Tag Archives: giant

Nacional unfurl world"s largest flag during Copa Libertadores win over Toluca

Now that is what you call a banner! South Americans unfurl giant 600m sign that needed an army of fans to march it into stadium

By
Matt Fortune

PUBLISHED:

14:58 GMT, 5 April 2013

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UPDATED:

15:08 GMT, 5 April 2013

Three years after the first seeds of a world record idea were planted in the minds of Nacional fans, the Uruguayan club have made history.

On Thursday, during their Copa Libertadores tie against Mexican club Toluca, fans around three-quarters of the 25,000-capacity stadium were engulfed by a 600mx50m flag, the largest ever unfurled at a football match.

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

The white, red and blue banner swept down the steep banks of the Parque Central stadium in Montevideo, covering the Colombes, Olympic and Amsterdam stands, setting the tone for a pulsating match, won 4-0 by the hosts.

Festivities started earlier in the afternoon when fans gathered in the city to help carry the enormous flag, which took a year and half to make once a design had been decided upon, to the stadium.

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Jamie Carragher can stand alongside Tony Adams and John Terry – Jamie Redknapp

I wasn't sure about Carra at first. In training, we all wanted to face him… but he's turned into a great player and can stand alongside Adams and Terry as a defensive giant

– it will almost certainly be his last domestic trophy” class=”blkBorder” />

Silver lining: Jamie Carragher lifted the League Cup in 2012 – it will almost certainly be his last domestic trophy

Warrior: A brave defender, Carragher would put his body on the line for Liverpool

Warrior: A brave defender, Carragher would always put his body on the line for Liverpool

Of all of my team-mates, nobody has worked harder than Carra to become the player he is. He deserves everything he has achieved in an age when young players are too quick to leave the training ground and shy away from the work required to master their art.

When he first came into the Liverpool squad, I wasn't sure. In training, Gerard Houllier would set us up one-on-ones – attack versus defence – and we all wanted to face Carra.

Passion: Carragher in action against Manchester United's Wayne Rooney

Passion: Carragher in action against Manchester United's Wayne Rooney

Strength: Carragher was a regular for England during his earlier years

Strength: Carragher was a regular for England during his peak

But after one summer, he came back with a
different approach – and began to stop everyone who tried to go past
him. He was fitter, faster, stronger. Since then, he has enjoyed a
wonderful career and can stand alongside Tony Adams and John Terry as a
defensive giant.

I would advise any young defender to travel to Liverpool and watch him play while you still can. The way he leads, the way he reads the game, the way he defends.

In quieter moments at a packed Anfield, you can hear his voice as he organises and manages on the pitch. In a time when players move from club to club like mercenaries chasing the money, Carragher has stayed loyal to one club.

Tony Adams

John Terry

Leaders: Carragher can claim to be among defensive greats such as Tony Adams (left) and John Terry

He could have finished in America or China, but it means more to him to be a one-club man for Liverpool than it does to grab a few more quid from the game.

He's a funny man, a magnificent defender and a great friend.

Paul Di Resta: I spoke to McLaren about replacing Lewis Hamilton

I held talks with McLaren, but they chose well-backed Perez, says Di Resta

By
Phil Duncan

PUBLISHED:

18:27 GMT, 14 January 2013

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UPDATED:

18:27 GMT, 14 January 2013

Paul Di Resta has hinted that McLaren's decision to sign Sergio Perez was financially motivated.

Di Resta has revealed for the first time that he held talks with the British constructor over a possible move to replace Lewis Hamilton after the 2008 world champion agreed a controversial three-year deal to join Mercedes.

McLaren however, chose to sign Perez, who is heavily supported by telecommunications giant Telmex, which is run by one of the world's richest men in Carlos Slim.

All smiles: Di Resta has revealed he held discussions with McLaren

All smiles: Di Resta has revealed he held discussions with McLaren

'I'm not going to give away too much, but yes, there were discussions,' Di Resta said.

'Unfortunately in this sport now there's a little bit more to it. There's a commercial side and money's tight. Perez has some good backing.'

Speaking at the Autosport International show, the Force India driver added: 'I've got a great relationship with McLaren. Martin Whitmarsh was actually the key person who put my name forward for Force India, and also I've been part of Mercedes-Benz for a lot of years.

'Our paths may cross. It may be in a car that's beating them and I'll have the last laugh. But if I've got to work with them, they're professional people and they win races, and that's what I'm in the sport to do.'

Paul O"Connell doubtful for Six Nations

Ireland's injury crisis worsens with O'Connell doubtful for Six Nations ahead of back surgery

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UPDATED:

14:53 GMT, 30 December 2012

Former Lions captain Paul O'Connell is a major doubt for Ireland's upcoming Six Nations campaign after his provincial side Munster announced that he would be undergoing surgery on a back injury that has blighted his season.

O'Connell has been dogged by injury in recent years and has only played two games for Munster this season with the back injury also forcing him to sit out Ireland's November internationals.

Green giant: O'Connell captained Ireland throughout last year's Six Nations

Green giant: O'Connell captained Ireland throughout last year's Six Nations

A statement from Munster revealed that the 33-year-old lock would undergo back surgery at the earliest opportunity but did not give a time frame for how long his recovery would take.

Ulster wing Tommy Bowe, the country's third highest try scorer of all time, was ruled out of the Six Nations earlier this month with a knee injury. Ireland open their campaign in Wales on February 2.

Zenit St Petersburg fans demand no non-white and gay players

Zenit fan group demands non-white and gay players to be left out of the team

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UPDATED:

19:19 GMT, 17 December 2012

A group of fans of Russian side Zenit St Petersburg are calling for non-white and gay players to be excluded from their team.

This is another sign of the racism which plaguing the country that will host the World Cup in 2018.

Landscrona, the largest Zenit supporters' club, released a manifesto on Monday demanding the club field an all-white, heterosexual team.

It added that 'dark-skinned players are all but forced down Zenit's throat now, which only brings out a negative reaction' and said gay players were 'unworthy of our great city.'

Insult: Hulk (right) is a non-white player who plays for the Russian side

Insult: Hulk (right) is a non-white player who plays for the Russian side

The club quickly sought to distance itself from the fans. Without directly referring to their manifesto, Zenit's Italian head coach, Luciano Spalletti, said on the club's website that 'tolerance for me is most of all the ability to understand and accept differences.'

'Furthermore, being tolerant means that you fight against any kind of stupidity,' he added.

The club, which is owned by state-controlled natural gas giant Gazprom, also told the R-Sport news agency it picked players on ability alone, insisting that 'the team's policy is aimed at development and integration into the world soccer community, and holds no archaic views.'

Zenit was the only top-flight Russian team without a black player until this summer, when it acquired Brazilian striker Hulk and Belgian midfielder Axel Witsel for 80 million euros.

French midfielder Yann M'Vila declined a move to the club in August after receiving death threats.

'I can personally assure you that I will do everything I can to help those who seek to explain to people what tolerance is, and the need to respect other cultures and traditions,' Spalletti said.

'I think that Zenit has proven through its work that the club understands what tolerance is, and what it means to have tolerant behavior. The team has gathered players from different countries and ethnic groups who work together to achieve a common goal, and work well.'

Against it: Luciano Spalletti spoke out against the fans' demands

Against it: Luciano Spalletti spoke out against the fans' demands

Fans insisted that 'we are not racists and for us the absence of black Zenit players is just an important tradition that underlines the team's identity and nothing more.'

Russia has struggled to deal with racism and violence at its stadiums as it prepares to host the 2018 World Cup.

Black players are frequently the targets of monkey chants and some, including Anzhi Makhachkala's Robert Carlos and Christopher Samba, have had bananas thrown at them by fans.

Officials have at times shown little enthusiasm for targeting racism. When Lokomotiv Moscow fans held up a banner in 2010 thanking an English team for signing their black striker Peter Odemwingie with a picture of a banana, the head of Russia's World Cup bid awkwardly claimed they were referencing a quaint, little-used Russian expression meaning 'to fail an exam.'

Zenit's fans have long been the country's
most problematic. Dick Advocaat, the team's former Dutch manager, once
admitted that 'the fans don't like black players' and that it would be
'impossible' for Zenit to sign one.

History: Wagner Love said Zenit's fans were the most racist in Russia

History: Wagner Love said Zenit's fans were the most racist in Russia

Several black players have also singled out Zenit's fans as particularly racist. Former Russian top scorer Vagner Love told a Brazilian newspaper in April that Zenit was 'the most racist team in Russia' and the only one whose fans had abused him in his seven years playing for CSKA Moscow.

Five years earlier, Krylya Sovetov Samara's former Cameroon international Serge Branco told a local newspaper that Zenit's management were 'the real racists' for not combatting the problem, adding that 'in a civilized country they'd smack them down to the third division for their fans' behavior.'

Zenit's fans have also come under the spotlight recently after one of them threw a firecracker that injured Dinamo Moscow's goalkeeper during a match in November.

Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, himself a Zenit fan, called for violent spectators to be banned for life from attending matches. Parliament has drafted a bill that would ban hooligans for a year.

EXCLUSIVE: Stuart Broad"s heel injury could scupper England"s hopes in India

EXCLUSIVE: Broad's heel injury could scupper England's chances in India Test series

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UPDATED:

22:45 GMT, 10 November 2012

England expect to discover on Saturday whether fast bowler Stuart Broad will be fit for the opening Test against India this week – or if injury will force him out of the opening two Tests at least.

After Broad's involvement in the second warm-up match of the tour against Mumbai A was cut short last week, England's management denied that they were concerned about his fitness for the series.

And even after a scan showed he had a bruised left heel, they continued to insist the problem was no more serious than a 'fast bowler's niggle' and that he was not a doubt for the first Test, which starts in Ahmedabad on Thursday.

All smiles: Stuart Broad's injured heel could cause England's vicecaptain to miss the first two Tests in India

All smiles: Stuart Broad's injured heel could cause England's vicecaptain to miss the first two Tests in India

But while Steven Finn's thigh strain, suffered on day one of the tour against India A, has healed well enough for the Middlesex giant to be in genuine contention, concerns are growing over Broad, who was appointed England's vicecaptain at the start of the tour to new leader Alastair Cook.

Stuart Meaker, called up for the first Test as cover for Finn, said: 'Looking at how Steven Finn is going, he's getting closer and closer to being ready.'

England's original rehabilitation plan for Broad was that he would sit out the final warm-up match in Haryana, completed on Friday, then test his fitness in the nets on Sunday with a view to playing in the Test three days later.

Sources within the coaching staff suggested on Friday that Finn had a better chance of playing than Broad but on Friday a team spokesman suggested that the latter might not bowl until Tuesday.

That fuelled fears that the first Test is too soon to risk him and put a question-mark over his participation in the second, starting in Mumbai on November 23.

The only cure for a bruised heel is rest, depending on the severity of the injury, for a minimum of two weeks.

In contention: Steven Finn has healed well from a thigh strain

In contention: Steven Finn has healed well from a thigh strain

That could even rule Broad out for the first half of the four-match series, with no practice match scheduled between the second Test in Mumbai and the third in Kolkata to prove his fitness in match conditions.

If Broad is not completely fit, he could play on Thursday only after an injection or relying on painkillers, but England will be aware that the effect of such action might put him at risk for the rest of the tour.

Broad is considered vital to England's chance of victory on the Sub-continent for the first time in nearly 30 years, since David Gower's side won 2-1 in 1984- 85.

Despite criticism for what some perceived as a dip in speed and penetration during the summer, the 26-year-old paceman arrived in India as the leading Test wicket-taker in world cricket for 2012.

Vital: Broad's contribution is considered essential if England are to succeed in India

Vital: Broad's contribution is considered essential if England are to succeed in India

Forty scalps in nine matches, against Pakistan, Sri Lanka, West Indies and South Africa, put him one ahead of Vernon Philander, Saeed Ajmal, Kemar Roach and Graeme Swann and 13 ahead of Dale Steyn, considered the most dangerous quickie on the planet.

If India want reminding of his threat, they need only recall his man-of-the-series performance against them during England's 4-0 win on home soil last year.

His 25 wickets at 13.84 included 7-94 and 8-76 at Trent Bridge, featuring the first Test hat-trick on that ground, and fuelled England's drive to the top of the ICC world rankings.

Broad also showed his ability to take wickets in seemingly placid batting conditions by taking 13 against Pakistan in Dubai and Abu Dhabi in January.

Lewis Hamilton: I"ve no regrets over leaving McLaren

Hamilton: I've no regrets over leaving McLaren… despite fact Mercedes haven't won a point in their last three races

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UPDATED:

17:00 GMT, 1 November 2012

Lewis Hamilton has admitted to suffering no second thoughts regarding his move to Mercedes in the wake of their recent dismal form.

Since Hamilton announced he was quitting McLaren after 14 years with the Woking-based marque and signing a three-year deal with Mercedes, the German manufacturing giant has failed to score a single point in the last three races.

It is Mercedes' worst run since they returned to Formula One at the start of 2010, in stark contrast to the fact that in their previous 52 grands prix they had not scored on just four occasions.

On the move: Hamilton says he has no regrets over cutting ties with McLaren

On the move: Hamilton says he has no regrets over cutting ties with McLaren

It would further appear to highlight the folly of Hamilton's switch, which he has long stated was because he wanted a new challenge.

On the evidence of Mercedes' woeful run it may be he has bitten off more than he can chew if he is hoping to revive their fortunes.

Asked about Mercedes' run, Hamilton said: 'I've been told about it. It makes me even more driven to help them score points, and no, I'm not thinking 'have I made right decision'

'I'm very happy with the decision I made. What is happening to them doesn't have any impact on that.
People do sometimes lose their way. Even we (McLaren) have struggled in the past and not scored points.

'To be honest, I've not really focused on them to see what problems they've had with the car. I've not really noticed it.

'I've just been focusing on trying to get the constructors' title for this team, trying to get the maximum for us. It is theoretically still possible for us to win it, so I'm going to be all guns blazing for that.'

Steering a new course: Hamilton's new team have failed to win a point in the last three races

Steering a new course: Hamilton's new team have failed to win a point in the last three races

Steering a new course: Hamilton's new team have failed to win a point in the last three races

Appreciating the size of the task awaiting him at Mercedes when he officially joins on January 1, Hamilton added: 'I already knew how big it was going to be. I really thought about it long and hard, and I could see how big it was. Perhaps it's now growing.

'But as a task I'm really excited about it, excited to meet new people and to being in a different environment, and to mould myself into that environment.'

Hamilton experienced an altogether different world away from F1 this week as part of his work with the children's charity UNICEF.

One particular experience earlier this year was eye-opening enough for the 27-year-old when he visited the Philippines capital Manila.

But a visit to one of India's most impoverished areas, following the grand prix on the outskirts of New Delhi four days ago, clearly left an indelible mark upon him.

Podium regular: Hamilton is a regular at the top of the starting grid and in the top three finishers

Podium regular: Hamilton is a regular at the top of the starting grid and in the top three finishers

Podium regular: Hamilton is a regular at the top of the starting grid and in the top three finishers

Podium regular: Hamilton is a regular at the top of the starting grid and in the top three finishers

Surrounded by the splendour of Abu
Dhabi's multi-million pound Yas Marina circuit, the contrast compared to
his environment of the previous few days was not lost on him.

'It's insane. They're a billion miles apart, literally opposite ends of the spectrum,' said Hamilton. 'You have one of the wealthiest places we ever get to go here in Abu Dhabi, and I've just been to one of the poorest places I've ever seen.'

Clearly choked at this point, Hamilton added: 'It was very sad to see.

'I was there and I got to see an issue not many people are conscious of because we just go about our daily lives, including me.

'There are ladies having babies on the streets, malnourished kids that are allowed to die. No-one comes to the rescue. These babies don't even have a fighting chance.

'That's insane considering there is enough money in the world, there is enough to go round. And if there's not, print some more.'

Choked: Hamilton was shocked by some of the scenes in New Delhi

Choked: Hamilton was shocked by some of the scenes in New Delhi

As to the impact of Hamilton's visit, he appreciates it is likely to be 'miniscule' making 'the smallest of differences'.

But at least he hopes it might have raised awareness as he said: 'It all starts with one step.

'Growing up I've always wanted to be like…you know when you put a pebble in the pond and it creates ripples, well, I'd like to start that kind of chain reaction so others can follow.

'There are loads of people doing great things in the world, and it's no skin off my nose to go and spend a couple of days doing what I did. It was really incredible. I really enjoyed it.'

Sports Direct signs torn down at St James" Park, Newcastle

Newcastle fans rejoice as Sports Direct signs are ripped down from St James' Park

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UPDATED:

11:00 GMT, 15 October 2012

To the joy of Newcastle fans around the world, the club have begun the process of tearing down the Sports Direct signs to return the club's historic name: St James' Park.

There was outrage when the club announced a sponsorship deal with the sportswear retailer which included the naming rights to the stadium to end 119-years of history in the city.

And anger directed at Mike Ashley – owner of both club and retail giant – in a move the fans regarded as running roughshod over the iconic heart of the city.

Good riddance: Newcastle fans will be pleased to see the back of these signs

Good riddance: Newcastle fans will be pleased to see the back of these signs

Controversial new sponsors Wonga.com have recently signed a 32million four-year shirt and stadium sponsorship deal.

The deal does not start until next season, but the club have immediately pulled down the Sports Direct signs and restore the St James’ Park name.

The original lettering is due to be restored for Newcastle’s next home game, in the Europa League against Club Brugge. The move is a victory for supporters who have refused to acknowledge the change to the Sports Direct Arena.

However, Toon army are furious with plans to have the short-term loans company's name emblazoned on the front of the famous black and white stripes

And one local MP has threatened to boycott the Wonga Arena if Ashley renames the stadium for a second time as part of a three-year deal worth a reported 8m a year.

The controversial company, already sponsors of Championship club Blackpool and top Scottish side Hearts, have been labelled a 'legal loan shark company' for offering short-term loans at an APR of 4,214 per cent.

Controversy: Many fans have expressed unease at new sponsors Wonga

Controversy: Many fans have expressed unease at new sponsors Wonga

But Newcastle boss Alan Pardew told Sky Sports News he was thrilled with the decision to revert back to the original name last week

He said: 'I'm a romantic, so the stadium change last year hurt me and hurt our team. It's one of those business decision that you can't get your head around at times as a football person.

'I made a point of saying that the same sign should go up, not a new one, the same sign, 'St James' Park', and I'm absolutely overjoyed with that.'

Serita Shone returns to bobsleigh after broken back

Shone takes a giant step back after horror crash

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UPDATED:

21:04 GMT, 13 October 2012

On Tuesday, Serita Shone will push a bobsleigh for the first time since she broke her back in a 70mph accident which doctors feared would leave her paralysed for life.

Her return may be confined to the dry push-start track at Bath University, but Shone's re-acquaintance with a bobsleigh symbolises the remarkable recovery she has made a year after her terrifying crash in Germany, where she was a novice brake-woman in a two-seater bobsled practicing for her first competition, at the British championships.

When driver Fiona Harrison lost control in the fastest sector of the Winterberg track and their bobsleigh overturned, Shone was slammed against the ice beneath the weight of the 175-kilogram sled where she lay motionless like a rag doll.

Comeback: British Bobsleigher Serita Shone

Comeback: British Bobsleigher Serita Shone

She had to be airlifted to Marburg
University where only the skills of a surgeon, who performed two
highly-complex operations on her spine five days apart, spared her from a
future spent in a wheelchair.

Yet every day since has been a challenge for the 23-year-old from Weymouth.

'I have tried to stay strong,' said
Shone last week. 'But I am not Superwoman. There have been times, really
dark days, when I felt I just couldn't go on. I felt I'd come so far,
but it wasn't far enough. It felt like I'd failed myself and let
everyone else down.'

So, the call she received five days
ago inviting her to Bath from Gary Anderson, the performance director of
the British bobsleigh team, was the kind of tonic unavailable on
prescription.

'I couldn't find the words to tell Gary how much it meant,' explained Shone.

Neither Anderson nor Shone are
deluding themselves that her appearance at the push-start track will
lead to her being able to fight for a place on the British team at the
2014 Winter OIympics in Sochi, Russia.

But is a start, at least. 'Before I
can tell myself I have beaten this injury, I need to get to the point
where I have finished a race,' said Shone.

'That to me is winning. Anything
after that will be a bonus.' Shone had only received medical clearance
to resume bob-specific training 12 days ago, when consultant spinal
surgeon Evan Davies reminded her on her last visit to see him at the
Royal South Hants Hospital in Southampton: 'Do you realise how lucky you
are, Serita You should be paralysed.'

She confesses she barely slept for a week before that consultation. 'I had nightmares every night,' said Shone.

'The closer the appointment got the
more frightened I was. I couldn't picture with how I would deal with
being told I was unfit to return to the sport.'

Outwardly, Shone is vivacious, a
young woman with an insatiable appetite for adventure that is
undiminished by her traumatic experience.

Yet sometimes appearances can be deceptive. 'I should be grateful how things are going – and I am,' she said.

'I can lead a normal life, but what I
want is the opportunity to prove to people that I can still be an
athlete. It's what I want most. I genuinely don't know what the future
holds, but at least the news from my consultant, then the call from
Gary, has been just brilliant. I know it's the start of the next long
road, but at least it feels like leaving the dark and dingy road I have
been on behind me.'

She admits she reached out to
psychologists when the sequence of her rehabilitation programme
stretched ahead of her like a series of mountain peaks to be conquered
alone.

'It's not nice putting yourself in the firing line of failure every day,' said Shone.

'No matter what you are trying to
attempt you may not be fit enough, strong enough or capable enough. For
six months, I didn't fully understand what had happened. I shut
everything off. You become good at adapting a self-coping mechanism; and
I became very good over the last year at masking pain, and hiding my
inner emotions.

'To begin with I didn't think I
needed any psychological help. But when everyone else was getting
excited about the new season, it hit home that I might not be involved
and that everything could be over. I thought life was unfair as I had no
choice in the matter. I was struggling ….and I realised I couldn't do
this on my own anymore.'

In the earliest days she saw Amanda
Gatherer, then more recently consulted Tig Calvert at the intensive
rehab unit at Bisham Abbey.

'I do realise things can't get worse from here.'

Shone will continue to receive
financial support for her on-going rehabilitation from the British
bobsleigh team, and she makes a modest income from being an athlete
mentor visiting schools, or clubs.

'I am really thankful to the bobsleigh team, yet like most athletes I am on the look-out for sponsorship,' she said.

In this summer of extravagant
success for British sportsmen and women, Shone has a narrative to sell
that, within its own context, is just as inspirational: her courage,
dedication and a refusal to yield to the overwhelming odds stacked
against her reflect a woman with star quality. Shone has only to shut
her eyes to recapture of that terrible day of October 26, 2011.

'I remember I screwed up my eyes, gritted my teeth and hung on for grim death,' she said.

'The noise of my helmet clattering
against the track was like ice in a blending machine. I had a searing,
burning pain in my back. I could hear people coming towards me, their
ice spikes crunching along the track. I remember being told that medics
were on the way, and being asked if I knew my name.'

She smiled, 'I knew my name, I knew exactly what happened. I just couldn't move.'

Stuart Fielden signs for Huddersfield

Huddersfield pick up former Great Britain prop Fielden on two-year deal

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UPDATED:

22:05 GMT, 12 October 2012

Huddersfield have signed former Great Britain prop forward Stuart Fielden following his release by Wigan.

The 33-year-old Fielden has signed a two-year contract with the Giants, where he will link up with head coach Paul Anderson, his old Bradford team-mate.

With Brian McDermott and Joe Vagana, they formed the famous 'awesome foursome' front row quartet who laid the foundations for Bradford's trophy-laden years in the early days of Super League.

Giant: Stuart Fielden has signed a two-year deal with Huddersfield

Giant: Stuart Fielden has signed a two-year deal with Huddersfield

Fielden was widely acknowledged as the best front rower in the game when he left Bradford midway through the 2006 season.

He cost Wigan a world record transfer fee of 440,000 but he was not offered a new contract after making just two appearances in the last two seasons due to knee and pectoral injuries.