Tag Archives: infamy

Neil Ruddock Celebrity Big Brother bath time

Did the water jump out when you got in, Razor Bath time for Ruddock in the Celeb Big Brother house

By
Paul Collins

PUBLISHED:

15:50 GMT, 7 January 2013

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UPDATED:

15:50 GMT, 7 January 2013

Who knows what Neil Ruddock's motives for going into the Celebrity Big Brother house were, but we hope losing a few pounds is somewhere on his list of priorities.

There's no doubt 'Razor' has earned the right to treat himself now that his playing days are behind him. But he's clearly treating himself a little too often.

The former Millwall, Tottenham and Liverpool defender has joined Frankie Dettori and host of other celebs hoping to win cash for their chosen charity.

He's big Big Brother contestant: Ruddock in all his glory, heading for a bath

He's big Big Brother contestant: Ruddock in all his glory, heading for a bath

This is not the first time that the 44-year-old has ventured into the world of reality television since he hung up his boots in 2003. Ruddock appeared on 'I'm a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!' in 2004.

While his television career has introduced his loutishness to a wider audience, Ruddock's behaviour gained him infamy in the footballing world in his mid-90s hey-day.

On the pitch, Ruddock was famously involved in a scuffle with Manchester United legend Eric Cantona, while he broke both of Cantona's United team-mate Andrew Cole's legs in a challenge in a reserve match in the same year.

One question: Is Ruddock really big, or is that bath really small

One question: Is Ruddock really big, or is that bath really small

Off the pitch, Razor earned himself a reputation as a heavy drinker and
womaniser during a career which spanned 17 years and took in eight
clubs.

Never the slimmest in his playing days, Ruddock has swelled to a size surely even he would have gawked at back in his prime. Maybe a spell away from the fridge will do him good.

Slim pickings: Ruddock cut a leaner figure in his playing days

Slim pickings: Ruddock cut a leaner figure in his playing days

Scott Brown fired up by chance to lead Celtic into the group stages of Champions League

Brown fired up by chance to lead Celtic into the group stages of Champions League

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UPDATED:

23:17 GMT, 19 July 2012

Fantasy football 2012

Even now, seven years on, their name
still hangs heavy in the air. Artmedia Bratislava were only meant to
catch Celtic's eye for a few days before sheepishly fading into the
distance. Instead, they became a permanent point of reference.

The night Gordon Strachan's ill- prepared side shipped five to the little known Slovakians was the moment everything changed.

In the new Europe, new names could no
longer be considered no-hopers purely for the reason that little was
known about them. There are no longer any gimmes in the game. Writing
off little-known sides from what are blithely referred to as backwaters
is the sport of fools.

Celtic captain Scott Brown

Celtic captain Scott Brown

As Celtic await the draw for the third qualifying round of this year's Champions League, the prospect of a fall at the first hurdle in this year of all years is surely unthinkable. Even manager Neil Lennon admitted yesterday his transfer plans hinge on a place in the group stages.

Unlike the Artmedia debacle, there is the safety net of another bite at the cherry in the Europa League were the worst to happen over the next three weeks. No one has the appetite for that, though.

Lennon's side should get through and probably face up to a tougher challenge in the play-off round.

A list of potential opponents that include HJK Helsinki and AEL Limassol should have no one trembling at the knees. But we've been here before haven't we

For Scott Brown, the prospect of skippering the side in the competition proper is one to set the blood pumping. Equally, the notion that the dream could end in infamy long before then is utterly chilling.

'It would mean a lot to me to take the club into the Champions League,' he said.

'Myself and a couple of the lads have played in it before, so we know how special it is.

'If we get in – which hopefully we do – it would be a great experience.

'I watched the games like anyone else. I always wanted to be in this situation, but there's a lot of work to be done.

'We've got two qualifiers before we do anything, so we have to see where we are in the next couple of weeks.

'We've definitely got the quality. Once we know who we're playing against, we'll definitely give it everything we've got.

Celtic were knocked out by Artmedia Bratislava

Shock: Celtic were knocked out by Artmedia Bratislava

'There are no easy teams any more. A few teams have been done with that thinking in the past.

'We could face teams who are halfway through their season, while this will be our first competitive game. It's up to us to get the season off to a flyer.'

Celtic's European campaign last year was a bizarre episode. Initially shown the door from the Europa League, Lennon's men were then ushered back through it by UEFA on account of Switzerland's Sion failing to comply with a transfer embargo.

Presented with something akin to a free hit, the Parkhead side did not look out of place in a strong group containing Rennes, Udinese and Atletico Madrid, only missing out on a spot in the knock-out stages after a draw in Italy in the last game.

'We have to take a lot of pride from the Europa League group last year,' Brown added. 'The competition seemed to kick-start our season.

'We got better and better with every game. We went 15 points behind in the league but still showed we had the character to come back from it.

'I think that Europa League group was the making of this squad. We had a lot of new faces but the lads have gelled well. There's no excuses now.'

If Celtic were to fail to clear the two hurdles that stand in their way, it will not be for the lack of preparation. There have been no long-haul flights this summer. The short hop to Bavaria has been agreeable, as have the training facilities and the standard of opposition in their tests against Augsburg, Stuttgart Kickers and VfR Aalen.

Now it's time to step things up a notch or two. Celtic will move to Holland today ahead of their game against Ajax tomorrow. Norwich City and Inter Milan are the final appetisers before the Champions League is served up.

MASTERS 2012: Nobody can afford to fall for Tiger Woods smile – Martin Samuel

Nobody can afford to fall for Tiger's smile

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 3 April 2012

The problem with Tiger Woods, according to his friend Michael Jordan, is that he hears everything.

Jordan has never bought the notion that Woods stalked the golf course utterly desensitised to his surroundings. Tiger, he argued, genuinely cared what people thought of him when his private life unravelled in public.

'Reputation, reputation, reputation – O, I have lost my reputation,' wails Cassio, the disgraced lieutenant in Shakespeare's play, Othello. 'I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.'

On the prowl: Tiger Woods looked happy during his pre-Masters practice round at Augusta on Tuesday

On the prowl: Tiger Woods looked happy during his pre-Masters practice round at Augusta on Tuesday

Jordan's reaction to the crisis Tiger faced would have been to play a game of such extreme achievement he rewrote the headlines to his satisfaction. Consider basketball star Kobe Bryant, or for a British equivalent, former England captain John Terry. Neither man has ever been much daunted by infamy.

Golf blog

Tiger, instead, retreated behind a wall of rehabilitation and therapy and winced his way around parts of the countryside he once owned. He heard it all.

And when Woods is around, a lot of other people hear stuff, too. They hear the intimate details of his life and thinking from former employees in diss-and-tell books; they hear the wisdom of experts on sporting psychology; sometimes they hear his movements updated hour by hour through the night.

All smiles: Woods answers questions during a press conference following his practice round

All smiles: Woods answers questions during a press conference following his practice round

'Tiger's in Bar West,' announced the young lady drinking on Augusta's Central Street on Monday evening. She read the news off a text on her phone. The establishment advertises itself as a Martini Bar & Lounge and its Facebook site promises dubstep music and HBO boxing. Lively for a weekday in Georgia, then.

Was Tiger in Bar West Who knows The type of parties he used to enjoy at the Masters did not take place in public view. There is a photograph of him on the wall at the local branch of Hooters, but it is young Tiger who is enjoying the hospitality, on one of his earliest visits.

He has been coming here 18 years, he told Luke Donald on the practice ground on Tuesday morning. When he emerged from purdah two years ago, he came out at Augusta, and at this tournament, where he felt protected.

The gallery awaits: Woods and his caddie Joe LaCava during their practice round

The gallery awaits: Woods and his caddie Joe LaCava during their practice round

Asked about where he is now, compared to that day two years ago, raw and vulnerable, having had his psyche stripped in private counselling, Woods retreated to his safe haven, with platitudes about familiar surroundings, that had nothing to do with the question asked.

Woods may hear everything, but he often hears what he wants to hear, too. Required to consider his professional and emotional development, the question Woods chose to answer was: 'Isn't Augusta a pretty golf course'

Question: 'Can you talk about where you feel you are now compared to where you were in 2010'

Fist pump: Woods bonds with Masters legend Fred Couples on the fifth fairway

Fist pump: Woods bonds with Masters legend Fred Couples on the fifth fairway

Woods (buying time): 'Say again'

Question: 'Where you are now to where you were two years ago'

Woods: 'Well, I wasn't hitting the ball very good. It was just having an understanding of how to play around this golf course, and that's certainly, as I was explaining earlier, is that coming to a golf course that we play each and every year certainly helps. And playing here for so many years now; this is, as I said, my 18th year, so understanding how to play this golf course has really helped me over the years.'

Question: 'Yes, but, what about personally, because obviously two years ago it seemed a very cathartic experience for you.'

Back in the swing: Woods hits from the fairway on the fifth hole during his practice round

Back in the swing: Woods hits from the fairway on the fifth hole during his practice round

Woods: 'Yeah, but it's also coming here to a golf course that I know. As I said, knowing how to play it, and just the history behind this tournament makes it so special.'

All the while, Mark Steinberg, Woods's agent, was trying to curtail interview time from the back of the room. His client had told the folksy anecdote involving Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer, he had addressed the odd local golf writer by his first name. He had smiled, winningly. Tiger's work here was done.

What his rivals are probably tired of hearing is the expectation that the Tiger of old is back, following his victory at the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill last month. His resurgence is reflected on betting sites, where he is the Masters favourite, and on the pages of Sports Illustrated, which declare that his duel with Rory McIlroy is the only story in golf.

Eye on the ball: Former world No 1 Woods is looking to win his fifth green jacket this week

Eye on the ball: Former world No 1 Woods is looking to win his fifth green jacket this week

Not an unexpected one either, according to Lee Westwood. 'I didn't see any reason why Tiger wouldn't be back,' said the Englishman. 'I've been through a similar period with a slip in form and eventually you figure it out. It's just a case of when. The difference is that once you have gone through it, there is scar tissue. You know you don't feel quite as bulletproof as you once did.'

Woods is recovering, though. In Abu Dhabi last January he invited McIlroy to play nine practice holes. A generous gesture. The great champion passing his knowledge to a young rival; a sign of personal change. Perhaps.

The more cynical take was that Woods, knowing he was playing well, wanted to show McIlroy first-hand what he would be up against this season. Tiger didn't win but he came a lot closer to doing so than McIlroy.

'I didn't know much about him,' Woods recalled. 'I had not played with him, so that was the first chance to really sit down and talk. It was fun for both of us. He can really move it out there. He has the makings of a great champion for a long period of time. I used to move it like that back in yesteryear.'

He smiled again, but nobody was falling for that one, certainly not McIlroy. Tiger isn't the only one with his ear to the ground.