Tag Archives: gayle

World Twenty20: New Zealand crash out

West Indies win Super Over to send New Zealand tumbling out of World Twenty20

|

UPDATED:

14:36 GMT, 1 October 2012

New Zealand crashed out of World Twenty20 after a Super Over defeat by West Indies in a Super Eight match in Pallekele International Cricket Stadium on Monday.

With the scores level, New Zealand scored 17 runs off the Super Over sent down by Marlon Samuels.

West Indies scored 19 off the first five deliveries bowled by Tim Southee to win the contest and keep alive their chances of a semi-final place.

Leading the way: Chris Gayle top scored for the West Indies as they beat New Zealand

Leading the way: Chris Gayle top-scored for the West Indies as they beat New Zealand

West Indies were bowled out for 139 in 19.3 overs with Chris Gayle top-scoring with a fluent 30 off 14 balls.

New Zealand seam bowlers Doug Bracewell (3-31) and Southee (3-21) shared six wickets between them.

Chasing the target, New Zealand struggled against the spin of Sunil Narine (3-20) but skipper Ross Taylor's unbeaten 62 helped them to finish on 139 for seven and force the Super Over.

Nowhere to hide: Tim Southee looked gutted as the West Indies players celebrated

Nowhere to hide: Tim Southee looked gutted as the West Indies players celebrated

World Twenty 20: Sri Lanka beat West Indies in Super Eights

Semis loom for Sri Lanka as Jayawardene oversees nine-wicket win over West Indies

|

UPDATED:

17:19 GMT, 29 September 2012

Hosts Sri Lanka put one foot in the ICC World Twenty20 semi-finals with a nine-wicket trouncing of the West Indies at Pallekele.

A capacity and partisan crowd celebrated every run as captain Mahela Jayawardene (65no) oversaw a composed run chase after the Windies had made 129 for five.

Jayawardene always had things under control, in a 45-ball half-century containing eight fours, to ensure Sri Lanka completed their straightforward task with almost five overs to spare.

In control: Sri Lanka romped to an easy win thanks to some cool batting from Kumar Sangakkara (left) and Mahela Jayawardene

In control: Sri Lanka romped to an easy win thanks to some cool batting from Kumar Sangakkara (left) and Mahela Jayawardene

Sri Lanka v West Indies

Click here for a full scorecard

He shared an unbroken century stand
with Kumar Sangakkara and Sri Lanka therefore lead Super Eight Group E
as the only team with two wins to their name.

Marlon Samuels (50) and Dwayne Bravo
were largely responsible for the Windies mustering as many as they did
after Darren Sammy unsurprisingly chose to bat first on an awkward, used
surface.

Skilful seamer Nuwan Kulasekera
conceded only seven runs in his first three overs, but 21 to Samuels and
Andre Russell when he came back for his last.

Up in the air: Denesh Ramdin and Jayawardene look to the skies

Up in the air: Denesh Ramdin and Jayawardene look to the skies

Kulasekera was still in credit,
having picked up the key wicket of Chris Gayle when the West Indies'
dangerman edged behind as he chased an attempted cut at a wide ball.

Number three Samuels bided his time,
in a stand of 65 with Bravo, as Ajantha Mendis continued to make life
difficult and returned figures of two for 12 in favourable conditions
for his brand of slow bowling.

Samuels upped the ante in the later overs – apart from the penultimate, in which Lasith Malinga proved tough to get away – to complete a 34-ball half-century containing four fours and two sixes.

Strike bowler: Ajantha Mendis recorded figures of 12 for two

Strike bowler: Ajantha Mendis recorded figures of 12 for two

One of those maximums was a straight
one off Kulasekera which carried more than 100 metres to become the
biggest hit of the tournament so far.

But Samuels and his team must hope
they have more than that to celebrate when they return here on Monday,
to face New Zealand, in search of their second Super Eight victory – and
a shot after all at a place in the knockout stages in Colombo.

What England need to do to beat West Indies: Nasser Hussain

England expects: How to get on top of West Indies

|

UPDATED:

21:44 GMT, 26 September 2012

Blow out Gayle early

West Indies opener Chris Gayle is a match-winner who could take the game away by smashing the bowlers as no-one else really can. England may remember how Steven Finn got him out pulling a short ball to deep fine leg when these teams met in the Twenty20 at Trent Bridge last summer and open with his pace, and use Graeme Swann’s off-spin at the other end. It can’t be easy pulling Finn with that big heavy bat that Gayle uses and Swann could bring slip and lbw into play because Gayle likes to have a look for an over before he goes on the attack.

Master blaster: Chris Gayle is a very destructive batsman

Master blaster: Chris Gayle is a very destructive batsman

Solve the mystery

England were able to pick ‘mystery spinner’ Sunil Narine in the third Test in the summer but on these pitches in the shorter game he is a different proposition. We have noticed that the position of his thumb is different for his off-spinner than the one that turns away from the right-hander and if England can pick that then they can use their feet and get to the pitch of the ball. But if they don’t know which way it is going to turn, the much-maligned sweep could become a valuable asset.

Work it out: Sunil Narine can be a threat with his mystery spin

Work it out: Sunil Narine can be a threat with his mystery spin

Read the conditions

Stuart Broad's side did not read the conditions quite right in Colombo because even though the pitch for the India match was a little drier, they decided not to play a second spinner against India. This time they have to forget about the opposition, look at the surface and if they think it will turn, then bring Samit Patel back. Indications are that the pitches at Pallekele will be true and the ball should come on to the bat which will suit England. Forget India, the tournament starts now for Broad and his men.

Read it right: Stuart Broad needs to understand the conditions

Read it right: Stuart Broad needs to understand the conditions

World Twenty20 2012: Steven Finn issues Chris Gayle warning

Fiery Finn issues Gayle warning ahead of Super Eights opener against West Indies

|

UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 25 September 2012

Upbeat: Finn is confident England can turn things around

Upbeat: Finn is confident England can turn things around

England headed to the hills on Tuesday, where they pledged to go on the attack when they come face to face with Twenty20’s biggest gun.

The long bus ride from Colombo to the picturesque city of Kandy was followed by a declaration of intent for their opening Super Eights match against West Indies at nearby Pallekele on Thursday.

Chris Gayle will spearhead a West Indies line-up brimful of big-hitting batsmen but England believe they have the firepower to cut him down, as they did when they last met in a Twenty20 match at Trent Bridge last summer.

Steven Finn dismissed Gayle for two then
as England won by seven wickets, the sort of result which would take
them halfway to the semi-finals if they can repeat it on Thursday.

‘Gayle has an aura about him and it’s
exciting to come up against people like that,’ said Finn. ‘It will be a
challenge bowling at one of the best Twenty20 batsmen in the world but
it’s a challenge I’m looking forward to.’

England will approach that challenge by attempting to make early inroads into a West Indies line-up which also includes plenty of others capable of clearing the boundary, such as Kieron Pollard.

Dangerman: Gayle (left) will open the batting for West Indies

Dangerman: Gayle (left) will open the batting for West Indies

‘It’s going to be up to me to set the tone against Gayle,’ said Finn. ‘My job with the new ball is to put the opposition under pressure by taking early wickets because that stalls any momentum.’

There was a confident and relaxed mood about England on Tuesday, at odds with their inept display against India on Sunday.

They believe the switch to what is likely to be a pitch with more pace at Pallekele will suit them in a group which also includes New Zealand and Sri Lanka.

Finn was on good form despite enduring a tortuous road trip here.

Confident: England feel that the Pallekele pitch will suit them

Confident: England feel that the Pallekele pitch will suit them

‘Four-hour bus journey has made me feel like I have bowled 30 overs,’ he tweeted.

There was an immediate riposte from his erstwhile team-mate and current TV pundit Kevin Pietersen, who displayed his confidence that he is close to an England comeback by replying: ‘You went on a bus Findog You should have asked and I would have got you the heli we use for our transport. Next time…’

Pietersen has not spoken to many of the England team since his exile began nearly two months ago but taking the mickey is a start.

Usain Bolt considering offer from Shane Warne to play Twenty20 cricket

Bolt bowled over! Usain considering offer from Warne to play Twenty20 in Oz

|

UPDATED:

11:47 GMT, 13 August 2012

The next time you see Usain Bolt in action may not be on a running track, but with a cricket bat in his hand after revealing he is considering an offer from Shane Warne to play Twenty20 cricket in Australia next season.

The superstar Jamaican sprinter lit up the London 2012 Games, taking gold medals in the 100 metre, 200m and 4x100m relay, but could soon be running a mere 22 yards between the wickets.

Bolt is a massive fan of cricket and played the sport in his home nation at junior level and revealed his prowess during a charity match in 2009 when he clean-bowled Chris Gayle.

Scroll down to watch video

Bowled over: Bolt is giving serious consideration to paying cricket in Australia

Bowled over: Bolt is giving serious consideration to paying cricket in Australia

And now legendary leg-spinner Warne has offered him the opportunity to participate in Australia's Big Bash League which runs between December 7 and January 9. Bolt will consider the offer, if he can get enough time off.

Bolt said: 'If I get the chance I will definitely try because I know it's going to be a lot of fun. I don't know how good I am. I will probably have to get a lot of practice in.'

'Warne contacted me and asked me about if I am serious and if I really want to do it then he can put in a few words that should get it done. So we will see if I get the time off. I will try.'

And of all the various forms of the game, the Twenty20 version is Bolt's favourite as he can relate to the high tempo drama to which he is accustomed in the field of athletics.

'Twenty20, I love it. Just the fact that it is so exciting, it's about going hard the whole time, not just about playing shots.

All rounder: Bolt enjoys batting and bowling - outside his regular job of sprinting, that is

All rounder: Bolt enjoys batting and bowling – outside his regular job of sprinting, that is

All rounder: Bolt enjoys batting and bowling - outside his regular job of sprinting - and with West Indies legends Curtly Ambrose (below left) and Courtney Walsh (below, right)

'It's about being aggressive and I like that style of batsman.'

Mike McKenna, project manager for the BBL on behalf of Cricket Australia is, understandably, very keen for Bolt to join the league. But only if he can reach the required standard.

'We'd be very keen to have someone like Usain Bolt involved in some way in the BBL,' McKenna said.

'He's very keen on cricket, he's been close to the Australian cricket team and I'd imagine he is pretty quick between the wickets.

'But we would want to make sure that any athletes can play another code to an appropriate level. The competition has gone beyond the novelty factor.'

VIDEO: Bolt bowls out West Indies batting legend Gayle

Chris Gayle recalled by West Indies

Gayle back from the wilderness after Windies recall batsman for England one-dayers

|

UPDATED:

06:32 GMT, 5 June 2012

The West Indies have recalled former
captain Chris Gayle after a 14-month absence to take part in the one-day
series against England later this month.

Gayle has returned to the squad after
his dispute with the West Indies Cricket Board led to the 32-year-old
opener missing over a year of international cricket.

Back in the fold: West Indies batsman Chris Gayle

Back in the fold: West Indies batsman Chris Gayle

He returns for the three-match series with England which begins on June 16 and is line to play his first game for his country since they lost to Pakistan in the quarter-finals of the World Cup in March 2011.

WEST INDIES SQUAD

Darren Sammy
(captain)
Dwayne Bravo (vice-captain)
Tino Best
Darren Bravo
Johnson
Charles
Fidel Edwards
Chris Gayle
Sunil Narine
Kieron Pollard
Denesh Ramdin (wicketkeeper), Ravi Rampaul
Andre Russell
Marlon
Samuels
Lendl Simmons
Dwayne Smith.

Gayle criticised the board and current coach Ottis Gibson after being left out of a one-day series against Pakistan a month later.

But meetings between Gayle and the WICB earlier this year have smoothed the path for his return.

Clyde Butts, chairman of the selection panel, said: 'Chris is a player of proven quality and we are looking forward to him adding this dimension to the side and his contributions as a senior member of the squad.'

Gayle joins a squad captained by Test skipper Darren Sammy who has Dwayne Bravo as his vice-captain.

Kieron Pollard, Andre Russell and Dwayne Smith are also named in the squad and opener Lendl Simmons is included.

There is also a place for spinner Sunil Narine who made a major impression during the recent Indian Premier League.

Openers Adrian Barath and Kieron Powell, who have struggled in the
first two Tests in the series against England, have been left out.

Test wicketkeeper Denesh Ramdin comes in to replace Carlton Baugh.

Talks: coach Ottis Gibson

Talks: coach Ottis Gibson

Butts added: 'We are now beginning to move into the next phase of the development of the team as we continue to build our ODI side as we continue to plan for the 2015 World Cup.

'A number of players who we have been exposed to international cricket and who, by their recent performances, have shown that they can play roles in the team have been retained.

'There is, what we believe, is a balanced combination of young rising players like Sunil Narine in the bowling department and Johnson Charles in the top order of the batting in addition to the well known seasoned internationals.'

England v West Indies – win tickets

WIN tickets to watch England v West Indies at Lord's – courtesy of ASDA

UPDATED:

15:44 GMT, 10 May 2012

Asda

Sportsmail has teamed up with ASDA to give two lucky readers the opportunity to watch England play the West Indies at Lord’s.

We have a pair of tickets to give away for day one and day two of the first Test on May 17 and 18.

To be in with a chance, answer the following question:

Who is the West Indies captain
A) Dwayne Bravo
B) Darren Sammy
C) Chris Gayle

E-mail your answer, along with your name, address and contact number to:

[email protected]

to arrive by 11am on Monday, May 14.

PLEASE NOTE: You must validate your entry with the words ASDA CRICKET TICKETS in your subject box; the tickets do not include travel to/from the ground, accommodation or hospitality; normal Associated Newspapers terms and conditions apply – the Editor's decision is final.

ASDA are proud to be entering their 7th year of sponsorship of the National Kwik Cricket competition. Their stores have handed out over 25,000 of healthy food and drink each summer at festivals to help a total of over 730,000 children get healthy and active through cricket to date. Go to www.asda.com/kwikcricket for more details.

The Top Spin: West Indies without Chris Gayle dampens series

Forget the rain… the lack of Gayle-force Windies dampens series

|

UPDATED:

09:35 GMT, 1 May 2012

Top Spin

A team purporting to represent the best
West Indies has to offer arrives in England on Wednesday for three
Tests, three one-dayers and a Twenty20 international. Had the Olympics
gone to Paris, they would probably have been given only two Tests. They
are, in truth, beneficiaries of a quirk in the schedule.

As recently as 2000, when the arrival of a side led by Jimmy Adams coincided with West Indies' 27th year in possession of the Wisden Trophy, their visit came complete with a frisson – which sounds like a shot only Brian Lara could have played.

They were awarded five Tests that summer (but never since), plus six one-dayers and numerous other matches. The tour averages tell us that opener Sherwin Campbell got through 20 first-class innings. Leg-spinner Mahendra Nagamootoo was given only one Test, but still bowled 328.4 first-class overs.

Absent friend: Chris Gayle (left) shares a joke with Royal Challengers Bangalore team owner Vijay Mallya

Absent friend: Chris Gayle (left) shares a joke with Royal Challengers Bangalore team owner Vijay Mallya

Gayle force: The opener is plying his trade in the IPL rather than joining West Indies in England

Gayle force: The opener is plying his trade in the IPL rather than joining West Indies in England

FOLLOW THE TOP SPIN ON TWITTER

For more cricketing musings, please follow us on Twitter: @the_topspin

They were in the days when a tour had a
rhythm of its own – and a subplot outside the Tests that could be
engrossing in its own right. This time West Indies have a three-day
game at Hove and a four-day match against England Lions at Northampton
before the first Test begins at Lord's on May 17. Move along, seems to
be the message – nothing to see here…

Of course 12 years ago it helped that
they still had names to conjure with: Courtney Walsh, Curtly Ambrose,
Lara, even Chris Gayle and Shivnarine Chanderpaul. And but for a
collapse to 54 all out in the second innings of the second Test at
Lord's, they would have taken a 2-0 lead with three to play. The summer
that kickstarted Duncan Fletcher's reign as England coach could easily
have been as miserable as the previous one.

Forgive, please, the nostalgia – but that is what we are left with.

If West Indies go out and a nick a rain-affected series 1-0 in the weeks ahead, this column will be suitably contrite. But we are talking about a team that has won only two Tests out of 30 since seeing off a rabble of an England side in Jamaica three years ago. And one of those two victories was against Bangladesh.

Changing allegiance: Dwayne Bravo (right) is more a part of Chennai Super Kings these days than West Indies

Changing allegiance: Dwayne Bravo (right) is more a part of Chennai Super Kings these days than West Indies

But the decline and fall of West Indies
is about more than a chance to moan about the fact that things aren't
what they once were. It is one of cricket's modern morality tales.

Absent from the 15-man Test squad will be Chris Gayle, Ramnaresh Sarwan, Sunil Narine and Dwayne Bravo. Gayle has not played international cricket since the World Cup a year ago after falling out with the West Indies Cricket Board, while Sarwan – who averages 40 in his 87 Tests – believes he has paid the price for being too close to the WICB's arch enemies, the West Indies Players' Association.

Narine, a 23-year-old Trinidadian unorthodox offie, recently took 11 wickets in five ODIs against Australia at an average of 14 and with an economy-rate of 3.32. But the lure of the IPL meant he played no part in the Tests, where Shane Shillingford promptly overtook him with a 10-wicket haul in Dominica.

As for Bravo, the more he plays for Chennai Super Kings, the less he feels a part of West Indies.

Those were the days: West Indies no longer boast cricketing superstars such as the legendary Brian Lara

Those were the days: West Indies no longer boast cricketing superstars such as the legendary Brian Lara

As a quartet, these men provide their own reflection of the state of the game in the Caribbean: a world in which communication is poor, administrators are at each other's throats, and funds are so scarce that talented cricketers are forced to place faceless franchises ahead of regional prestige.

We are often told that West Indian cricket has been the victim of circumstances beyond its control, and no doubt there is some truth in this. Sporting dynasties cannot last for ever, the lure of American sports is undeniable, and the post-colonial rage that burned inside Viv Richards may have flickered its last.

But let's not patronise West Indian cricketers too much. Because they could, if they got their house in order, field the following XI at Lord's: Gayle, K Edwards, Sarwan, Darren Bravo, Chanderpaul, Dwayne Bravo, Ramdin, Sammy, Narine, F Edwards, Roach. No world-beaters, perhaps, but strong enough to give England at least a scare.

Instead, we will have to make do with a watered-down approximation of the real thing. And that is a source of regret – not just for the Caribbean, but for everyone who cares about cricket.

THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS

More from Lawrence Booth…

The Top Spin: Come what May tortured batsmen will weather cruel April's storm
24/04/12

Top Spin: Time for Twenty20 to pay some of Test cricket's bills… it's what families do
17/04/12

The Top Spin: Chastened, not disheartened – why England can afford a smile again
10/04/12

Top Spin at the Test: Spinner Swann on song for England
04/04/12

Top Spin at the Test: Mahela makes the mathematicians earn their keep
03/04/12

The Top Spin: Colombo is England's chance to nip the doomsday Test scenario in the bud
02/04/12

The Top Spin: Testing times ahead as five-day game could be reduced to Ashes
27/03/12

Top Spin: Two Indian greats… but only one Little Master: Why Tendulkar outshines Dravid
19/03/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

What a washout

So, not a single one of last week's eight county championship matches achieved a result. Two were abandoned without a ball being bowled, and only one reached the third innings. Four of the 20 rounds of games are now complete and the real winner has been the rain.

The ECB can't control the weather, but the BBC's Philip Eden, writing in this year's Wisden, pointed out: 'Sooner or later… a very wet April and May is bound to come along which, with the present scheduling regime, will mess up the Championship.'

Five more rounds are scheduled to take place or start this month, and the forecast isn't great. The authorities can't say they weren't warned.

Flower speaks sense

Was it a 'witch-hunt' or wasn't it Were the questions put to Andrew Strauss about his future during the tour of Sri Lanka legitimate lines of enquiry or just media muck-raking

Graeme Swann and Kevin Pietersen made it clear they took the second view, which probably said more for their loyalty to Strauss than any objective interpretation (incidentally, in Colombo, Swann admitted he DID read the press, which flies in the face of years of player protestation – but we digress…)

Anyway, last week Steve James asked Andy Flower what he thought. His reply should settle the matter. 'I think the description of it being a witch-hunt is inaccurate,' said Flower in the Sunday Telegraph. 'I don't think anyone is wanting to burn Strauss at the stake. But I think people are questioning him for not scoring heavy enough runs, and I can understand that.'

One to bear in mind next time the players mount a witch-hunt against the press…

Speaking sense: Andy Flower (left) admits that Andrew Strauss is not the victim of a media witch-hunt

Speaking sense: Andy Flower (left) admits that Andrew Strauss is not the victim of a media witch-hunt

I said what

It was back to my old stomping-ground of Magdalen College School, Oxford, last week to conduct a Q&A for the benefit of the parents' association with two of the newest members of staff: John Crawley and Phil DeFreitas.

Before the evening got going, however, the headmaster Tim Hands read out a couple of entries on the players' Cricinfo profiles. Hands noted that Crawley was described on the website as 'heavy-hipped', while DeFreitas's action 'wouldn't win any beauty contests'.

Which was all fine and dandy, except that those profiles had been penned by none other than yours truly – years ago, it's true, but a useful reminder that the internet makes the past impossible to escape…

You may have missed it, but…

Congratulations to Shivnarine Chanderpaul for reclaiming top spot in the Test batting list after a gap of three years. But a glance at the rankings page turned up an anomaly in another, unrelated, table.

India, begetters of the world's richest and most glamorous Twenty20 tournament, are currently seventh in the T20 rankings, one place ahead of Ireland.

Back to his best: Shivnarine Chanderpaul (right) is the top-ranked Test batsman once again

Back to his best: Shivnarine Chanderpaul (right) is the top-ranked Test batsman once again

This is not a gratuitous dig at India, as some of you will choose to believe. It is a genuine question. How can the country that has become the home of Twenty20 cricket have slipped so far at international level from the peak of winning the World Cup in 2007 Or is it the case that the financial success of the IPL – even with dwindling TV audiences – is the primary concern

Answers in the comment section please.