Tag Archives: hawk

Hawk-eye awarded Premier League contract for goalline technology – Exclusive

EXCLUSIVE: Hawk-eye awarded Premier League contract for goal-line technology from next season

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Net gains: John Terry makes a controversial clearance in England's 1-0 win over Ukraine at Euro 2012

FA General Secretary Alex Horne told BBC Sport earlier this week: ‘I always thought it was an ideal piece of technology to allow into the game. The (Premier League) club meeting is on Thursday so I'm expecting it to go through at that meeting.’

‘There are occasions (when GLT is needed) and we've seen them here at Wembley, we've seen them in World Cups, we've seen them 11 or 12 times in the Premier League this season alone.

Over Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final

Over Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final

Support: FA secretary Alex Horne is behind the idea of goal-line technology

Support: FA secretary Alex Horne is behind the idea of goal-line technology

‘So technology that says 'yes, the ball has crossed the line' and lets the referee know makes an awful lot of sense to me.

‘Particularly where it's a knock-out situation, incorrect decisions have less opportunity to even themselves out over a season.’

The Premier League are likely to ‘centrally fund’ GLT for its member clubs and the FA will pay for cameras to be installed at Wembley.

FIFA tell goal-line technology companies to take insurance for wrong decisions

Don't blame us if it doesn't work properly! FIFA demand goal-line technology firms take out insurance if it goes wrong

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UPDATED:

10:23 GMT, 23 October 2012

FIFA have ordered goal-line
technology companies to take out insurance cover so they won't face costly lawsuits if they fail to spot a goal or players and officials are injured by their equipment.

Hawk-Eye and GoalRef have received
official authorisation to install their systems worldwide after being
granted licences by FIFA.

The technology is likely be introduced to the Barclays Premier League for the start of next season.

But the companies have had to provide
insurance so that if the systems fail – either failing to spot the ball
has crossed the line or registering wrongly that the ball was over the
line – they are covered if legal action is launched against them.

Over the line: Two technology companies have signed agreements with FIFA

Over the line: Two technology companies have signed agreements with FIFA

Over the line: Two technology companies have signed agreements with FIFA

It also covers any claims if a player or official says they have been injured by the equipment.

The
FIFA rules on insurance for goal-line technology state: 'This policy
should provide sufficient insurance coverage for claims being raised by
third parties due to the licensee's activities or omissions (failure to
act) as well as claims being raised due to potentially faulty
(manufactured) products.

'A
claim is deemed as a demand for compensation of bodily injury, property
damage and pure financial loss. The policy shall be concluded with a
well-respected and reputable national or international insurance
company.'

The granting of
the licences means the systems can now be installed in stadiums, after
which they will undergo a final inspection by an independent test
institute before being allowed to function.

The first competitive tournament using the systems is expected to be FIFA's Club World Cup in Japan in December.

Goal-line technology has moved another
small step closer after the two providers, GoalRef and Hawk-Eye, signed
licence agreements with FIFA.

The move means both companies, who
have been competing for more than a year for the right to be considered,
now have authorisation to install and use their systems across the
globe.

GOALREF

A joint Danish-German system, GoalRef uses magnetic fields to detect
whether the ball has crossed the line. Three magnetic strips are placed
inside the outer lining of the ball, between the bladder and the outer
casing, and when the ball crosses the line these are detected by sensors
inside the goalposts and crossbar.

The sensors send out electronic waves which are disrupted when the ball
crosses the line, and a computer then sends a message to the match
officials' watch receivers in less than a second.

Installation costs should be lower than Hawk-Eye but still significant.
There remains possible issues over deals with manufacturers to allow the
magnetic strips inside their balls, but GoalRef have already been in
contact with the manufacturers.

HAWK-EYE

Camera-based system developed by a British company which
was bought last year by Sony. Used by tennis and cricket.

Six or seven high-speed cameras at both ends of the stadium, mounted
on the roof, track the ball in flight and a computer system calculates
exactly where the ball is on the pitch, sending an electronic message to
a watch-like receiver worn by the match officials when it crosses the
line.

The only issue is whether the Hawk-Eye cameras would work in the very
rare instance of the ball being completely covered by the keeper's
body.

FIFA have insisted that the pictures will not be shown on TV or
stadium screens after any controversial incident, with only the
officials being alerted whether the ball crossed the line.

The systems are
set to be trialled at the Club World Cup in December before being
introduced in the Barclays Premier League next season.

Both GoalRef and Hawk-Eye have been put
through rigorous laboratory and field tests since being selected as the
final two by football's governing body.

Each
system is required to send an immediate message to a watch worn by the
match officials within a second of the ball crossing the line.

The
tests included exposing the equipment and watches to extreme heat and
cold, as well as humidity and heavy rain. Experiments also took place
during live matches including England's match against Belgium on June 2.

The
Hawk-Eye system – developed by a British company now owned by Sony – is
based on cameras and GoalRef, a Danish-German development, uses
magnetic fields.

In a statement on FIFA's website, they
said: 'In order to become a FIFA licensee, both companies also had to
meet a range of application requirements such as compliance with the
code of conduct of the WFSGI (World Federation of the Sporting Goods
Industry), as well as fulfilling the ISO 9001 standard to demonstrate
fitness for business.'

FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke
said earler this year that they intended to also bring goal-line
technology in for next year's Confederations Cup and the 2014 World Cup
in Brazil.

Controversy: The issue was once again highlighted at Euro 2012 during England's match with hosts Ukraine when John Terry spectacularly hooked a ball clear from just behind the line.

Controversy: The issue was once again highlighted at Euro 2012 during England's match with hosts Ukraine when John Terry spectacularly hooked a ball clear from just behind the line.

The
statement added: 'Once a system has been installed in a stadium, the
system undergoes a final inspection to check its functionality. This is
carried out by an independent test institute, and the results of this
so-called 'final installation test' must be successful.

'Only a positive final installation
test qualifies a system to be used in official matches. When this
occurs, the system is awarded the FIFA QUALITY PRO mark.

Valcke has said FIFA would pay for the systems – around $250,000 per stadium – and leave them in place in the stadiums.

FA
general secretary Alex Horne also said at the time: 'We believe that it
is a great day for football. From an English perspective today is a
hugely important day, it is a cause we have had on our agenda for a
number of years.

'This is about having the right technology helping the referee in a relatively rare occurrence – the scoring of a goal.'

Meanwhile, German company Cairos developing a third system are applying to be approved by the International FA Board at their meeting in Scotland in March.

HOW OTHER SPORTS HAVE LED THE WAY

CRICKET
The third umpire was first introduced in international cricket 20 years
ago, primarily for on-field umpires to call for assistance for run-out
and stumping decisions and whether catches had carried to fielders. Over
the years the remit has been expanded as technologies have advanced
with third umpires now having access to super-slow motion, infrared
imaging, stump microphones and the predictive ball-tracking 'Hawk-Eye',
which can rule on lbws. Players can now challenge umpires' decisions by
calling for a TV review.

TENNIS
Wimbledon watchers will remember the bleeps of 'Cyclops', the infrared
system which was used to detect whether serves were in or out and was
introduced at the championships in 1980. These days the showpiece
matches utilise Hawk-Eye, which tracks the ball all over the court. If a
player disagrees with a line judge's call, they can call for a Hawk-Eye
review and are allowed two incorrect challenges per set.

Leading the way: The Hawk-Eye system is already in use in tennis

Leading the way: The Hawk-Eye system is already in use in tennis

RUGBY LEAGUE
The video referee came into rugby league with the launch of Super League
in 1996 and has become part of the competition's fabric, although it is
still only used in live TV matches for cost reasons.

The system has been refined over the years but the video referee can
rule on a wide range of decisions when called upon by the referee, with
the exception of the forward pass, for which camera angles can be
deceptive. The system is also used in televised Challenge Cup ties,
Australia's NRL and selected international fixtures.

RUGBY UNION
The 15-man code paved the way for the introduction of the Television
Match Official in 2001. They are now regularly used at the top level but
their scope remains limited with referees only able to call for
assistance in acts of scoring. That could change later this year with
the International Rugby Board having approved trials for reviews on
other matters within the field of play.

Since last season the TMO has been used in all English Premiership games, not just those being televised.

AMERICAN FOOTBALL
The NFL introduced a replay system in 1986 with an extra official used
to review certain plays. It was dropped in 1992 amid general feeling it
had done little to improve the game but a new method of coaches'
challenges was brought in seven years later.

When a challenge is made in the NFL, it is the on-field referee
himself who will watch replays, under a hood, on the sidelines. He must
see clear evidence of an error and has 60 seconds to make a decision.
Coaches are allowed to challenge two decisions per game but if both are
successful are allowed a third. If a challenge is unsuccessful, the team
is charged with a timeout. Challenges cannot be made in the final two
minutes of each half, or overtime, but all plays are observed by an
additional TV official.

Goal-line technology set to be introduced

Goal-line technology set for green light in historic day for football

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UPDATED:

08:46 GMT, 5 July 2012

The long wait for goal-line technology will finally reach its conclusion when football's law-makers meet to approve two systems.

The International FA Board (IFAB) are set to give the go ahead to both the Hawk-Eye and the GoalRef systems, which will give the green light to the Premier League and Football Association introducing the technology into their competitions.

A comprehensive series of tests have been carried out on the systems by Swiss scientists and IFAB sources have confirmed that both Hawk-Eye and GoalRef will be deemed to have passed the tests satisfactorily.

Decisions, decisions: Sepp Blatter poses ahead of the IFAB meeting

Decisions, decisions: Sepp Blatter poses ahead of the IFAB meeting

Chelsea manager Roberto di Matteo said a system was needed as soon as possible.

Di Matteo said: 'We see every season, every big tournament, we need it because there are some crucial moments within those games where, with a bit of technology, you could find the right solution.'

There will still be a delay before either system can be used in competitive football, however – each will need to be licensed, installed and then tested in every venue to make sure it is working properly.

The IFAB, who are meeting in Zurich, will also insist the technology is used only as an aid to referees to make a decision, rather than being the deciding factor in whether the ball has crossed the line.

It means referees can still decide not to award a goal based on what they see even if the systems are indicating the ball has crossed the line.

FIFA's president Sepp Blatter is now a firm supporter of goal-line technology, having changed his mind after Frank Lampard's disallowed goal for England against Germany in the 2010 World Cup.

Moving the goalposts: Blatter's mind was changed following Frank Lampard's strike in the 2010 World Cup

Moving the goalposts: Blatter's mind was changed following Frank Lampard's strike in the 2010 World Cup

The clamour increased last month after Ukraine's disallowed goal against England and has also served to sweep aside any lingering doubts over the systems' margins of error.

However, FIFA are insistent that, initially at least, the technology's signal of a goal should only be transmitted to the match officials and not to the crowd or TV audience.

The IFAB is made up of FIFA, who have four votes, and the four home nations, who have one vote each. Any law change needs at least six votes.

The body will also consider whether the UEFA experiment with extra officials has been a success and should be continued, but UEFA president Michel Platini will not be going to Zurich to argue the case in person.

The England v Ukraine incident, which saw John Terry hook the ball back into play when it was already across the line, could hardly have fallen worse for Platini.

No goal was awarded despite the extra official being no more than 10 yards away and staring straight along the line.

That suited Blatter perfectly, who opposes the extra two officials on the grounds that in many countries there are not a sufficient number of referees.

They even themselves out: John Terry was too late to stop Marko Devic's shot crossing the line - but the goal was not given

They even themselves out: John Terry was too late to stop Marko Devic's shot crossing the line – but the goal was not given

The tests on the technology were carried out by the EMPA – the Swiss Federal Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology – and the results discussed by IFAB members at a meeting earlier this month.

The Hawk-Eye system – developed by a British company now owned by Sony – is based on cameras and GoalRef, a Danish-German development, uses magnetic fields.

Each system is required to send an immediate message to a watch worn by the match officials within a second of the ball crossing the line.

The tests included exposing the equipment and watches to extreme heat and cold, as well as humidity and heavy rain. Experiments also took place during live matches including England's match against Belgium on June 2.

FIFA's Club World Cup in Japan in December is likely to be the first competition where the technology is used.

The IFAB are also due to rule on whether special headscarves can be worn during matches after pressure from some Muslim countries.

The body will hear a report from FIFA's medical committee which warns that headscarves could in some cases be a danger to players.

Hawk-Eye and GoalRef to get green light with IFAB set to approve goal-line technology

IFAB set to approve goal-line technology with Hawk-Eye and GoalRef to get green light

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UPDATED:

17:34 GMT, 4 July 2012

The long wait for goal-line technology will finally reach its conclusion when football's law-makers meet to approve two systems.

The International FA Board (IFAB) are set to give the go ahead to both the Hawk-Eye and the GoalRef systems, which will give the green light to the Premier League and Football Association introducing the technology into their competitions.

A comprehensive series of tests have been carried out on the systems by Swiss scientists and IFAB sources have confirmed that both Hawk-Eye and GoalRef will be deemed to have passed the tests satisfactorily.

Decisions, decisions: Sepp Blatter poses ahead of the IFAB meeting

Decisions, decisions: Sepp Blatter poses ahead of the IFAB meeting

Chelsea manager Roberto di Matteo said a system was needed as soon as possible.

Di Matteo said: 'We see every season, every big tournament, we need it because there are some crucial moments within those games where, with a bit of technology, you could find the right solution.'

There will still be a delay before either system can be used in competitive football, however – each will need to be licensed, installed and then tested in every venue to make sure it is working properly.

The IFAB, who are meeting in Zurich, will also insist the technology is used only as an aid to referees to make a decision, rather than being the deciding factor in whether the ball has crossed the line.

It means referees can still decide not to award a goal based on what they see even if the systems are indicating the ball has crossed the line.

FIFA's president Sepp Blatter is now a firm supporter of goal-line technology, having changed his mind after Frank Lampard's disallowed goal for England against Germany in the 2010 World Cup.

Moving the goalposts: Blatter's mind was changed following Frank Lampard's strike in the 2010 World Cup

Moving the goalposts: Blatter's mind was changed following Frank Lampard's strike in the 2010 World Cup

The clamour increased last month after Ukraine's disallowed goal against England and has also served to sweep aside any lingering doubts over the systems' margins of error.

However, FIFA are insistent that, initially at least, the technology's signal of a goal should only be transmitted to the match officials and not to the crowd or TV audience.

The IFAB is made up of FIFA, who have four votes, and the four home nations, who have one vote each. Any law change needs at least six votes.

The body will also consider whether the UEFA experiment with extra officials has been a success and should be continued, but UEFA president Michel Platini will not be going to Zurich to argue the case in person.

The England v Ukraine incident, which saw John Terry hook the ball back into play when it was already across the line, could hardly have fallen worse for Platini.

No goal was awarded despite the extra official being no more than 10 yards away and staring straight along the line.

That suited Blatter perfectly, who opposes the extra two officials on the grounds that in many countries there are not a sufficient number of referees.

They even themselves out: John Terry was too late to stop Marko Devic's shot crossing the line - but the goal was not given

They even themselves out: John Terry was too late to stop Marko Devic's shot crossing the line – but the goal was not given

The tests on the technology were carried out by the EMPA – the Swiss Federal Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology – and the results discussed by IFAB members at a meeting earlier this month.

The Hawk-Eye system – developed by a British company now owned by Sony – is based on cameras and GoalRef, a Danish-German development, uses magnetic fields.

Each system is required to send an immediate message to a watch worn by the match officials within a second of the ball crossing the line.

The tests included exposing the equipment and watches to extreme heat and cold, as well as humidity and heavy rain. Experiments also took place during live matches including England's match against Belgium on June 2.

FIFA's Club World Cup in Japan in December is likely to be the first competition where the technology is used.

The IFAB are also due to rule on whether special headscarves can be worn during matches after pressure from some Muslim countries.

The body will hear a report from FIFA's medical committee which warns that headscarves could in some cases be a danger to players.

Wimbledon 2012: Hawk that patrols SW19 stolen from car

Rufus the Wimbledon hawk stolen from car… better call in the flying squad

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UPDATED:

16:43 GMT, 30 June 2012

The hawk that patrols Wimbledon to deter pigeons has been stolen, police said.

Detectives are investigating the
theft of Harrier Hawk Rufus, who was stolen along with his cage
overnight between Thursday and Friday from a car parked in Wimbledon.

Court out: Rufus the hawk has been stolen

Court out: Rufus the hawk has been stolen

A spokesman said Rufus was in the car parked on a private drive in Dunstall Road with the rear window open for ventilation.

The hawk, which deters pigeons at the All England Club purely by his presence, is also a family pet, he said.

'The family has become very attached to the bird who is now four-and-a-half years old.

'They are distressed over the theft and are appealing for help to recover the bird.'

Rufus has become a well-known fixture at the south-west London club, with visitors often stopping to ask for photos with the hawk.

Keeper Wayne Davis with Rufus

Distressed: Keeper Wayne Davis with Rufus

He even has his own Twitter account, but has not tweeted for a day.

His last tweet was before Rafael Nadal's shock exit from the tournament, when he said: 'Murray is through, Rafa is down 2-1 (!), Ward played brilliantly but lost to Mardy Fish, and Italy are beating Germany 1-0!'

Rufus is a Harris Hawk, an American species. Hawking was first introduced to the All England Club in 1999 as an environmentally-friendly method of pest control.

Pigeons are not the Harris Hawk's natural prey, and they are trained not to attack but to circle and fly around the courts to scare the birds.

Rufus is flown each morning and evening of the championships before and after play, but not during, so as to avoid any distraction.

Goal-line technology to be tested in England v Belgium game at Wembley

Better late than never! Goal-line technology to be given Wembley trial during England game

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UPDATED:

14:41 GMT, 24 May 2012

FIFA have given the go-ahead for goal-line technology to be tested at Wembley during England's Euro 2012 warm-up game with Belgium.

The Hawkeye system will be installed at the national stadium for the match, which will be Roy Hodgson's first home game in charge of England.

If there are any close calls however only the scientists monitoring the system will know the results – the referee will not be informed.

Over the line If goal-line technology had been in place Frank Lampard's goal against Germany in the last World Cup would have stood

Over the line If goal-line technology had been in place Frank Lampard's goal against Germany in the last World Cup would have stood

If the tests are successful, the go-ahead for technology is expected to be given on July 2.

It will be the final live test for the Hawkeye system and follows a previous test during the Hampshire FA Senior Cup final at Southampton's St Mary's Stadium on May 16.

Another system, called GoalRef, is being tested in the Danish Super League. All the tests are being monitored by officials from EMPA, the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology.

Testing: The technology was tried out at St Mary's stadium

Testing: The technology was tried out at St Mary's stadium

Checking the results: EMPA officials test the Hawk-Eye Goal Line Technology system

Checking the results: EMPA officials test the Hawk-Eye Goal Line Technology system

The move comes two years after Frank Lampard was denied a 'goal' during England's Second Round World Cup game against Germany in South Africa and brought the debate to the top of the agenda.

FIFA said in a statement: 'Such tests could lead to the International Football Association Board (IFAB) approving the introduction of GLT at its special meeting at the beginning of July.

'Only the EMPA observers, IFAB and FIFA representatives at Wembley will have access to the GLT system readings.

System in place: How the Hawk-Eye cameras will look mounted on the roof of the stadium

System in place: How the Hawk-Eye cameras will look mounted on the roof of the stadium

'Therefore, should a goal-line incident occur at this or any of the 'test' matches, the system will not be utilised by the match officials. It means the GLT system will have no influence on the outcome of the matches in which the system is being tested.

'FIFA would like to place on record its sincere thanks to the Football Association for their willingness to support the live match tests, a critical part of Test Phase 2 for goal-line technology.'

Nasser Hussain: Anderson is the key to trapping stubborn Chanderpaul

Anderson is the key to trapping stubborn Chanderpaul

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UPDATED:

22:07 GMT, 17 May 2012

I know England weren't able to budge Shiv Chanderpaul but I think Andrew Strauss will have settled for that. When you look at some of the recent Test scores at Lord's, a total of 243 for nine is no great shakes from West Indies.

In fact, I'd say England bowled pretty well yesterday considering they had to adapt to home conditions following five Tests in a row in Asia. Jimmy Anderson in particular bowled beautifully with the new ball and Stuart Broad came back well late in the day.

Token resistance: West Indies batsman Shivnarine Chanderpaul

Token resistance: West Indies batsman Shivnarine Chanderpaul

But they're going to need to review how they bowl to Chanderpaul. Early on they went round the wicket with a 7-2 off-side field and tried to keep the ball away from his pads.

I can understand why: he's merciless through the leg side. But by doing that you're removing the option of getting him lbw – and he's a definite candidate. Among batsmen who have played at least 100 Test innings, only Mike Gatting, Younus Khan and Graham Gooch have a higher percentage of lbw dismissals.

Late in the day, when Broad had the second new ball, he showed how best to bowl to Chanderpaul. He pitched a ball up and swung it back into the left-hander, hitting his pads. Hawk-Eye showed the ball pitched outside leg stump, but you could see Chanderpaul wasn't comfortable.

Success: England's Jimmy Anderson dismisses Kieran Powell

Success: England's Jimmy Anderson dismisses Kieran Powell

If I were the captain, I'd back Anderson to attack his pads early and bowl stump to stump from over the wicket. Sure, he might get clipped for a few boundaries, but you can't risk allowing Chanderpaul to get in because he'll bat until the cows come home.

They could also have attacked Darren Bravo more early on. He aimed an airy drive at his second ball and nicked it at catchable height between third slip and gully. I realise you can't always have four or five slips, but I'd like to see more aggressive fields set to the new batsman.

The bowler on that occasion was Anderson, who looks the real deal every time he bowls. The key is the late swing he gets, which makes him look nippier on the slow pitch than Broad or Tim Bresnan – and makes him a nightmare to face. But, as the pitch quickened later, Broad became more of a threat.

If England can hone their method of attack to Chanderpaul, they really will have control of this series.

Goalline technology tested live for first time in England

Goalline technology gets its first outing… is this the start of the future

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UPDATED:

22:53 GMT, 16 May 2012

Goalline technology was given its first live test on Wednesday night in the Hampshire FA Senior Cup final between AFC Totton and Eastleigh FC.

Hosted at Premier League new boys Southampton's St. Mary's Stadium, the Hawk-Eye technology was put through its paces.

Although the system was being tested, the referee had no access to its results – they were being monitored by an independant tester who did not communicate them to the official.

Not needed here: The ball clearly crossed the line on this occasion

Not needed here: The ball clearly crossed the line on this occasion

Eastleigh ran out 2-0 winners and the first goalscorer for, Chris Flood, proudly tweeted after the game: 'I think I made history tonight. First ever goal to be scored in the UK with goal line technology.'

This is the start of a process which could see the technology introduced at the top level by halfway through the 2012-13 season.

World football's governing body FIFA will decide in July if the technology will be permitted.

The Premier League are keen for it to be introduced after a number of high-profile incidents, including Juan Mata's 'ghost-goal' in the FA Cup semi-final.

The Chelsea player was awarded a goal even though his effort did not cross Tottenham's line.

Earlier in the season QPR's Clint Hill had a header against Bolton in the Barclays Premier League which was clearly over the line but the goal was not given.

QPR lost the game and were seething about the incident – an example of why the technology is being so urgently called for.

More to follow.

Goal-line technology will be tested in April, say FIFA

Goal-line technology will be tested this month, say FIFA after Chelsea 'goal'

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UPDATED:

20:34 GMT, 15 April 2012

FIFA have announced that final tests on goal-line technology will begin later this month, before a definitive decision on the matter is made by football's governing body in July.

The announcement comes in the wake of Chelsea's 'ghost goal' against Tottenham in the FA Cup semi-final on Sunday, when replays showed that Juan Mata's strike had clearly not crossed the line, despite a goal being awarded.

Ghost goal: Benoit Assou-Ekotto clears the ball off Tottenham's line

Ghost goal: Benoit Assou-Ekotto clears the ball off Tottenham's line

The International Football Association Board, the game's rule-making body, last month approved two systems to go into a second round of testing in match scenarios before either can be sanctioned for use in competitive fixtures at a meeting on July 2.

And FIFA confirmed on Sunday that tests with Hawk-Eye or GoalRef will begin before the end of April and continue throughout May.

LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS: Volleyball won"t use Hawk-Eye

We won't use Hawk-Eye! Volleyball won't have tracking system in place for Olympics

Volleyball chiefs will not use the Hawk-Eye ball tracking system at the London Olympics after deciding there is not enough time to implement the changes.

The use of a challenge system at next month's European Volleyball Confederation Champions League Final Four in Poland has led to speculation that review technology, already seen in sports such as tennis and cricket, could come in for the Games.

The International Volleyball Federation ruled this out on Wednesday however.

No Hawk-Eye: Volleyball won't use the tracking system in London this summer

No Hawk-Eye: Volleyball won't use the tracking system in London this summer

'The FIVB continues to discuss and explore the possibility of using a review system with the potential for possible implementation at some stage in the future,' FIVB's Andre Meyer said in a statement.

'However no firm decisions have been made at this moment as evaluations are ongoing.

'One thing is for sure, it is definitely not feasible to implement such a system at the London Olympics due to the timing and any decisions in this direction would only be with the FIVB World Championships 2014 in mind.'