Tag Archives: girls

David Moyes picture Playboy model Hannah Elizabeth, Sara Beverly Jones Tony Bellew fight Liverpool Echo Arena

Moyes eyes a couple of strikers! Everton boss poses with blonde beauties before Bellew's bout

By
Lee Bryan

PUBLISHED:

02:55 GMT, 31 March 2013

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UPDATED:

03:01 GMT, 31 March 2013

David Moyes was grinning like a Cheshire cat on Saturday – and for good reason.

After watching Everton see off Stoke thanks to Kevin Mirallas' splendid strike at Goodison Park, the 49-year-old Scot proved he's still got it, sandwiching himself between a couple of glamour girls at Liverpool's Echo Arena.

Moyes was there to support Toffees fan Tony Bellew in his bout against Isaac Chilemba – which ended in a draw – but he got a little more than he bargained for in his ringside seat.

Blonde ambition: David Moyes is grabbed by a pair of Betfair beauties at the Echo Arena

Blonde ambition: David Moyes is grabbed by a pair of Betfair beauties at the Echo Arena

Everton skipper Phil Neville was quick to tweet the picture, saying: “Moyes at the boxing, go on son! That's how your Boss rolls” is he in bellews corner'

Playboy model Hannah Elizabeth, pictured left in the picture, remarked on the social network site: 'howlin that I was sittin next to David Moyes ringside n got a pic on his knee with my @SaraBeverley #LEG'

Her pal Sara Beverly Jones – an actress, presenter and promotional model – added: 'Me and @misshannahelizx on David moyes knee! Ha my face! … Add your own caption.'

In this case, we think a picture tells a thousand words…

Australian Open 2013: Angelique Kerber beats Madison Keys 6-2, 7-5

Birthday girl Kerber celebrates with win over Keys… as American teen goes to buy new headphones to get over loss

. Kerber was the last.

On her way to victory: Kerber beat teen Keys in straight sets

On her way to victory: Kerber beat teen Keys in straight sets

Bowing out: Keys was knocked out of the Australian Open and said she was going to buy some new headphones

Bowing out: Keys was knocked out of the Australian Open and said she was going to buy some new headphones

Meanwhile, Keys said she would learn from the experience – but then use her prize money to buy a new pair of headphones.

She said: 'I'm taking away some positives. But right now, it kind of sucks.'

Mopping up: Ball boys and girls use towels to dry Rod Laver Arena as rain interrupted play

Mopping up: Ball boys and girls use towels to dry Rod Laver Arena as rain interrupted play

'I think it was the occasion, centre court the first time, I think I was just kind of… I think I almost psyched myself out, thinking I had to play better than what I did have to play.

'I think I just got really nervous, going for too much, and pressing instead of just working points.'

'My headphones right now for my iPod are really broken,' she added. 'I have to wiggle the wires around to try to get sound, so I think maybe I can afford new headphones. Other than that I'll probably just stick (the prizemoney) in savings.’

Mission complete: Kerber shakes hands after defeating Keys

Mission complete: Kerber shakes hands after defeating Keys

Rafael Benitez buys ticket for conned Chelsea fan Harry Rennell

Benitez just the ticket for nine-year-old Chelsea fan conned by online tout

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UPDATED:

00:00 GMT, 31 December 2012

The cacophony of boos that heralded the appearance of Rafa Benitez at Goodison Park would have you believe he is football’s equivalent of a pantomime villain.

Since replacing Roberto Di Matteo as manager, the Spaniard has struggled to win over a stubborn Chelsea support, unwilling to accept him or forgive and forget his days as their nemesis as Liverpool’s manager.

Yet in the eyes of Chelsea-mad nine-year-old Harry Rennell, Benitez is very much his hero this morning.

Conned: Tony Rennell (left) thought he had bought a ticket for the Boxing Day match between Norwich City and Chelsea for his nine-year-old son, Harry, only to discover he had been tricked out of 300 by a touting website

Conned: Tony Rennell (left) thought he had bought a ticket for the Boxing Day match between Norwich City and Chelsea for his nine-year-old son, Harry, only to discover he had been tricked out of 300 by a touting website

Surprise: Chelsea manager Rafa Benitez secured the Rennell's tickets for the Capital One Cup semi-final with Swansea on January 9 after reading about the story

Surprise: Chelsea manager Rafa Benitez secured the Rennell's tickets for the Capital One Cup semi-final with Swansea on January 9 after reading about the story

In a story that pulled heartstrings across the country, Harry’s father Tony wrote a cautionary tale in the Daily Mail last Friday of how he had been let down after ordering two tickets from Online Ticket Express for Chelsea’s game at Norwich City as a Christmas present.

Despite paying more than 300 for the tickets, they failed to arrive in the post, leaving Tony and his son despondent.

On reading the story, Benitez, himself the doting father of two girls, contacted Sportsmail and offered Harry and his father two tickets for Chelsea’s Capital One League Cup semi-final, first-leg tie against Swansea on January 9.

Harry’s delighted father Tony said: ‘Thank you, Rafa. There has been a very sympathetic response.

‘One Chelsea fan has invited us to go as his guest to the QPR game on Wednesday, and we’ll be there to cheer them on.

Stocking filler: Mr Rennell had wanted to surprise his Chelsea-mad son for Christmas and paid website Online Ticket Express over 300 for them

Stocking filler: Mr Rennell had wanted to surprise his Chelsea-mad son for Christmas and paid website Online Ticket Express over 300 for them

‘What is great is that nine year-old Harry now knows that, although some people may let us down in life, there are always others who will step forward to do the right thing.’

Doing the right thing may soften some Chelsea supporters’ view of their interim manager, but it’s not the first example of kind-hearted Benitez showing the grander side of football.

Hearing a pensioner had been mugged on the Wirral, then Liverpool manager Benitez made sure the elderly fan and his family were guests at Anfield.

On his departure from Liverpool, the 52-year-old gave a ‘substantial five-figure sum’ to the parents of Rhys Jones, the young Everton fan who was shot dead as he returned from football training in August 2007.

Disappointed: Harry was let down but will now get to watch his heroes in action next week

Disappointed: Harry was let down but will now get to watch his heroes in action next week

At the time, Benitez said: ‘I am doing this on behalf of the people that cannot. I know that every person on Merseyside would have loved to give the fund a donation, but they are in hard times and can’t find the extra cash.’

Benitez donated 96,000 to the Hillsborough Memorial Fund and gave a further 2,800 to aid running costs through his wife Montse’s foundation.

Whatever he does from now on, Benitez may always be the villain to some, but at least his gesture is just the ticket for Harry Rennell.

Jessica Ennis praises family who helped her to Olympic success

Ennis: My family are the real champions… they helped me through it all

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UPDATED:

22:44 GMT, 10 November 2012

Jessica Ennis remembers the first time she set eyes on the running track at the Don Valley Stadium in Sheffield. She was 13 and had been sent there with her sister, Carmel, for a summer athletics camp because her parents were fed up with their boisterous arguments.

It was, says Ennis, the place where her Olympic heptathlon triumph in London this summer was forged. While it may have been the first athletics-related reason Ennis had to thank her parents, Alison and Vinnie, it is far from the last.

‘It was the first time I ever experienced proper sport and it changed my whole life,’ she recalled. ‘It made me who I am. I’m grateful my parents were so fed up with us that they shipped us off there, because it changed everything.

A lot to thank them for: Jessica Ennis praised her family for their support

A lot to thank them for: Jessica Ennis praised her family for their support

‘It’s nice to explain properly the role my family have played and how they’ve been there for me.’

Despite the noisy relationship with Carmel when they were younger —‘we were just typical sisters, we were at each other the whole time’ — there were far larger worries in Ennis’s life as a teenager.

She was bullied at school ‘quite badly’ and made that first visit to the track with her confidence in tatters. As so often, sporting success eventually drove away her tormentors, but she has never forgotten those days.

‘With girls, I think it can be especially horrible because they know exactly what to do to undermine you and make you miserable. It’s important to tell girls of that age that it does happen, but it’s something that does pass. It won’t be there forever, I’d love them to understand that.’

Ennis’s relationship with her coach Toni Minichiello appears both hugely successful and endearingly fiery — she first used a sports psychologist to sort out their battles, rather than conquer any demons of her own.

Moment of glory: Jessica Ennis wins heptathlon gold

Moment of glory: Jessica Ennis wins heptathlon gold

Then there was a dispute with Charles van Commenee, the outgoing head coach of UK Athletics, who wanted Ennis to move to London. She refused, even when, she maintains, Van Commenee tried to use Minichiellos’s job as a lever. Did it feel like bullying

‘No, and it’s not that I’m having a dig at Charles. I’m just trying to explain that when a decision needs to be made and when I need to stick to my guns, I will do both.’

Next year she will marry Andy Hill, who has known her since school days and understands the demands of her role better than anyone.

‘We’ve been together a long time and we’ve been on this massive journey. He’s been brilliant every step of the way.’

Hill’s happiness to stay out of the limelight is matched by the rest of the Ennis family. She said: ‘They’ve never tried to push themselves forward. They’ve always been there in the background, supporting me. For them to be there in the Olympic Stadium when I won gold was a wonderful moment.’

Their awareness of her needs extended to the tactical, moving seats before the long jump started, for fear that they were in her line of sight and would be a distraction.

Limelight: Ennis takes the stage but people like her partner Andy Hill have provided necessary aid

Limelight: Ennis takes the stage but people like her partner Andy Hill have provided necessary aid

‘For them to realise the importance of something as little as that, but something that could have made such a big difference, says everything, really,’ said Ennis. ‘I’ll always remember seeing my sister in the crowd as I came out to get my medal. We’re very close — we’ve grown up now! She was in floods of tears.

‘Andy was wearing dark glasses and I later realised it was because he’d had a few tears and didn’t want people to see.’

Yet her favourite memory remains a personal one. In the wake of victory, at a private celebration with her family, her precious gold medal went missing. There was panic, until someone counted heads and realised one family member was absent.

‘My Nan had taken it and was having a little walk round, just looking at it, taking it all in. Those are the really special moments. The ones with your family.’

She giggles at the recollection. It seems highly appropriate, given the support her family played in Ennis winning gold, that ‘Nan’ was the only person at the Olympics who came close to taking it away from her.

Unbelievable by Jessica Ennis is published by Hodder & Stoughton, 20.

McLaren line up Sergio Perez to replace Lewis Hamilton

McLaren boss lines up Perez to replace Hamilton as contract talks hit crisis

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UPDATED:

20:56 GMT, 15 September 2012

Mexican Sergio Perez is being lined up to replace Lewis Hamilton at McLaren as the British star's contract negotiations reach crisis point.

Only a week after McLaren boss Martin Whitmarsh admitted the team did not have a 'Plan B', it is understood contact has been made with Perez as Hamilton ponders a 60million offer from Mercedes.

Pole position: Sergio Perez lined up to replace Lewis Hamilton at McLaren

Pole position: Sergio Perez lined up to replace Lewis Hamilton at McLaren

McLaren's approach to the 22-year-old Sauber driver is an indication the team are growing impatient with the negotiating strategy of Hamilton's management, XIX Entertainment.

The agency is controlled by Simon Fuller, the man behind the Spice Girls, David Beckham, Andy Murray and creator of the Pop Idol TV franchise.

The move is the beginning of the end game. Hamilton may find his future is taken out of his own hands with the spectre of Perez being courted by McLaren, who do not want to be outmanoeuvred by the 27-year-old British driver.

A senior Formula One insider said: 'Lewis Hamilton is playing with fire, and when you play with fire sometimes you get your fingers burned. He'd be crazy to leave McLaren. If he wants to know what happens when you leave a top team to chase money, he needs only to Google Jacques Villeneuve.'

Rebel: Hamilton has been warned 'he's playing with fire'

Rebel: Hamilton has been warned 'he's playing with fire'

Villeneuve's story is a salutary
lesson for all drivers, even one as brilliant as Hamilton. Having won
the 1997 World Championship with Williams – a team with a rich,
race-winning Grand Prix heritage – Villeneuve accepted a multi-million
pound pay rise to drive for the fledgling BAR team pieced together by
his manager Craig Pollock.

Villeneuve never won another race, BAR evolved into BAR Honda which, in
turn, evolved into Brawn, then Mercedes; and the Canadian driver
eventually left Formula One seven years later as a fallen star.

Fuller's desire, in his first foray into Formula One's political and notoriously ruthless world, is to create a contract for Hamilton that will allow him to develop his own brand beyond those of McLaren's current sponsorship partners, numbering 30 in total. To McLaren chairman Ron Dennis this is anathema. His company, and the world titles won by men like Niki Lauda, Alain Prost and the late Ayrton Senna, has always been dependent on the income generated by commercial partners. They, in return, have access to McLaren's drivers.

Main man: Simon Fuller

Talks: Simon Fuller

Hamilton is believed to be unsettled by
the refusal of these demands and also by the salary offer on the table.
The five-year deal negotiated by his father, Anthony, in 2007, was worth
a total of 75m on a sliding scale, with this final year paying him
about 18m. Sources close to XIX Entertainment claim Hamilton is being
asked to take a pay cut to re-sign for McLaren, who groomed him from the
age of 13.

This is flatly denied by McLaren. Informed speculation is that McLaren have proposed a deal close to 45m for a two-year contract, plus one-year option.

Mercedes have put an offer before XIX Entertainment that, with bonuses, could be worth 60m to Hamilton over the same three-year period from 2013.

They would also give XIX Entertainment the leeway to broaden Hamilton's brand into new markets. Mercedes have another card to play: the team are directed by Englishman Ross Brawn, who won seven world championships with Michael Schumacher, five with Ferrari and two with Benetton, and another with Jenson Button, team-mate to Hamilton at McLaren.

Hamilton has won two of the last three races, and Button the other, as McLaren demonstrate they once again have the fastest car on the grid ahead of the Singapore Grand Prix next weekend.

Is it wise to abandon McLaren, with a record of winning one of every four grand prix races, to take a gamble on Mercedes

Mo Farah wins at Great North CityGames

Olympic hero Farah can't wait to relax after ending season with CityGames win

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UPDATED:

12:54 GMT, 15 September 2012

Mo Farah rounded off his spectacular season by coasting to victory in the two-mile event at the Great North CityGames on the quayside in Gateshead.

The double Olympic gold medallist stalked Australian Collis Birmingham through the first section of the race, before bursting to the front over the Swing Bridge and crossing the line in a winning time of eight minutes 40.04seconds.

Another winning Mo-ment: Olympic hero Mo Farah ended his season in style

Another winning Mo-ment: Olympic hero Mo Farah ended his season in style

Another winning Mo-ment: Olympic hero Mo Farah ended his season in style

Farah told the BBC: 'It was tough. It hasn't been easy getting everything done but the Olympics is done and this was to enjoy and run for the home crowd and it was amazing.

'Now I will just have a rest and spend time with my family and look after my little girls. I can have fun and eat what I like.'

London 2012 Olympics: Fans gather at closing ceremony

Out with a bang! London gathers for mammoth Games send off as thousands pack out Olympic Park for closing ceremony

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UPDATED:

20:03 GMT, 12 August 2012

After London welcomed all 204 of the competing nations to the capital for what was undoubtedly one of the greatest Olympic Games in history, athletes, fans and celebrities assembled at the closing ceremony.

If the spectacular official opening ceremony of the Games – organised by Slumdog Millionaire director Danny Boyle – the close to the Games promises to be a show and a half.

London hosted an Olympics which saw Team GB win an unbelievable 29 gold medals, dwarfing the 19 won four years prior in Beijing, and those lucky enough to have tickets have filled the Olympic Park in Stratford to bid their farewell.

To celebrate the hosting of a hugely successful Olympiad, fans will be treated to a feast for the eyes and ears, amongst the spectacles are internationally renowned girl band the Spice Girls.

Fond farewell: Thousands gathered at the Olympic Park in Stratford for the closing ceremony

Fond farewell: Thousands gathered at the Olympic Park in Stratford for the closing ceremony

Fans got in the mood ahead of the ceremony

Fans got in the mood ahead of the ceremony

The Olympic flame was still burning as the Spice Girls rehearsed their routine

The Olympic flame was still burning as the Spice Girls rehearsed their routine

Burning bright: The Olympic flame was still lit as the Spice Girls rehearsed their routine

Transformed: The stadium looked completely different to when athletes competed on it throughout the Games

Transformed: The stadium looked completely different to when athletes competed on it throughout the Games

Transformed: The stadium looked completely different to when athletes competed on it throughout the Games

Transformed: The stadium looked completely different to when athletes competed on it throughout the Games

The Olympic rings were on display above the well lit arena

The Olympic rings were on display above the well lit arena

Sailors Mills and Clark delay motherhood to plot an Olympic course for Rio

Sailors Mills and Clark delay motherhood to plot an Olympic course for Rio

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UPDATED:

21:08 GMT, 11 August 2012

Hannah Mills woke with her Olympic silver medal next to her but her red Team GB trainers had been harder to find meaning she was barefooted when she appeared from Weymouth on the BBC’s breakfast show with her sailing partner, Sas Clark.

Kindly, Clark fielded most of the questions while Mills dealt in near silence with an aching head. An hour later, Mills, 24, was still far from her usual effervescent self. ‘Hannah was doing shots last night,’ said Clark, giggling by way of explanation. ‘So was I, but I’ve eight years more experience!’

Hannah Mills (R) and Saskia Clark (L) of Great Britain celebrate after finishing second and taking the silver medal in the 470 Women's Class Sailing

Big plans: Saskia Clark and Hannah Mills are not content with a silver and will continue training for a shot at gold in Rio

The big party thrown by their parents, and the parents of their team-mates Luke Patience and Stuart Bithell, who also won silver medals in the same 470 class boats as Mills and Clark on Friday, had been a riotous night after months of abstinence from alcohol by the sailors.

‘Everyone was so happy for us, it brought home what we had achieved,’ said Mills. In just 18 months in a boat together, Mills, from the Vale of Glamorgan, and Clark, 32, from Essex, had navigated to the second step of the Olympic podium.

Yet while they appreciated the flattering comments from family and friends, many of whom they had not seen for months or longer, the two women cannot accept this is the end of their Olympic odyssey.

‘For me, the whole Olympicthing still burns prettybright and we want to get a gold medal in Rio in 2016,’ said Clark. And without hesitation, she places a quest for gold over motherhood.

Hannah Mills (L) and Saskia Clark (R)

Party girl: Hannah Mills celebrated her silver medal with a heavy night out

‘I’m the youngest of three girls and both my sisters have kids,’ said Clark, in a long-term relationship with Olympic sailor Paul Goodison, who won gold in Beijing four years ago but suffered a back injury that knocked him down the Laser fleet at these Games.

‘I’m not sure if I want to have kids. It’s a massive deal that you can’t walk away from.

‘Would an Olympic gold medal mean more than having a family At this point in time, yes. The Olympics bug gets you — and I think Paul’s up for competing again. But life also happens and we’ll see how it all pans out. Even so, I can’t see myself in four years’ time doing anything else other than being in Rio.’

Mills and Clark epitomise the sportsmen and women who, for the past two weeks, have stepped from the shadows to make a nation proud of them for the sheer purity of their ambition.

Hannah Mills & Saskia Clark for the GB Women's 470 sailing team at Portland Dorset

Big plans: Saskia Clark (right) says a gold medal is more important than starting a family at this point in her life

As part of the sailing team, they drive sponsored cars and receive a grant from the National Lottery, but Mills and Clark train and dedicate their lives to the pursuit of excellence because that is an end in itself to them.

‘There are some exceptions, but a lot of sports in the Olympics are minority ones,’ said Clark.

‘Hannah and I are not doing this to have a big house or a snazzy car.’ Each morning throughout her Olympics, Clark was sick through nervous anxiety.

‘Breakfast was a battle every day,’ she explained. But these women’s passion for their sport is an incurable addiction.

Mills said: ‘We’re both going to take some time out and do other things we want to do; but then, we’ll come back to the drawing board early next year and make a little bit of a plan of what we both want to do.’

She does not intend to return in the foreseeable future to Bristol University, where she deferred her degree in mechanical engineering after two years to concentrate on the Games.

Hannah Mills (L) and Saskia Clark

Top team: Mills, Clark and the other British sailors lived separately from their fellow British Olympians during the games

‘I want to travel and enjoy life as someone not living and breathing sailing.’

Clark added: ‘Hopefully, we’ll have lots of cool and exciting things to do in the short term. I’m probably a terrible daughter and friend because we dip in and out of their lives and miss every significant event in those people’s lives.

‘It will be nice to be on the end of the phone and go to things that happen in everyday life.’

In Weymouth and Portland, the sailors existed independently from other Olympians.

‘We’ve lived in a little bit of a parallel universe,’ smiled Clark, although the Duchess of Cambridge, as well as Princess Anne and Prime Minister David Cameron, did travel to the Jurassic coast to watch some racing.

‘We missed Kate as we were on the water racing, but the boys in the team, particularly Luke and Stuart, were very excited by her presence,’ laughed Clark. Ben Ainslie claimed Britain’s solitary gold on the water, though Team GB amassed four silver medals as well.

Hannah Mills (R) and Saskia Clark (L) of Great Britain react after finishing second and taking the silver medal in the 470 Women's Class Sailing

Hard graft: Mills and Clark will unite with their Great Britain team-mates on an open-topped bus through Weymouth

On Wednesday, the team will ride on an open-topped bus through Weymouth at the start of innumerable engagements over the coming months to celebrate their success. The popularity of the Olympic regatta was beyond their wildest imagination.

‘It’s unheard of to have any crowd watching us, let alone 5,000 people who came to see the races on the Nothe Course in Weymouth,’ said Clark. ‘You could hear the noise, the cheers, from the water.’

Most evenings, Mills and Clark had joined team-mates in the communal lounge in Team GB’s apartment block at Portland to yell and shout for British athletes competing in the Olympic Stadium.

‘Like the rest of the country, we were thrilled Jess Ennis achieved her gold medal,’ said Mills. ‘That was inspiring.’ Clark added: ‘Most of us were close to tears by the time Mo won the 10,000m.’

Mills and Clark might have been celebrating gold themselves, but for a wind change shortly after the start of their medal race with New Zealand’s Jo Alieh and Pollie Powrie.

The British girls tacked left, the New Zealanders went right and the day was lost. ‘We planned our preparation to every inch of its life,’ said Mills. ‘We were really proud of how we approached the Games and got through them.

It’s just an insane experience, especially as someone in her first Olympics at home. I wouldn’t really change a thing.’ Clark said, drily: ‘Only thing I’d change is go right in that last race.

Otherwise, I’m really proud ofwhat Hannah and I have done.’ And excited by the prospect of being together again in Rio four years from now.

My medals are for my two girls (due anytime now)! Fabulous Farah books place in history with devastating double and Britain roars in delight

My medals are for my two girls (due anytime now)! Fabulous Farah books place in history with devastating double and Britain roars in delight

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UPDATED:

23:07 GMT, 11 August 2012

Mo Farah ran himself into British Olympic history with an extraordinary second gold medal, completing the long-distance double by haring away from the field in last 50 metres of the race to win the 5,000m in 13min 41.66sec.

Roared on by another ecstatic capacity crowd at the Olympic Stadium, who have now been treated to four British gold medals in track and field, Farah replicated the heroics of Dame Kelly Holmes, who won the 800m-1500m double in Athens 2004, by holding on to claim gold as Ethiopian Dejen Gebremeskel attempted to run him down in the home straight.

In so doing, Farah had overcome the fatigue of the heats, where he had looked jaded, and last weekend's 10,000m, withstanding a field full of fast finishers to complete a 5,000m-10,000m double, which only six men have done in the history of the Olympic Games.

For the girls: Mo Farah celebrates with his pregnant wife and daughter

For the girls: Mo Farah celebrates with his pregnant wife and daughter

'It's unbelievable,' said Farah. 'I didn't feel so good in my heat and I thought the others would do something to get rid of me. But they didn't so that worked out.

'The American tried to come past me at one point, but I didn't let him. I just knew I couldn't let anyone past. Everything has its time, and this has worked out for me. I've got two gold medals, who would have thought it

'I've grafted to get here and it's just hard work. To anyone out there, all it takes is hard work. I just want to thank everyone who has supported me. All my coaches down the years and everyone who has helped me get here.'

Golden momen: Mo Farah and his daughter Rihanna with a gold medal

Golden momen: Mo Farah and his daughter Rihanna with a gold medal

Farah sought out his wife, Tanya, eight months pregnant with twin girls, and stepdaughter Rhianna on his lap of honour, as well as embracing his Cuban-born American coach, Alberto Salazar.

'These two medals are for my two girls who aren't born yet,' said Farah. 'I'd like to thank my wife. She's carrying twins and I didn't want to know anything about it if it [the birth] happened in the run-up. But that's worked out. They could arrive any moment, though!'

Farah looked vulnerable at times in a slow race, but when he moved to the front, with 700m to go, he had at least seized back control of his destiny.

Still, after the exceptionally slow early pace, a gang of athletes were at his shoulder as they headed round to the bell and, one by one, they attempted to wrest the lead from him.

Still ahead: Mo Farah reacts as he crosses the line

Still ahead: Mo Farah reacts as he crosses the line

Kenyan Isiah Koech tried with 400m to go, looking to go a stride ahead round the penultimate bend.

But Farah hung on, with 1500m bronze medallist Abdalaati Iguider of Morocco also in contention down the back straight.

Yet Farah simply held the racing line, and, on his way to an astonishing 52.96sec last lap – almost half a second fastest than last week's final 400m – he headed into the home straight ahead, with the Olympic Stadium now reaching the peak of its by now familiar thunderous support.

In the last 100m, Thomas Longosiwa looked to rein Farah in but as the Hounslow athlete's long legs stretched away again, the Kenyan's challenge faded.

Relief: Mo Farah smiles with Bernard Lagat of the U.S. as he celebrates

Relief: Mo Farah smiles with Bernard Lagat of the U.S. as he celebrates

Then came Gebremeskel, the 22- year-old from Ethiopia, and world No 1 this season, making up ground on the home straight at an alarming rate.

Later, the Ethiopian would admit they had allowed the pace to be too slow, that he had delayed his charge too late and that his hesitancy at the bell had cost him gold.

For as the Briton maintained his form and stride length, Gebremeskel faded and, a few metres from the end, Farah threw his hands to his face as if in disbelief as the finish line and a place in history in beckoned.

I've done it: Mo Farah wins the Olympic 5,000 metres

I've done it: Mo Farah wins the Olympic 5,000 metres

Farah now matches the feats of the legends of distance running, Hannes Kolehmainen, Emil Zatopek, Vladimir Kuts, Lasse Viren, Miruts Yifter and Kenenisa Bekele.

Arms outstretched he crossed the line and sank to his knees in his now familiar celebration pose before enjoying a more frivolous moment, performing his 'Mobot' celebration to a delighted crowd.

It was a scarcely conceivable scenario for the man who, 10 years ago, was a party-loving student who jumped naked off Kingston Bridge into the Thames for a dare.

Even a month ago, as a sober world-class athlete, it seemed unlikely. But now, Farah has become an Olympic legend.

London 2012 Olympics: Joanna Rowsell on her women"s team pursuit gold

Wow! How on earth will I ever top this

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UPDATED:

23:56 GMT, 5 August 2012

Joanna Rowsell was part of the women's pursuit team who won gold in the Velodrome on Saturday.

Here, the Sportsmail columnist describes her experience.

GOLDEN FEELING

I was woken up on Sunday by a 6.45am alarm to do BBC Breakfast — but it was OK because the first thing I saw was a gold medal on the bedside table. It’s bigger and heavier than I thought. It weighs you down a bit. It has been crazy since we won the team pursuit. For starters, we’ve had police with us wherever we have been.

We went to do some shopping and they made us put our medals, which we had been wearing round our necks all morning, in a safe at Team GB House even though we were happy to put them in our pockets. I didn’t like it but it was the right call as we could barely walk two metres without everyone saying ‘Hi’ and asking for pictures.

Golden girls: Dani King, Laura Trott, and Joanna Rowsell celebrate their victory in the women's team pursuit

Golden girls: Dani King, Laura Trott, and Joanna Rowsell celebrate their victory in the women's team pursuit

PERFECT PREPARATION

We had such a big gap over the others in qualifying it was hard to not be complacent. On Saturday, because we only had an hour between races — normally it’s around five — we had to devise a recovery plan before the final. We called it the Golden Hour and it involved a 10-minute warm-down, then a chill-out period with a cool towel around our necks and the special hot pants on our legs to keep our muscles warm. Then, just before the race, a warm-up.

WHAT A RACE!

The crowd were so loud I had to block them out at the start as I didn’t want to go out too fast. Our coach stands up from the finish line if we’re riding better times than we are supposed to and down from the line if we’re off schedule. He was standing well up from the line in the first few laps so we knew we were doing well.

Fast as lightening: The pursuit team broke the world record as they stormed to glory in the Velodrome

Fast as lightening: The pursuit team broke the world record as they stormed to glory in the Velodrome

DESPERATE FOR DAN

After the victory laps, I was trying to find my boyfriend, Dan, in the crowd. All these people were cheering so I figured I could just pretend I’d gone to wave at them if I couldn’t find him. Luckily I did.

SOAKING IT UP

We only had about five minutes to get ready for the podium and were in a tiny room trying to make ourselves look nice. Thankfully one of the American girls had a make-up bag and was letting us use it. The organisers were reading us instructions for the ceremony but we weren’t paying attention. So when we got off the podium, we stepped the wrong way. It was great up there — it’s the only point you really get to take it all in.

Proud as punch: Sportsmail's Rowsell poses with her gold medal at what is her first Olympic Games

Proud as punch: Sportsmail's Rowsell poses with her gold medal at what is her first Olympic Games

HAIR HOPES

I knew before the race it was International Alopecia Day. It was a bit of a spooky coincidence. I didn’t have time to think about putting a wig on for the podium and I don’t mind not having one on in the Velodrome. I feel comfortable there and never think about all the people watching on TV. I’ve had the condition since I was 10 so I’m used to it. You will have seen I have hair on some parts of my head and they are just the bits that still grow. I know it looks a bit silly at the moment but I don’t want to cut them off as I’m hoping the rest of it will grow.

HAPPY FAMILIES

After all the interviews, Laura (Trott) went back to rest as she has the omnium to compete in. Dani and I came back to Team GB House. As we came out of the lift there were big cheers and our families were lined up to welcome us. Then it was more media till 11.45pm, back to the village and McDonald’s at 1.30am. Then Dani and I watched the race back on the internet as it’s tough to remember what you were doing.

Happy families: The three women celebrate their stunning win at the Velodrome

Happy families: The three women celebrate their stunning win at the Velodrome

THANKS, GUYS

I couldn’t have done any of this without my team-mates. Laura is the youngest at 20. She’s tiny so she gets lots of protection when she’s behind, which is great because she can save lots of energy for a big burst. She’s really loud and bubbly and not afraid to say what she thinks. Dani is 21 and the best of us at pace control, which is so important. She’s great at keeping things light-hearted if it gets a bit tense or tough. Wendy (Houvenaghel) didn’t get to ride but was so important to our success. We couldn’t have done it without her advice and support.

THE FUTURE

I’m going to stick around to watch Laura, go to the closing ceremony and then it will be off to anywhere with a beach. After that, I want to carry on but I don’t know how I will ever top this: first Olympics, gold medal, world record. And who knows if the team pursuit will still be in the Olympics in Rio. They might include the individual pursuit too and I won that at the Test event, so that would be a new challenge.