worth the wait

Proof once again that Murray is a bit of a slow burner at this tournament. After dropping his opening service games against Ivo Karlovic and Marin Cilic — the first time he had done so in six years here — Murray was sluggish getting going again.

However, this time he fought back from 15-40 down to hold and became better as the match progressed. Some of his tennis in the third set especially was spectacular.

Europe are top dogs now

How’s this for an insight into how the tennis landscape has changed Murray facing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga means 17 of his last 18 matches at Wimbledon will have been against Europeans. The only exception was a fourth-round tie with America’s Sam Querrey in 2010.

So much for the days of American and Australian dominance. In fact, of the 16 quarter-finalists (eight men and eight women) this year, Serena Williams was the only non-European.

Where’s the respect

Two moans.

One: the number of empty seats on Centre Court. Have people gone home or are they too busy drinking Pimm’s to watch the best British tennis player we’ve had since the 1930s

Two: people shouting out during points. It puts the players off and no-one thinks you’re funny.

What was funny was the crowd breaking into laughter when Murray started high-pitch grunting during a point in the first set. He did not look overly impressed.

Fancy that: Fans enjoy the atmosphere on Centre Court on Wednesday

Fancy that: Fans enjoy the atmosphere on Centre Court on Wednesday

Wimbledon sex row is 50 Shades of Grey – Martin Samuel

Wimbledon sex row… it's 50 Shades of Grey

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UPDATED:

23:55 GMT, 1 July 2012

Andy Murray's best point of Wimbledon’s first week was not made against a tricky opponent. It did not even take place on Centre Court or in front of a large audience.

Murray’s admirable return came in the environs of the main interview room at Wimbledon’s press centre following his four set victory over Ivo Karlovic. He had already ridden the foot fault controversy and the issue of whether the tournament’s line judges were biased in his favour when Gilles Simon’s comments about equal pay were raised: specifically his statement that the entire men’s tour objected to women being paid the same at Grand Slam events.

‘Gilles Simon has kicked off a bit of a debate about equal pay,’ began a voice from the comfortable seats. ‘He said all the men in the locker room agree with him that it’s not right. Would you say that’s true’

Fair Serena Williams has success in the singles

Fair Serena Williams has success in the singles and the doubles with sister Venus (below)

... and the doubles with sister Venus

More from Martin Samuel…

Martin Samuel: Unlucky Heather… or simply not up to it Watson's failings are exposed
29/06/12

No, minister, you are not up to the job: Why the inexperienced Chloe Smith deserved Paxo's grilling

29/06/12

Psycho Pearce He's not as mad as he seems (Still as brave, though)
28/06/12

Martin Samuel: This was pure punk tennis… it was edgy in a good way
26/06/12

Martin Samuel: Why did Roy give up on the Baresi of England Revolution means Jones
26/06/12

Martin Samuel: Hands to the pump, backs to the wall… that all we've got
25/06/12

Martin Samuel: Until England can find their Pirlo, we must prepare for more of this
24/06/12

Martin Samuel: If Ronaldo wins this for Portugal, it will be the best we've seen
24/06/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

The question sounded innocuous enough
but Murray has been here before. A throwaway line about Anglo-Scottish
rivalry in 2006, made in response to some ribbing from Tim Henman about
Scotland’s World Cup fortunes, has taken him six years to live down.
Some very reasonable uncertainty about protocol turned into a row over
whether he would bow to the Queen. One wrong word and he would be Murray
the misogynist for a decade at least. The only man in Britain who
stands against equality for women. It was a question that needed to be
left like an over-hit forehand. Murray instead took it on the volley and
survived.

He did not sell out the men’s locker
room or Simon, who is by all accounts a more thoughtful figure than he
has been painted and is newly elected to the Players’ Council for that
reason. Nor did he give an answer that would understandably infuriate at
least half the population. What Murray said merely raised a very
interesting point.

‘There are a lot of things the guys
do agree on,’ he replied. ‘For example, at the French Open, Sara Errani
made the final in singles and won the doubles. Because it’s not best of
five sets for women, it’s much easier to play both, so they have more
chance to make money. There are very few guys that have a realistic shot
of winning the singles event at Roland Garros who will be playing
doubles there, too. Same thing at Wimbledon. It’s five set singles, five
set doubles, so fewer guys play. It’s not always about equal pay. It’s
about the way the men’s and women’s tournaments differ.’

Never thought of it like that. Never
even considered it. Suddenly an issue that seemed so black and white in
the modern age had 50 shades of grey. So is Murray right Are men now
financially disadvantaged at Grand Slam tournaments Put it like this.
The last man to make an appearance in both singles and doubles finals at
a Grand Slam event was Yevgeny Kafelnikov at the French Open in 1996.
And how many times have women done it since then Twenty eight.

Return shot: Maria Sharapova slammed Gilles Simon's comments

Return shot: Maria Sharapova slammed Gilles Simon's comments

There have been 10 dual singles and
doubles finalists at the Australian Open, 10 at Wimbledon, four at the
French Open and four at the US Open. The last was in June, when Errani
of Italy lost to Maria Sharapova in the French Open final but clinched
the doubles title with her partner Roberta Vinci.

She made history of a different sort
at Wimbledon on Saturday, becoming the first player to lose a Grand Slam
set without winning a single point. The match having lasted 57 minutes,
her opponent, Yaroslava Shvedova, then went off to play a mixed doubles
match. She is also in the last 16 of the women’s doubles competition.

How many of the last 16 at Wimbledon
are also involved in men’s doubles competition Two. Xavier Malisse of
Belgium and Denis Istomin of Uzbekistan. And Murray is right: neither
will be getting their hopes up in the singles.

There was a time when men could play
twice and remain competitive but not any more. The physical demands of
singles tennis are too great these days. The men’s third round contained
eight sets that lasted longer than Shvedova’s entire match against
Errani and nine more that were within five minutes of it. The longest
set went on for two hours and seven minutes. The five sets of the match
between Marin Cilic and Sam Querrey were timed at 55, 39, 54, 56 and 127
minutes. Unsurprisingly, neither is bothering with the men’s doubles
this year.

It was an Eighties thing, the
two-pronged assault. With the exception of Kafelnikov at Roland Garros
in 1996, the last man to reach the singles and doubles final at a Grand
Slam did so when Bananarama were going strong. Wisely, Murray did not
enter the equal pay debate but a sub- section of it, and the statistics
to back his argument are below.

The last man to reach twin singles
and doubles finals at the Australian Open was Stefan Edberg in 1987.
Since when, in the women’s event, this has been done by Serena Williams
(2010, 2009), Lindsay Davenport (2005), Venus and Serena Williams
(2003), Martina Hingis (2002, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997), Arantxa Sanchez
Vicario (1995), Mary Joe Fernandez (1992, 1990), Jana Novotna (1991),
Chris Evert (1988) and Martina Navratilova (1987). Total: 16.

Kafelnikov we know. Since his feat in
1996, Errani (2012), Kim Clijsters (2003), Mary Pierce (2000) and
Hingis (1999) have all trod an equally admirable path for the women.

Eighties thing: The last man to reach twin singles and doubles finals at the Australian Open was Stefan Edberg in 1987

Eighties thing: The last man to reach twin singles and doubles finals at the Australian Open was Stefan Edberg

A Wimbledon men’s double dates back
to John McEnroe’s win over Jimmy Connors in 1984 and his magnificent
doubles partnership with Peter Fleming. So that is 27 years and
counting, during which time Vera Zvonareva (2010), Venus and Serena
Williams (2009, 2008, 2002), Venus Williams (2000), Davenport (1999),
Novotna (1998), Sanchez Vicario (1995), Novotna (1993), Steffi Graf
(1988), Navratilova (1986, 1985, 1984) and Hana Mandlikova (1986) have
replicated his achievement. So, 17 occasions.

The longest standing men’s record of
all is McEnroe’s again, at the US Open in 1981 (OK, so technically
Bananarama did not have a hit until 1982 but their first single Aie a
Mwana was released earlier). And since then Svetlana Kuznetsova (2004),
Serena Williams (1999), Davenport and Hingis (1998), Sanchez Vicario
(1994), Helena Sukova (1993) and Navratilova (1989, 1987, 1986, 1985,
1984, 1983) have emulated him. That’s 11. And yes, one name is skewing
the figures but that’s what genius does.

Across the various tournaments 17
different female players have achieved what no man has done. So either
the women’s game is full of brilliant, incisive tennis — and at times it
is, no dispute there — and the men are all inconsistent lightweights or
the difference between playing best of three sets and best of five is
so great that the physical challenge barely compares.

Sports scientists say that men’s
tennis is probably the toughest sport to prepare for because it is so
furiously energetic and draining yet elastic in time. When Cilic and
Querrey walked on to Court No 2, they did not know that they were in for
a match lasting five hours and 31 minutes. It could all have been over
in 90 minutes. Yet tennis players must always prepare for the endurance
test. No point in gambling that it will finish soon, even against a
lesser opponent, as Roger Federer discovered. No men’s third round match
produced a set that ended 6-0; yet there were four in the women’s
event. The women’s third round contained eight tiebreak sets, as opposed to 14 in the men’s.

This is not to say that men’s tennis
is simply superior, which is what Simon appeared to suggest clumsily,
but it is certainly demanding in a way that limits the scope for success
at a Grand Slam tournament.

Having his say: Murray raised the point that men can be financially disadvantaged heading into tournaments

Having his say: Murray raised the point that men can be financially disadvantaged heading into tournaments

In 2008 at Wimbledon, Rafael Nadal
and Federer played one of the most magnificent finals of modern times.
It went to five sets, the last of which Nadal won 9-7, and included two
tiebreaks in a match lasting 288 minutes. He received 750,000. The
same year Venus Williams beat her sister, Serena, in straight sets. She
received 750,000, too. The pair then defeated Lisa Raymond and
Samantha Stosur 6-2, 6-2 in the women’s doubles and split an additional
230,000. That match lasted 59 minutes.

The following year Federer defeated
Andy Roddick in another five-set match that broke the record for the
number of games in a men’s final, 77. The final set was won 16-14 and
Federer received 850,000. Meanwhile, Serena defeated Venus in straight
sets and was paid the same as Federer. The sisters then won the doubles
in straight sets and shared 230,000. Both finals combined entailed 44
games.

And there is Murray’s point: 43 per
cent less work for 13.5 per cent more pay. It does not apply on tour,
when men and women play three-set matches just the same, but at Grand
Slam events the calculations change.

‘I don’t deserve less because I have
boobs and they don’t,’ said Serena Williams on Saturday. She had just
entertained Centre Court with a quite brilliant match against Jie Zheng,
of China, lasting 148 minutes but was still going off to play doubles
with her sister later that day, although dark closed in and they didn’t
get on court.

‘I have worked just as hard since I
was three,’ she added. ‘My whole life has been dedicated toward being a
top athlete and I shouldn’t get paid less because of my sex.’

And that was certainly the correct starting point for the equal pay movement.

It is also true. Whatever the
circumstances, it seems outrageous in modern society even to consider
alternate pay structures for men and women. And yet, as Murray pointed
out, statistically the distinctions are undeniable.

What is the solution There isn’t one
without making men’s doubles a three-set affair; and no Grand Slam
organiser is going to run through that minefield. For now, the men will
have to continue grumbling in their locker rooms and just accept that,
in tennis at least, it truly is different for girls.

Read between the lines to see Carra's real point

Steven Gerrard has been upset by criticism of England’s European Championship performance by his friend Jamie Carragher.

‘Should we give up’ Gerrard asked. ‘Should we not go to Brazil in 2014 because of what Jamie Carragher said’

Yet it is what Carragher hasn’t said that is most interesting. Read between the lines of this observation, for instance.

Read between the lines: England captain Steven Gerrard reacted to comments made by Liverpool colleague Jamie Carragher

Read between the lines: England captain Steven Gerrard reacted to comments made by Jamie Carragher

‘There is contradiction at the top. We want a more attractive, passing game but the Football Association appointed a head coach with very clear tactical ideas based on counterattacking football. I hear many say it needs to evolve in the World Cup qualifiers. The tactics will not change and it would be unfair to criticise Roy Hodgson for that. Everyone knows his methods.’

You see it too, don’t you You see what he’s saying. It’s not just me, is it

Fabio's entitled to Rooney rant, Roy…

Fabio Capello's criticism of Wayne Rooney has drawn condemnation, not least from England manager Roy Hodgson.

‘Capello can hardly talk’ is the popular opinion, having got so little out of the player himself. Another case of short memory syndrome affecting English football.

Under-fire: Former England boss Fabio Capello condemned Wayne Rooney's Euro 2012 displays

Under-fire: Former England boss Fabio Capello condemned Wayne Rooney's Euro 2012 displays

Reaching the World Cup in 2010, Wayne Rooney was the leading goalscorer in European qualification with nine in 10 games for England.

He was dismal in the tournament proper but it still means Capello did more with Rooney over a sustained period than any previous England manager and is entitled to an opinion.

Pearce can't win

Stuart Pearce having shot Bambi, it is now open season on the Team GB football coach.

In some quarters he is accused of not giving his players enough time to prepare, in others of wasting money on team bonding gatherings at Champneys Springs health spa in Leicestershire and a Spanish training camp.

Why do they need these lavish trips,
it is asked. Perhaps because, unlike just about every other Team GB
squad, Pearce’s players will not be greatly familiar with each other and
will need to be fast-tracked into coming together as a coherent unit.

Isn’t that obvious Just because Pearce hasn’t picked David Beckham does not mean we can abandon rational thought.

Platini's vodka shot

Grand design: UEFA president Michel Platini

Grand design: UEFA president Michel Platini

Michel Platini says he has drunk a lot of vodka in Ukraine, and some are mockingly connecting this revelation with his plan to stage the 2020 European Championship in anything from 12 to 32 different countries (depending from which part of the press conference you select his answer, because numbers fluctuated quite alarmingly, almost as if he was making it up as he went along).

Sadly, Platini does not need a bottle of Pyotr Smirnov’s finest to come up with a bad idea: he’s had 10 of those before breakfast most mornings.

This latest one is a damage limitation exercise, caused by the brainless announcement that he would be supporting Turkey as Euro 2020 hosts, made two days after the bidding process opened.

As Istanbul is also angling for the Olympics that year, UEFA suddenly realised Turkey would not be the best candidate. Too late, the damage was done: as the president’s mind had already been made up, every viable rival to the Turkish bid bailed, leaving Georgia and Azerbaijan as the only game in town.

So now the European Championship may be hawked across a continent at who knows what cost to the travelling fan.

Platini is pretending this is a grand design. It is nothing of the sort. It is a desperate face-saving exercise because he couldn’t keep his mouth shut.

No more late escapes

One moment Marcos Baghdatis was causing Andy Murray serious problems, the next he was obligingly going down 6-1 in the fourth set to meet a specious 11pm deadline for close of play at Wimbledon.

It was almost as if he was railroaded into ending resistance. This should not be allowed to happen
again. If Wimbledon wants to play late it should do so without deadlines.

Time's up: Murray managed a late escape against Baghdatis - three minutes after play should have finished

Time's up: Murray managed a late escape against Baghdatis – three minutes after play should have finished

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray"s "victim" Ivo Karlovic makes official protest

Foot in mouth… now Murray's 'victim' makes official protest

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UPDATED:

21:49 GMT, 29 June 2012

Ivo Karlovic will make an official complaint to Wimbledon and demand an inquiry into the foot-fault row that blew up in his defeat by Andy Murray.

The 6ft 10in Croat was unhappy that a series of foot-fault calls went against him on Centre Court, claiming it was a deliberate ploy to help Murray win the match.

He stood by his claims on Friday and demanded a public apology from the All England Club, while suggesting that the BBC were also in on the conspiracy.

Fury: Karlovic is set to make an official complaint after losing to Murray

Fury: Karlovic is set to make an official complaint after losing to Murray

Speaking after he secured his passage to the last 16 of the men's doubles – where he did not foot-fault once – Karlovic said: 'I am happier because today there were no foot faults.'

Asked if he would make a formal complaint, the 33-year-old said: 'I believe so. If there is a way to look at it and it turns out I didn't do them, I would like a public apology from the tournament because I deserved to get a fifth set. A lot of the foot faults were aces. I looked at tapes and online footage last night and what is weird is that there was only one replay and in that I didn't foot-fault.

In the firing line: The Croatian has hit out at the standard of officiating at SW19

In the firing line: The Croatian has hit out at the standard of officiating at SW19

'After that they didn't show another slow-motion close-up. It's very strange what happened and that the BBC didn't show the replays with all the technology they have.'

Karlovic suggested on Thursday that 11 calls were made against him but yesterday revised the number to nine.

Time for a change: Karlovic has called for technology in judging foot-faults

Time for a change: Karlovic has called for technology in judging foot-faults

'The woman line judge called six or seven and someone else three. Maybe she doesn't know the rules. Who are they hiring here She didn't look old so her reflexes and eyes should be OK. I'm not saying I would have won because he played unbelievably. But I was not given an equal chance.'

Karlovic also said that he has had support from 99 per cent of the other players in the locker room and called for the introduction of a system similar to Hawk-Eye to avoid a similar situation happening again.

Centre of attention: Murray will face Baghdatis on Saturday

Centre of attention: Murray will face Baghdatis on Saturday

'Everybody who was watching thinks it is unbelievable,' said Karlovic. 'We have to have cameras looking down the line. They can call it Side-Eye. Maybe I'll trademark it.'

The tournament have vowed to look into the issue when Karlovic lodges his complaint while the BBC have vehemently denied claims they deliberately didn't show replays of the foot faults, instead promising any help they can provide to assist the investigation.

Wimbledon 2012: Ivo Karlovic says tournament is fixed for Andy Murray

It's a fix! Murray's win was bent, says angry Karlovic after SW19 exit

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UPDATED:

23:24 GMT, 28 June 2012

Ivo Karlovic stormed away from Centre Court with the extraordinary accusation that Wimbledon was fixed in Andy Murray’s favour.

Murray beat Karlovic in their second-round match 7-5, 6-7, 6-2, 7-6 but the 6ft 10in Croat claimed the match turned on foot faults, having been called an unprecedented 11 times. And he alleged the British desire to see a home champion was behind events.

Asked what made the difference, Karlovic replied: ‘Foot faults. It was outrageous. In my whole life, since I was eight years old, I didn’t do this many. After this match, the whole credibility of the tournament went down for me.

Not amused: Ivo Karlovic accused Wimbledon bosses of fixing the tournament for Andy Murray

Not amused: Ivo Karlovic accused Wimbledon bosses of fixing the tournament for Andy Murray

‘It was never called when it was 30-0 or 40-0. It was always when it was 30-all or in a tiebreak. I mean, what is this, the Davis Cup or Wimbledon I’m angry because I don’t expect it here, even against the English (sic) guy who they want to win.’

Asked to clarify whether he was accusing Murray or Wimbledon of being involved, or whether the organisers are merely desperate on Murray’s behalf, Karlovic said: ‘Murray, I don’t know. It is not Wimbledon, but the whole of the United Kingdom.’

Karlovic said that he even changed his approach midway through to avoid offending, but without success. ‘I thought I would stand back a little from the line so they could not call,’ he said. ‘But they still did it. It was outrageous.’

Going through: Andy Murray beat Karlovic in four sets

Going through: Andy Murray beat Karlovic in four sets

The world No 59 sent down a phenomenal 17 aces but his concentration was clearly broken by the line judges’ calls and he double-faulted twice in the fourth-set tiebreak.

Karlovic added: ‘I don’t foot fault. The most I remember in a tournament is one or two, and I can’t think of the last time.

‘Normally my left leg is still on the line, but I went back and still they called it. I didn’t want to go too crazy because I was trying to stay focused.

‘I’m a calm guy. If I lose it, I go off court. But I feel cheated — a Grand Slam, on Centre Court, I don’t know what to say.’

Done deal Karlovic claims Wimbledon is fixed to help Murray

Done deal Karlovic claims Wimbledon is fixed to help Murray

Wimbledon refused to comment, but Murray said: ‘It’s very tough to question the integrity of Wimbledon. It’s got a lot of history and tradition. There’s been hundreds and thousands of matches over the years — I’ve never heard of it before.

‘I need to see the videos. If there were 11 foot faults and every one was incorrect then that’s completely wrong and unfair.’

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray beats Ivo Karlovic in four sets

Giant killer! Murray overcomes threat of big serving Karlovic to reach third round

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UPDATED:

16:47 GMT, 28 June 2012

Andy Murray made his way into the third round after seeing off giant Ivo Karlovic in four sets.

The big serving Croat looked to cause the Scot some problems and he was pushed all the way in the opening set with Murray eventually winning 7-5.

Karlovic hit back in the second set winning it on a tie break before Murray won the third set 6-2 and then claimed the fourth set on a tie break.

More to follow…

No messing about: Andy Murray celebrates beating Ivo Karlovic

No messing about: Andy Murray celebrates beating Ivo Karlovic

On the way to victory: Murray beat Karlovic in four sets

On the way to victory: Murray beat Karlovic in four sets

Fighting back: Karlovic celebrates taking the second set during his match with Murray

Fighting back: Karlovic celebrates taking the second set during his match with Murray

At full stretch: Murray goes for the ball

At full stretch: Murray goes for the ball

WIMBLEDON 2012 LIVE: Day four news as it happens

WIMBLEDON 2012 LIVE: Follow all the latest news from day four at the Championships

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UPDATED:

11:07 GMT, 28 June 2012

SW19 essentials

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12.05: Laura Robson is out there on the practice courts. She is in doubles action with Heather Watson later.

Laura Robson

Laura Robson

11.57: Errani has taken the first two games on Court Two. There are still thousands of empty seats by the way.

11.50: Keothavong is under way in her match. She's right up against it though

11.45: I'm watching pictures of Virginia Wade and John Lloyd speaking with Sue Barker, with people in the background setting up picnics and trying to gain a good vantage point in front of the big screen. Pure Middle England.

11.35: Rafael Nadal is also in action later, against Czech player Lukas Rosol. Whisper it quietly, but this might just be the most interesting day of the tournament so far.

11.25: There's plenty of British interest on this fourth day. James Ward takes on Mardy Fish first up on Court One. Anne Keothavong plays Sara Errani first on Court Two, and that match begins shortly.

11.15: It's an absolutely lovely day here in London by the way. It feels genuinely hot out there.

Fan-tastic: There were long queues again outside Wimbledon on the fourth day of the tournament

Fan-tastic: There were long queues again outside Wimbledon on the fourth day of the tournament

11.10: Come on, Andy. That's something that might well be heard at Wimbledon today. Murray is in second round action against Ivo Karlovic. To mark your card timings wise, the match is second on Centre Court after Serena Williams plays Melinda Czink. With that first match beginning at 1pm, we expect Murray to begin some time between 2pm and 3pm.

11.00: If I'm not mistaken, the time has ticked round to eleven o'clock. It's time for day four of Wimbledon. Yes. you're invited too.

Raring to go: Andy Murray (left) takes on Ivo Karlovic for a place in the third round of Wimbledon

Raring to go: Andy Murray (left) takes on Ivo Karlovic for a place in the third round of Wimbledon