Tag Archives: jumper

Phillips Idowu Lottery funding renewed by UKA

Rio funds for Idowu as triple-jumper ends UKA feud despite London 2012 flop

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 15 October 2012

Phillips Idowu's spat with UK Athletics appears to be over after he was lavished with warm words and the tangible gift of 75,000.

The triple-jumper kept his top-bracket Lottery funding for 2013 on the day marathon world record-holder Paula Radcliffe was among several senior athletes removed from the programme in UKA’s ruthless push for success at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

Idowu's inclusion on 'podium' funding — up to 26,000 in living expenses, plus coaching, training, competition, medical and scientific support worth another 50,000 — comes despite his rift with former head coach Charles van Commenee.

Bust-up: Phillips Idowu feuded with former UKA chief Charles van Commenee

Bust-up: Phillips Idowu feuded with former UKA chief Charles van Commenee

The pair fell out over the way Idowu withdrew from the European Team Championships last year, with the stand-off doing neither any credit.

Idowu, 33, then refused to come clean about his injury status as the London Olympics approached and failed to qualify for the final, but now Van Commenee has departed.

After meeting Idowu, new performance director Neil Black said: ‘We both feel really positive about the future. We are going to work together.’

Cash blow: Radcliffe has been removed from the list of athletes befitting from Lottery funding

Cash blow: Radcliffe has been removed from the list of athletes benefitting from Lottery funding

There can be no argument with Radcliffe’s treatment. She is 39 in December and has suffered a litany of injuries, the latest of which — to her left foot — kept her out of the Olympics. Her chances of making Rio are slim, but she said: ‘Retirement is definitely not in any plans. I’m not doing all this cross-training and getting this foot healthy and strong for nothing!’

With Black saying the emphasis is on Rio, the inclusion of well-travelled triple-jumper Yamile Aldama appears odd. The former Cuban and Sudanese competitor will be 44 by then.

Leap of faith: Garabarz is one of those whose funding will be boosted

Leap of faith: Garabarz is one of those whose funding will be boosted

Other big names to be axed are: veteran sprinters Mark Lewis-Francis and Marlon Devonish, European 400m hurdles champion Rhys Williams, Radcliffe’s fellow marathon runner Mara Yamauchi, former European 800m silver medallist Michael Rimmer, Commonwealth 1500m bronze medallist Steph Twell and former world 400m silver medallist Nicola Sanders.

Sprint prodigy Adam Gemili, 19, is added to the podium list. Robbie Grabarz, Olympic bronze-medal-winning high jumper, returns to full funding.

Ryder Cup 2012: Europe to wear Seve Ballesteros outfits

Europe stars to wear Seve outfits during singles matches in honour of legend

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UPDATED:

23:16 GMT, 24 September 2012

Europe's players are set to pay tribute to the late Seve Ballesteros by dressing in his image for the singles at this week's Ryder Cup.

Ballesteros, who died in May last year after a long battle with cancer, captained Europe to victory in his native Spain in 1997 after playing in the biennial contest eight times, forming an amazingly successful partnership with current skipper Jose Maria Olazabal.

And while Olazabal would not confirm that the plan is for his team to wear the navy jumper and trousers and white shirt so associated with Ballesteros, he has already consulted United States captain Davis Love on the issue.

All smiles: Europe captain Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and US captain Davis Love III at the Medinah Country Club

All smiles: Europe captain Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and US captain Davis Love III at the Medinah Country Club

Tribute: Team Europe will wear navy jumpers and trousers and white shirts, just as Ballesteros (above) used to

Tribute: Team Europe will wear navy jumpers and trousers and white shirts, just as Ballesteros (above) used to

Tribute: Team Europe could wear navy jumpers and trousers and white shirts, just as Ballesteros used to

'I talked to Davis Love about that and
he was very understanding of it and I will say no more at the moment,'
Olazabal said. 'Seve is going to be there in our team in some way or
form.

'We are going to miss him a lot. It's the first time he is not going to be with us. He was a special man.'

Team member Paul Lawrie, quoted in Bunkered magazine, had previously
said: 'I don't know for sure but the word is that we're wearing navy
trousers, navy sweaters and white shirts like Seve always wore in the
final round of majors. I think that will be our singles outfit.

All smiles: Europe captain Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and US captain Davis Love III at the Medinah Country Club

All smiles: Europe captain Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and US captain Davis Love III at the Medinah Country Club

'I don't know that for certain but a few of the boys have mentioned that
and I think that if that is indeed the case, there could be no more
fitting a tribute to a guy like Seve than having 12 of the best players
in Europe wearing his outfit on the final day of the Ryder Cup. If
that's how they're going to do it, then it's absolutely bang on.'

Love added: 'Seve meant a lot to the Ryder Cup in general. He will be watching over our team as well.

'On both sides we have a lot of emotion. We've just lost Maria Floyd
(the wife of former captain Ray Floyd, who died earlier this month), but
that's what the Ryder Cup is about on top of all the other emotions.'

Gearing up: Staff at Medinah prepare the course for the weekend's golf

Gearing up: Staff at Medinah prepare the course for the weekend's golf

Gearing up: Staff at Medinah prepare the course for the weekend's golf

Only three members of the European team – Lawrie, Francesco Molinari and Nicolas Colsaerts – were with Olazabal on the flight from London to Chicago, with five others having played in the Tour Championship which finished in Atlanta on Sunday and the remainder all having homes in America.

But Olazabal insisted missing out on some time for team bonding on the plane – previously a major feature of Ryder Cup week – was not a problem. 'It feels a little strange but there's no surprise,' Olazabal said.

'I don't see that as a disadvantage to be honest. We have always been a close team and they are all going to be there by the time I get to the hotel.

Head-to-head: The flags of each team fly over the course on Monday

Head-to-head: The flags of each team fly over the course on Monday

'We will have a relaxing time and we'll chat together and will create that bond. I think the most important thing is the passion that everyone brings into the team and into the game itself.

'You have to make your players believe that you're playing for something really special, that it's a unique moment. It only happens once every two years and you let them realise that there are moments that are unique to this event, that won't happen anywhere else in any other tournament.'

Pristine: The course looks in sublime condition

Pristine: The course looks in sublime condition

Much has been made of the possible influence of the Chicago crowd at Medinah, and although both captains stressed the mutual respect between the teams, Love admitted the local fans would be 'fired up' when the contest gets under way on Friday.

'When we travel over there it's tough on us and when they travel over here it's tough on them,' he added.

Eyes on the prize: The formalities were completed on Monday

Eyes on the prize: The formalities were completed on Monday

'Chicago is an incredible sports town and they are going to be fired up. 'I think the first tee could be the loudest any of these guys have ever heard to start off a golf tournament. I expect a lot of passion. I expect if we are winning holes it's going to get pretty loud out there and that's what home-field advantage is all about.

'As Jose-Maria said, that's what you prepare these guys (the players) for. You have to tell them, 'Hey, this is going to be something like you've never seen before'.

'And we both know what the good cheers sound like and what the bad cheers sound like. We'll try to get them going loud in our favour.'

Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake upstaged by Aries Merritt at Brussels Diamond League meeting

Bolt and Blake upstaged by 110m heroics from Merritt at Diamond League final

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UPDATED:

19:51 GMT, 7 September 2012

Usain Bolt won his year’s final 100metres in the Diamond League final but was overshadowed by American Aries Merritt.

Bolt won in 9.86sec, modest by the world record holder’s standards, but Merritt beat the world 110m hurdles record by 0.07sec in 12.80. The margin is a country mile in a sprint and the biggest improvement in three decades.

Bolt said: 'Coming to this event I felt
so tired, I felt so drained. I just went through the motions. It was an
OK race, I did not lose so it is good.' Yohan Blake won the 200m in 19.54sec.

Bolt from the blue: The Jamaican superstar sprinter won and treated the fans to his customary celebration

Bolt from the blue: The Jamaican superstar sprinter won and treated the fans to his customary celebration

Bolt from the blue: The Jamaican superstar sprinter won and treated the fans to his customary celebration

Long jumper Chris Tomlinson had the 31,000 prize as Diamond League winner within his grasp and then let it slip.

A jump of 7.95m in the third round launched him into the lead for the season’s bonus.

Russian Alek Menkov had fouled his
first three attempts and in other competitions he would have missed the
cut but, with only eight starters, he was reprieved.

He
finally got his act together with a career-best leap of 8.29m while
Tomlinson improved only one centimetre and faded to fourth.

Easy, tiger: Blake cleaned up in the 200m after training partner Bolt took the 100m

Easy, tiger: Blake cleaned up in the 200m after training partner Bolt took the 100m

Easy, tiger: Blake cleaned up in the 200m after training partner Bolt took the 100m

Perri Shakes-Drayton finished second to Kaliese Spencer in the 400m hurdles.

Merritt told the BBC: 'I can't believe I ran that fast – I'm in shock. I
was focused on running under 13 for one last time to cap off a really
good season, and I obliterated it. When I crossed the line and saw the
time I was still in shock.

'I'm so happy I'm finally living up
to my potential after all this time with injuries and hamstring tears
and so many people telling me I should throw in the towel and get a
normal job.'

Usain Bolt finished his season by
winning the 100m in 9.86, ahead of fellow Jamaicans Nester Carter and
Kemar Bailey, but admitted fatigue was starting to be a big factor.

Centre stage: Merritt smashed the 110m hurdle record in Brussels

Centre stage: Merritt smashed the 110m hurdle record in Brussels

Bolt, who recovered from a shoddy start to lead home the field, said: 'I'm so tired, I just feel drained and I went through the motions pretty much – it was an okay race and I didn't lose so that's good.

'To go to the Olympics and push yourself drains you mentally because people are saying that maybe you'll lose. Coming to the end of the season, your level just goes way down.'

Bolt's compatriot and training partner Yohan Blake eased to victory in the 200m in a sparkling time of 19.54.

Final flourish: Shakes-Drayton had to settle for second in the 400m hurdles

Final flourish: Shakes-Drayton had to settle for second in the 400m hurdles

London 2012 Olympics: Robbie Grabarz wins bronze

Bronze for Grabarz as high jumper adds another medal to Team GB's collection

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UPDATED:

19:55 GMT, 7 August 2012

Robbie Grabarz completed a remarkable rise by taking a share of the Olympic bronze medal in the high jump.

The 24-year-old had first-time clearances up to 2.29 metres before three failures at 2.33m sent him out of the competition.

Canadian Derek Drouin and Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim had exactly the same record to share third place with the Briton.

More to follow…

Up and over: Robbie Grabarz had high hopes in the high jump

Up and over: Robbie Grabarz had high hopes in the high jump

Share the joy: Robbie Grabarz and two other athletes took home a bronze medal

Share the joy: Robbie Grabarz and two other athletes took home a bronze medal

Gutted: Robbie Grabarz's hopes of a gold medal were dashed

Gutted: Robbie Grabarz's hopes of a gold medal were dashed

London 2012 Olympics: Phillips Idowu crashes out of triple jump

Idowu saga ends with a whimper as Brit crashes out of triple jump at the first stage

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UPDATED:

10:37 GMT, 7 August 2012

Phillips Idowu's brief appearance at the London Olympics is over as quickly as it began after the British triple jumper crashed out of his home Games in the qualifying stage.

Idowu, suffering from a trapped nerve, only arrived at the athletes' village on Sunday shrouded in mystery and amid a row with UK Athletics chief Charles van Commenee.

The former world champion, born in Hackney, could only manage 16.53m with his third and final jump of the morning, leaving him outside the top 12 and short of the distance needed to qualify for the final.

The pits: Phillips Idowu competes in the men's triple jump at the Olympic Stadium on Tuesday

The pits: Phillips Idowu competes in the men's triple jump at the Olympic Stadium on Tuesday

Falling short: Idowu jumps in London

Falling short: Idowu jumps in London

There had been frenzied speculation
over the Beijing silver medallist's fitness following his late
withdrawal from the Olympic trials and last month's London Grand Prix,
when he pulled out just 25 minutes before the competition was due to
start.

Despite his late arrival into the
athletes village, Idowu claimed that for the last few weeks he has
simply been in his home city of London, finalising his preparation and
receiving treatment, easily reachable by the 'appropriate people'.

In contrast, UK Athletics head coach
Van Commenee said last week he was perplexed that Idowu had turned his
back on UKA and his own coach Aston Moore, who had only received a brief
text before Idowu cut off contact.

Idowu needed to jump 17.10m to qualify automatically for Thursday's final.

More to follow.

The game's up: Idowu knows his jump is not good enough to carry him into the final

The game's up: Idowu knows his jump is not good enough to carry him into the final

London 2012 Olympics: Athletics: Charles van Commenee confused by Phillips Idowu

Van Commenee confused by Idowu's 'bizarre' decision leave his coach in the lurch

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UPDATED:

14:35 GMT, 1 August 2012

UK Athletics head coach Charles van Commenee admits he is perplexed by the 'bizarre' decision of triple-jumper Phillips Idowu to turn his back on his own coach ahead of the London Olympics.

Idowu, who is suffering from a trapped nerve, opted to arrange his own treatment in London rather than attend UKA's training camp in Portugal, even though his coach Aston Moore was there, along with the governing body's medical experts.

And although Van Commenee has been informed by the British Olympic Association (BOA) that Idowu will be fit for triple jump qualifying on August 7, the Dutchman admits he has no idea what the Beijing silver medallist is doing.

Snub: Phillips Idowu opted to arrange his own treatment for an injury rather than attend the Team GB training camp

Snub: Phillips Idowu opted to arrange his own treatment for an injury rather than attend the Team GB training camp

'Up until about two weeks ago, Aston Moore was in regular contact and had seen him in training a number of times, but that contact died,' said Van Commenee, who has not spoken to Idowu since a row last year over the 33-year-old's withdrawal from the European Team Championships.

'(He had) a brief text message about a week ago and that was it. Phillips decided not to join the team (in Portugal) and by definition in my eyes he compromises his preparation. I find it bizarre. Aston finds it bizarre.

'He's under the wing of the BOA at the moment and we'll support when that's needed, like we always have.

Making a splash: Idowu is currently suffering with a trapped nerve ahead of the Games

Making a splash: Idowu is currently suffering with a trapped nerve ahead of the Games

Charles van Commenee (left) was perplexed by Idowu's decision to turn his back on his own coach

Charles van Commenee (left) was perplexed by Idowu's decision to turn his back on his own coach

'UK Athletics has supported Phillips Idowu for about 12 years, financially for a big part of those 12 years in terms of providing training accommodation, camps, medical support, psychological support, biomechanical support and coaching support.

'We pay the salary of his coach, our coach, so I'm perplexed that the last two weeks before the Games he turns his back on us, and I've got no idea why.

'All information we have about Phillips is now coming from the BOA. That information is that he's fit and ready to go. He had to hand in medical information. The BOA decided not to take it to the next stage, which would be a fitness test.

'Therefore Phillips Idowu is fit to compete and probably in great shape, because that's the sort of athlete he is. I'm sure he'll be a medal contender.'

London 2012 Olympics: Daley Thompson"s top 10 world Olympians

Daley's top 10 world Olympians: Legend's list of the best from around the globe

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UPDATED:

01:55 GMT, 28 July 2012

Sportsmail's Daley Thompson chose his top 10 Olympians from across the ages and iconic artist Paul Trevillion was on hand to put pencil to paper.

Carl Lewis

1. Carl Lewis (USA)

Los Angeles 1984: Gold 100m, Gold 200m, Gold 4x100m relay, Gold long jump.
Seoul 1988: Gold 100m, Silver 200m, Gold long jump.
Barcelona 1992: Gold 4x100m relay, Gold long jump.
Atlanta 1996: Gold long jump

Just so, so good. I don’t even like the fella and he has to make my list. He was the fastest man on earth and easily the best long jumper, but the only chink in his athletic armour was that he never broke the long jump world record. Mike Powell beat him to it, which was a travesty. Lewis was so physically capable I can't believe he didn't do it.

Viktor Saneyev

2. Viktor Saneyev (USSR)

Mexico City 1968: Gold triple jump. Munich 1972: Gold triple jump. Montreal 1976: Gold triple jump. Moscow 1980: Silver triple tump.

For me, this is the most physically demanding event. The training for it is really tough. Four Games, three golds, enough said.

Birget Fischer
3. Birgit Fischer (East Germany/Germany)

Moscow 1980: Gold canoeing K-1 500m. Seoul 1988: Gold K-2 500m, Gold K-4 500m, Silver K-1 500m. Barcelona 1992: Gold K-1 500m, Silver K-4 500m.
Atlanta 1996: Gold K-4 500m, Silver K-2 500m. Sydney 2000: Gold K-2 500m, Gold K-4 500m. Athens 2004: Gold K-4 500m, Silver K-2 500m.

Sickness has robbed Birgit of competing at the highest level for 32 years of Olympic Games. She was supposed to be here this summer going for gold after winning her first in 1980. To reach the pinnacle every four years for so long is phenomenal, which is why she’s one of my top non-British Olympians. Incredible.

Jim Thorpe
4. Jim Thorpe (USA)

Stockholm 1912: Gold pentathlon, Gold decathlon.

King Gustav of Sweden described him as ‘the world’s greatest athlete’, which was true until I came along! Now he’s the second greatest athlete. Thorpe’s Native American name of ‘Bright Path’ was pretty cool, too.

Lasse Viren

5. Lasse Viren (Finland)

Munich 1972: Gold 5,000m, Gold 10,000m. Montreal 1976: Gold 5,000m, Gold 10,000m.

The first bloke to do the ‘double double’. An amazing achievement. He even finished fifth in the marathon just 18 hours after claiming gold in the 5,000m at Montreal. That blows my mind.

Dawn Fraser

6. Dawn Fraser (Australia)

Melbourne 1956: Gold 100m freestyle, Gold 4x100m freestyle, Silver 400m freestyle.
Rome 1960: Gold 100m freestyle, Silver 4x100m freestyle, Silver 4x100m medley.
Tokyo 1964: Gold 100m freestyle, Silver 4x100m freestyle.

Great personality, great athlete. A typical Aussie who worked hard and played hard. Then played some more. Three swimming sprint golds in a row is seriously impressive.

Emil Zatopek
7. Emil Zatopek (Czechoslovakia)

London 1948: Gold 10,000m, Silver 5,000m.
Helsinki 1952: Gold marathon, Gold 10,000m, Gold 5,000m.

I fell in love with this incredible distance runner because of two brilliant stories. When I was little I read about how he’d train by running while holding his breath and that his wife would go out and find him unconscious.

I was also told that Ron Clarke, probably the greatest athlete never to win Olympic gold, went to visit Zatopek and after he left he found that the Czech had slipped one of his gold medals into Clarke’s bag. Classy gesture.

Fanny Blackers-Koen
8. Fanny Blankers-Koen (Holland)

London 1948: Gold 100m, Gold 200m, Gold 80m hurdles, Gold 4x100m relay.

After all those years of war and deprivation, the world needed a lift and got one. Fanny was just an ordinary person with extraordinary ability.

Jesse Owens
9. Jesse Owens (USA)

Berlin 1936: Gold 100m, Gold 200m, Gold 4x100m relay, Gold long jump.

Iconic. To go to Germany at that time and beat the Germans ensures he’s a shoo-in on this list.

Mark Spitz
10. Mark Spitz (USA)

Mexico City 1968: Gold 4x100m freestyle, Gold 4x200m freestyle, Silver 100m butterfly, Bronze 100m freestyle.
Munich 1972: Gold 100m butterfly, Gold 100m freestyle, Gold 200m butterfly, Gold 200m freestyle, Gold 4x100m freestyle, Gold 4x100m medley, Gold 4x200m freestyle.

I saw from Spitz that you could make a living being an athlete. Everything just added up after I saw him make $1million after he finished competing.

P.S SPECIAL MENTION…

British sports administrator Sir Denis Follows was told not to take a British team to the Moscow Games in 1980 as Margaret Thatcher’s government wanted us to boycott those Olympics. Sir Denis, chairman of the BOA, refused which was certainly good news for Seb and me.

London 2012 Olympics: Niels de Vos backs Phillips Idowu to shine

De Vos dismisses Van Commenee's controversial Idowu deselection claims

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UPDATED:

01:55 GMT, 28 July 2012

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UK Athletics chief executive Niels de Vos expects Phillips Idowu to do 'very well' at the London Olympics, even though head coach Charles van Commenee said he does not know if the triple jumper will be fit.

Van Commenee also said he had considered deselecting the Beijing silver medallist, who has arranged his own medical treatment in London rather than attend the UKA training camp in Portugal, but De Vos feels that would be 'a nonsense'.

'I think what Charles was saying is actually once someone has been selected, the only thing you can do if you have concerns is to deselect them and clearly it would be a nonsense to deselect someone of Phillips' standing and ability,' De Vos told Sky Sports News.

Torch bearer: Idowu has vowed to be fit for the Games

Torch bearer: Idowu has vowed to be fit for the Games

'I think that was the point he was making and it perhaps did not come across in the right manner.

'I am very confident Phillips will be fit. There has been a kind of media furore over this which is a bit of a nonsense. It's manufactured by the media essentially.

'He is a very experienced athlete. He has won Olympic medals, world medals; he is preparing in the best way he sees and I am sure he will be there, and if he is ready, which I believe he will be, I think he will do very well. It's as simple as that.'

Idowu has not competed since June 1 and is undergoing treatment on a trapped nerve which is causing problems in his left hip and knee.

His agent said the 33-year-old was 'incredibly disappointed and surprised' that the British Olympic Association made public a request to see Idowu's medical records, a request which was complied with on Thursday.

Model performance: Idowu is one of the main attractions

Model performance: Idowu is one of the main attractions

'I believe they (the BOA) did ask to see them and that's absolutely fine,' De Vos added. 'Everyone is working together to make sure Phillips does the best he can.'

The BOA insisted yesterday they had a good working relationship with Idowu, but the former world champion does not speak to Van Commenee since a row over his withdrawal from the European Team Championships last year.

Van Commenee claimed that Idowu announced his withdrawal via Twitter, a medium he feels is for 'clowns and attention-seekers.' Idowu denied that was the case, called Van Commenee a blatant liar and demanded a public apology, which the Dutchman has no intention of making.

London 2012 Olympics: Dimitris Chondrokoukis

Greek indoor high jump champion Chondrokoukis tests positive for banned substance

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UPDATED:

16:43 GMT, 26 July 2012

Olympics 2012

World indoor high jump champion Dimitris Chondrokoukis has tested positive for a banned substance and pulled out of the Olympics, according to reports in his native Greece.

Chondrokoukis' father and coach Kyriakos is reported to have sent a statement to various Greek news outlets in which he confirmed the failed test for the steroid stanozolol but also protested his son's innocence.

'Dimitris will not take part in the Olympic Games, leaving unfulfilled a dream of a lifetime,' read the statement, according to www.ekathimerini.com.

Positive: Dimitris Chondrokoukis will not compete at the Games

Positive: Dimitris Chondrokoukis will not compete at the Games

Chondrokoukis junior was one of Greece's best hopes for a medal at London 2012 after taking gold in the world indoors in Istanbul in March and finishing fifth in the 2011 World Championships in Daegu.

The news comes as another blow for Greece following triple jumper Voula Papachristou's exclusion from the Olympic team yesterday.

Papachristou was thrown out after making a remark about African immigrants on her Twitter feed. She later apologised.

London 2012 Olympics: Phillips Idowu ready for Games

It's go for Idowu! Triple jumper says he's ready for Games amidst injury rumours

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UPDATED:

22:13 GMT, 11 July 2012

Phillips Idowu has been spotted alive and walking without a limp. He is fit and ready to triple jump for gold at London 2012.

For 40 days and 40 nights, since his last competitive appearance, he had kept us – and Charles van Commenee, UK Athletics' head coach whose ego he loves to tweak – guessing about his injury status.

Yesterday, he boarded a river cruiser on the Thames aware of the furore his silence had created and acted as nonchalantly as you would expect from someone who has spent 33 years practising the art.

Confident: Phillips Idowu says he has let the rumour mill spin itself about his injury

Confident: Phillips Idowu says he has let the rumour mill spin itself about his injury

So what is his medical condition 'I'm well,' he said, confirming that he will compete at Crystal Palace this weekend.

'I'm good. I'm keeping my head down and getting on with my day job. They call me the invisible man.'

His head – be it up or down – was bejewelled in his customary ironmongery: studs and rings in ears and tongue. He chewed on a piece of fluorescent gum.

'I've not mentioned anything about an injury. Nobody has heard the words come out of my mouth, or from my coach's, or from any of my team's,' he added.

'I have let the rumour mill stir itself and it has given me an opportunity to focus on my preparations for the Games, which I feel have gone really well.'

The rumour mill may have been a reference to Van Commenee himself.

Wears it well: Idowu will represent Great Britain in the triple jump

Wears it well: Idowu will represent Great Britain in the triple jump

The Dutchman had said Idowu missed the Olympic trials through injury but that 'medical confidentiality' forbade him from supplying further explanation.

Then, when announcing the athletics team for the Olympics last week, Van Commenee admitted he had no idea whether the former world champion was still crocked, claiming he had been too busy to find out.

As we pointed out here, that seemed a trifle negligent considering that Idowu is among only a handful of British track-and-field gold medal prospects.

Van Commenee's ill-informed position reflected, at least in part, the fact that the two men do not speak directly but through intermediaries after a Twitter-based row last year: Idowu told his followers that he would not be taking part in the 2011 European Team Championships; Van Commenee thought it disrespectful not to have told him first; Idowu claimed he had informed UKA; Van Commenee later claimed they had spoken about the incident and made up; Idowu countered that they had not cleared the air and called Van Commenee a liar.

This sorry impasse continues, with Van Commenee of the opinion that Twitter devotees are 'clowns and attention seekers'.

Even though Idowu did not mention Van Commenee by name on the boat that he boarded at Westminster Pier, his every comment could be interpreted as an affront to his head coach's authority.

Idowu, who typically wore a lime green tracksuit as he travelled back from the World Championships in Korea last year when everyone else wore team kit, presented himself as a man who lives above Van Commenee's law.

Focused: Idowu in Daegu last year

Focused: Idowu in Daegu last year

Of his relationship with Van Commenee, Idowu said: 'That's not an issue. This year I have kept myself to myself.

'The people most important to me are my family, my representatives and my coach.

'That is the small circle of people I work with. Nobody else needs to be involved.'

So let's clear this up. Did he injure himself in his last competition, a Diamond League meet in Eugene, Oregon, on June 1

After all, he withdrew after landing awkwardly. 'It was precautionary,' he said. 'I slipped on the board – it happens. You hit the board, your foot slips and it kind of sends the fear of God through you.

'I didn't want to take any chances.'

He then withdrew from Oslo. Why, if he was not injured

'To prepare for the Games,' he replied. 'Every year I never compete in every meet I put down as scheduled.

'There are times when things are going really well and you feel like, “OK, I can take a step back” and there are times when you feel, “I may need to compete in more competitions than I expected”.'

Then he missed the trials. Why 'Precautionary.'

He added: 'There was a lot of fatigue in my system and I didn't want to jeopardise my chances at the Games by competing when I wasn't in tip-top form.

I have always said, if I am not in the best possible physical shape, then I won't compete because people pay hard-earned money to come to see me perform well.'

My guess is that he had a niggle-cum-foot injury after Eugene – a fact confirmed at the time by his people – then enjoyed keeping Van Commenee in the dark thereafter, merrily dancing in that grey area between precaution, niggle and injury.

We are happy to report he did not slip as he left the boat.