Tag Archives: gautam

India v England ODI series: Eoin Morgan praises preparations

Morgan praises England's preparations for India as one-day series looms large

. There are a lot of foundations already set so it's a matter of building on that,' he said.

'The majority of our preparation has already been done pre-Christmas. Many of us have been here (with the Test squad) since the 24th or 25th of October and some of the guys who weren't spent three weeks here before Christmas too.

'Over the next few days we'll just be doing top-ups in different areas of our games. We are prepared.'

'We've seen in past series how important that is – like the (2010/11) Ashes where we were there three or four weeks prior to the first game. It has done us good in the Test and Twenty20 matches and hopefully it will in the one-dayers too.'

While England are looking to get 2013 off to a winning start at the Palam Services Ground, all eyes in Delhi will instead be on the host nation's ODI match against Pakistan.

India have already lost that series after back to back defeats to their fierce rivals, but there is plenty still to play for in the final fixture.

Media pundits, former internationals and fans alike have called for a change when the squad for England is announced and established stars like Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Virat Kohli and Yuvraj Singh are all in need of runs.

Run drought: Gautam Gambhir is in a rut

Run drought: Gautam Gambhir is in a rut

Spin bowler Ravichandran Ashwin has been another target for criticism, having performed also modestly against England in the Tests, but Morgan is not ready to take the reigning world champions lightly.

'I don't think it is a good time to play India. I don't think it is ever a good time to play India,' said the Dubliner.

'We know how successful they have been in the past and they are the World Cup champions at the moment.

'They might be going through a bad patch but they are very, very dangerous cricketers and they have guys who can turn the game on its head in a matter of minutes.'

Tomorrow's match is due to begin at 9am local time (3.30am GMT) in conditions likely to be colder than an April outing at Chester-le-Street.

England's new limited-overs coach Ashley Giles is in charge of his country for the first time and has a couple of selection issues to ponder.

Somerset's Jos Buttler and Yorkshire's Joe Root appear to be battling for one place in the top six, while the variations of Jade Dernbach and the pace of Stuart Meaker offer different options for the final pace bowling spot.

Giles must also decide whether to leave Ian Bell at opener or restore Kevin Pietersen, back in the 50-over set-up after reversing his retirement, alongside Alastair Cook at the head of the innings.

Lawrence Booth: England show more resolve and nous than India at key moments

Lawrence Booth: England show more resolve and nous than India at key moments of Test

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UPDATED:

11:23 GMT, 14 December 2012

These are heady times for England. Already 2-1 up in a series they were widely tipped to lose, they have now taken control of a Test which yesterday looked as if it might descend into a bar-room brawl.

For the third Test in a row, England have shown more resolve and nous at the crucial moments than India. At 139 for 5, and then 242 for 7, their first innings was in the balance – or worse.

But Joe Root added his name to a list of heroes that has grown beyond England’s wildest dreams since Ahmedabad, and Graeme Swann proved he can still construct an innings worthy of his ability.

Playing his part: Graeme Swann chipped in with 56 runs with the bat as well as a wicket

Playing his part: Graeme Swann chipped in with 56 runs with the bat as well as a wicket

Then Jimmy Anderson, who came alive when he found reverse-swing in Kolkata, took charge, bowling Virender Sehwag and the hapless Sachin Tendulkar, and forcing a loose drive out of Gautam Gambhir, a combative cricketer England take special delight in seeing the back of.

It was high-class stuff from a bowler who was questioned in some quarters during England’s defeat to South Africa in the summer. Then, he was made to look ordinary by the big beasts of South Africa’s top order. Now, a combination of his own skill and India’s pussy-cat willingness to have their tummies tickled, has turned him into a match-winner.

In between, Swann accounted for Cheteshwar Pujara, whose star has waned since the first innings at Mumbai, a time when England did not appear to know how to get him out.

Getting his man: James Anderson took the wicket of Sachin Tendulkar for the ninth time

Getting his man: James Anderson took the wicket of Sachin Tendulkar for the ninth time

The shame was that Pujara should not have been sent on his way by Rod Tucker, caught at short leg by Ian Bell off forearm rather than glove.

But the point has been made so many times in this error-ridden series that it barely needs repeating now: India’s distrust of ball-tracking technology has persuaded them to throw out the baby with the bathwater. Every mistake that goes against them merely highlights their stubbornness. When, you wonder, will they learn

Getting it right: Alastair Cook has guided England to the brink of a series win

Getting it right: Alastair Cook has guided England to the brink of a series win

If England had been unsure where their first-innings 330 stood in the scheme of things, they were reassured by the instant removal of Virender Sehwag, who looked off the pace in losing his middle stump to Anderson.

And yet some fluent drives from Gambhir and Pujara suggested strokeplay was possible. England still had work to do.

What has become clear since their first-innings surrender at Ahmedabad is that they keep finding someone for the job. It is a conviction perhaps borne of adversity: they were rightly rounded upon after the whitewash in the UAE, then needed some sensible batting from Andrew Strauss and Alastair Cook, plus Kevin Pietersen’s pyrotechnics, to salvage a series draw in Sri Lanka.

After the home defeat to South Africa – their first in four years – they took a young squad to the World Twenty20 in Sri Lanka and came badly unstuck. Then there was Ahmedabad, after which Cook made the point to his players that the rot had to stop, and it had to stop in the next game at Mumbai.

England’s response, whether the rest of the world likes it or not, has been one of the cricket stories of the year. What happened today felt like part of the narrative.

England on verge of winning third Test in India

England on verge of victory but Ashwin frustrates tourists as India dig in

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UPDATED:

11:35 GMT, 8 December 2012

England inflicted a telling collapse on India to put themselves on the verge of victory, and an unassailable 2-1 series lead, after day four of the third Test at Eden Gardens.

The tourists took six wickets for 36 runs this afternoon but, with an innings win almost within their grasp in the final session, Ravichandran Ashwin (83 not out) prevented them finishing the job.

Number eight Ashwin even took India into a 32-run credit by stumps on 239 for nine, and forced England to take a second new ball under floodlights, as the contest somehow limped into a final day.

There was no way past Ashwin and Ishant Sharma for more than an hour in a ninth-wicket stand of 38.

Ashwin escaped a stumping chance on 22, and Sharma was dropped by wicketkeeper Matt Prior on nought – both off Monty Panesar.

Then even after Panesar at last got the number 10, toppling over to be bowled, Ashwin stayed to complete his 111-ball 50 with successive fours off Graeme Swann which also ensured England must bat again.

England just did not have the leeway they needed as Ashwin stood firm, in company with last man Pragyan Ojha.

After dominating the first three days thanks to Alastair Cook's batting and James Anderson and Panesar's bowling, the tourists first had to overcome a chastening morning before India's collapse.

England's own last four wickets could muster only 14 on the way to 523 all out and then they were unable to take any of India's before lunch.

But after Graeme Swann kickstarted the hosts' troubles by bowling Virender Sehwag with the first ball of the afternoon, the rest of the frontline batting simply folded.

Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir sowed some doubts in an opening stand of 86 in just 28 overs, during which England had a half-chance to see off each of the openers.

But Sehwag escaped on seven when Swann could not hang on to a low one-handed catch to his left at second slip off Anderson, then Gambhir pushed Panesar off the face of the bat to short-leg, where Ian Bell could not quite react in time.

Ball rolling: Graeme Swann took the first wicket of India's second innings

Ball rolling: Graeme Swann took the first wicket of India's second innings

The most worrying aspect for the tourists was the increasing ease with which Sehwag in particular was playing their spinners.

But they need not have been concerned because Swann produced the perfect off-break to draw the drive, beat the bat and hit the outside of off-stump straight after the break.

Gambhir had accepted the blame in the first innings for Sehwag's run-out, and perhaps will need to do likewise for his part in a faulty single which saw off Cheteshwar Pujara thanks to Bell's direct hit from midwicket.

Transient controversy followed when Gambhir escaped on 36, umpire Rod Tucker apparently initially satisfied he had edged to slip but unsure whether the ball had carried to a diving Jonathan Trott.

It had, but third umpire Vineet Kulkarni also seemed to convey the fact Gambhir had not got bat on ball after all.

The right decision had been reached via a grey area in the established process for series not involving DRS.

But the fact that Gambhir followed some reverse-swing from Finn (three for 37) to edge behind just four runs later relegated the discussion, and it was less relevant still when Sachin Tendulkar was next out, edging a Swann arm ball to slip.

Flying Finn: England's bowlers all chipped in to dismantle India

Flying Finn: England's bowlers all chipped in to dismantle India

Yuvraj Singh and Virat Kohli's attempt to stop the rot did not last long before the left-hander was bowled by one from Anderson that snaked in from round the wicket and kept low, and India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni edged the same bowler low to his opposite number Cook at slip.

Kohli edged behind flailing at some more outswing from Finn after tea, and it seemed certain England were on the home straight – until Ashwin got set.

England had arrived this morning in the hope of maximising the pressure and an hour's profitable batting would have been their first wish.

Instead, their innings was finished in under five overs.

Prior and Swann could add only a single between them to their existing seventh-wicket stand of 56.

Prior drove the first ball of the day for a single, only for Swann to then immediately become Ojha's fourth victim – edging another attempted drive to slip.

Tail end: Monty Panesar took the final wicket of the day

Tail end: Monty Panesar took the final wicket of the day

Then Prior went to cut Zaheer Khan at the other end and edged behind – England's second departure in the space of seven balls.

Finn and Anderson managed a boundary each but the introduction of Ashwin for Ojha (four for 142) brought two wickets in two balls to conclude the innings.

Ashwin had previously conceded 183 runs for his one success but, after Anderson edged to slip and Monty Panesar went lbw first ball, despite an apparent inside-edge, the off-spinner had two more at no further cost.

It seemed the mid-match momentum had perhaps switched, all the more so when Sehwag and Gambhir tried to seize the initiative too.

But it was a short-lived illusion.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures
from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of
Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news
organisations.

The BCCI
has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty
Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.
MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and
supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

LIVE: India v England, day five, first Test, Ahmedabad

LIVE: India v England – the action on day five of the first Test in Ahmedabad

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UPDATED:

04:15 GMT, 19 November 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day five of the first Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Ahmedabad while our brilliant team of writers update
with their insights from the ground. Contact me on Twitter via: @Chris_Cutmore or e-mail your thoughts to [email protected]

India v England: Essentials

India: Virender Sehwag, Gautam Gambhir, Cheteshwar Pujara, Sachin Tendulkar, Virat Kohli, Yuvraj Singh, Mahendra Dhoni (capt & wk), Ravichandran Ashwin, Zaheer Khan, Umesh Yadav, Pragyan Ojha.

England: Alastair Cook (capt), Nick Compton, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Samit Patel, Matt Prior (wk), Tim Bresnan, Stuart Broad, Graeme Swann, James Anderson.

Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pakistan) and Tony Hill (New Zealand).

Referee: Roshan Mahanama (Sri Lanka).

India first innings: 521-8 dec

England first innings: 191

Click here for a full scorecard

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PICTURE DISPUTE:

We are unable to carry live pictures from the First Test in Ahmedabad due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

LUNCH ON DAY ONE: INDIA 120-0 (Sehwag 79 Gambhir 37)

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Ahmedabad

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-2232857/LIVE-India-v-England-day-Test-Ahmedabad.html#ixzz2CSP9h3DH

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LUNCH ON DAY ONE: INDIA 120-0 (Sehwag 79 Gambhir 37)

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Ahmedabad

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-2232857/LIVE-India-v-England-day-Test-Ahmedabad.html#ixzz2CSP9h3DH

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

131sth over: England 346-5 (Cook 168 Prior 90)

Shot! That's a statement of intent from Prior, who creams a length ball from Zaheer to the cover fence for the first FOUR of the day. And Prior follows up with another sweet drive into the covers, just one this time as the sweeper cuts it off. Into the 90s goes England's wicketkeeper. Will they be nervous If he carries on like that he won't be in them for long…

130th over: England 341-5 (Cook 168 Prior 85)

The highly-impressive Pragyan Ojha resumes the attack from the opposite end with his left-arm spin. India on the attack: slip, gully, silly point – they won't move for most of the day, you'd think. Prior notches the first run of the day with a trademark punch through the covers.

129th over: England 340-5 (Cook 168 Prior 84)

Zaheer Khan, wily old left-armer, gets us underway… and it's a beauty! From over the wicket to the left-handed Cook the ball holds its line and zips past the outside edge. Nervy start for England's captain. Maiden.

3.55am: Players are out, Indians in a huddle and getting a real talking to by captain MS Dhoni… we're ready to go.

3.50am: Brisbane 2010, remember that England 221 runs behind after first innings 501 for one Alastair Cook 235 not out

Well, that's the spirit that Cook invoked yesterday during his incredible innings of 168 not out, but the job's not done yet.

England lead by just 10 runs and with only five second-innings wickets in hand. But if the Gabba taught us anything it's that this side knows how to seriously scrap.

Rounds one, two and three went to India, but round four was claimed by Cook and Matt Prior.

Ding ding… round five.

Hopes fading: Can Matt Prior rescue England in the first Test

Glimmer of hope: Can Matt Prior help rescue England in the first Test

Indian Grand Prix 2012: Mark Webber plays cricket as Red Bull look to secure constructors" title

Aussie Webber shows off his cricket skills as Red Bull look to move closer to constructors' title in India

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UPDATED:

16:29 GMT, 24 October 2012

Red Bull driver Mark Webber swapped holding a steering wheel for a cricket bat as the Australian prepared for the Indian Grand Prix on Sunday.

The Aussie faced a number of balls from Indian cricketer Gautam Gambhir at Noida International University and revealed that while on the face of it there might not seem to be too many similarities between the two sports, the skills involved are the same.

Webber said: ‘A trip to India is incomplete without the delicious food and a game of cricket. Cricket as a sport requires a lot of concentration and hand-eye coordination, especially under extreme conditions, and so does Formula One.’

Eyes on the prize: Mark Webber plays a shot from the bowling of Indian cricketer Gautam Gambhirs as Red Bull look to close in on the constructors' title

Eyes on the prize: Mark Webber plays a shot from the bowling of Indian cricketer Gautam Gambhirs as Red Bull look to close in on the constructors' title

Mark Webber and Gautam Gambhir

Mark Webber and Gautam Gambhir

Webber’s Red Bull hold a healthy 77-point advantage over Ferrari in the constructors championship with just four races left in the season Webber says they are taking nothing for granted.

Phil Duncan F1 blog

He said: ‘Hunger is still there as every race is a new challenge for us. We would like to win every race to end the season on a high.

‘Yes, we have a good lead at the constructors' table to the day. Everyone associated with the team has put in a massive effort to take us where we are right now. There would be nothing more satisfying than to win the teams' championship three years in a row.

‘It's a very special achievement for Red Bull. The next two events are very important that we keep our foot on their throats and see how the next few go. We are not looking at the points really. We need to reap in the maximum from the races ahead.’

Playing in straight: Webber enjoys a game of cricket ahead of the Indian Grand Prix

Playing in straight: Webber enjoys a game of cricket ahead of the Indian Grand Prix

Diving in: Webber makes a dive to complete a run

Diving in: Webber makes a dive to complete a run

Meanwhile, over at McLaren Martin Whitmarsh is predicting a more 'profitable affair' for his side in Formula One's latest double-header after being forced to feed off scraps in the Far East.

Heading into the races in Japan and Korea earlier this month, Lewis Hamilton was in with a shout of the drivers' title, whilst McLaren as a team were pushing Red Bull in the constructors' championship.

But in the space of eight forgettable days Hamilton saw his hopes of departing McLaren as a double world champion effectively bite the dust as he is now 62 points behind Sebastian Vettel.

The 27-year-old could only manage fifth in Japan and then a battling 10th in Korea where he suffered a rear anti-roll bar failure that badly affected the handling of his car.

Team-mate Jenson Button fared little better as he was fourth around Suzuka before being punted off on the first lap by Sauber's Kamui Kobayashi at Yeongam.

Bowling Mark: Webber chances his arm with the ball

Bowling Mark: Webber chances his arm with the ball

The word is watching: Gambhir bowls to Webber in front of the media

The word is watching: Gambhir bowls to Webber in front of the media

As for McLaren, it would appear they are now simply looking to finish ahead of bitter rivals Ferrari in the team race after slipping to third.

The forthcoming races in India and Abu Dhabi surely cannot be any worse for McLaren as team principal Whitmarsh said: 'Our two weekends in Japan and Korea weren't particularly prosperous.

'But while fortune certainly didn't smile on us during those two races, it's proof – if it were needed – that no team or driver is immune from tides of good or bad luck.
'Of course, luck flows both ways, and I'm positive that after two disappointing races, this next double-header will be a more profitable affair for Jenson, Lewis and the whole team.'

Hamilton's drive to 10th in Korea was particularly hard-fought, with the point gained described by Whitmarsh as 'heroic'.

Although announcing four weeks ago his departure from McLaren after 14 years to join Mercedes on a 15million-per-season, three-year deal, his commitment still to the Woking marque's cause cannot be questioned.

Talking a good game: Webber and Gambhir discuss their sports

Talking a good game: Webber and Gambhir discuss their sports

For his part, Hamilton believes he is leaving no stone unturned on the track as he said: “I feel I've been driving better than ever recently – even if the results haven't quite shown it.

'So I'm headed to India determined for another good result. I think we'll have a car that's a match for the circuit, and I can't wait to get out there and start practicing on Friday.'

As for Button, he has already conceded he will be driving for fun over the final four grands prix after falling 84 points adrift of championship leader Sebastian Vettel in the standings.

Following the incident with Kobayashi, it has become a case of attempting to close out the season on a high.

'Through no fault of my own, my weekend in Korea was a wasted opportunity,” said Button.

'But it's already far behind me, and I'm really looking forward to these next two back-to-back races.

'The Indian Grand Prix went well for me last year – I had an absolutely straightforward drive, running second from start to finish.

'It's a circuit I like. It has a good feel to it, and you can tell it's quite different from the normal places we visit.'

Although tangling with Felipe Massa last year en route to seventh, Hamilton is also an admirer of the Buddh International Circuit, one of designer Hermann Tilke's better efforts compared to Yas Marina in Abu Dhabi that follows next weekend.

Hamilton said: “The circuit is something of a revelation.

'Most modern tracks have a very similar feel. You find that the same driving style and rhythm suits them all.

'But the Buddh International Circuit is different. It has more in common with a great track like Spa than it does with any number of the more modern places we visit.

'That's because it's got an incredible flow. From Turn Four, a wide-apex right-hander that sweeps downhill, the track is just a series of fast, rolling curves which really allow you to put the car absolutely on the limit.'

ICC World Twenty20 2012: India beat Afghanistan

Dropped catches cost Afghanistan chance of historic upset as India win by 23 runs

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UPDATED:

18:24 GMT, 19 September 2012

Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of a famous upset against India in the ICC World Twenty20 as they were beaten by 23 runs in Colombo.

After Gautam Gambhir and Virender Sehwag were dismissed early on, Virat Kohli benefited from a ball dropped over the boundary for six on his way to 50 and Suresh Raina had two let-offs in making 38.

The pair led India to 159 for five and though Mohammad Nabi led a spirited run-chase, India made a winning start ahead of their clash with England on Sunday.

Close but no cigar: Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of an upset against India

Close but no cigar: Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of an upset against India

Shapoor Zadran screamed in celebration in the third over as Gambhir edged onto his stumps for just 10 runs before Mohammad Shahzad snaffled a poor shot from Sehwag to embarrass the left-armer for eight.

Yuvraj Singh announced himself with a huge six but he was soon dismissed by Karim Sadiq as he sliced a cut straight to Shapoor.

After such a strong start, Afghanistan's attack began to falter, a series of dropped catches helping Kohli reach his half-century.

But Dawlat Zadran would soon remove the middle-order batsman, Nabi taking the catch and then adding another scalp when he scooted the ball under Raina's bat in the 20th over.

This is how it's done: Yuvraj Singh expertly takes a catch

This is how it's done: Yuvraj Singh expertly takes a catch

I'm stumped: Dawlat Zadran of Afghanistan is bowled by Lakshmipathy Balaji

I'm stumped: Dawlat Zadran of Afghanistan is bowled by Lakshmipathy Balaji

Mahendra Singh Dhoni added 10 runs to India's tally from the last two deliveries and Afghanistan were set a target of 160 runs for victory.

They made a promising start, openers Shahzad and Nawroz Mangal putting on 26 before the former slogged the ball straight to Yuvraj at mid-on.

Yuvraj then trapped Mangal lbw with his very first delivery before forcing Sadiq into an aimless hit towards Gambhir.

Asghar Stanikzai edged into Dhoni's gloves next ball and though Samiullah Shenwari survived the hat-trick ball, a third wicket fell in six deliveries when he was caught and bowled by Ravichandran Ashwin.

Nabi and Shafiqullah breathed new life into the run chase with giant sixes but the latter soon walked after a contentious lbw call off Irfan Pathan's bowling.

Nabi's effort of 31, including two fours and two sixes, came to an end in the 17th over as he lifted Ashwin straight to Ishant Sharma.

Najibullah Zadran spanked Balaji to the cover boundary but was then run out, with Balaji dismissing Dawlat Zadran to wrap up the innings.

On that got away: Virat Kohli benefited from a dropped catch on his way to a half century

On that got away: Virat Kohli benefited from a dropped catch on his way to a half century