Tag Archives: invention

Martin Jol rules Fulham out of signing Chelsea"s Frank Lampard

Lampard will never play for Fulham! Jol rules out move for ace

By
Simon Peach, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

22:40 GMT, 16 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

06:49 GMT, 17 April 2013

Martin Jol has laughed off any chance of Fulham signing Frank Lampard ahead of tomorrow's west London derby with Chelsea.

The 34-year-old midfielder might be just two goals shy of the Blues' all-time scoring record, but a Stamford Bridge exit at the end of his contract this summer looks likely.

Having stayed on the bench for Sunday's FA Cup semi-final with Manchester City, Lampard is in line to make his 600th Chelsea appearance tomorrow at Craven Cottage.

Moving on: Chelsea's Frank Lampard looks set to leave the club in the summer

Moving on: Chelsea's Frank Lampard looks set to leave the club in the summer

Fulham boss Jol was full of praise for the England international ahead of the match but dismissed suggestions he might make a summer approach.

'He is the most productive midfield player in England in the last 30 or 40 years,' the Dutchman said.

'Everyone would love to have him. He's fit and is a good character.

'He will have a smile on his face if he listens to Fulham but I would love to have him.

Heading for the exit: Lampard has scored 200 goals for Chelsea

Heading for the exit: Lampard has scored 200 goals for Chelsea

'But it's hypothetical as he will never play for Fulham. I'm not sure he will play for a top-10 team.

'He's a legend – a living legend over there. He won all the prizes over there. In the end I have a feeling they will keep him.'

Any move for Lampard would fly in the face of Jol's ambition to lower the age of the Fulham squad.

They have had the oldest in the Premier League for the past three seasons, but the Dutchman will not use young players for the sake of it.

'Necessity is the mother of invention,' he said. 'I've got a few youngsters but they have to do well.

No interest: Martin Jol says he won't move for Lampard in the summer

No interest: Martin Jol says he won't move for Lampard in the summer

'For example Matthew Briggs is a youngster and has played for a few loan teams but he has to do well.

'If you don't do well you can't expect to be in the first team.

'Kaca (Alex Kacaniklic) did okay but they have to work hard and develop themselves.

'Kerim Frei is one them. Chris David will be one of them but they have to prove they are as good as someone in the first team.

'It's not an easy one but I'm 100 per cent certain that we have one of the best academies in England. They proved that every year – champions of England and finalists before.

'How many players in England are 18 or 19 in the first team Mention one player. But Fulham will have one or two. I am always respectful for my older players.'

London Welsh 15 London Irish 9: Gordon Ross seals points for Welsh as red card mars dire game

London Welsh 15 London Irish 9: Ross seals points for Welsh as red card mars dire game

PUBLISHED:

17:59 GMT, 1 December 2012

|

UPDATED:

17:59 GMT, 1 December 2012

London Welsh claimed victory over basement rivals London Irish at the Kassam Stadium.

However the game was ruined as a contest by the early dismissal of number eight Chris Hala'ufia which resulted in the visitors having to play 70 minutes with 14 men.

The match was a dreadful spectacle with neither side having any attacking invention to break down the opposition's defence and it was left to Gordon Ross to secure victory for his side with five penalty goals.

No way through: London Irish's Sailosi Taicakibau is tackled

No way through: London Irish's Sailosi Taicakibau is tackled

London Welsh took a fifth minute lead when Ross kicked his first penalty after Irish were penalised for dragging down a lineout drive.

Almost immediately, Welsh suffered a big blow when influential centre Hudson Tonga'uiha left the field with what appeared to be a serious shoulder injury.

Irish had their first opportunity for points but Ian Humphreys was narrowly short with his 45-metre penalty attempt.

On the march: London Welsh's Tyson Keates drives forward

On the march: London Welsh's Tyson Keates drives forward

The visitors then suffered a huge set back when Hala'ufia was sent off for a dangerous tip tackle on Welsh replacement Seb Jewell.

The referee JP Doyle sought the advice of his touch judge before issuing a red card.

Hala'ufia expressed his regret by immediately walking over to the uninjured Jewell to shake his hand but the damage was already done.

Flying high: London Welsh's Jonathan Mills rises to take the ball

Flying high: London Welsh's Jonathan Mills rises to take the ball

The resulting penalty was kicked by Ross.

With 15 minutes gone, Irish were again penalised to enable Ross to kick his third penalty to give his side a handy 9-0 advantage.

Tom Homer put Irish on the scoreboard with a penalty before the visitors were given further hope when Humphreys kicked another.

When Matt Garvey carelessly lost possession, Irish again offended for Ross to be on target.

With two minutes of the half remaining, Homer had the opportunity to reduce the arrears but his kick from just inside his own half sailed narrowly wide to leave Welsh deservedly ahead 12-6 at the interval.

Irish introduced Halani Aulika at prop for the second half and were unlucky not to get the first points of the half when Humphrey's penalty rebounded back off a post.

The visitors' woes continued when flanker Garvey was sent to the sin bin for a deliberate offside before Humphreys again missed with another penalty attempt.

Playing against 13 men, Welsh blew their best chance.

Tom Arscott neatly chipped through for Nick Scott to run on to. The wing was first to the ball and booted it over the try line but somehow Tyson Keates failed to secure the easy touchdown.

Full stretch: Matt Garvey of London Irish bursts through

Full stretch: Matt Garvey of London Irish bursts through

Garvey returned with no damage to the score line but once again Irish offended at the line out to allow a kick from Ross to scrape over via the crossbar.

Homer missed with a long range penalty but fifteen minutes from time succeeded with another as the spirited Irish raised their game.

When Sonny Parker was yellow carded for a deliberate offside with 10 minutes to go, Irish scented an unlikely win but Welsh hung on.

Brendan Rodgers takes heart from Reading axe going into new Liverpool job

Reading axe made me more clinical, says new Liverpool boss Rodgers

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UPDATED:

16:51 GMT, 2 June 2012

Brendan Rodgers believes the defining moment in his career so far is not getting the Liverpool job but losing the one he had at Reading.

After guiding Watford away from the npower Championship relegation zone he was head-hunted by the Royals but just five months into the season he left in December 2009 after a run of disappointing results.

It was not long before he was back in work, however, taking over at Swansea the following summer and the success he had there in taking the club to the Barclays Premier League earned him his chance at Liverpool.

Huge opportunity: Brendan Rodgers was unveiled as the new Liverpool boss

Huge opportunity: Brendan Rodgers was unveiled as the new Liverpool boss

But the 39-year-old is far too realistic to believe he has made it as a top-level manager and still looks back on his ill-fated spell at Reading as a pivotal moment.

'I probably became more clinical after that,' he said. 'I went in there looking to change things too quickly.

'I went in thinking “right, the club want a new vision, a new philosophy” and I felt if I stripped it down quickly and let it build then that would be okay.

'But what I realised after that was you are still in the business of winning. You talk about football, creativity and invention, but you have to win games – as simple as that.

'That was something very important to me on reflection when I came away from Reading.

Put your shirt on it: Rodgers stands between managing director Ian Ayre and chairman Tom Werner

Put your shirt on it: Rodgers stands between managing director Ian Ayre and chairman Tom Werner

'When I went in to Swansea I knew very well I could still work with the same philosophy and identity but I would have to get to the end point quicker.

'That allowed me to round off everything I do and how I work with players and it brought me success at Swansea.

'That six months at Reading over the course of a nearly 20-year period coaching and managing has been great learning for me. Hopefully that will be the defining moment of my career.'

Rodgers has already demonstrated his strength of character in rejecting Liverpool's initial approach because he did not want to be another name in a long list of candidates.

He needed to know he was more than just a contender, he needed to be told he was the only contender.

Once he received that assurance from the Reds' second approach the decision to leave the Liberty Stadium, while difficult, was an obvious one.

Composed: Rodgers gave a polished performance on his media debut

Composed: Rodgers gave a polished performance on his media debut

And the Northern Irishman arrived at Anfield on Friday ready to go straight to work on turning around the club's faltering fortunes by trusting in the principles which have served him so well since he began coaching children at the age of 20 after a knee condition ended his playing career.

'I have an inherent belief in what I do and the way I work and I will fight for my life to get Liverpool back on track,' he insisted.

'For me it is simple. I have three promises I always take into a club and it will be the same here.

'First, my communication is open. I speak with players and I speak with people and I respect people.

'Wherever they sit in the hierarchy of a club organisation my door will always be open. Secondly I promise quality, quality in my work. I have studied nearly 20 years to be the very best I can and that has taken me through working with kids to coaching top players at Chelsea.

'My work will be quality, the players will enjoy the work and think that bit differently in how we play.

'The third thing I bring is ambition. The most important thing is the club's success. Of those three things I can give no more. If the club or anyone else needs anything else I can't bring it but I promise those three things.'

Unhappy Reading stint made me more clinical and want to win games, says Liverpool boss Rodgers

Short Reading stint shaped me and made me more clinical, says new Liverpool boss Rodgers

|

UPDATED:

12:33 GMT, 2 June 2012

Brendan Rodgers believes the defining moment in his career so far is not getting the Liverpool job but losing the one he had at Reading.

After guiding Watford away from the npower Championship relegation zone he was head-hunted by the Royals but just five months into the season he left in December 2009 after a run of disappointing results.

It was not long before he was back in work, however, taking over at Swansea the following summer and the success he had there in taking the club to the Barclays Premier League earned him his chance at Liverpool.

Huge opportunity: Brendan Rodgers was unveiled as the new Liverpool boss

Huge opportunity: Brendan Rodgers was unveiled as the new Liverpool boss

But the 39-year-old is far too realistic to believe he has made it as a top-level manager and still looks back on his ill-fated spell at Reading as a pivotal moment.

'I probably became more clinical after that,' he said. 'I went in there looking to change things too quickly.

'I went in thinking “right, the club want a new vision, a new philosophy” and I felt if I stripped it down quickly and let it build then that would be okay.

'But what I realised after that was you are still in the business of winning. You talk about football, creativity and invention, but you have to win games – as simple as that.

'That was something very important to me on reflection when I came away from Reading.

Put your shirt on it: Rodgers stands between managing director Ian Ayre and chairman Tom Werner

Put your shirt on it: Rodgers stands between managing director Ian Ayre and chairman Tom Werner

'When I went in to Swansea I knew very well I could still work with the same philosophy and identity but I would have to get to the end point quicker.

'That allowed me to round off everything I do and how I work with players and it brought me success at Swansea.

'That six months at Reading over the course of a nearly 20-year period coaching and managing has been great learning for me. Hopefully that will be the defining moment of my career.'

Rodgers has already demonstrated his strength of character in rejecting Liverpool's initial approach because he did not want to be another name in a long list of candidates.

He needed to know he was more than just a contender, he needed to be told he was the only contender.

Once he received that assurance from the Reds' second approach the decision to leave the Liberty Stadium, while difficult, was an obvious one.

Composed: Rodgers gave a polished performance on his media debut

Composed: Rodgers gave a polished performance on his media debut

And the Northern Irishman arrived at Anfield on Friday ready to go straight to work on turning around the club's faltering fortunes by trusting in the principles which have served him so well since he began coaching children at the age of 20 after a knee condition ended his playing career.

'I have an inherent belief in what I do and the way I work and I will fight for my life to get Liverpool back on track,' he insisted.

'For me it is simple. I have three promises I always take into a club and it will be the same here.

'First, my communication is open. I speak with players and I speak with people and I respect people.

'Wherever they sit in the hierarchy of a club organisation my door will always be open. Secondly I promise quality, quality in my work. I have studied nearly 20 years to be the very best I can and that has taken me through working with kids to coaching top players at Chelsea.

'My work will be quality, the players will enjoy the work and think that bit differently in how we play.

'The third thing I bring is ambition. The most important thing is the club's success. Of those three things I can give no more. If the club or anyone else needs anything else I can't bring it but I promise those three things.'

AUSTRALIAN GRAND PRIX 2012: Sky coverage impressive

Early alarm for BBC as Sky set new standard with Australian GP coverage

|

UPDATED:

00:26 GMT, 19 March 2012

You have to be a fanatical
petrol-head to rise a few ticks after four o'clock on a Sabbath morning
to watch some guys drive round and round at the other end of the world.

But you would have to be certifiably
insane to think that by the time the BBC highlights come on, at
approximately the point you're a few slices into your roast beef, you
could avoid having heard the result.

That or a Carthusian monk.

Slick start: Sky F1 presenters Simon Lazenby, Martin Brundle and Damon Hill

Slick start: Sky F1 presenters Simon Lazenby, Martin Brundle and Damon Hill

I can report there is a second compelling reason to put the alarm clock to such extreme use.

It is simply this: Formula One
coverage has never been broadcast more brilliantly than during Sky's
inaugural transmission from Melbourne on Sunday.

That is not a glib verdict. Nor is it a criticism of the energy brought to the task by the BBC over the last three years.

Nor is it a failure to recognise how ITV introduced revolutionary in-paddock analysis before that.

Nor does it marginalise Murray Walker's high-decibel contribution dating back to the invention of the wheel.

It is just to say that Sky (who had
around 85 staff in Australia, compared to 47 on the McLaren race team)
brought to the paddock the polish that has long marked, most notably,
their football and cricket coverage. They did not trivialise.

They elucidated this most complex of sports but did not patronise. Most strikingly, the chemistry of the team was right.

Take the commentary box. First, we
must accept that there will never be another Walker, now living at his
lovely house in Hampshire and as sharp as a pin at 88.

Favourite feature: Martin Brundle has continued his grid walk with Sky

Favourite feature: Martin Brundle has continued his grid walk with Sky

Television, with its myriad channels, no longer produces that single voice of any one sport.

But in David Croft, formerly of Radio
5 Live, Sky have employed a natural broadcaster whose inflection fits
and accentuates the unfolding drama. I contrast that with the BBC's
pairing last year.

Yes, Martin Brundle and David
Coulthard knew their stuff, but if Michael Schumacher had overtaken five
cars, somersaulted over the fence and hurtled out of the cockpit in a
ball of smoke, it is 50-50 whether they would have thought it worth
breaking off from an earnest discourse on tyre degradation to tell us.

It needed a broadcast journalist to
be amazed when we at home are amazed, to frame the narrative of the
race, to ensure that the technical talk laps the shores of the
commentary rather than sinks it.

Croft allows time and space for
Brundle, now his co-commentator, to get the best analysis and most
arresting phrases out of himself.

When Mark Webber's tyres were shot, Brundle said: 'Ready to hand them back in. I don't think he'll get much for them.'

That was a nice, light touch.

Beyond the commentary box, Sky's
in-house presenter Simon Lazenby went ably from garage to garage and one
paddock hospitality area to the next. I know for certain he was in a
high panic about his debut race.

Formula One is a minefield for any new boy and those internet snipers can be moronically fierce.

But, apart from once calling McLaren's Martin Whitmarsh, 'Martin Wishmarsh', Lazenby was word perfect.

Dream team: Sky's F1 coverage has sent a message out to the BBC

Dream team: Sky's F1 coverage has sent a message out to the BBC

He prompted intelligently and was also refreshingly modest and well-mannered enough not to try to turn himself into the star.

Speaking of manners, I liked the more measured pace of Brundle's grid walk.

There was time to stop for Advance Australia Fair.

Blimey, there was even time to listen to people's answers.

The weekend was also a triumph for former world champion Damon Hill. He was at Lazenby's shoulder throughout, bringing typical thoughtfulness and detachment to the role.

Having been largely absent from the travelling grand prix circus for some years, his perspective came across as fresh.

Another new contributor was the so-called 'Skypad', with its touch-screen gizmos and graphics.

We were intermittently taken 'upstairs', where Georgie Thompson and Anthony Davidson were playing with their new toy.

Davidson is an intelligent and lucid pundit, if perhaps underused in yesterday's casting, something that may be rectified when Hill misses a few races as per his contract.

All this slick production took me back to last season's final race in Brazil and the closing remarks by the BBC's Jake Humphrey.

'The message is clear,' he said. 'The bar has been raised. Can anyone come with a decent challenge'

The answer is, shall we say, clear. And it was in before the birds had started singing.