Tag Archives: jessica

Jessica Ennis becomes TV interviewer in park – VIDEO

Which Olympic champion turned TV interviewer with an impromptu workout in the park (she's not really a blonde)

and a dazzling gold medal winner, but she wasn't easily recognised when she put on a wig and took a microphone into Hyde Park.

For regular morning fitness fanatics the last thing you expect is to bump into Sheffield's finest, Jessica Ennis. But one runner got more than he was expecting when she stopped him for a chat – and then offered an impromptu workout.

Scroll down to watch the video

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Disguise: Jessica Ennis has a wig fitted as she prepares to undercover and surprise runners in London

Ennis initially donned a wig, grabbed a microphone and film crew and questioned runners in London's Hyde Park about their training habits.

Then, having revealed herself to one unsuspecting participant, the 27-year-old Olympic heptathlon gold medallist spent an hour showing him ways to improve his fitness.

Using equipment ranging from a medicine ball to a park bench, the amateur athlete is put through
his paces.

The video was shot as part of a new Powerade campaign: ‘You Have More Power Than You Think'.

And with Sunday's London Marathon fast approaching, what better time to pick up some last-minute tips

For more information and to download the training tips, click here.

Up close and personal: Ennis stopped unsuspecting runners to quiz them on their fitness regimes

Up close and personal: Ennis stopped unsuspecting runners to quiz them on their fitness regimes

Surprise: Ennis reveals her true identity to one runner before taking him through a workout

Surprise: Ennis reveals her true identity to one runner before taking him through a workout

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Working out: Ennis takes the amatuer athlete through a session involving a variety of exercises

Dean Saunders issues McDonald"s ban on Wolves players

Eat like Ennis! McDonald's is off limits to Wolves players as Saunders clamps down

By
Rik Sharma

PUBLISHED:

08:36 GMT, 11 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

13:51 GMT, 11 January 2013


Big Macs banned: Dean Saunders wants his Wolves players to eat properly

Big Macs banned: Dean Saunders wants his Wolves players to eat properly

New Wolves manager Dean Saunders has ordered the club's players to stop eating at McDonald's.

The former Wales striker takes charge of his first game at Molineux tonight, against Blackburn, and wants to get his squad in shape.

He has issued a set of strict rules to keep his team in top condition as they prepare to recover from a disastrous spell under Stale Solbakken.

He said: 'Without discipline you have
nothing. Football is a watered-down version of the army and in the army
they make you do things you don’t want and you have to obey orders.

'The
overall thinking of it is that when we go into battle – when it really
matters – and you get instructions, you comply with the instructions you
are given.

'You are all
together as a group. And you get used to obeying instructions and
respecting authority. It keeps everybody together on the same sheet.

'If
you go into war and two soldiers do their own thing, they get the rest
killed. Obviously we are not in the army but there have to be rules in
place.

No entry: Wolves players must not visit McDonald's after training

No entry: Wolves players must not visit McDonald's after training

'They include not
being late for training, not leaving your training kit on the floor,
being in for treatment on time, living your life properly, not going
away from here into McDonald’s. Eating like an athlete.

'I
don’t think Jessica Ennis stops off at McDonald’s on the way home, I
don’t think so looking at her. That’s discipline – to be able to say
“No” to things that don’t make you play very well.

'You need to respect your team-mates and respect authority. If the manager tells you to do something, do it!

New rules: Saunders has told his troops that Olympian Jessica Ennis (below) wouldn't eat at McDonald's

New rules: Saunders has told his troops that Olympian Jessica Ennis (below) wouldn't eat at McDonald's

Olympic heroine Jessica Ennis

'I’m not an old school manager, really. Graeme Souness packed in because of it. It’s harder and harder to discipline players – they just look at you sometimes and go, “What are you on about”'

Saunders believes the Wolves players will soon appreciate his stern stance.

He explained: 'Most footballers like discipline. They like to know where the line is. And they don’t like to see other people not adhering to it.'

London 2012 heroes including Ben Ainslie, Bradley Wiggins and Jessica Ennis gave us the time of our lives – Patrick Collins

Thank you, Sir Ben and Sir Bradley, Jessica, Ellie and David for giving us time of our lives

|

UPDATED:

00:15 GMT, 30 December 2012

It was towards the end of the Opening Ceremony that a blissful certainty descended. In the space of a single enchanted evening, Danny Boyle had painted a picture of a nation at ease with itself; compassionate, resourceful, diverse and quirky. And as we stumbled away from the stadium, senses reeling from the spectacle, we knew beyond question that Boyle’s masterpiece had set the stunning tone; that London would stage an Olympics for the ages.

The heroes would emerge in golden clusters; Mo and Jessica, Bradley and Victoria, Ben, Andy and all those for whom first names alone now suffice. Over the past few weeks of the awards season, those heroes have been duly feted by a grateful public. Soon they will tramp in massed ranks to the house at the end of The Mall, where a sword will touch deserving shoulders and medals will dangle from worthy lapels.

Arise: Ben Ainslie is one of the Olympic heroes being honoured for their achievements

Arise: Ben Ainslie is one of the Olympic heroes being honoured for their achievements

Pace setter: Bradley Wiggins celebrates winning the Men's Individual Time Trial

Pace setter: Bradley Wiggins celebrates winning the Men's Individual Time Trial

Something to behold: Jessica Ennis flew the flag for Britain as she won the heptathlon

Something to behold: Jessica Ennis flew the flag for Britain as she won the heptathlon

More from Patrick Collins…

Patrick Collins: Why do we keep letting Sir Alex and his manager pals get away with endless self-indulgent tantrums and spats
29/12/12

Patrick Collins: So this is how football gets into the spirit of Christmas!
22/12/12

Patrick Collins: How Fergie's bedtime habits set standards at Old Trafford
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: The anti-Wenger mob should be careful what they wish for
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: England's sensational miracle workers have everyone believing again
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Captain Cook must stand the test of time before he can join the greats
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Football's silent majority must set the tone, not the bigots who just want to be noticed
01/12/12

Patrick Collins: Richie McCaw, Dan Carter… your boys took one hell of a beating!
01/12/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

It is right that they should be rewarded, especially if those rewards help us remember how it felt in the days of high summer, when great deeds were done in stadium and velodrome, on lake and road and in all those arenas which held the country entranced for day after magical day. And not merely the deeds themselves, but the numbers and the passion of those who witnessed them.

Those of us who have followed the Olympic circus down the decades had grown used to stadia being thinly populated for heats or qualifiers or so-called ‘minor’ sports. Not in London. Sebastian Coe had promised that the Games would be watched by capacity crowds. To the amazement of the International Olympic Committee, that promise was emphatically delivered.

The numbers were unprecedented. If tickets were unobtainable, then the public would stand five, ten, 15 deep to cheer on the triathletes, the marathon runners or the road racing cyclists. And not only the British contenders, but each and every Olympian.

The feats of the gods demanded full tribute, of course. Usain Bolt was already installed as a citizen of the world, while the likes of the American swimmer Michael Phelps, and Kenya’s David Rudisha, whose 800 metres world record was perhaps the performance of the entire Games, produced the kind of excellence which far superseded nationality.

But the same approval and admiration was accorded to the overmatched boxer, the outclassed swimmer, and to young Sarah Attar, the first woman athlete from Saudi Arabia to compete in an Olympic arena. Sarah finished more than 30 seconds behind the field in the 800 metres but thunderous cheers told of her ultimate triumph. Somebody asked if she had a message for her countrywomen. ‘I’d tell them: Don’t give up on your dreams,’ said Sarah, and a roomful of reporters began blinking furiously.

Usain and Michael, David and Sarah; we treated them all alike. Never was a Games more welcoming, less partisan. It was an object lesson in how civilised sport should be conducted. In truth, we surprised ourselves. For there was courtesy and friendliness, a willingness to chat with strangers, advise on travel and recommend decent pubs. This was not what visitors expected from Britain, and most certainly not from London. Their surprise was our delight.

Delivered: Sebastian Coe oversaw a fantastic Olympics in front of packed stadiums

Delivered: Sebastian Coe oversaw a fantastic Olympics in front of packed stadiums

Global citizen: Usain Bolt is known all over the world and his popularity increased further still at the Games

Global citizen: Usain Bolt is known all over the world and his popularity increased further still at the Games

What about the golf

If anybody is foolish enough to ask me about the last day of the Ryder Cup, I tell them at some length about standing on the fringe of the 18th green at Medinah, so close to the winning putt that I actually heard Martin Kaymer’s ball fall ‘clonk-clonk-clonk’ into the cup.

And it’s true, at least I think it is. Difficult to tell as, at that moment, the world went mad in celebration of the most incredible recovery in the history of the event.

In any other year, it would have been the outstanding sporting memory. In the year of the London Olympics, it took its place in a long queue.

The same may be said of Rory McIlroy. Being leading money-winner on both sides of the Atlantic, as well as US PGA champion, qualifies him for no more than an honourable mention. Even so, it was a staggering year for the young Irishman.

Naturally, the mood was assisted by the extraordinary success of Team GB. At this nostalgic time of year, the tales of gold are lovingly retold. Even those of us present on the first ‘Super Saturday’ occasionally wonder if it really happened.

But the reality was gold in the women’s team pursuit, gold in the men’s coxless four and gold for Sophie Hosking and Katherine Copeland in the women’s double scull. All of which was a prelude to a night of sheer fantasy in the Olympic Stadium.

Heptathlon gold for Jess Ennis, long
jump gold for Greg Rutherford, 10,000 metres gold for Mo Farah. Lord Coe
called it ‘the greatest day of sport I have ever witnessed’. But it was
even more; with six Olympic gold medals, it was the greatest day that
British sport has ever known.

And so it continued; Wiggins in the time
trial, Murray at Wimbledon and, absurdly, another Super Saturday with Mo
winning an historic 5,000 metres and Bolt’s Jamaicans obliterating the
sprint relay world record.

Magic MOment: Farah crosses the line to win the 5,000m at the London Olympics

Magic MOment: Farah crosses the line to win the 5,000m at the London Olympics

Spectacular: It wasn't just the stadium and the fireworks which looked great

Spectacular: It wasn't just the stadium and the fireworks which looked great

Along with a fierce pride in our city and its people, there was a deep and genuine sadness when the Olympic flame died. We told ourselves that never again would we know such times, nor see such sport. That mournful conviction lasted precisely 17 days.

For, quite astonishingly, the Paralympics were equally compelling. Long before the first week was through, the names of David Weir and Sarah Storey, of Sophie Christiansen and the captivating Ellie Simmonds were rolling off the tongue. Ellie’s 400 metres performance in the Aquatic Centre was equalled only by the drama of the men’s 100 metres, when Britain’s Jonnie Peacock sprinted away from the overwhelming favourite, Oscar Pistorius.

Captivating: Ellie Simmonds (right) was one of the Paralympians who stunned us again and again

Captivating: Ellie Simmonds (right) was one of the Paralympians who stunned us again and again

Thrillers: David Weir and Sarah Storey (below) delighted us during the Paralympics

Thrillers: David Weir and Sarah Storey (below) delighted us during the Paralympics

Sarah Storey

Sarah Storey

The Paralympics were no longer worthy and esoteric. In less than two weeks, they had moved into the mainstream. It was perhaps the most significant advance that British sport made all year. And when they ended, in lachrymose lashings of Coldplay, the melancholy began in earnest.

I remember leaving the Olympic Park on that Sunday evening and boarding the Docklands Light Railway. Across the carriage, in their distinctive purple and red suits, sat a couple of volunteers. They were middle-aged, tired and a little emotional. Unpaid and largely unheeded, they had worked throughout the Olympics, then the Paralympics. Save for a single basketball game, they had seen little live sport.

On that final day, they had completed a double shift, getting up at 6.15 for the early start. It was almost midnight, and their faces were grey with fatigue. Tomorrow, they would become civilians again. They were not looking forward to it. ‘So you enjoyed the Games’ I asked. They smiled at the foolish question. ‘Enjoyed it’ said the man. He shook his head, slowly. ‘It was the best time of our lives.’ In those few words, he had given us the perfect summary of our Olympic summer.

Murray delivers the dream

There were times during 2012 when the bare facts read like tall stories. Andy Murray, Wimbledon finalist, was one thing. Andy Murray, Olympic gold medallist, was another.

And Andy Murray, US Open champion, the first Briton to win a Grand Slam since 1936, was of another order entirely. Yet in the course of his staggering summer, he delivered all three. In a normal era, it would have been a sensational achievement. But in an era containing the finest players the game has known, it was a feat beyond compare.

Enlarge

What a year: Andy Murray memorably won the US Open title in November

What a year: Andy Murray memorably won the US Open title in November

Unless the comparison happened to be with the deeds of Bradley Wiggins. His victory in the time trial at the London Games was his fourth Olympic gold. He also happened to win the Tour de France.

It goes without saying that he was the first Briton ever to do so; the first to scale the mountains, to charge through the valleys, to endure the sprints and the time trials and to ride into Paris in a yellow jersey. He covered 2,173.75 miles and devastated the most formidable field his sport could assemble.

To have a Murray or a Wiggins once in a lifetime would represent lavish prosperity. To have two such athletes in the same astonishing year was sporting wealth beyond measure.

Pietersen keeps finding new ways to steal the limelight

One abiding image of the celebrations which followed England’s series victory in India is of Kevin Pietersen grinning at the camera, the autographs of his team-mates scrawled all over his shirt front. The picture screamed ‘reintegration’, which was presumably what Pietersen wanted to convey.

It was a momentous year for English cricket. A great captain, Andrew Strauss, made way for the youthful Alastair Cook, who also has the whiff of greatness about him. And England lost a hard-fought home series to a formidable South Africa team, which made their subsequent triumph in the sub-continent the more remarkable.

Yet throughout the year, Pietersen had invaded the headlines to the discomfort of the cricket authorities. There was his texting to South African opponents — ‘provocative’ but not ‘derogatory’, he insisted. There were his crass public statements, the indiscreet jabber which invited retribution.

Whirlwind: Currently there is tranquility between England and Kevin Pietersen... will it last

Whirlwind: Currently there is tranquility between England and Kevin Pietersen… will it last

And there was his unfortunate habit of listening only to bad advice, taking only unsound decisions and repeatedly allowing ego to over-rule his dubious judgement.

But there was also his talent, that glittering ability which allowed him — in Colombo, at Headingley and, most dramatically, in Mumbai — to play, in a calendar year, three of the finest innings the modern game has known.

It was that glorious talent which saw him reintegrated into a team that sorely need his gifts. At the moment, all is tranquil between Pietersen and England. We must hope that tranquillity reigns in 2013.

Greed and ugliness 3

Drama and Sense 2

At the last gasp, Manchester City won the most dramatic title contest the Premier League has seen. Still more improbably, Chelsea emerged from the Champions League clutching the trophy with the big ears.

Another massive TV deal was signed, prompting agents to order fresh stocks of Krug. And England chose an immensely capable and experienced man to be their new manager.

There were those who declared it an excellent year for football. And they were wrong.

For the most urgent priority of the English game was the pursuit of the bottom line. The Premier League was the richest, therefore, it had to be the best.

Racism was ugly, of course, but it was a problem for less enlightened countries. We have no truck with that kind of thing here. Likewise hooliganism; all in the past. And yet, the cases began to accumulate. The Luis Suarez-Patrice Evra affair was shabbily treated by Liverpool.

Shambolic: Liverpool's treatment of the Luis Suarez-Patrice Evra race row was poor

Shambolic: Liverpool's treatment of the Luis Suarez-Patrice Evra race row was poor

The John Terry-Anton Ferdinand scandal dragged on through much of the year and was appallingly handled by just about everybody involved.

The moral leadership was non-existent, the consequences deeply damaging.

Meanwhile, crowd chants grew uglier, more threatening, and grounds suddenly seemed less safe than they should be.

Good things were happening, too, and the appointment of Roy Hodgson was sane and sensible. He may not have sufficiently talented players and the Brazil World Cup is surely a hopeless quest. Yet he represents an important step in the right direction.

The national game — so wealthy, so confident yet so little loved — needs many such steps in 2013.

Sir Alex Ferguson gets away with tantrums because we let him – Patrick Collins

Why do we keep letting Sir Alex and his manager pals get away with endless self-indulgent tantrums and spats

|

UPDATED:

22:21 GMT, 29 December 2012

It was a depressing tantrum; a foot-stamping, arm-waving, finger-jabbing eruption of self-indulgence, with more than a hint of the bully about it.

Sir Alex Ferguson behaved quite outrageously at Old Trafford on Boxing Day. He may be incomparably accomplished but for a man on the eve of his 71st birthday he can sometimes seem distressingly immature.

Yet nobody was unduly surprised by the performance, since Ferguson has form in this department. Just as nobody was especially amazed by Mike Dean's decision not to report Sir Alex to the Football Association.

Blast from the hairdryer: Sir Alex Ferguson shouts at assistant referee Andy Garrett at Old Trafford on Saturday

Ferguson and Andy Garratt share a joke

Up to your old tricks, Sir Alex All eyes were on Ferguson during Manchester United's 2-0 win over West Bromwich Albion on Saturday after his Boxing Day outburst (below), but while he shouted at assistant referee Andy Garrett at Old Trafford (left), he also showed his gentler side by sharing a joke with the official (right)

Ferguson's ref rant

Of course, he should not have tolerated such a show of crass dissent during the United-Newcastle game, since it demeaned his own authority and diminished the status of officials at every level.

But clearly he felt he had little option. For Dean is merely a football referee, while Ferguson is a member of an altogether happier, wealthier, more prestigious profession. He is a football manager.

Once again, 2012 was the year of the manager, confirming a trend which has developed down the decades. the man in the dugout is now more famous, and considerably more powerful, than almost any of the young athletes in his care.

-heroes-including-Ben-Ainslie-Bradley-Wiggins-Jessica-Ennis-gave-time-lives–Patrick-Collins.html”>Patrick Collins: Thank you, Sir Ben and Sir Bradley, Jessica, Ellie and David… you gave us the time of our lives

29/12/12

Patrick Collins: So this is how football gets into the spirit of Christmas!
22/12/12

Patrick Collins: How Fergie's bedtime habits set standards at Old Trafford
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: The anti-Wenger mob should be careful what they wish for
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: England's sensational miracle workers have everyone believing again
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Captain Cook must stand the test of time before he can join the greats
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Football's silent majority must set the tone, not the bigots who just want to be noticed
01/12/12

Patrick Collins: Richie McCaw, Dan Carter… your boys took one hell of a beating!
01/12/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

But the manager is different. As the public face of his club, he is the man who pulls the strings and sets the tone. As such, he enjoys considerable influence and he can become tetchy when he feels his powers being mocked or challenged.

If Ferguson's outburst was wearily familiar, then his subsequent spat with Newcastle's Alan Pardew was still more predictable. Now Pardew is rarely regarded as one of football's intellectuals. Certainly, his short-term memory is as faulty as the rest of his trade.

He correctly suggested that Ferguson should have been sent to the stands but naturally he overlooked the opening match of the season, when he pushed over a linesman. 'It was comical,' Pardew chuckled at the time. 'He just happened to be right in front of me.'

Ferguson has reminded him of the incident, and his arrogant description of Newcastle as 'a wee club in the north-east' has ensured that the dreary squabble has a long way to run. Yet, for most of them, squabbling and self-protection is a way of life. At tImes, they make politicians appear almost altruistic.

Thus, Harry Redknapp takes over at QPR from the expensive disaster that was Mark Hughes and promptly damns the previous regime. 'I don't want to spend the owners' money, really,' says Redknapp. 'I've got to be honest with you. I don't want to see the owners have their pants taken down like they have in the past. a lot of agents have made an awful lot of money out of them.'

Now, it is true that Rangers spent an extraordinary 6.8million on agents in the year ending September 2012. It may also be true that some of those agents were more talented footballers than the players they represented. Yet nobody mentioned that in Redknapp's three-and-a-half years as Tottenham manager, the club spent the thick end of 25m on agents' fees. Hughes will surely rectify that omission and another feud will gain pace.

Power games: Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini is another who loves a tiff where possible

Power games: Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini is another who loves a tiff where possible

Mancini at Norwich

Mancini at Norwich

Roberto Mancini is another manager with a healthy respect for self-protection. Sometimes this takes the form of a juvenile jibe at an official, like last week's 'maybe the referee ate too much for Christmas'. Sometimes it may be a theatrical clash with the opposition – Moyes, Ferguson, Wenger, Lambert and Martinez have all served as sparring partners.

Yet most managers seem to enjoy a tiff and we in the media are all too often at pains to publicise their differences. Consider the recent League Cup tie between Leeds and Chelsea. On this entire strife-torn, recession-ridden planet, could anything be less important than wondering if Neil Warnock will shake the hand of Rafa Benitez But wonder we did. and great was the rejoicing when peace broke out.

You see, these are people of consequence and as such we weigh their pronouncements – the nonsense along with the profound. We inflate their successes and vilify their shortcomings. We may occasionally marvel at a compensation system in which failure is rewarded as lavishly as success but we say nothing.

You see, they are the masters now. They set their own terms and make their own rules. And if the leader of their pack should indulge himself with the odd touchline tantrum, then he can anticipate no serious penalty. For he knows that football managers are the new aristocracy of professional sport. Such is the status quo. Expect no changes in 2013.

Time for a sit-down protest

The dying days of 2012 have produced a most unlikely hero. I give you Paul Weir, Sunderland's head of safety and security.

Most of our major football clubs have a serious problem with selfish spectators who insist on standing in areas designed for seats, thereby blocking the view and ruining the match for countless fans.

But Sunderland have done something about the problem. They have ejected 38 people, suspended season tickets and taped up the seats of persistent offenders.

Sit down! Sunderland are cracking down on supporters who persistently stand at matches

Sit down! Sunderland are cracking down on supporters who persistently stand at matches

Mr Weir said: 'We have a duty of care to all our supporters, including elderly and disabled fans who have contacted us, very concerned that their enjoyment on a match day is being compromised because people around them stand throughout the game.'

Inevitably, some of the standing blockheads are mightily miffed by this action and one of the Sunderland message boards was awash with schemes for demonstrating their displeasure at Saturday's game.

But others opted for sanity. I cherished the brutal Wearside common sense of the man who wrote: 'Daft t***s will probably stage a sit-down protest'.

Past his bedtime: Phil 'The Power' Taylor

Past his bedtime: Phil 'The Power' Taylor

Power failure hits Phil

From time to time, usually by people who ought to know better, Phil 'The Power' Taylor is described as 'Britain's greatest-ever sportsman'. This apparently derives from the fact that he has won a version of the darts world title on 15 occasions, thus elevating himself high above the likes of Bannister, Coe, Matthews, Finney, Moore, Botham, Redgrave, Wiggins and others.

I recalled the absurdly recurring claim when I heard about Taylor's struggle to stay awake for the evening sessions of the latest world event. At 52, he complained, starting matches at 10 o'clock at night was far too tiring.

'The late nights are difficult,' confessed 'The Power'. 'I would love to be on at 8pm. That would be perfect for me. I can go back, put on my slippers on and go to bed early.'

He then posed the question: 'Has Roger Federer ever played at 11.30pm at night in a last-32 match' Well, I imagine he has because Federer is a superb athlete who excels in a cruelly demanding and utterly authentic sport.

Had he hankered after early nights and slippers, then he would have taken up a pot-bellied pub game. Britain's 'greatest-ever sportsman' could suggest one.

Pulis: A clarification

Last week I referred to a published report that the Stoke manager, Tony Pulis, had officially complained about the suspension of Marouane Fellaini for head-butting Ryan Shawcross. The report, widely circulated across the media, said Pulis believed the three-match ban was too lenient and that a Stoke player would have received something far more punitive.

Tony Pulis has assured me that the report was a complete invention and that he had made no such complaint. I am pleased to accept his assurance and thank him for clarifying the situation.

Pele should perform Mobot, says Mo Farah

Pele should be next to perform Mobot, says Farah after SPOTY disappointment

|

UPDATED:

16:55 GMT, 17 December 2012

Mo Farah wants Pele to be the next famous person to do the 'Mobot'.

Farah went home empty-handed from last night's BBC Sports Personality of the Year awards despite becoming the first Briton in history to claim Olympic gold in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres this summer.

The Somalia-born long-distance runner was one of the favourites for the award, but he had to settle for fourth place behind winner Bradley Wiggins, Jessica Ennis and Andy Murray.

Had it been any other year Farah might have expected to win by a landslide. His determination to win two of the hardest Olympic track events and the famous 'Mobot' celebration which accompanied both his victories made him a popular, iconic figure of London 2012.

M for Mo: Farah's celebration is now world famous

M for Mo: Farah's celebration is now world famous

Usain Bolt, Lennox Lewis and Boris Johnson are just three of the many people who have attempted the pose and Farah now wants arguably the greatest footballer of all time to attempt it too.

'I'd like a football player to do it, someone like Pele,' the 29-year-old said. 'I would probably like to see someone like Pele do it. That would be good.'

Celebrities such as Robbie Williams, Suggs and Girls Aloud have been pictured mimicking Farah's signature pose, which was coined by James Corden and Clare Balding during Farah's appearance on television programme 'A League of Their Own'.

Farah, who was born in Mogadishu, Somalia, but grew up in London, beamed with pride last night as he recalled winning the two gold medals on successive Saturdays during the Games.

'As an athlete you dream of becoming an Olympic champion, but to do it like that was something I would have never dreamed of,' Farah added.

'To come back twice and do it in the 5,000 was so difficult because my legs were tired and the other guys were working as a team.

'There aren't many athletes who have done that (win 5,000 metres and 10,000 metres) so it's an honour.'

Oh what a night! Farah delivered one of the highlights of the Olympics

Oh what a night! Farah delivered one of the highlights of the Olympics

Success in London 2012 has had its drawbacks, however. Farah, who wants to compete in Rio 2016 – possibly in the marathon – thinks his rivals will now be more determined than ever to beat him.

For that reason he is looking to quickly forget about his double-gold triumph and start planning for 2016.

He said: 'This year has been a great year and hopefully 2013 will be the same again for me.

'As an athlete you have to forget about what you have achieved and you have got to move on.

'There are more people out there who want to beat me now so that's the way I have got to see it and I have to get back in to serious training again.

'My coach Alberto (Salazar) has got me back into training already and hopefully we will get a block of training together and then go to Kenya, because that's what we always do so I am quite looking forward to that.'

I'll do it! Farah wants Brazil legend Pele top perform the famous celebration

I'll do it! Farah wants Brazil legend Pele top perform the famous celebration

Bradley Wiggins wins Sports Personality of the Year – Tour de France champion wants to display his BBC award in BOTH his local pubs

The best bar none… As Wiggins says he'll keep SPOTY trophy in pubs, BOTH landlords say they'd be thrilled to display Bradley's BBC gong

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UPDATED:

15:43 GMT, 17 December 2012

Bradley Wiggins has revealed he is going to display his Sports Personality of the Year award on the bars of his local pubs.

The Tour de France winner has
promised to lend the prestigious trophy to his grandma, Mauren Cousins,
and then take it on a tour of two of the watering holes near his home in
Lancashire: the Farmers Arms in Heskin and then the Original Farmers
Arms in Eccleston.

Barry Newton, landlord of the
Original Farmers Arms, said: ‘It would be fantastic. It’s quite a large
thing and we’re only a small bar but we would definitely find somewhere
to put it.

‘We’ll see what
happens when he comes back. We would really appreciate it but it’s his
award – it’s up to Bradley to decide what to do with it.

‘A
lot of us were watching last night and we all jumped up when his name
was announced because there were so many good people who could have won
it this year. We had all been voting for him.’

Winner of Sports Personality of the Year 2012, Bradley Wiggins

Bradley Wiggins during the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards 2012 at ExCeL London

Pub talk: Bradley Wiggins kisses the iconic trophy last night (left) and (right) thanks his nan in his speech

Over to you, Sue: Sue Barker (left) chats to Bradley Wiggins during the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards 2012 at ExCeL London last night

Over to you, Sue: Sue Barker (left) chats to Bradley Wiggins during the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Awards 2012 at ExCeL London last night

the Farmers Arms in Heskin

The Farmers Arms in Heskin will be the first pub that the Tour de France winner takes his award to

Nearly 500,000 people – a 30.25 per cent
share of the vote – chose Wiggins, 32, as the 2012 BBC Sports
Personality of the Year ahead of Jessica Ennis and Andy Murray last
night.

Wiggins said: ‘I am going to let my nan have it for a bit, because I've promised her, and then I have promised the local pub – the Farmers Arms in Eccleston – that they can have it for a bit.

‘They can put it on the bar, and then it's going to the Original Farmers Arms, because there are two, you see. Then I am going to take it home for a bit and maybe put it under the Christmas tree.

Ann Rothwell, landlady of the Farmers Arms, said the pub would be delighted to look after Wiggins’ award.

The Original Farmers Arms in Eccleston

'We had all been voting for him': Barry Newton, landlord of the Original Farmers Arms, said that Wiggo had a lot of support in the pub

She said: ‘It would be absolutely great. When’s he coming We were all watching last night and we would be proud to put the Sports Personality award on our bar.

‘He lives in-between the two pubs and he does bob in here now and again, but he’s an athlete, isn’t he He doesn’t frequent the pub that often.’

Suits you: Winner of Sports Personality of the Year 2012, Bradley Wiggins shows off the trophy that he'll leave at his two local pubs

Suits you: Winner of Sports Personality of the Year 2012, Bradley Wiggins shows off the trophy that he'll leave at his two local pubs

Bradley Wiggins celebrates Sports Personality of the Year award at Whisky Mist

Here Wiggo! Olympic hero and Tour de France champion celebrates winning Sports Personality of the Year in London jolly

|

UPDATED:

12:27 GMT, 17 December 2012

After the year he's had, no one would begrudge Bradley Wiggins letting his sideburns down to celebrate winning the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award.

Wiggo was spotted leaving London's Whisky Mist at 3am with his wife Catherine, clutching a bottle of beer after being crowned Britain's No 1 sportsperson.

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Where's your award Wiggo left Whisky Mist, without his award, but clutching a bottle of beer after serenading the fans on stage

Where's your award Wiggo leaves Whisky Mist, without his award, but clutching a bottle of beer

Where's your award Wiggo left Whisky Mist (right), without his award, but clutching a bottle of beer after serenading the fans on stage at the award ceremony in east London (left)

SPOTY results

1. BRADLEY WIGGINS – 492,064 votes – 30.25%

2. JESSICA ENNIS – 372,765 – 22.92%

3. ANDY MURRAY – 230,444 – 14.17%

4. MO FARAH – 131,327 – 8.07%

5. DAVID WEIR – 114,633 – 7.05%

6. ELLIE SIMMONDS – 102,894 – 6.33%

7. SIR CHRIS HOY – 42,961 – 2.64%

8. NICOLA ADAMS – 35,560 – 2.19%

9. BEN AINSLIE – 35,373 – 2.17%

10. RORY MCILROY – 29,729 – 1.83%

11. KATHERINE GRAINGER – 28,606 – 1.76%

12. SARAH STOREY – 10,342 – 0.64%

TOTAL VOTES CAST: 1,626,718

The Tour de France champion and seven-time Olympic gold medallist beat-off competition from Jessica Ennis, Andy Murray and Mo Farah to land the prize at the end of an unprecedented year of sporting action.

The London-born cyclist was serenaded by the 16,000 fans at the ExCel in east London as chants of 'Wiggo, Wiggo', rang out as he collected his prize.

Five hours later he looked slightly worse for wear as he left the Mayfair nightclub before jumping in a waiting cab with his wife.

Wiggins said: 'Thank you very much to everyone who picked the phone up and voted.

'We've had all that jungle stuff (I'm a Celebrity) and the X Factor so for people to pick up and vote is phenomenal. To my nan, the cheque’s in the post because you pressed redial so many times.

'What a year. It was the year to be
British, wasn’t it When they mentioned Mo I thought: “Oh God, I'm not
even in the top three.” To stand on the stage with the likes of these
people next to me, it’s incredible. If I stood here as the only gold
medallist it would mean nothing.

Where next Wiggins looks ready to move on to the next drinking spot...

Where next Wiggins looks ready to move on to the next drinking spot...

Where next Wiggins looks ready to move on to the next drinking spot…

Night to remember: Wiggins with his wife Catherine jump in a cab after a night of partying ends

Night to remember: Wiggins with his wife Catherine jump in a cab after a night of partying ends

Night to remember: Wiggins with his wife Catherine jump in a cab after a night of partying ends

'I'd like to thank my team-mates because I wouldn’t be here without them. Cycling is a team sport and I couldn't have done it without the team behind me.

'We’re just the athletes. That sounds really demeaning but there is an incredible team of people behind every one of us.'

Top prize: David Beckham and Kate Middleton were on hand to award Wiggins the trophy

Top prize: David Beckham and Kate Middleton were on hand to award Wiggins the trophy

VIDEO Wiggins: The award is my 'greatest sporting achievement'

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Sports Personality winner Bradley Wiggins hails extraordinary year of British achievement

'It was THE year to be British, wasn't it' Wiggins hails unforgettable 2012 as he collects Sports Personality award

|

UPDATED:

00:15 GMT, 17 December 2012

Bradley Wiggins thanked his nan, Maureen Cousins, for voting for him so many times as he picked up the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award.

The 16,000-strong crowd chanted ‘Wiggo’ as the 32-year-old seven-time Olympic medallist collected his award last night at the ExCeL in east London. But the cyclist thought he had missed out when Jessica Ennis was announced as the runner-up.

Double Olympic gold medallist Mo Farah did not make the top three in an astonishing year for British sport.

Popular champion: Bradley Wiggins was voted the BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012 at a glittering ceremony in East London

Popular champion: Bradley Wiggins was voted the BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012 at a glittering ceremony in East London

Wiggins said: ‘Thank you very much to
everyone who picked the phone up and voted. We’ve had all that jungle
stuff (I’m a Celebrity) and the X Factor so for people to pick up and
vote is phenomenal. To my nan, the cheque’s in the post because you
pressed redial so many times.

‘What a year. It was the year to be
British, wasn’t it When they mentioned Mo I thought: “Oh God, I’m not
even in the top three.” To stand on the stage with the likes of these
people next to me, it’s incredible. If I stood here as the only gold
medallist it would mean nothing.

‘I’d like to thank my team-mates
because I wouldn’t be here without them. Cycling is a team sport and I
couldn’t have done it without the team behind me.

‘We’re just the athletes. That sounds really demeaning but there is an incredible team of people behind every one of us.’

Winner: Wiggins was presented with his accolade by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

Winner: Wiggins was presented with his accolade by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

Sky procycling team rider Bradley Wiggins of Britain celebrates his overall victory on the podium

Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain celebrates after the Men's Individual Time Trial Road Cycling

Extraordinary achievements: Wiggins became the first Briton to win the Tour de France (left) and then took gold in the Olympic time trial in London

Lord Coe was introduced by David
Beckham as the ‘man that has run the Olympics and won the Olympics’ as
he picked up the Lifetime Achievement Award. The double Olympic 1500
metres gold medallist and chairman of the London 2012 organising
committee received his trophy from the Duchess of Cambridge.

Lord Coe said: ‘I’m so honoured to be
the recipient of this award tonight. I’m also incredibly lucky. For the
larger part of my life I’ve woken up knowing sport is going to shape
that day.

‘Thanks to the extraordinary athletes
we’ve celebrated tonight, who made this year what it has been. Thanks to
the millions of people the length and breadth of the country, whose
generosity of spirit made this Games what they were and, of course,
thanks to our Games makers.Nobody could have done this alone. It has
been an extraordinary night for me — I could never forget it.’

Sir Roger Bannister presented the
Team of the Year award to Victoria Pendleton, who received it on behalf
of Team GB and Paralympics GB, who won a record 185 medals at London
2012.

Delivering the Games: Lord Coe was awarded the Lifetime Achievement award after organising the London Olympics

Delivering the Games: Lord Coe was awarded the Lifetime Achievement award after organising the London Olympics

Dave Brailsford, the performance
director of British cycling, beat Ennis’s coach, Toni Minichiello, and
rowing coach Paul Thompson to be Coach of the Year. Brailsford, said:
‘It’s a huge privilege to win this because it was a fantastic summer of
sport. There is a great team behind me at British Cycling and Team
Sky.

‘They did a brilliant job. Our opponents thought our wheels were rounder than theirs.

‘It’s great because everyone sniggered when we said we would win the Tour de France in five years with a clean British rider.’

Our Greatest Team: Victoria Pendleton (centre) and Jonnie Peacock (right) received the Team of the Year award from Sir Roger Bannister on behalf of Team GB and Paralympics GB

Our Greatest Team: Victoria Pendleton (centre) and Jonnie Peacock (right) received the Team of the Year award from Sir Roger Bannister on behalf of Team GB and Paralympics GB

Paralympic swimmer Josef Craig, 15,
Britain’s youngest 2012 gold medal winner, was the BBC Young Sports
Personality of the Year.

Fabrice Muamba, who suffered an
on-pitch cardiac arrest during Bolton’s game at Tottenham in March,
presented the BBC Sport Unsung Hero Award to husband and wife team Sue
and Jim Houghton.

SPOTY 2012: Bradley Wiggins is the champion of champions

Jonathan McEvoy: 'Champion of Champions' Wiggins caps a year to cherish as the nation crowns him Sports Personality

|

UPDATED:

00:34 GMT, 17 December 2012

The everyman and his nan won the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award last night. Bradley Wiggins, the fellow who could not care less about his image, is the champion of champions in the year of sporting years.

Britain’s first Tour de France winner, and gold medallist in the Olympic time-trial, jokingly thanked his grandmother Maureen for pressing the redial button.

He won because he was, even among the dozen greats in the running, the supreme candidate.

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The Nation's Choice: Bradley Wiggins has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012

The Nation's Choice: Bradley Wiggins has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012

Great achievement: Wiggins was presented with the award by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

Great achievement: Wiggins was presented with the award by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

He attracted 492,064 of almost 1.63million votes — 30.25 per cent. Jessica Ennis, the girl-next-door heptathlete who turned into the lady in red last night, was second, 120,000 votes adrift.

Andy Murray, who ended the nation’s long wait for a male tennis grand slam winner, was third, a further 140,000 or so behind. Mo Farah was fourth another 100,000 back.

Some viewers complained they could not cast their vote in the early surge. Show organisers insisted it was not a substantial number – and, certainly, the outcome was not distorted.

In fact it was so straightforward for Wiggins that the only possible impediment would have been if he said something silly to offend Middle England. Always a possibility for this straight-talker.

But he was well behaved, even if at the start he appeared perhaps a little lubricated by the BBC’s pre-show largesse. Like the others, Wiggins talked of the team behind the athletes.

He called Sue Barker ‘Susan’ for comic effect. He poked fun at Gary Lineker’s thick make-up and later kissed him.

Golden Duo: Sport Personality of the Year Bradley Wiggins with runner-up Jessica Ennis
Golden Duo: Sport Personality of the Year Bradley Wiggins with runner-up Jessica Ennis

THE RESULTS

1. BRADLEY WIGGINS – 492,064 votes – 30.25%

2. JESSICA ENNIS – 372,765 – 22.92%

3. ANDY MURRAY – 230,444 – 14.17%

4. MO FARAH – 131,327 – 8.07%

5. DAVID WEIR – 114,633 – 7.05%

6. ELLIE SIMMONDS – 102,894 – 6.33%

7. SIR CHRIS HOY – 42,961 – 2.64%

8. NICOLA ADAMS – 35,560 – 2.19%

9. BEN AINSLIE – 35,373 – 2.17%

10. RORY MCILROY – 29,729 – 1.83%

11. KATHERINE GRAINGER – 28,606 – 1.76%

12. SARAH STOREY – 10,342 – 0.64%

TOTAL VOTES CAST: 1,626,718

After receiving the accolade from the Duchess of Cambridge, he promised not to swear. His wife, Cath, murmured, ‘Oh God’.

He was fine. The crowd loved him, chanting ‘Wiggo, Wiggo.’ As Lord Coe observed, he has a ‘rock-star quality’.

The fans and stars alike streamed
here, 16,000 souls wanting to drain every last drop of Olympic
champagne. And the BBC even altered their rules to keep the party going
right to the end of their annual knees-up.

‘For the avoidance of doubt,’ the
Beeb’s published criteria for the Team of the Year Award read, ‘it
excludes Team GB/Paralympics GB but includes the likes of British
Cycling, the rowing coxless four and European Ryder Cup.’

But, no, that did not fit the spirit
of the age. It did not reflect the all-embracing hug we have all enjoyed
sharing. So the judges rightly exercised their right to amend the
criteria — and I’m not congratulating them just because my boss was one
of them.

Popular choice: Bradley Wiggins was crowned BBC Sports Personality of the Year following his Tour de France and Olympic triumphs

Sky procycling team rider Bradley Wiggins of Britain celebrates his overall victory on the podium after the 20th and final stage of the Tour de France

Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain celebrates after the Men's Individual Time Trial Road Cycling

Champion: The award caps a wonderful year for Wiggins, who won the Tour de France (left) and Olympic time trial gold

VIDEO: Bradley Wiggins receives his award

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REACTION TO THE WIGGINS WIN

UK Prime Minister on Twitter: 'PM: “Congratulations to Bradley Wiggins -a truly inspirational winner, after an incredible year for British sport”. #SPOTY'

Rio Ferdinand on Twitter: 'Congratulations to Bradley Wiggins winning #Spoty'

British Cycling president Brian Cookson: 'Bradley's win is a high point of what has been the greatest year in British Cycling's history.

'To win the Tour de France and gold in the Olympic time-trial in the same year is a feat that has anchored our sport in the mainstream of British life.

'The fact that three out of the 12 nominees this year are cyclists [Sir Chris Hoy and Sarah Storey were the others] is recognition of the hard work and dedication of not just our amazing athletes but of everyone who works in cycling.

'Dave Brailsford's win as Coach of the Year and BMX rider Quillan Isidore making it on to the short list for Young Sports Personality shows the success cycling has enjoyed across all disciplines.

'A cyclist has been crowned Sports Personality three times in the last five years, proving that cycling is the sport that has redefined our national sporting identity.'

Runner-up: Jessica Ennis came second after winning the Olympic heptathlon gold

Runner-up: Jessica Ennis came second after winning the Olympic heptathlon gold

Golden Girl: Olympic champion heptathlete Jessica Ennis is interviewed by Sue Barker on stage

Golden Girl: Olympic champion heptathlete Jessica Ennis is interviewed by Sue Barker on stage

Man in Miami: Third-placed Andy Murray was presented with his award by boxer and former SPOTY winner Lennox Lewis in Miami

Man in Miami: Third-placed Andy Murray was presented with his award by boxer and former SPOTY winner Lennox Lewis in Miami

So, that problem cleared, the party
was on. The 800-plus athletes of our British Olympic and Paralympic
teams were thrust into the centre of the occasion, winning the Team
Award. Who could begrudge them after 185 medals

Coe, now undisputedly the dominant
figure in British sport, got the Lifetime Achievement Award for
producing the Games. He also deserves a gold medal for all the ceremony
speeches he has made in the last few weeks.

VIDEO: Lord Coe receives his Lifetime Achievement award

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Lifetime achievement: Lord Coe was honoured for helping deliver the London Olympics and Paralympics

Lifetime achievement: Lord Coe was honoured for helping deliver the London Olympics and Paralympics

But, by the time the main award was
handed out, Wiggins’ boss Dave Brailsford, 48-year-old performance
director of British Cycling, had been named Coach of the Year. He is the
embodiment of the modern Lottery-era coach. Professional, clinical,
organised.

The top-performing sport at Beijing
four years ago, British Cycling won eight gold and 22 medals at this
year’s Olympics and Paralympics. And add in the small matter of
masterminding Team Sky’s Tour de France win.

Cycling has been swept from the margins to become a major British sport. Tell your boy to go into the bike shop business.

Stars: The Duchess of Cambridge and David Beckham presented the Sports Personality and Lifetime Achievement awards

Stars: The Duchess of Cambridge and David Beckham presented the Sports Personality and Lifetime Achievement awards

Who else could win the Overseas Sports
Personality of the Year but Usain Bolt In fact, he seemed bored in his
acceptance speech from Jamaica. So many awards, so many thank yous.

More sombrely, for the Helen Rollason
Award for Outstanding Achievement the Olympic symbolism stretched back
to 2005. The winner was Martine Wright, the Paralympic sitting
volleyball player who lost both legs in the 7/7 bombings. That horror
befell London the day after Coe & Co won the bid in Singapore.

Wright’s inspirational journey lent a
nice symmetry to proceedings. ‘I’d like to thank Liz for saving my life
that day,’ she said of PC Elizabeth Kenworthy. ‘This is also for the 52
who died. Now we have to go on and inspire a nation.’

The only bauble that departed from the
Olympic script was the Unsung Hero Award for Sue and Jim Houghton, the
inspiration behind a community centre in Leicestershire. One sport they
have contributed to: pigeon racing.

The Houghtons were the only unsung
heroes of the night. The hymns of praise to our Olympians rang loud and
clear at the end of a year the memory of which will never leave us.

THE SPORTS PERSONALITY WINNERS IN FULL

Sports Personality of the Year – Bradley Wiggins

Lifetime Achievement Award – Lord Coe

Overseas Sports Personality of the Year – Usain Bolt

Coach of the Year – Dave Brailsford, Performance Director of British Cycling

Team of the Year – Team GB and Paralympic GB

Unsung Hero Award – Sue and Jim Houghton – Spent 25 years transforming a derelict Leicestershire sports ground into a community facility

Helen Rollason Award – Martine Wright – 7/7 survivor who played sitting volleyball for Paralympics GB

Young Sports Personality of the Year – Josef Craig, Britain's youngest goal medallist at the 2012 Paralympics in the S7 400m freestyle swimming


Superman: Mo Farah, the double Olympic champion, is quizzed by Gary Lineker

Superman: Mo Farah, the double Olympic champion, is quizzed by Gary Lineker

Champion: Rower Katherine Grainger talks about her Olympic achievements with Clare Balding

Champion: Rower Katherine Grainger talks about her Olympic achievements with Clare Balding

City slickers: Vincent Kompany and Sergio Aguero (left) are interviewed by Gary Lineker to celebrate City's first Premier League title triumph

City slickers: Vincent Kompany and Sergio Aguero (left) are interviewed by Gary Lineker to celebrate City's first Premier League title triumph

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BRADLEY WIGGINS

1980: Born April 28 in Ghent, Belgium before growing up in London. Son of Australian former racing cyclist Gary Wiggins.
1992: Begins track cycling at Herne Hill Velodrome, London.
1997: Wins individual pursuit gold at Junior World Track Championships in Cuba.
2000: March – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Manchester.
October – Bronze in team pursuit at Olympic Games in Sydney.
2001: September – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Antwerp, Belgium.
2002: July – Silver for England in team pursuit and individual pursuit at Commonwealth Games in Manchester. Gold in individual pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.
2003: August – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.
September – Wins opening stage of Tour de l'Avenir.
2004: August – Olympic gold in individual pursuit at Athens Olympics. Also wins silver in team pursuit alongside Steve Cummings, Paul Manning and Rob Hayles and bronze in Madison alongside Rob Hayles to become first Briton since 1964 to win three medals at one Games.
2005: September – Wins stage eight of Tour de l'Avenir.
2006: July – Makes Tour de France debut, riding for French team Cofidis.
2007: March – Wins gold in the individual pursuit and team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Palma, Majorca.
June – Prologue victory in Dauphine Libere.
July – Finishes fourth in Tour de France prologue in London behind Swiss winner Fabian Cancellara but his team, Cofidis, later withdraw after team-mate Cristian Moreni fails a drugs test.
2008: January – Wiggins' estranged father, Gary Wiggins, is discovered unconscious in New South Wales and later dies.
March – Wins individual pursuit, team pursuit and Madison gold at Track Cycling World Championships in Manchester.
August 16 – Successfully defends Olympic individual pursuit title with gold at the Laoshan Velodrome.
August 18 – Olympic team pursuit gold alongside Ed Clancy, Geraint Thomas and Paul Manning in a world record of three minutes 53.314 seconds.
August 19 – Favourite for Olympic Madison alongside Mark Cavendish but ninth-placed finish results in Manxman suffering the ignominy of being the only member of GB's track team to leave the Laoshan Velodrome without a medal and has a public falling-out with Wiggins.
October – Releases autobiography titled 'In Pursuit of Glory' detailing his struggle with alcohol after Athens Games.
2009: July – Secures fourth place in Tour de France, matching highest-ever placing by a British rider.
September – Wins British Time-Trial Championship.
October – Wins stage five time-trial and overall title at Jayco Herald Sun Tour in Australia.
December 10 – Signs four-year deal with Team Sky, the BSkyB-backed road team which is being led by British Cycling performance director Dave Brailsford.
2010: February 7 – Makes Team Sky debut at Tour of Qatar, helping squad to victory in the race's opening team time-trial.
March – Finishes third overall in the Tour of Murcia.
May – Wins Giro d'Italia prologue to become second Briton to wear race leader's pink jersey, the maglia rosa. The victory gives Team Sky a Grand Tour stage win at the first attempt.
July – Finishes 24th on Team Sky's Tour de France debut, upgraded to 23rd after Alberto Contador is stripped of the title for a doping offence.
2011: March – Finishes third overall in Paris-Nice stage race.
May – Wins fourth stage of Bayern-Rundfahrt as team-mate Geraint Thomas wins overall.
June – Wins traditional Tour de France warm-up Criterium du Dauphine. Wins British Championships road race.
July 8 – Abandons Tour de France after fracturing collarbone in crash on seventh stage. Wiggins was sixth overall, 10 seconds behind race leader Thor Hushovd, entering the stage.
September – Finishes third overall at the Vuelta a Espana, with Team Sky colleague Chris Froome second. Finishes second in World Championships time-trial before helping Cavendish win the road race.
2012: February: Wins stage five of Volta ao Algarve.
March – Wins Paris-Nice overall, completing victory with win on stage eight.
April – Triumphs in Tour de Romandie, winning stages one and five.
June – Successfully defends his Criterium du Dauphine title and wins stage four time-trial for an unprecedented series of results.
July 7 – Takes the Tour de France yellow jersey after stage seven.
July 9 – Enhances hold on maillot jaune ahead of the first rest day with a first Tour stage win, on the stage nine time-trial to Besancon.
July 21 – Wins the time-trial on the Tour's penultimate day to all but secure victory.
July 22 – Confirmed as Britain's first-ever winner of the Tour de France.
August 1 – Claims gold medal for Team GB at London 2012 in Olympic road time-trial.
November 7 – Taken to hospital after a collision with a car near his home in Lancashire. Wiggins suffered bruising, a fractured rib, a bruised lung and a dislocated finger.
December 16 – Wins BBC Sports Personality of the Year award, finishing ahead of second-placed

Sebastian Coe to be given

Coe to be honoured with Lifetime Achievement Award following successful Olympics

|

UPDATED:

00:01 GMT, 16 December 2012

Sebastian Coe is to be honoured for his achievements on and off the track by being given the Lifetime Achievement Award at tonight's BBC Sports Personality of the Year awards.

The broadcaster say Lord Coe's recognition comes not only for his efforts in leading the bid to bring, and subsequent successful delivery of, the Olympic and Paralympic Games to London, but also for his career as a middle-distance runner before that.

The 56-year-old, who was last month appointed as the new chairman of the British Olympic Association, won 1500m golds at successive Games in 1980 and 1984.

Starring role: Lord Coe was instrumental in bringing the Olympics to London

Starring role: Lord Coe was instrumental in bringing the Olympics to London

Coe took on the position of chairman of the London 2012 bid team in 2004 and played a key role in securing the vote ahead of a bid from Paris.

A 12-time world record-holder, he retired from the track in 1990 and became a conservative MP for Falmouth and Camborne. In 2002 he was made a Peer, Lord Coe of Ranmore, and was knighted in 2006.

Previous winners of the lifetime achievement award include David Beckham, Sir Bobby Charlton, Sir Alex Ferguson, Sir Bobby Robson and most recently Sir Steve Redgrave.

Iconic: Coe won gold in the 1500m at the 1980 Olympics in Moscow

Iconic: Coe won gold in the 1500m at the 1980 Olympics in Moscow

This year`s ceremony is one of the most eagerly anticipated in history, coming at the end of a memorable year for British sport.

Nicola Adams, Ben Ainslie, Jessica Ennis, Mo Farah, Katherine Grainger, Sir Chris Hoy, Rory McIlroy, Andy Murray, Ellie Simmonds, Sarah Storey, David Weir and Bradley Wiggins are in the running for the award.

Wiggins, the Tour de France and Olympic time-trial gold medalist, is the current favourite.