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Sportsmail"s Magnificent Seven, including Louis Smith and Tom Daley, come together for the final time

Thanks for being MAGNIFICENT! Sportsmail pays tribute to the seven athletes we have followed from 2005 to the 2012 Olympics

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UPDATED:

00:04 GMT, 28 December 2012

Seven years ago, Sportsmail began following seven young athletes as they set out on their journeys to try to reach the 2012 Olympics and Paralympic Games in London.

Three of the original seven made it to the Games but two called time on their sporting careers before the start of this year. Their replacements, however, were both part of Team GB and Paralympics GB last summer.

It has been an enlightening experience, punctuated by extremes of success and disappointment, watching the development of these athletes' careers since 2005.

Recently, Sportsmail's Magnificent Seven met up for the final time and shared memories of their experiences.

Then and now: From left, Gemma Howell, Tom Daley, Louise Watkin, Sportsmail's Andy Hooper, Emily Pidgeon, Shanaze Reade and Louis Smith met up for one final time recently

Then and now: From left, Gemma Howell, Tom Daley, Louise Watkin, Sportsmail's Andy Hooper, Emily Pidgeon, Shanaze Reade and Louis Smith met up for one final time recently

As they were: The original Magnificent Seven lined up at Lord's, from left, Tom Daley, Louis Smith, Jean-Rene Badrick, Emily Pidgeon, Giles Scott, Rachael Latham and Shanaze Reade

As they were: The original Magnificent Seven lined up at Lord's, from left, Tom Daley, Louis Smith, Jean-Rene Badrick, Emily Pidgeon, Giles Scott, Rachael Latham and Shanaze Reade

Tom Daley, Diving, 18, from Plymouth

The youngest of the Magnificent Seven has become a superstar. Daley was selected for the Beijing Games aged just 14 after becoming a British and European champion in the 10-metre platform.

He added the world title in 2009, two Commonwealth golds (in the individual event and synchronised 10m platform) in 2010 and then won an emotional Olympic bronze medal in London, despite intense pressure and expectation and the passing of his father, Rob, in May 2011.

'When I look at some of the photos from 2005 I'm so small! It's crazy how much I've changed since then and what I've achieved in that time.

'Life's changed, too. In fact, it's stacked up to a whole new level since London. Going out anywhere, there are so many people who stop you and say, “Congratulations”.

'It's nice to feel appreciated and respected but it does feel weird that seven years of training were geared towards London 2012 and now it's been and gone.

Superstar: Tom Daley won a bronze medal in the men's 10m platform at the London Games

Superstar: Tom Daley won a bronze medal in the men's 10m platform at the London Games

In the spotlight: Daley (right) presented the Young Sports Personality of the Year award to Josef Craig (centre)

In the spotlight: Daley (right) presented the Young Sports Personality of the Year award to Josef Craig (centre)

WHERE IT ALL BEGAN…

The Magnificent Seven series originated in 2005 through Sportsmail selecting seven talented athletes to follow through to London 2012.

The National Lottery joined as partner in 2006 to promote their funding into the seven chosen athletes, along with over 1,200 other competitors, on their journey to the London 2012 Games.

National Lottery funding, originating directly from the Lottery-playing public across the UK, enables elite athletes to benefit from the world-class coaching, facilities and medical support, giving them every possible chance to succeed during the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

As the nation's attention moves from the London 2012 Games to Rio 2016, The National Lottery will continue to invest in sports facilities, support staff and coaching, providing opportunities for future generations to succeed on an elite level.

No-one has contributed more to our athletes than National Lottery players, with more than 1,200 athletes having benefited from world-class coaching and support. www.national-lottery.co.uk/London2012

'I think 2012 changed the face of British sport but there was a bit of a crash after the Olympics when I thought, “I can't believe it's all over.” I'm slowly, gradually, building my way back up there.

'After the Games, I went on holiday with my family and then got two golds at the World Junior Championships: one in the 10-metre event and one in the 3m synchro with Jack Laugher. Then I went to Dubai with my friends and have been back at school catching up on my maths and Spanish A-levels. I want to get three A*s rather than three As.

'Rio in four years' time does seem a long way away, but there are also World Championships, European Championships and Commonwealth Games in between, so there's plenty to look forward to.

'I think in total I might make maybe four or five Olympic Games – depending on how diving moves on – but we'll get to Rio first. It's outdoors, which the Chinese don't like, and I love diving outdoors.'

Louise Watkin, Paralympic Swimming, 20, from Redhill (replaced Rachael Latham)

Latham, who was born with Erbs Palsy, which limits the use of her left arm, made two swimming finals at the Paralympic Games in Beijing.

She retired in 2010 due to injury but went on to become a Channel 4 presenter and was a Sportsmail columnist during the London Paralympics. Watkin, who has upper limb deficiency, won two Paralympic silvers and two bronzes in London.

Dazzling: Louise Watkin won four medals in the London Paralympic Games

Dazzling: Louise Watkin won four medals in the London Paralympic Games

'The Paralympics were amazing. I didn't want them to end. You could hear the crowd when you were under water in the Aquatics Centre. I came away with two medals from the individual events and two in the relays. It went brilliantly.

'In the past four years, the Paralympics has moved on so much. People are still talking about it now. It's nice so many people have got the Paralympics bug. 'I hope there will be more integration in the future. Come and watch us at the World Championships next year. Then hopefully I'll get my gold in Rio!'

Giles Scott, Sailing, 25, from Huntingdon

Scott was a world youth champion in the Laser class when he joined us in 2005 and became world champion in the Finn in 2011. The one major disappointment was missing out on London 2012.

Scott competes in the same class as Ben Ainslie and GB could only send one sailor. With Ainslie now retired, Rio 2016 cannot come soon enough.

Disappointed: Giles Scott missed out on the London Games as he was in the same division as gold medal winner Ben Ainslie

Disappointed: Giles Scott missed out on the London Games as he was in the same division as gold medal winner Ben Ainslie

Who they are

'I wouldn't call it bad luck, being in the same division as Ben. If I had performed at the right regatta it would have led to me being selected to go to the Olympics.

'I was unsure whether to watch the Olympics and some of it was hard, but I got into it and was probably as addicted as everyone else by the end. Since then I have joined an America's Cup team (Team Korea) and moved away from the UK. I wanted to broaden my horizons so I don't mess up for Rio like I did this time around.'

Emily Pidgeon, Athletics, 23, from Cheltenham

Pidgeon was an outstanding junior 5,000 metres runner but has struggled with injuries and found it difficult on the senior circuit. She still hopes her best years are to come.

Her boyfriend, GB runner Andrew Osagie, was in the fastest 800m race in history, the Olympic final in London.

'It has been an amazing journey. It's scary how quickly it's gone. I always thought I'd be there in London, so it's been up and down.

'When I realised I wasn't going to be
able to compete, it wasn't that I didn't want anything to do with the
Olympics but I just knew I'd find it hard to go and watch.

A first: Emily Pidgeon ran around the Olympic Park stadium before anyone else

A first: Emily Pidgeon ran around the Olympic Park stadium before anyone else

'But because I got injured in May I had dealt with that by the time the Olympics came round.

'I was determined to enjoy the experience and I'm so glad I did. I was there to watch Andrew in his heat and his final. I think there's a reason I was injured and I hope Rio will be my time.'

Gemma Howell, Judo, 22, from Telford (replaced Jean-Rene Badrick)

Badrick, then 16, won bronze at the European Youth Olympics but retired in 2010 through injury. Howell replaced him, battled back from serious injury and was selected for London.

She was disqualified in her first-round fight against world champion Gevrise Emane.

'It was the worst and best week of my life. I was devastated. When I came off the mat I wanted to get out of there as quickly as possible but then I thought, “I just have to use this going forward to Rio.”

Devastated: Gemma Howell was disqualified in her first round bout at the 2012 Olympics

Devastated: Gemma Howell was disqualified in her first round bout at the 2012 Olympics

'I was more nervous than I'd ever been. I have dreamed since I was little of being Olympic champion and I was a bit overwhelmed. Hopefully I can just get on with the job next time around.

'I've started a sport and exercise science degree at Bath University. My brain hurts after four years out of education. But while I want an Olympic medal more than anything, it's education and judo going forward.'

Louis Smith, Gymnastics, 23, Peterborough

In 2006, Smith won the Commonwealth pommel horse title aged 16 and has not looked back. He won Britain's first individual Olympic gymnastics medal for 100 years with a bronze in Beijing and went one better with silver in London.

He also won a bronze in the men's team event. Since the Games he has won the BBC's Strictly Come Dancing. 'No one would ever have thought we could have got that bronze in the team event. I didn't even think we could do it. It was a big statement to the rest of the world.

'It was really hard to come back again for my individual event. Winning the bronze was such a high and then you've got to come back down again for the event that was most important for me, and the one everyone expected me to do well in. It was tough but I'm glad I finished it the way I did.

Enjoying it Smith posed for Sportsmail on the back of a real 'pommel horse'

Enjoying it Smith posed for Sportsmail on the back of a real 'pommel horse'

Proud: Smith put in a sterling performance on the pommel horse to take silver home

Proud: Smith put in a sterling performance on the pommel horse to take silver home

A different route: Smith recently won the BBC's Strictly Come Dancing

A different route: Smith recently won the BBC's Strictly Come Dancing

'There are about seven different paths I could take now: fashion, property, sport. Do I carry on to Rio The Commonwealths When do I call it quits It's about making the right and the best decision, not necessarily the one everyone wants me to make.

'I want to start my own fashion range. It's something I've wanted to do for a while, although I won't be keeping any clothes I've worn on Strictly. They love their glitz and glam and shiny stuff!

'Magnificent Seven has been remarkable in so many different ways. It's been fantastic and we've done some funky stuff along the way.

'I never want to go on a horse again after that photoshoot when I pretended it was a pommel horse! I was scared stiff. I did it, although I probably wouldn't do it now!'

Shanaze Reade, BMX Cycling, 24, from Crewe

Reade went to Beijing as a world champion but crashed out in the final after deciding she would not settle for silver. Reade regained her BMX world title in 2010 and has also won two world championship golds on the track, but that Olympic medal still eludes her. Reade finished sixth in the BMX final in London.

'It was quite hard, mentally, after the Games. Everyone in British cycling did so well and I was tipped to get a medal but, again, I didn't fulfil my potential. I can definitely see what went wrong. It's about staying injury-free moving forward and just getting on that good mental pathway of getting some success under my belt and getting my confidence back.

'I have “Team Reade”, a group of people who I trust and I know will push me, to help me do that, but first and foremost it comes down to me.

Crushed: Shanaze Reade finished sixth in the final of the Olympics BMX Cycling

Crushed: Shanaze Reade finished sixth in the final of the Olympics BMX Cycling

Crushed: Shanaze Reade finished sixth in the final of the Olympics BMX Cycling

'I'm at a crossroads now where I feel I want to be world champion again in BMX, hopefully in New Zealand next year, and win a BMX Olympic medal. But then I've been world champion on the track and I also want to get further in that because I've only ever done six- to eight-week blocks of training. I would like to do the Commonwealth Games, and BMX isn't in it, so we'll see.

'I went to Beijing on such a high. I hadn't lost a race for six or seven years so I thought, “Why should it be any different”

'Coming into London was the opposite. I had been injured, missed races, crashed out of finals. I had never really fulfilled what I was capable of doing on the day. Now I don't want to short-change myself any longer.'

Great Britain – we"re world beaters, Daley Thompson

Little Britain, great success: We might be small but we're world beaters

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UPDATED:

22:48 GMT, 13 August 2012

Sportsmail columnist Daley Thompson looks back on a truly tremendous fortnight of action.

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

The world will go away impressed and with treasured memories that will last a lifetime. We are the biggest little country in the world and a little shy to say how great we are at times. My friend, former Australia cricket captain Steve Waugh, told me the facilities and atmosphere were the best he’s ever seen.

I don’t know what we can do to thank Sebastian Coe. He’s brought the country together and put a smile on everybody’s faces. He’s done an unbelievable job.

Hats off: Lord Sebastian Coe delivered a quite remarkable spectacle

Hats off: Lord Sebastian Coe delivered a quite remarkable spectacle

THE PROPER THANK YOUS…

The blazers will be putting in their orders for New Year honours about now, but we should save our heartfelt thanks for the people who really deserve it — the athletes, their coaches and their parents who have all spent many years preparing their charges for these Games. It’s the early dark mornings, training in the snow and rain, and the long car journeys to competitions in the middle of nowhere when nobody knows your name that build the belief and attitude which win you a place on the team. In Beijing there was no involvement from the local people. London has been a happier place and a more inclusive Games. The volunteers have been amazing and one of the best things that happened was G4S not being able to complete their job. It meant the armed forces came in and they were brilliant.

Heroes: Troops stepped in at late notice to become an integral part of the Games's success

Heroes: Troops stepped in at late notice to become an integral part of the Games's success

Three British moments I loved

Watching Tim Baillie and Etienne Stott win the canoe slalom. They had seven pairs going after them so it was really tense for about 25 minutes.

The 45 minutes in the Olympic Stadium on the first Saturday was magical. First Jess Ennis won gold, then Greg Rutherford and then Mo Farah. You can’t beat that.

Katherine Grainger winning after all the pain of those silvers at other Games. I was so happy for her.

THE GREAT DEBATE…

If you follow Sir Steve Redgrave’s theory, then there is a new greatest in town — Sir Chris Hoy. He has six gold medals so should therefore be considered the best Olympian we’ve had, overtaking Redgrave. The greatest is dead, long live the greatest. However, if you agree with my theory that such a title is impossible to give to one athlete, then we can all still enjoy endless hours of pub talk about who our favourites are and their merits. So welcome to my round table of greatness, Chris, where there is room for many.

MOAN No 1…

I don’t understand why the relay team failed again. They are fast enough and they should have won a medal. Our sprinters are rubbish on the world stage — an Olympic semi-final is the best they can hope for — but as a relay team we have a chance. It’s their only way on earth of winning a medal, so they should have been prioritising it ahead of the individual event, practising all the time. It’s delusional to think they can do anything on their own and a real shame.

Over the line: Great Britain's relay team should have won a medal

Over the line: Great Britain's relay team should have won a medal

BEST OF BRITISH…

I thought we’d do as well as we did and it’s great because we want and need British heroes. Now it’s important that the sports clubs across this country are ready for all the kids who are going to want to get involved. That’s what will ensure our success for the next 20 years. The Australians were brilliant from 2000 till about a year ago. They’ve become complacent. They haven’t continued to change. Look at the cycling. They did well in the World Championships and thought that would be enough. It wasn’t. Sport is so competitive that you always need to look to improve and we must do that if we want to keep being this successful.

Backward step: Australia won six cycling medals at the velodrome - one gold, two silver and three bronze

Backward step: Australia won six cycling medals at the velodrome – one gold, two silver and three bronze

And three non-British moments

My favourite of the whole Games was David Rudisha winning the 800 metres. The way he ran the race was unbelievable.

The 200m butterfly where Michael Phelps just got beaten in the final length by South Africa swimmer Chad le Clos was so exciting. Phelps could never lose that event — it was unthinkable.

The women’s volleyball final between Brazil and the USA was incredible, with some great rallies. I went to a pool match and the USA won so it was a surprise to see Brazil beat them.

THE BIG DIP…

Most of the athletics competitors will be out earning a living again in the next few weeks. But this will be the end of the year for some other sports. And a lot of competitors will go back to normal life and their jobs. It is tough for some people — most feel a bit flat after an Olympics because coming off that high and back to normality is difficult. I never found it a problem because I was so focused on training for the next event. The key is to go back to training only when you feel comfortable. In the meantime, just enjoy it, see your friends and family, and ride the wave. Then one day you’ll wake up and want to train again.

MY SPORT SHONE…

It was the best athletics meet ever. The performances to win events were staggering. Nobody would have thought that Andrew Osagie’s 1min 43.77sec would be good enough only for last place in the 800 metres. Mo Farah was unreal, too. Everyone thought he had a good chance of a medal but he surpassed that. Some people think that Usain Bolt was not as successful as he was in Beijing, because he wasn’t breaking as many records. But no-one has won those titles in consecutive Games like he has. He can continue if he wants — he’s a young man — but he might struggle to find the motivation because he could have better things to do. You have to really want it. Moving up to the 400m won’t happen either because it takes much more training.

Motivation: After two consecutive gold medal triple-hauls, where does Usain Bolt go from here

Motivation: After two consecutive gold medal triple-hauls, where does Usain Bolt go from here

MOAN No 2…

The Badminton World Federation’s decision to ban those players for trying to lose to secure an easier match after their round-robin was the worst thing at the Games. They had created that format, they knew what was going to happen. All the athletes were trying to do was improve their chances in a system they’d been given. It’s not that much different from a runner deliberately slowing down to save energy and finishing fourth when he knows the top four qualify from a race. The BWF created rules which made losing appealing — it should be a straight knockout in future.

He must stay: Charles van Commenee has done a splendid job

He must stay: Charles van Commenee has done a splendid job

DON’T GO, CHARLES…

Charles van Commenee hasn’t done a bad job. His problem is that he’s backed himself into a corner by saying he needed to deliver eight medals. But, of the six we did win in athletics, four of them were gold, which is the equivalent to 20 silvers, in my opinion. What else is he going to do He’s already the highest paid in that job in the world, so where else would he go

Interview by Alex Kay

Roberto Martinez explains selection to Dave Whelan

Martinez forced to explain team selection to Wigan owner Whelan

Roberto Martinez will tell Wigan
owner Dave Whelan on Monday why he left out star trio Hugo Rodallega,
Victor Moses and Mohamed Diame – a decision which was publicly
questioned by Whelan following the 2-0 defeat by Swansea.

Martinez rested them because of their
long-haul international trips last week and insisted: 'Lengthy journeys
do take it out of you. At this level you need to be perfect in what you
do. I don't think we could cope.'

Demanding answers: Dave Whelan (left) to hold talks with Roberto Martinez (right)

Demanding answers: Dave Whelan (left) to hold talks with Roberto Martinez (right)

Demanding answers: Dave Whelan (left) to hold talks with Roberto Martinez (right)

Whelan, back from a four-week break in Barbados, described the match as the worst Wigan performance for years and is demanding an explanation.

'Nobody is happy. The chairman is the reason why we are here. Every performance is for him and this wasn't good enough,' admitted Martinez.

Rested: Hugo Rodallega (left) and Victor Moses (right)

Rested: Hugo Rodallega (left) and Victor Moses (right)

Rested: Hugo Rodallega (left) and Victor Moses (right)

'I have been at Wigan for nine years. I know what it means. If you have players arriving on Friday evening it is nearly impossible to prepare for a game.'

Wigan have still to play Liverpool, Chelsea, Manchester United and Arsenal.

Newcastle and Sunderland will not be rushed into panic buys

Rivals Pardew and O'Neill will not be rushed into panic buys

Halfway through peeking in the window and so far all is quiet.

There have been rumours, there have
been talks, there have been endless meetings and flights and car
journeys for numerous scouts.

But so far the January window, the one
managers all claim to hate, has passed without any new faces or exits
from Newcastle United or Sunderland.

Waiting game: Sunderland boss Martin O'Neill wants to boost his attacking options

Waiting game: Sunderland boss Martin O'Neill wants to boost his attacking options

Middlesbrough have a new striker and have diligently checked the opposition, the lower leagues, affordable foreign options and more Premier League loans before going full circle and signing Coventry's Polish striker Lucas Jutciewicz. He will be a valuable addition if Boro are to maintain their promotion challenge.

Strikers are the priority for Alan Pardew and Martin O'Neill, although they have been checking out defenders too.

More from Colin Young…

Northern Exposure: Sunderland marching on under O'Neill has Pardew peering over his shoulder
04/01/12

Northern Exposure: How do you solve a problem like Bendtner O'Neill may not bother to find out
21/12/11

Northern Exposure: O'Neill ticks all the boxes to take Sunderland forward
06/12/11

Northern Exposure: Fans' fury at Bruce gives Short no choice but to sharpen the axe
29/11/11

Northern Exposure: Bruce has three games to get fans back on his side
22/11/11

Northern Exposure: Newcastle even surprise themselves with brilliant start
02/11/11

Northern Exposure: Newcastle are on the up, but will the fans ever forgive Ashley
18/10/11

Northern Exposure: Stadium of Light, where most Mackems have been kept in the dark
04/10/11

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

January, and the wear and tear it brings, often dictates a club's transfer targets and in Newcastle's case the absence of Demba Ba has raised very public concerns, and they got through the uninspiring win over Queens Park Rangers thanks to Leon Best's first goal in 10 and with no recognised striker on the bench as back-up to the Republic of Ireland striker and Shola Ameobi.

Best's finish, and the exquisite use of his feet to bamboozle Anton Ferdinand and Paddy Kenny was a reminder of his talents which have been overshadowed by Ba's brilliance and prowess, and his own genuine misfortune in front of goal. He has also not started every game.

The fragility of the defensive unit has already been exposed, and Newcastle just about got through December, but an injury to Fabricio Coloccini and you have to fear the consequences.

So a body, anybody would do but Pardew, who has been careful not to stray from his 'no comment' mantra long before the window opened, has said he will be careful before he adds to his squad.

He said: 'There's money available to me and I think we'll take a player if we think one works for us, financially and for the team. We've got to remember that we've got a really tight bunch here and don't want to upset it.'

Alan Pardew says he has money to spend

Back up: Alan Pardew insists he has money to spend

O'Neill has been pretty tight-lipped about his intentions too but he did meet Ellis Short before the weekend defeat at Chelsea which ruthlessly exposed his team's lack of reliable firepower.

Although Fraizer Campbell is close to a return, he is being carefully ushered back into contention which perhaps indicates expectations will be kept under control when he is ready. And that O'Neill is prepared to look elsewhere for reinforcements.

Like Pardew, He has been hit by injuries to his defence, although most will be back to full fitness by the end of the month.

Agents have been busy offering players but the new man will be careful and eager to show his chairman that he is clever and astute in the market, as well as the dug-out. It could help shape his budget in the summer.

The problems with Darlington

As Newcastle, Sunderland and Middlesbrough prepare to spend a few million, and shift a players in the transfer window like chess pieces in a bid to mould squads for the remainder of the season, one North East club looks certain to go to the wall this week.

The money which the three big guns aim to spend in January is not particularly obscene compared to previous transfer windows. The players, management, staff and supporters of Darlington will still look at such figures with heavy hearts.

Folly: Darlington's grand stadium has cost them dear

Folly: Darlington's grand stadium has cost them dear

When you ask these people, and those in this region who cover the club more closely, just where it has all gone wrong, who is to blame, they all have their different theories and guilty parties. It's complicated. And it's a sorry, sorry mess.

But you go back to that move from Feethams, the agonising play-off defeat David Hodgson's team suffered in one of the old Wembley's final games, and the folly that was George Reynolds' reign, and it's hard to look beyond that.

I visited Darlington Arena several times, the last competitive game was the FA Cup tie with York City which their Conference rivals, who have been through their own financial/ground difficulties, won to earn the right to play Bolton away. There was enough spare room in the 25,000 seater stadium for us to all have our own rows.

It was nothing on Feethams, which was a tight abyss of noise for night games and had that added attraction of the nearby river to make the playing surface a gluey quagmire. It's sorely missed.

Reynolds' ambitions got the better of him, and the club. I was among the press along for the ride with the former safebreaker and he knew how to put the club on the map. In the end, not for the right reasons.

But when questioned, as he was at length back then, on the decision to move to a wasteland on the edge of the town, Reynolds always insisted he believed a successful team could attract supporters from beyond Darlington. And he would draw a pretty big, unrealistic circle.

If they had achieved promotion under Hodgson, who fought valiantly for so long for the club and deserved success for his endeavours, Reynolds' theory might have been tested. But they never really recovered.

The last chairman Raj Singh did his best, but failed to summon support from anyone who would listen to his pleas. The man and his pocket could take no more.

After three administrations, and the devastating relegation to the Conference after a points deduction, the life has been slowly sucked out of the club.

The staff are gone, years of loyalty thrown in their faces, manager Craig Liddle and the ten players he had left were sacked on Monday.

Thanks to supporters who are refusing to let the club die, the administrators who so cruelly made the heroic Liddle and his loyal players redundant, will meet potential investors on Wednesday in a final bid to rescue the club.

It means they are likely to field a team of youth and academy players at home to Conference leaders Fleetwood on Saturday. If the game does go ahead, let's hope North East football fans will turn out to support them.

Despite their difficulties, Darlington have invested well in their youth system and they have found a rich seam of youngsters for their academy, cashing in on some who were overlooked by the big three at tender ages.

This weekend may offer an unexpected and potentially harsh opportunity but soon for many of them a path to professional football could be closed.

Hopefully the FA and PFA will be there to keep their dreams alive, if not what's wrong with the big three offering them fresh starts Just a thought.