Tag Archives: hundredths

Hannah Miley beats Ye Shiwen to gold in 400m medley at World Short-Course Championships and Lowe wins bronze

Miley beats Olympic champion Ye to win gold and Lowe bags bronze at World Short-Course Championships

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UPDATED:

21:11 GMT, 12 December 2012

Hannah Miley held off Olympic champion Ye Shiwen to claim Great Britain's first gold medal of the World Short-Course Championships when she won the 400 metres individual medley in Istanbul.

Ye was at the centre of the biggest controversy in the pool at the 2012 Olympics as her freestyle leg en route to victory in the eight-length event almost defied belief.

In London the Chinese teenager was just three hundredths of a second slower over the final 100m than Ryan Lochte, winner of the men's race.
Indeed her last 50m was faster than four in the men's final, including Lochte and Thiago Pereira, the gold and silver medallists.

Earlier Jemma Lowe won Britain's first medal at the event by finishing third in the 200
metres butterfly.

Take that: Miley (left) held off a late rally from Chinese sensation Ye Shiwen

Take that: Miley (left) held off a late rally from Chinese sensation Ye Shiwen

Miley, fifth in London, had qualified fastest into the final, but predicted it would be a different race come the final, claiming the Chinese teenager was 'playing' in the heats.

Fourth after the butterfly and backstroke legs, Miley then produced a superb breaststroke to turn first going into the freestyle, 2.04 seconds ahead of Ye.

However, as expected, Ye came back and on her final 25m of 28.14 secs, the only sub 29-second last length in the field, she reeled Miley in.

The Scot, though, was breathing to her right where she could see her rival, whom she held off by 0.19s to win in a new championship record of four minutes 23.14 seconds, the fastest ever in a textile suit, bettering her own mark from the European Championship last month.

Hanging on: Miley turned into the freestyle leg 2.04 seconds ahead of Ye and held on to win by 0.19 seconds

Hanging on: Miley turned into the freestyle leg 2.04 seconds ahead of Ye and held on to win by 0.19 seconds

The 23-year-old 'was hanging on for dear life' and admitted the achievement had significance for both her and her father and coach Patrick, vindicating their approach after the Olympics.

Miley said: 'A lot of top athletes aren't here so for me I see it as an opportunity and any opportunity I see I try and take it.

'So for me I was aiming for it to be a confidence booster for both myself and my dad and what we are doing this season.

'Not only were we trying to chase placings, but also to do a really good time which I was really happy with.

'But the main thing is long-course (50m) swimming so I am really happy with what I've done, but for me I am not going to be happy with it until I can prove I can do it long course as well.

'Hindsight is a great thing and lots of people have cliches and I was genuinely was happy with that swim, but for me I probably wouldn't be the athlete I am standing here today doing those times if the Olympics hadn't have happened.'

Golden girl: Miley (centre) poses with her gold medal in Istanbul

Golden girl: Miley (centre) poses with her gold medal in Istanbul

Lowe secured Britain's first medal in Istanbul as she won bronze in the 200m butterfly.

The 22-year-old swam from lane one after qualifying seventh, meaning she had no idea of how the expected leaders were faring.

However, that had little bearing on the Swansea ITC swimmer who touched in two minutes 3.19 seconds. It was also a national record for Lowe, who lowered her own 2010 mark, the Briton leading after 150m before being overtaken by Hungarian Katinka Hosszu and 2012 Olympic champion Jiao Liuyang.

All smiles: Jemma Lowe (right) picked up the bronze in the 200m butterfly

All smiles: Jemma Lowe (right) picked up the bronze in the 200m butterfly

Lowe said: 'I'm really pleased with that. I didn't know what to expect after this morning when I was in that slow heat by myself and I just scraped into the final.

'Because I have won a medal previously at world short course I was really determined to get up there, so I just gave it my very best tonight and I can't believe how it worked out.'

There was no such satisfaction for Michael Jamieson, the Olympic 200m breaststroke silver medallist.

The Glaswegian was thoroughly frustrated, despite setting a new personal best of 58.56s in the 100m breaststroke.

He said: 'It's the same old story on the 100 – I just can't keep up with the bigger guys.

Powerhouse: Lowe put in a solid performance to pick up Britain's first medals

Powerhouse: Lowe put in a solid performance to pick up Britain's first medals

'It's frustrating – it's the fastest I have ever been but I am getting to the stage with the 200m that if I am ever going to improve then my 100 needs to come down.'

That was in contrast to Georgia Davies, another Swansea ITC swimmer, who set a personal best of 57.41s to qualify third for the 100m backstroke final.

Lizzie Simmonds was 10th in 58.34s, although her focus is on the 200m since her move to Bath ITC.

Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake dodge duel at Lausanne Diamond League

Sprint titans Bolt and Blake dodge a duel in Lausanne as showdown proves too costly

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 22 August 2012

Following the euphoria of London 2012, Olympians from across the globe are competing again on Thursday night in a Diamond League meet in Switzerland.

Sprint sensation Usain Bolt will race in the 200 metres in Lausanne — but has avoided fellow Jamaican Yohan Blake who will run in the 100m.

The pair contested Olympian tussles that more than matched the occasion over the 100m and 200m — Bolt wining both — before combining to help break the 4x100m world record.

Raring to go: Usain Bolt is set to race again for the first time since his remarkable Olympics

Raring to go: Usain Bolt is set to race again for the first time since his remarkable Olympics

But the value of a race involving the two has soared since the Games and not even the Diamond League — the most lucrative meet in athletics — can afford it.

Blake said: ‘I love to race against Usain but I leave that to my manager. He has chosen some great races for me and he knows what he is doing.’

The pair are also scheduled to avoid each other at Diamond League meets in Zurich and Brussels before they finish their season.

Blake’s manager Cubie Seegobin said: ‘Maybe if there is some rich guy who wants to put the money up for this race it can happen.’

Signature: Bolt strikes his famous pose during a conference at IMD Business School in Lausanne

Signature: Bolt strikes his famous pose during a conference at IMD Business School in Lausanne

Blake will face Tyson Gay in the 100m who came fourth in the Olympics with a time of 9.80sec, only five hundredths of a second behind Blake.

Gay is still the second fastest man of all time — a record set when he ran 9.69 in 2009 — and his form has improved steadily in the past year.

The Beast: Yohan Blake in Lausanne

The Beast: Yohan Blake in Lausanne

Away from the track, Great Britain’s
Robbie Grabarz, who won bronze in the high jump, will get the chance to
test himself against gold medal winner Ivan Ukhov from Russia.

It was Grabarz’s bronze that took Great Britain’s medal total to 48, surpassing Beijing four years previously and making London 2012 the biggest medal haul in 104 years.

The former European gold medal winner jumped 2.29 metres but he has some way to go to beat Ukhov whose winning jump of 2.38 was the second highest jump in Olympic history.

Fellow Brit Lawrence Okoye has not given up on discus after coming last in the final at the Games. The 20-year-old giant, who is 6ft 6in and weighs 20st, has an offer to read law at Oxford University and was considering returning to play professional rugby.

Martyn Rooney and Conrad Williams run in the 400m against Kirani James who became the first person to win an Olympic medal for Grenada when he took gold. And Steve Lewis, competing in the pole vault, completes the Brits taking part.

The women who won gold, silver and bronze in the 100m will face each other again. Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won her second consecutive Olympic gold — the third woman to retain the 100m title.

She races Carmelita Jeter from USA, who won Olympic silver, and Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell-Brown, who won bronze.

London 2012 Olympics: Adam Gemili narrowly missed out on a place in the 100m final

What a Gem! Teen Brit Adam just misses out on final flourish

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UPDATED:

22:54 GMT, 5 August 2012

Three Britons reached the men’s 100m semi-finals and Dwain Chambers, Adam Gemili and James Dasaolu all went out.

But while Chambers will look back, not for the first time, at what might have been, and Dasaolu can be satisfied with his performance, 18-year-old Gemili can dream of what the future could hold.

It came down to three one-hundredths of a second in the end for Chambers. That was all that separated the former drugs cheat from reaching his second Olympic final, 12 years after he finished fourth in Sydney.

Just missing out: Adam Gemili came third in his semi-final but was not quick enough to make the final

Just missing out: Adam Gemili came third in his semi-final but was not quick enough to make the final

But the thing that will gall him most The knowledge his first-round time, 10.02 seconds, could just have seen him pip the silver medallist from Beijing, Richard Thompson, to a place in the most eagerly awaited 100m final in history.

It was not to be. Drawn in a lane next to Usain Bolt, Chambers drove out of the blocks well but visibly tensed up when he sensed the Jamaican begin to ease past him.

As the world record-holder floated away, the 34-year-old’s neck muscles became tauter and he slipped back to fourth, his knee lift looking more and more strained. ‘I ran out of petrol,’ he said.

There was not quite redemption for Chambers on the track after serving a two-year drugs ban and getting a second chance to savour the Olympic experience through the courts.

Going close: Gemili finished behinds Yohan Blake

Going close: Gemili finished behinds Yohan Blake

OH SO CLOSE…

There may have been no British representative in last night’s 100 metres final — but our sprinters came mighty close.

Dwain Chambers and Adam Gemili were two of the three fastest not to make the final. Sprint sensation Gemili, 18, ran 10.06sec, just outside his personal best.

Chambers — running next to Usain Bolt in the second semi-final — clocked 10.05sec and just missed out to Trinidad and Tobago’s Keston Bledman.

But there was a moment he will cherish, as, before his heat, he was warmly cheered by the British crowd.

‘I’m gutted that I didn’t make the final, but we can’t have it all,’ he said. ‘It was worth it to soak up the atmosphere. I loved every moment.’

Gemili, too, came close to a place in the final, clocking 10.06 as he powered to third place in his semi-final. But his whole demeanour could not have been more different to that of Chambers, the experienced campaigner.

This is all new to the teenager from Dartford, Kent, the world junior 100m champion.

Gemili started training full-time only
in January and probably thought he would be running up hills as part of
Dagenham and Redbridge’s pre-season programme instead of lining up in
the Olympic Stadium.

End of the dream: Dwain Chambers missed out on a place in the final

End of the dream: Dwain Chambers missed out on a place in the final

Perhaps it was no coincidence that the best phase of his race was the last 20 metres or so.

As the athletes prepared to walk on to the track, Gemili had the disorientated look of someone asking for directions. When the camera panned to him on the start line, in a race boasting Yohan Blake and Tyson Gay, he smiled and looked embarrassed.

There was nothing wrong with that. The bravado and showboating of a 100m sprinter will come, if Gemili wants it. His promise is in the natural, unguarded way he runs.

Disappointment: James Dasaolu missed out on a place in the final

Disappointment: James Dasaolu missed out on a place in the final

His style isn’t complicated or over-thought. He just does it. This experience will only help him build the consistency needed to perform over three rounds in a major championship.

‘It is an amazing experience to make the semi-finals,’ he said. ‘I am disappointed to come third but I lost to two of the best athletes in the world.’ There is no shame in that.

No shame, either, for Dasaolu, the 25-year-old from Croydon who has suffered hamstring, calf and groin injuries over the past Olympic cycle.

He was in the same race as Asafa Powell, whom he has called his ‘hero’ in the past, and finished seventh, tying up a little at the end to clock 10.18.

It was, however, the fastest Olympic semi-final of all time. There is still plenty of time for Dasaolu too.

London 2012 Olympics: Rebecca Adlington blazes trail in 880m freestyle

Adlington blazes trail to 800m freestyle final as British star fires warning

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UPDATED:

11:20 GMT, 2 August 2012

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MEDALS TABLE

Rebecca Adlington produced the fifth fastest 800 metres freestyle in the world this year as she sent out an ominous warning to her rivals.

The 23-year-old is seeking to become the first Briton to successfully defend an Olympic title and her time of eight minutes 21.78 seconds has been bettered only by herself and American 15-year-old Katie Ledecky this year.

The Nova Centurion swimmer has swum four of the five top times in 2012 but anyone who thinks gold is a mere formality should take heed of Lotte Friis, just nine hundredths of a second behind.

Friis was second behind Adlington when the Briton triumphed in a final-length shootout at last year's World Championships as she wrested the world crown from the Dane.

Catch me if you can: Rebecca Adlington powered into the 800m freestyle final

Catch me if you can: Rebecca Adlington powered into the 800m freestyle final

Friis, who was locked out of the medals as Adlington took bronze in the 400m earlier this week, has said she 'hopes to spoil the party' and she is a real threat to Adlington's ambitions.

Ledecky announced herself on the world stage in June when she won the United States trials in 8:19.78, the third fastest time in the world this year and one bettered only by Adlington on two occasions.

This time the teenager touched in 8:23.84 to qualify third fastest.

She said: 'It was my first Olympic race, so I went in with a lot of adrenalin and a few nerves, but it carried me through the first 400m and I finished with a solid time.

Hard to beat: Adlington was the fastest qualifier for the 800m freestyle final

Hard to beat: Adlington was the fastest qualifier for the 800m freestyle final

'I managed to get some sleep last night. I felt pretty good, I just wanted to set the tone for the remaining two heats and post a fast time.

'I was a little nervous, that was to be expected though.'

City of Sheffield swimmer Eleanor Faulkner was 22nd in 8:38.00 and said: 'It was a hard tough swim, a great experience, I did as best as I possibly could but my time wasn't there today.

'It's been great, the crowds have been amazing. My first international and I am happy with everything, it's been a great experience and I definitely want to come back for more, 2016 hopefully.

'It's been a long wait, yesterday was my first swim in the relay and went out there and got the team into the final. Didn't swim in the evening because I wanted to concentrate on the race today and it didn't go my way.'

See you tomorrow: Adlington will be back on Friday for the 800m freestyle final

See you tomorrow: Adlington will be back on Friday for the 800m freestyle final

Adam Brown failed to make it through the heats of the 50m freestyle. As in the 100m freestyle, the 23-year-old was the only British representative and his 22.39 was only good enough for 20th.

Brown said: 'I thought the swim itself was going really well but I think I glided into the finish which cost me a few tenths and in the 50 a few tenths is the difference between making the semi-final or not.

'I'm a bit gutted, I would have liked to have gone faster but it's right around what my season's best is so I can't really complain in front of a massive crowd all cheering for me.'

On a more positive note, Brown admitted Michael Jamieson's silver medal on Wednesday night had been inspirational.

'Definitely,' he said. 'It's been a while since the lads got a medal so silver medal, Olympic Games in front of a home crowd, he's a bit of a legend now. He's a good guy and he definitely deserves it.'

George Bovell of Trinidad was quickest in 21.77 ahead of world record holder and world champion Cesar Cielo.

Also through was Anthony Ervin, the 31-year-old who left the sport in 2003 before returning after an eight-year hiatus from competition.

The American was joint champion with team-mate Gary Hall Jnr in this event in Sydney as well as silver medallist in the 4x100m freestyle relay.

He walked away from the sport, setting out on a long and winding road that saw him live a nomadic lifestyle, join a rock band – the Weapons of Mass Destruction – and sell his gold medal to raise money for victims of the 2004 tsunami as well as lose his silver along the way somewhere.

Inspired to return to the pool after helping a friend teach children to swim, Ervin qualified for the splash and dash at the American trials in June.

He went through in fourth in 21.83 while James Magnussen returned hours after being touched out of the 100m freestyle by one one hundredth of a second by Nathan Adrian.

It has not been the championships the Australian had hoped for after he entered London with realistic ambitions of at least two gold medals.

However, the Aussie sprint relay squad – also known as the Weapons of Mass Destruction – finished fourth before Wednesday's silver, despite being red-hot favourite.

London 2012 Olympics: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning in to women"s pairs final

British pair send message to rivals with Olympic record to reach rowing final

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UPDATED:

09:06 GMT, 28 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Helen Glover and Heather Stanning confirmed their status as gold medal favourites as they stormed into the final of the women's pair in a new Olympic record time.

Roared on by a packed crowd at Eton Dorney, Glover and Stanning won the opening heat of the Olympic regatta in a time of six minutes and 57.29 seconds, beating the previous best by over four seconds.

Glover and Stanning controlled the race from the outset, leading the field by a half a length at the 500 metre time-check before pulling smoothly clear to beat the United States crew by a length.

Easy does it: Great Britain's Heather Stanning (right) and Helen Glover set a new Olympic record

Easy does it: Great Britain's Heather Stanning (right) and Helen Glover set a new Olympic record

The defending Olympic champions Romania came a surprise third and will have to negotiate the repechages to reach Wednesday's final.

Glover and Stanning reacted to being pipped into silver place at the 2011 world championships by dominating the women's pair this year, winning gold at all three of this summer's World Cup regattas.

If they can continue that run of success into Wednesday's final they will become Britain's first ever female Olympic rowing champions.

Here we go: Helen Glover gets ready to compete in the women's pair at Eton Dorney

Here we go: Helen Glover gets ready to compete in the women's pair at Eton Dorney

Saturday's performance sent out a powerful message of intent to the rest of the field, with heat two winners Australia coming home in a time four seconds slower than the British crew.

New Zealand, who beat Glover and Stanning by eight hundredths of a second to win the world championships last year, trailed home unconvincingly behind the Australians.

Dani Pedrosa pips Jorge Lorenzo and Hector Barbera to pole at Mugello MotoGP

Pedrosa pips Lorenzo and Barbera to pole at Mugello MotoGP

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UPDATED:

14:49 GMT, 14 July 2012

A track record lap earned pole position for Dani Pedrosa for the MotoGP Gran Premio D'Italia at Mugello.

The Spaniard powered his Repsol Honda around the three-and-a-quarter-mile circuit in one minute 47.284 seconds in the closing seconds of the session to pip compatriots Jorge Lorenzo and Hector Barbera to top spot.

Yamaha's Lorenzo had led the standings until that point but a mechanical problem which caused his bike to lose power prevented him from completing his final flying lap.

The man to beat: Pedrosa

The man to beat: Pedrosa

Barbera, riding for Pramac Racing, claimed his first front row grid position since stepping up to MotoGP in 2010.

American Nicky Hayden (Ducati) edged out Pedrosa's Australian team-mate Casey Stoner for fourth place while Monster Yamaha pair Cal Crutchlow and Andrea Dovizioso were separated by just two hundredths of a second in the battle for sixth.

The Briton won the battle despite a crash, Italian Dovizioso narrowly avoiding the same fate late on while pushing for a place on the second row.

Stefan Bradl (Honda) is eighth ahead of Ben Spies, who crashed his Yamaha in the same spot as Crutchlow on turn 12. Valentino Rossi could only manage 10th place for Ducati.

London 2012 Olympics: Dai Greene in top form ahead of Games

Greene for gold! Runner-up Dai sure he will peak in London

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UPDATED:

22:39 GMT, 6 July 2012

The odds against Dai Greene repeating his triumph at last year’s world championships on the Olympic stage in London are shortening.

In Paris on Friday night he ran the fastest 400 metres hurdles time of his life — 47.84sec — and was only two hundredths of a second off Kriss Akabusi’s British record. He was beaten but only by the year’s fastest time of 47.78, run by Javier Culson of Puerto Rico.

Ten months ago, Greene added the world title to the European gold won in Barcelona in 2010. The trajectory looked perfect for London and he was up there with Jessica Ennis and Mo Farah as one who the British imagined they would be acclaiming on the podium come August.

Timing his run: Greene impressed in Paris but failed to stop Javier Culson

Timing his run: Greene impressed in Paris but failed to stop Javier Culson

Instead this summer his form has been as uninspiring as the weather.
Greene was ranked at 16th in the world going into last night’s race after running only two international races all year.

The Welshman did not come close to last year’s times in either race and missed another chance when he went down with a virus on the morning of the recent Diamond League race in Rome.

So it has been a season far removed from what he must have imagined when he sat down last autumn with his coach Malcolm Arnold to plan his path to the top of the podium in London.

But he remains confident it can all come good in the end.

‘I am confident because I train really hard,’ he said. ‘I know I have done everything I can for the race. That’s the way it should be for an athlete. I’m just motivated by trying to win the major medals.’

Runner up: Culson is congratulated by Greene

Runner up: Culson is congratulated by Greene

Certainly he has not felt burdened by the pressure building on him into the Olympic season. ‘It’s not so much the pressure. I don’t really feel that side of things. It comes down to the training,’ he said. If I stay injury-free I’ll be happy with myself.

‘It’s not a long time to go, but in my world there’s a lot of training sessions to come. And if I was to get injured in the next two or three weeks it would pretty much spoil my dream.

‘I aspire to be better than I was last year. I do still think I can succeed. I’ve done really well the last couple of seasons at the majors and I’d like to think I can use that experience and draw on it.

Race to the line: Culson gets ahead of Greene

Race to the line: Culson gets ahead of Greene

‘Hopefully, with a home crowd as well, it will be that much more enjoyable.’

Hopefully he can also get it right in the final four weeks before he must race in London. A lot of training sessions, to be sure, but only one more race and that is one week away at Crystal Palace. So this remains a race against time.

‘I taper far more for the majors than I do for these sort of competitions.

‘No one can tell you who won this race last year. They are quickly forgotten. I realised that a couple of years ago.

‘I was doing all right but I realised it didn’t really matter. No matter how fast I was running outside the majors it didn’t mean anything until you actually won the medals,’ he said.

‘When you imagine yourself training in the winter and you think, “Oh, this is hard work, I’ve got to get on with this”, you don’t think, ‘Oh, I can’t wait to win in Lausanne or wherever”. You think, “I want to win in London at the Olympics”.

On top of the world: Greene goes into the Olympics as world Champion

On top of the world: Greene goes into the Olympics as world Champion

‘That’s what gets you through. That’s your main aim. Everything else is just a stepping stone on the way.’

When he came to Paris his best time this year was 48.96sec, set in his first race at Rabat in May.

Greene was second there and fourth in his only other international race in Oslo, where he was marginally slower.

He was slower still at the British trials but there the only concern was winning. He did so, but it is his only victory this year.

Meanwhile, Barbara Parker was picked to double up in the 5,000m and steeplechase when Britain announced its Olympic team on Tuesday but she was well off her best in the steeplechase last night, coming home 13 seconds off the British record she set last month. She finished eighth.

Yohan Blake beats Usain Bolt in Jamaica Olympic trials

Blake stuns Bolt to win Jamaican Olympic trials with fastest time of 2012

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UPDATED:

19:03 GMT, 30 June 2012

Usain Bolt may be the world's fastest man but he is no longer the best in Jamaica.

And if he does not sort out his start in the next five weeks, the Olympic gold medal may be beyond his grasp.

Bolt was beaten by his training
partner and rival, Yohan Blake, in the 100metres at the Jamaican Olympic
trials, the first time they have lined up together in competition since
Blake took Bolt's world title in Daegu last year.

SCROLL DOWN TO WATCH THE RACE

Bolt from the blue: Blake (left) crosses the finish line to win in Kingston

Bolt from the blue: Blake (left) crosses the finish line to win in Kingston

On that occasion Bolt was disqualified for a false start. But this time Blake beat him fair and square.

He was spectacularly quick off his
blocks at the National Stadium in Kingston, he was always ahead and he
won in 9.75sec, the year's fastest time. It makes him the fourth fastest
man of all time.

Bolt was so far off the pace that he
barely beat former world record holder Asafa Powell for second place,
overtaking him only in the last stride to stop the clock at 9.86sec, two
hundredths ahead.

All three men are picked
automatically for the 100m in London, a race once regarded as a Bolt
coronation but now being hyped as a potentially epic battle.

World champion: Blake heads to London having run the fastest time in the world this year

World champion: Blake heads to London having run the fastest time in the world this year

Jubilant Blake said: 'It's awesome.
No pressure at all. I'm the world champion and now I'm the national
champion of Jamaica. I go into the Olympics like this.'

Blake shares coach Glenn Mills and training sessions with Bolt but he has avoided him in races this year.

Those who have paid 725 to see the Olympic 100m final are guaranteed their money's worth.

The result means that six men – three Jamaicans, two Americans and one Trinidadian – have run 9.86sec or faster this year.

'Could be the best race ever,' four-time Olympic medallist Ato Bolden tweeted.

Well beaten: Bolt congratulates Blake after the race

Well beaten: Bolt congratulates Blake after the race

Third: Asafa Powell fell away after a blistering start

Third: Asafa Powell fell away after a blistering start

Bolt had problems with his starts in both semi-finals and final.

'I had trouble getting out but I kept feeling like I can't give up. I had to ignore it,' he said.

His long legs reduce the number of
strides he needs to cover 100 metres to 41 – three fewer than others –
but they take a lot of unwinding from the blocks and it is a problem he
has struggled with all summer.

Mills dismissed the setback even
though the clock is running with just five weeks to go until the first
round of heats in London.

'Bolt is a tough cookie and I think he will survive,' he said. 'We are right where we want to be going into London.'

National record: Fraser (centre) won the women's final

National record: Fraser (centre) won the women's final

History tells us that, when Bolt gets it right, he is utterly devastating. He won Olympic gold in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay at the 2008 Games in Beijing, had held the previous fastest time in the world this year after clocking 9.76 in Rome last month and still holds the world record, a jaw-dropping 9.58 set three years ago.

Dwain Chambers, like the other British sprinters in Helsinki for the European Championships, was astonished by the news from Kingston, where even fourth-placed Michael Frater clocked 9.94.

'You just have to forget about it. Those guys are on another planet,' said Chambers.

asdg

While the Jamaican trio and their American rivals Justin Gatlin and Tyson Gay and Trinidadian powerhouse Keston Bledman continue to stop the clock in the high nines, Britain's best are struggling to get near 10 seconds.

British No 1 Adam Gemili has broken the tape at 10.08 this season but Chambers's 2012 best is a relatively pedestrian 10.25, set in Birmingham last week.

Michael Johnson helps out Williams F1 pit crew

Williams job is the pits for Johnson as Olympic legend helps out mechanics

Dressed in a shirt bearing the logos of his sports training company and Williams, you could easily be forgiven Michael Johnson's tie up with the Formula One team is just another corporate branding exercise.

Rubens looks Stateside

Veteran driver Rubens Barrichello, dropped by Williams in favour of Brazilian countryman Bruno Senna, could move to IndyCar after 19 seasons in Formula One after agreeing a two-day test with KV Racing.

But the Olympic legend and his team of sports boffins have devised a training programme for a bunch of mechanics designed to shave valuable hundredths of a second off pit-stop times.

When asked how long this arrangement will run Johnson is forceful.

'We'll be going until it gets done,' he says. 'Until it gets done.'

Branching out: Olympic 200m and 400m gold medallist Michael Johnson

Branching out: Olympic 200m and 400m gold medallist Michael Johnson

Enough to strike fear into the toughest mechanic, as Ben Howard, who has spent three years removing the front left wheel of a Williams as fast as he is able, explains.

'Everybody was excited, but a little bit apprehensive as well. Michael trains top-level sportspeople but we're not professional athletes so there was some nervousness as to what he might make us do!'

Johnson and his team have identified three areas where they feel they help Williams move them up from seventh in the pit-stop rankings, 1.1 seconds down on the average time set by 2011 table toppers Red Bull.

Left behind: Williams were well below Red Bull in average pit-stop length in 2011

Left behind: Williams were well below Red Bull in average pit-stop length in 2011

Programmes to improve overall fitness and sensory ability will be implemented, but it is the area of biomechanics, the physics of sport, where Johnson feels the biggest gains can be made.

'There is a lot of movement going on by all three people (changing each wheel),' says Johnson. 'So what we do is try and make that movement more efficient and quicker.'