Tag Archives: guilt

Michael Schumacher given penalty after Jean-Eric Vergne crash

Schumacher slapped with 10-place grid penalty after crashing into Vergne

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UPDATED:

18:13 GMT, 23 September 2012

Michael Schumacher has been handed a 10-place grid penalty for the Japanese Grand Prix after smashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne in Sunday's race in Singapore.

Seven-times world champion Schumacher admitted liability for the accident that occurred just after the midway point of the race at the Marina Bay Street Circuit. It followed the restart after a safety car period for HRT's Narain Karthikeyan hitting a barrier across Anderson Bridge.

In what was a repeat of two previous incidents – one at this track last year and one earlier this season when Schumacher ran into the rear of Williams' Bruno Senna in Barcelona – the stewards decided to heavily penalise the 43-year-old for the next race in Japan.

Mistake: Schumacher was penalised for crashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne

Mistake: Schumacher was penalised for crashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne

Schumacher collected a five-place penalty for the subsequent race in Monaco after hitting Senna, one which saw him start sixth after he had set the fastest time in qualifying.

On this occasion, given it was a repeat offence, the punishment was doubled, with the stewards stating: 'The penalty takes into account this is the second similar offence by the driver this season.

'The driver admitted the collision was his error due to the failure to anticipate the braking performance of the car with lower grip following a safety car period.'

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

For his part, Schumacher said: 'It was obviously a very unfortunate ending to my race when I ran into the car of Vergne, who accepted my apology straight afterwards.

'I am not totally sure why it happened. I was braking, but the deceleration was not as strong as it usually would be and I could not avoid running into the car in front of me.

'We have to find out what happened. Up until then I think it would have been possible to get some points.'

Sorry: The veteran is facing a ten-place grid drop at the Japanese Grand Prix

Sorry: The veteran is facing a ten-place grid drop at the Japanese Grand Prix

As the two men climbed out of their cars, Mercedes driver Schumacher waited for Vergne to come across, immediately putting his arm around the Frenchman before they headed back to their respective garages.

Toro Rosso driver Vergne said: 'I was focussing on catching Perez at that point, trying to brake late to catch him, so I am not too sure what happened exactly.

'I assume Michael braked a bit too late and could not avoid running into me.

'There is no sense in being angry about it because these things happen in racing and even the most experienced driver on the grid can make mistakes. 'He said sorry and that's the end of it.'

London 2012 Olympics: Dwain Chambers hopes his presence will deter drug taking

Chambers hopes his presence in London will deter athletes from taking drugs

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UPDATED:

23:54 GMT, 12 July 2012

Sprinter Dwain Chambers believes his presence at the Olympics should serve as a warning to anyone thinking of doping.

The 34-year-old was cleared to compete at London 2012 earlier this year when the British Olympic Association's lifetime ban on drugs cheats was overturned.

'I hope my presence makes people think twice and not do it,' he told The Times. 'I hope they never contemplate it because it really doesn't help.

Second chance: Dwain Chambers' Olympic ban was overturned this year

Second chance: Dwain Chambers' Olympic ban was overturned this year

'You may look at times and statistics but it doesn't help your life. It ruins your life and you will regret it for ever.'

Chambers tested positive for THG in August 2003 and served a two-year ban.

He feels doping did him and his career nothing but harm – a fate he hopes other athletes can avoid.

'I got worse on drugs,' he said. 'It did not help me in any capacity. It made me a very unsociable person and ruined my career and the image of the sport.

'I hate to think I caused that. That is guilt.'

London 2012 Olympics: Victor Conte believes Dwain Chambers deserves second chance

Drug cheat Chambers deserves second chance, says shamed nutritionist Conte

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UPDATED:

14:03 GMT, 26 April 2012

British sprinter Dwain Chambers has earned a second chance according to Victor Conte, the sports nutritionist at the centre of the 'Balco' scandal that rocked athletics and saw Chambers banned for two years following a positive drug test.

Conte was jailed for the part he played in a designer steroid business but has now revealed the guilt he feels for involving Chambers.

'He trusted me like a father, and I will be forever remorseful regarding the pain and suffering I caused not only him but his entire family,' he told BBC Sport.

Second chance: Dwain Chambers deserves a new beginning, according to Victor Conte

Second chance: Dwain Chambers deserves a new beginning, according to Victor Conte

'Dwain has rebounded from the serious mistakes he made to become a man of strong moral character – I could not be more proud of Dwain Chambers and the terrific human being he has become.'

The 34-year-old Chambers tested positive for the banned substance THG in 2003 and despite several appeals his two-year ban stood, with the British Olympic Association issuing a lifetime ban from competing for Great Britain at future Olympics, and a number of previous results were also nullified.

He made a return to the track after several other sporting ventures, including a brief foray into rugby league, failed and won gold in the 60m at the 2010 World Indoor Championships.

Gunning for the Games: Chambers wants to compete in London

Gunning for the Games: Chambers wants to compete in London

Conte praised Chambers for his work away from the sport in the years following his ban and believes he should now be given the chance to compete at this summer's Olympic Games.

'It's (competing in the Olympics) become the most important thing in his life,' he said.

'I know he goes to lots of schools and
talks to lots of kids and he's doing what he can to stop them making
the very serious mistakes he did. I think he has walked the talk and
earned his opportunity.

'I've known him for a long time but
Dwain has really grown as a person, and he's someone his team-mates can
trust to be clean for the rest of his time that he competes in sport.'

Chambers is likely to discover next week if his lifetime Olympic ban from the BOA has been lifted by the Court of Arbitration for Sport, with cyclist David Millar also hoping to see the same ban overturned.

Bernice Wilson banned for four years following failed drugs test

British sprinter Wilson banned for four years following failed drugs test

Banned: Bernice Wilson

Banned: Bernice Wilson

British sprinter Bernice Wilson has had a four-year ban confirmed after losing an appeal against the sanction imposed following her positive test for two anabolic steroids.

Wilson, 27, from Lincolnshire, broke into the British team last year and competed at the European indoor championships in Paris in March but tested positive for testosterone and clenbuterol on June 12.

An independent National Anti-Doping Panel handed out a four-year ban which Wilson appealed against, and UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) has confirmed she had lost her appeal.

UKAD chief executive Andy Parkinson said: 'We have successfully argued for a four-year ban which demonstrates that UK Anti-Doping always seeks robust sanctions against athletes who look to cheat the system and betray those around them.

'This sends a strong message to anyone looking to dope in the UK and gives clean athletes the confidence that we are working hard on their behalf, within the framework of the World Anti-Doping Code, to protect their right to compete in doping-free sport.'

A first doping offence normally carries a two-year suspension but it can be increased to four years for 'aggravating circumstances' including if an athlete tests positive for more than one banned substance.

In its decision, the National Anti-Doping Panel said Wilson was an 'experienced and senior athlete' who saw herself as a role model to younger athletes.

'Far from admitting her guilt… she sought to blame other people,' said the panel in its ruling.

The appeal panel confirmed the four-year ban, said Wilson's arguments were 'entirely without merit' and ordered her to pay UK Anti-Doping's costs of the appeal.

Wilson had been almost unknown in athletics until 2010 and qualified for the European indoors in Paris with a personal best 60 metres time of 7.25 seconds.

Olympics minister Hugh Robertson in the anti-doping laboratory in Harlow on Thursday

Olympics minister Hugh Robertson in the anti-doping laboratory in Harlow on Thursday

Drug cheats have been warned they
will be caught at next summer's Olympics and Paralympics as London 2012
unveiled 'the most high-tech' laboratory in the history of the Games.

Up to 6,250 samples will be tested by 150 scientists working at the 24-hour anti-doping facility in Harlow, Essex.

All Olympic medallists will have to submit a urine sample and there will be around 1,000 blood tests.

Hugh Robertson, Minister for Sport
and the Olympics, said: 'This is about integrity and the integrity of
London's Games. Everyone wants to know what they are seeing in front of
them is a true and fair contest.'