Tag Archives: humanitarian

Rory McIlroy plans humanitarian mission to Haiti

McIlroy plans humanitarian mission to Haiti during build-up to Masters

By
Graeme Yorke

PUBLISHED:

15:14 GMT, 25 March 2013

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UPDATED:

15:14 GMT, 25 March 2013

Rory McIlroy will spend part of his week before the Masters on a humanitarian mission in Haiti.

McIlroy says he will meet with children and their families April 1 and 2 to see how their lives have changed since the 2010 earthquake that ravaged the country. McIlroy also made a trip to Haiti before going to the U.S. Open in 2011. He won his first major at Congressional with a record score.

Heading back: McIlroy will return to Haiti, where he spent time in 2011

Heading back: McIlroy will return to Haiti, where he spent time in 2011 following the disastrous earthquake

Laying low: McIlroy has been spending time with his girlfriend Caroline Wozniacki in Florida

Laying low: McIlroy has been spending time with his girlfriend Caroline Wozniacki in Florida

Laying low: McIlroy has been spending time with his girlfriend Caroline Wozniacki in Florida

McIlroy is an Ireland ambassador to UNICEF and has geared his own charity work toward children.

The 23-year-old from Northern Ireland says he is excited to return. He calls Haiti an inspiring and humbling country where children face daily struggles. McIlroy says he hopes his presence can create international awareness of the plight Haitian children are facing.

Out on the range: McIlroy rocked up at a local course to hit some ball on the driving range

Out on the range: McIlroy recently rocked up at a local course in Miami to hit some ball on the driving range

Out on the range: McIlroy rocked up at a local course to hit some ball on the driving range

Oscar Pistorius golfing at Dunhill Links: Sprinter terrified by dancing

Gold-winning sprinter Pistorius picks up the clubs and reveals dancing terror

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UPDATED:

17:54 GMT, 3 October 2012

Oscar Pistorius said the most petrifying three minutes of his life had nothing to do with the Olympics or Paralympics.

The 25-year-old amputee sprinter, who has switched to golf in Scotland this week as one of the celebrities at the Dunhill Links Championship pro-am, said: 'I had to do a 'Dancing with the Stars' thing last year in Italy.

'I would like to have two left feet, but I have no feet at all! That for me was by far the most nerve-wracking thing I've ever done.

Challenges: Oscar Pistorius revealed his dancing ordeal

Challenges: Oscar Pistorius revealed his dancing ordeal

'It was 157 seconds of absolute torture – but a lot of fun.'

Pistorius partners Paul McGinley at Carnoustie on Thursday alongside Colin Montgomerie and Sir Steve Redgrave and has warned them not to expect too much.

'My golf is rubbish at the moment and I've got quite a dodgy game as it is. Yesterday I shot 88 or 89 and today (in his final practice round) I shot closer to triple digits.'

Building: Pistorius is trying to improve his golf game

Building: Pistorius is trying to improve his golf game

Pistorius, who had a double below-the-knee amputation as a baby after being born without a fibula in either leg, was bought his first set of clubs as a teenager, but running soon took over his life.

He competed in the London Olympics in both the 400metres and 4x400m relay and then won two golds at the Paralympics to take his career total to six.

The man known as 'Blade Runner' is aiming for the 2016 Games in Rio and then possibly one more year of competition after that.

One more shot: Pistorius wants to compete in Rio

One more shot: Pistorius wants to compete in Rio

He added: 'I'll be 30 then, so it's fairly early for a sprinter, but I've been running since I was 17 and internationally since 2007.

'It's a very demanding career and I would like to get involved in other aspects of my life, in humanitarian work and family life.'

Muhammad Ali receives Liberty Medal

Ali receives Liberty Medal in Philadelphia for lifetime role as humanitarian fighter

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UPDATED:

10:46 GMT, 14 September 2012

Muhammad Ali received another title for his legendary collection on Thursday when he was honoured with a Liberty Medal for his role as a humanitarian fighter.

The boxing legend took centre stage at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia to receive the award for his longtime role outside the ring as a fighter for humanitarian causes, civil rights and religious freedom.

The three-time world heavyweight champion received an honour that his wife, Lonnie Ali, called 'overwhelming'.

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Family affair: Ali receives the award from his daughter Laila in a ceremony which the legendary fighter's family describe as 'overwhelming'

Family affair: Ali receives the award from his daughter Laila in a ceremony which the legendary fighter's family described as 'overwhelming'

She said: 'It is especially humbling for Muhammad, who has said on many occasions, “All I did was to stand up for what I believe”.'

70-year-old Ali, who has battled Parkinson's disease for three decades, stood with assistance to receive the medal from his daughter Laila Ali.

He looked down at his medal for several moments and then waved to the crowd. The award comes with a $100,000 cash prize.

Ali was born Cassius Clay but changed his name after converting to Islam in the 1960s. He refused to serve in the Vietnam War because of his religious beliefs and was stripped of his heavyweight crown in 1967.

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling later cleared him of a draft evasion conviction, and he regained the boxing title in 1974 and again 1978.

Legend: The boxing icon received the award from his daughter Laila for his lifetime role as a fighter for humanitarian causes

Legend: The boxing icon received the award from his daughter Laila for his lifetime role as a fighter for humanitarian causes

Legend: The boxing icon received the award from his daughter Laila for his lifetime role as a fighter for humanitarian causes

One of his most famous fights took place in Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where he battled George Foreman in the 'Rumble in the Jungle' in 1974.

At the ceremony, retired NBA star Dikembe Mutombo recalled the impression Ali's visit made on him as an 8-year-old growing up in that country.

'He changed my life,' said Mutombo, who also is a trustee of the Constitution Center. 'I can never forget how inspired I was to see a black athlete receive such respect and admiration.

'He changed how the people of Zaire saw themselves, and in turn how the world saw them.'

Since hanging up his gloves in 1981, Ali has traveled extensively on international charitable missions and devoted his time to social causes.

Ali received the nation's highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in 2005. He also has established the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Research Center in Phoenix and a namesake educational and cultural institute in his hometown, Louisville, Ky.

The National Constitution Center, which
opened in 2003, is dedicated to increasing public understanding of the
Constitution and the ideas and values it represents.

One of a kind: Ali's family, including his wife Lonnie (second left) and sister-in-law Marilyn Williams (right) said the icon received the award despite 'standing up for what he believes in'

One of a kind: Ali's family, including his wife Lonnie (second left) and sister-in-law Marilyn Williams (right) said the icon received the award despite 'standing up for what he believes in'

Another title for the collection: Ali, who has been battling Parkinson's disease for three decades, did not speak at the award ceremony

Another title for the collection: Ali, who has been battling Parkinson's disease for three decades, did not speak at the award ceremony

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