Tag Archives: glandular

Heather Watson diagnosed with glandular fever after Miami Open

Concern for weary Watson as British star is diagnosed with glandular fever

By
John Drayton

PUBLISHED:

16:04 GMT, 3 April 2013

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UPDATED:

16:51 GMT, 3 April 2013

Heather Watson has been diagnosed with glandular fever.

Blood tests after the Sony Open in Miami revealed traces of the virus and Watson, who is set to be overtaken by Laura Robson as British No 1 next week, has been told to rest and recover.

Watson, 20, is at the tail end of the illness and is not expected to miss any of the summer tournaments.

Virus: Blood tests after the Miami Open last week showed British No.1 Heather Watson had Glandular Fever

Virus: Blood tests after the Miami Open last week showed British No.1 Heather Watson had Glandular Fever

Speaking to the LTA, Watson said: 'I had to do some blood tests after Miami and the results have shown that I have traces of glandular fever (mono) in my system.

'There is no prescription for this other than complete rest but the good news is that the doctors have told me I am at the tail end of the fever.

'This means I have been trying to compete through the symptoms for some time.'

She continued: 'I have been struggling with both training and playing matches and felt so tired and exhausted for months but now that the doctors have found the cause of this, it explains everything that has been happening to me physically and mentally.

Slowed: Watson admitted to feeling 'burnt out' following her first round exit to Ayumi Morita in Miami

Slowed: Watson admitted to feeling 'burnt out' following her first round exit to Ayumi Morita in Miami

'I am actually relieved to know what is wrong so that I can get myself on the mend.

'I hope to recover as soon as possible by resting my body and getting lots of sleep. I already feel better from being at home for a week, and am looking forward to getting back on Tour soon.'

Watson crashed out to Alumina Morita in the first round in the Sony Open in Miami and admitted she was feeling 'burnt out.' She said she would take a break from tennis to recover, but changed her mind the following day.

Recovery: Watson, who will be replaced as British No.1 by Laura Robson next week, has been told to rest

Recovery: Watson, who will be replaced as British No.1 by Laura Robson next week, has been told to rest

Iain Bates, the LTA's head of women's tennis, said: 'First of all, get well soon, Heather, from the whole team.

'We all know she'll bounce back better than ever. Heather's focus will be on her recovery, and we will do whatever we can to support Heather and help that process.'

London 2012 Olympics: Chris Mears finishes 9th in 3m springboard

A personal best – just being alive…. British diver Mears finishes 9th in 3m springboard

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UPDATED:

19:40 GMT, 7 August 2012

Chris Mears had a five per cent chance. Of living, that is. Nothing to do with diving. A five per cent chance of surviving an emergency operation on a ruptured spleen in a training hospital in Sydney.

Impressive then that on Tuesday night, three years on, the 19-year-old was competing in an Olympic final. Especially as he wasn't supposed to get past the preliminary stage anyway.

He finished a respectable 9th in the 3m springboard, some way off Russian winner Ilya Zakharov, but 9th in the world isn't too bad when you've been through what he's been through.

Feel the force: Mears, 19, finished a respectable 9th in Tuesday night's final

Feel the force: Mears, 19, finished a respectable 9th in Tuesday night's final

'I had glandular fever and the glands in my stomach and my spleen swelled up,' said Mears. 'It caused a rupture. I didn't have any symptoms of having glandular fever, so the doctors couldn't figure out what was wrong with me, which caused me to lose about five pints of blood. In theatre they cut me open and gave me a five per cent chance of surviving the operation.'

As Mears, who is good friends with fellow divers Tom Daley and Tonia Couch, was hurried into surgery, his parents Katie and Paul rushed to the airport and the other side of the world.

'Katie was at home and I was in Dubai with work,' said Paul, Katie adding: 'It was one o'clock in the morning when I got the call and we both went straight to the airport.'

Everybody loves Chris: Tom Daley, Tonia Couch and Sarah Barrow cheer on Mears

Everybody loves Chris: Tom Daley, Tonia Couch and Sarah Barrow cheer on Mears

Paul said: 'It was the morning of the Youth Olympic Games in Sydney and he was on his way to the competition. He collapsed after breakfast and things went from bad to worse. Luckily the hospital was just round the corner and their best people were on duty. If they hadn't been, he probably would not have made it. Now he's an Olympic finalist.'

Surviving the operation was just the start of the drama, as Mears explained. 'I went into intensive care for a week. But then two days after I was released I had a seizure for seven hours and went into a coma for a couple of days.'

He recovered slowly because having his spleen removed meant he picked up a lot of infections. He needed at least 10 hours of sleep each day – he still needs a lot now – but decided to return to diving a more determined young man.

'It's definitely made me work harder in the gym and the pool to become a better diver,' said Mears, whose final dive in the semi-final – a risky forward four-and-a-half somersault – scored him 91.2 points and an overall personal best of 461pts.

'My parents have seen me at my lowest and that must have hurt them pretty badly. But for them to see me now makes them very happy. This morning was without a doubt the best performance of my life, the best dive of my life. And it happened when it mattered and made me an Olympic finalist. I can't quite believe what has happened. I saw my parents on the screen going wild. I could hear them before every dive, too.'

They were indeed going wild, waving homemade scoring cards with '10' on them and wearing 'Go Chris' T-shirts alongside their other children, Natalie, 24, and Charlie, 12. 'Making the final feels like winning a medal,' said Katie.

I want Great Britain to rule the cycling world: Joanna Rowsell

It's fantastic to win… now to be invincible

By
Joanna Rowsell

PUBLISHED:

21:52 GMT, 5 April 2012

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UPDATED:

21:52 GMT, 5 April 2012

I am so thrilled to have pulled on the rainbow jersey and to wear that gold medal around my neck. That is the moment when our win really sank in.

It feels like a long time since I was last a world champion, back in 2009.

We missed out in 2010 to Australia, the worst feeling of my career. Then I was injured and ill last year — breaking my elbow in a freak training accident and contracting glandular fever.

It meant I had to watch the girls reclaim the title, but really I wanted to be back in there myself. That is one reason why this win means so much to me.

Pride: Joanna Rowsell and the other members of the Women's Pursuit team celebrate their gold medals

Pride: Joanna Rowsell and the other members of the Women's Pursuit team celebrate their gold medals

Everyone will see our victory in the context of the London Olympics and, yes, it has certainly given us a boost. But we are aware that the rest of the world is catching us up. They are doing really, really fast times.

Before the World Cup in London in February people were around the 3min 20sec mark, but not now. So we have to maintain our focus — nothing has changed in that regard.

We’ve always said that we were looking at the 3min 15sec mark — our winning time yesterday — to win gold at the Olympics but we now need to set our target a bit higher. It may take as much as two or three seconds’ improvement but we won’t know until we get there and everybody is fully tapered.

Another pleasing aspect of our win was that we were controlled — the opposite of the way we raced at the London World Cup.

On track for success: Great Britain's trio race to a world record

On track for success: Great Britain's trio race to a world record

I went out super-fast then because of the inspiration I drew from the crowd. We died in the last few laps. We knew we could do far better than that.

In training we’ve done far more disciplined rides.

Last week we did world record pace but that was only over 2k — rather than the full 3k — so we didn’t know whether we could carry it on.

Paul Manning, our coach, is very strict. He keeps us on precisely the right pace. To begin with, it’s weird holding yourself back in training but obviously it pays off at the end of the race. That’s where it is won, as we showed.

Different style: Rowsell, who suffers from alopecia, has previously worn a wig to collect her medals

Different style: Rowsell, who suffers from alopecia, has previously worn a wig to collect her medals

I have suffered from alopecia, or hair loss, since I was 10. I had auburn hair until then.

I have twice worn a wig to collect medals, but I didn’t yesterday.

When I first bought wigs I thought I’d give it a go on the podium. I do enjoy wearing them and the way they make me feel. But it wasn’t really me. Without a wig represents me on a bike. It is me as an athlete.

I am going home to my parents in Surrey at the end of the championships and then the training starts again in earnest.

By the time the Olympics come around the aim is to be invincible.

Ronnie O"Sullivan"s manager casts doubt over his snooker future

O'Sullivan's manager casts doubt over snooker future of stricken Ronnie

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UPDATED:

21:14 GMT, 16 March 2012

Ronnie O'Sullivan's snooker career is under threat from glandular fever, says his manager Django Fung.

The Rocket pulled out of the Players
Tour Championship Grand Finals in Galway and Fung admitted: 'It is a
fair question to ask whether he can continue as a player.'

Health concerns: Ronnie O'Sullivan

Health concerns: Ronnie O'Sullivan

Ronnie O"Sullivan wins German Masters by beating Stephen Maguire

O'Sullivan comes back to beat Maguire and land German Masters

Ronnie O'Sullivan came from behind to beat Stephen Maguire and win the German Masters in Berlin.

The former world number one, just one frame away from a first-round exit on Thursday, won Sunday's final 9-7 to land his first ranking title since September 2009.

Maguire fired three successive centuries on his way to a 5-3 lead at the Tempodrom and took the first frame of the evening session – but O'Sullivan finished strongest, rattling off five in a row to take control of the 30-year-old Scot.

Champ: Ronnie O'Sullivan won to bag his first ranking title since 2009

Champ: Ronnie O'Sullivan won to bag his first ranking title since 2009

Prior to this tournament, the penultimate event before the rankings cut-off point to decide which 16 players get automatic places at the World Championship, O'Sullivan was 16th and in danger of missing out on automatic qualification.

However, this success means his supporters can look forward to seeing him attempt to win a fourth Crucible crown.

O'Sullivan, who reached this final despite a bout of glandular fever, looked in good touch as he cantered to the opening frame, his break of 111 a taster of the superb fare to come in this best-of-17 contest.

However, Maguire – who whitewashed Shaun Murphy and John Higgins en route to the final – pulled level in the second frame after easing to a confident 130 break, the highest of the tournament so far.

He followed up with an equally assured 106 in the third and then produced a 128 to move 3-1 ahead after finding himself snookered from the break.

'The Rocket' made a decent start in the first frame after the interval, but when he broke down on 58 Maguire stole in to move 4-1 ahead.

A scrappy sixth frame went the way of O'Sullivan before a 55 helped Maguire restore his three-frame lead, but it was the three-time world champion who had the final say at the end of a breathless afternoon's snooker, a break of 75 giving him renewed hope heading into the evening session.

Maguire won the first frame after the resumption and potted five reds and five blacks at the start of the 10th but O'Sullivan hit back with a 96 clearance to reduce the gap to two frames, then picked up the next one to trail by just one.

Maguire was in first in the 12th frame with a break of 52 but missed the yellow and O'Sullivan cleared to the pink to level the match, punching the air after doing so.

It proved a key moment as he returned from the mid-session interval in inspired form, with a 67 break giving him the lead at 7-6.

Soon after it was 8-6 and he looked well placed to wrap up victory when he produced a break of 43 in the 15th frame, only to leave a black in the jaws.

Maguire, who led O'Sullivan 5-2 in last year's Welsh Open final but lost the contest 9-6, held his nerve to stem the tide and stay in the match with a clearance of 82.

There was an interesting twist at the start of the 16th frame when both players agreed to a rerack before a ball had been potted – and when they were respotted the cagey nature continued until O'Sullivan produced a break of 46.

Maguire got to within 17 points of his opponent but soon found himself needing a snooker – which O'Sullivan escaped from but went in off.

However, after Maguire had missed the blue, O'Sullivan wrapped up the 16th frame, which lasted nearly 40 minutes, and the match.

O'Sullivan said afterwards: 'All credit to Stephen, because he's had a great tournament.

'He's played really well and is playing as well now as when he first came on the scene and I tipped him to be the dominant player of the decade.

'He outplayed me today, I hung in there and nicked frames.'

The Essex man continued: 'This is the best venue we play in on the tour. It used to be Wembley Conference Centre…but it's brilliant to play here and get to the final.

'I'm 36 now and coming to the end of my career so every victory now is nice. If I can nick a tournament here or there it's great – it would be nice to go out at the top.'

Maguire pinpointed the 12th frame as decisive, telling British Eurosport: 'I should have made it 7-5 but I played a bad positional shot and when it went 6-6 he had the rhythm – I think that was the turning point in the match.

'I've beaten some good players this week and if I'm honest I probably wasn't expecting to get to the final – but I can't look at it that way now. I just want to jump off a bridge.'

Chris Smalling could be out for three months glandular fever

EXCLUSIVE: Smalling shock for United as fever may force defender out for three months

Manchester United fear key defender Chris Smalling could be out for three months with glandular fever.

Smalling, 22, missed the Boxing Day win over Wigan with what was thought to be a heavy cold, but the illness is more serious and he will remain on the long list of United players currently sidelined through injury or illness.

The acute stage of glandular fever — usually involving flu-like symptoms and fatigue — lasts up to two weeks, but sufferers cannot do strenuous exercise for at least two months. For a professional footballer, it will be longer.

Blow: Chris Smalling could be out for three months if his illness is confirmed

Blow: Chris Smalling could be out for three months if his illness is confirmed

That would be a huge setback for Smalling and United, already without Darren Fletcher, Nemanja Vidic, Ashley Young, Tom Cleverley, Anderson, Jonny Evans, Fabio Da Silva and Michael Owen.

Former Liverpool and Sunderland physio Mark Leather believes United’s 10million signing from Fulham could be out for three months if his illness is confirmed by the club.

Mounting concerns: Sir Alex Ferguson faces a growing injury crisis at United

Mounting concerns: Sir Alex Ferguson faces a growing injury crisis at United

He said: ‘You can get back into shape in two months but it might be another three to four weeks before you’re firing on all cylinders. The first time he would be able to play a full game would be nearer to three months.’

Rio Ferdinand and Phil Jones missed the win over Wigan but are expected back for Saturday’s clash with Blackburn at Old Trafford.

Return: Phil Jones (centre) will be back to face Blackburn Rovers

Return: Phil Jones (centre) will be back to face Blackburn Rovers

Jones, who moved from Ewood Park in the summer, was in the Rovers side beaten 7-1 at Old Trafford last season.

He describes it as ‘probably the worst day of my career’ but warned team-mates not to take Steve Kean’s side lightly. ‘It won’t be easy,’ he said. ‘They’re a lot better than their League position.’