Tag Archives: garros

Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition despite taking two months off

Don't view my break as a lack of ambition… I still want to win more titles, warns Federer

By
Mike Dickson

PUBLISHED:

18:46 GMT, 12 March 2013

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UPDATED:

18:46 GMT, 12 March 2013

Roger Federer’s back is creaking again and soon he will be taking nearly two months off, but the Wimbledon champion insists that neither of these factors should be seen as his ambition waning for more titles.

Once he is finished at this week’s $10 million BNP Paribas Open Federer will retreat until May for practice and family time, and byhis return he is unlikely to still be world No 2.

Andy Murray, who earlier this morning was due to face Taipei’s Yen Hsun Lu in the third round, is closing and could usurp the great Swiss if he were to significantly outperform him at this first Masters event of the season.

Fully focused: Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition

Fully focused: Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition

Federer concedes that the forthcoming break will not help his ranking in the short term but believes it will make him more dangerous for the summer’s three Grand Slams: 'If you play well then you can manage your schedule, but with the rankings you do need to win the tournaments you actually play. I know when I’m playing well I always have a shot.

'My schedule is not in set in stone, maybe if I lost early here or won the tournament it could change my mindset but I doubt it because what I want to do is practise hard. I’m really eager for that because I haven’t been able to practise as much as I would have liked in the last two years.

Taking a break: Federer is set to take two months off

Taking a break: Federer is set to take two months off

'This year the priority is a big build up then coming back really strong for the Masters events in Madrid and Rome before Roland Garros.'

Federer’s back suffered one of its periodic tweaks during his third round victory over Ivan Dodig, but he feels he will be fine to face compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka today.

Victory in that could give him a much-anticipated clash with Rafael Nadal, but first the Spaniard has to overcome the season’s most improved player in Ernests Gulbis.

The colourful Latvian is very talented but has revelled in being an international playboy for the past three years. Now pledging to at least cut down on the drinking, smoking and carousing he has got himself fitter, and the result has been a 12-match winning streak.

London 2012 Olympics: Andy Murray eyes place in last 16

Murray has no drama in mind as Nieminen stands in way of last 16 berth

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UPDATED:

00:03 GMT, 31 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Andy Murray and Jarkko Nieminen might notice there is something – or someone – missing when they step out on court on Tuesday.

Two years ago they played at Wimbledon in front of the Queen and met Her Majesty after the match.

The British No 1 won in straight sets that day and will be hoping for a repeat as he aims to reach the last 16 and move a step closer to an Olympic medal.

Net result: Murray's only hope of glory is in the singles after being dumped out of doubles

Net result: Murray's only hope of glory is in the singles after being dumped out of doubles

'He's a very tough player,' said Murray, who was taken to four sets by the world No 41 in the second round of the French Open this year but has beaten Nieminen on all four occasions when they have met competitively.

WHEN AND WHERE…

Andy Murray plays Jarkko Nieminen in the second round of the tennis singles on Wimbledon's Centre Court at 2pm

'He has lots of experience and has been around the tour for a long time.’
Murray’s grandma cried when she saw her grandson meet the Queen but it was the 25-year-old who was almost in tears at Roland Garros in May when a back injury nearly saw him lose to the Finn.

'He recovered to win but his struggles led to former Wimbledon champion Virginia Wade calling him a 'drama queen'.

Nieminen would not be drawn into that
debate but thinks his experience with the Queen rather than the drama
queen will stand him in good stead for the match.

Finn-ished Nieminen stands in Murray's way and a place in the last 16

Finn-ished Nieminen stands in Murray's way and a place in the last 16

'It’s great,' added Nieminen, who beat Somdev Devvarman in the first round. 'I have nothing to lose, he’s a big favourite here, and he almost won Wimbledon.'

Already in the last 16 is the man who beat Murray in the Wimbledon final. Roger Federer breezed past Julien Benneteau in straight sets, no mean feat considering the Frenchman took him to five at The Championships.

Wimbledon moved back one week from 2015

Wimbledon will be held back one week from 2015 to aid grass-court season preparations

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UPDATED:

22:03 GMT, 19 July 2012

After a century of tradition the Wimbledon fortnight is moving back a week to allow players more time to switch from the clay of the French Open at Roland Garros to the grass of the All England Club.

Instead of the usual fortnight between the two events a three-week gap will be opened between them from 2015.

As revealed in Sportsmail before this year’s Championships, the All England Club had stepped up their campaign to move their big fortnight back one week and on Thursday they announced agreement has been secured.

Not quite: Andy Murray in the Wimbledon 2012 final

Not quite: Andy Murray in the Wimbledon 2012 final

So in three years Wimbledon will not
begin until June 29 and will end on July 12. It is unquestionably a
sensible move in a calendar of more than 10 months to allow greater
transition time between the sport’s two most differing surfaces.

There were, of course, other
considerations, one of which is a desire not to clash so much with the
major football championships that occur every other year. The All
England would ideally liked to have made the move in 2014 to avoid a
clash with the Brazil World Cup, but the knock-on effect for other
tournaments is sufficient for more time to be needed to re-arrange the
schedule.

Among the events that might be
affected, hopefully in a positive fashion, are the AEGON Championships
at Queen’s Club, which currently take place immediately after the French
Open, clashing with the ATP event in Halle, Germany.

They may now avoid such a conflict,
allowing more top players to be available. This year, for example, Novak
Djokovic did not play any official event on grass prior to Wimbledon
after his lengthy stay in Paris.

Flag-bearer Rafael Nadal hopeful ahead of "hardest title" challenge

Flag-bearer Nadal hopeful ahead of 'hardest title' challenge

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UPDATED:

16:43 GMT, 14 July 2012

Rafael Nadal hopes he will be fit
enough to lead the Spanish team at the opening ceremony of the Olympic
Games as he continues his recovery from a knee complaint.

The 11-time Grand Slam winner was
surprisingly knocked out by Lukas Rosol in the second round at Wimbledon
two weeks ago and has since been battling to ensure he will be ready to
return to the All England Club to defend his Olympic title.

The 26-year-old is also due to carry
the Spanish flag at the opening ceremony and he is looking forward to an
experience he has described as 'unforgettable.'

Unforgettable: Rafael Nadal is due to lead Spain out at the Olympics

Unforgettable: Rafael Nadal is due to lead Spain out at the Olympics

Speaking as he received the flag from the Spanish Olympic Committee, he said, 'I am doing everything possible to recover. After Roland Garros I had a difficult time, but the excitement is at its maximum, I am working as hard as I can and hopefully I will be at 100%.

'I am the one who is most worried. I hope that things improve and my intention is to arrive in London well prepared and recuperated. It is for this that I work every day.

'Carrying the flag will the something unforgettable and I hope that Spain continue on the path of success it has been on for the past few years.'

Nadal also believes that the Olympics are even more special than some of the bigger annual tournaments on the tennis tour because they only come around every four years.

Down and out: Nadal will be hoping to bounce back from defeat to Lukas Rosol at Wimbledon

Down and out: Nadal will be hoping to bounce back from defeat to Lukas Rosol at Wimbledon

'This is the hardest title to win because in the career of a tennis player you only get two or three opportunities. I feel very fortunate to have been as I was that week in Beijing. I had the luck to arrive at almost an impeccable moment.'

The 2008 and 2010 Wimbledon champion insisted that his confidence on grass had not been shaken by the Rosol defeat.

'Opponents intimidate everyone, you can't hide when you are competing against the best.

'You go onto court knowing that you can win or lose. You have to accept both things. I have already had years of competing and I know that there are bad moments and defeats.'

Wimbledon 2012 Brian Baker goes from hit-and-giggle on grass to last 16

Baker goes from hit-and-giggle on grass to Wimbledon last 16 as fairytale continues

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UPDATED:

17:09 GMT, 30 June 2012

Brian Baker has gone from playing 'hit-and-giggle' grass-court tennis with friends to amazing his family and the wider sporting world by reaching the last 16 at Wimbledon.

The 27-year-old was unranked just a year ago, a once leading junior whose hopes of a career in the game had been seemingly ruined by a succession of injuries.

But having undergone a succession of operations, Baker gave it one last shot, and beat France's Benoit Paire 6-4, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3 to reach the fourth round of the world's most famous grand slam.

Wonderful week: Baker

Wonderful week: Baker

Fortunately his family have already extended their stay in London to include Monday, when he will face 27th seed Philipp Kohlschreiber for a place in the quarter-finals.

'I think they had to change their flights twice, they weren't that confident in me starting out,' said Baker, smiling.

'I was just excited that they were able to come back over. They came over for the French Open, so it's nice to see my dad was able to take time off work again.

'It makes it a lot more special to be able to share it with my family and girlfriend than it is if you're just doing it on your own.'

Baker's comeback began on the golf course last summer.

That was when the Nashville resident found out he had been given a wild card into a Futures tournament in Pittsburgh, only his third event since 2005. Not only did he qualify, he won the tournament.

The former French Open boys' finalist has said repeatedly that he never doubted his ability, and he really came back onto the radar when he won a Challenger tournament in April that earned him a wild card into the French Open.

A week before Roland Garros he qualified for his first ATP World Tour event in almost seven years, in Nice, and then beat the likes of Gael Monfils and Nikolay Davydenko to reach the final.

There were calls for Baker to be given a wild card for Wimbledon, but now he is through to the last 16, the American is grateful that did not happen.

He said: 'I wasn't that disappointed that I didn't get one. I needed the match practice on the courts. My only grass-court match was at Queen's qualifying and I lost. I didn't feel I was comfortable on the stuff.

'There's actually two grass courts at the club where I grew up at back in Nashville. I think I once played hit-and-giggle tennis on that. I played a pro-am doubles tournament up in the Hamptons with a buddy from Nashville on grass.

Into the second week: Baker will play Phillip Kohlschreiber in the last 16

Into the second week: Baker will play Phillip Kohlschreiber in the last 16

'But those courts are nothing compared to these. They're a lot softer. It had been seven years since I played on a similar style grass court.'

Baker's victory today, over an opponent who badly lost his cool in the third and fourth sets, ensures he will break into the top 100 for the first time in his career.

Asked if he still has to pinch himself, Baker said: 'I'm sure I will. It's been unreal. When I'm on the court I know I definitely have nerves. Closing out the match you definitely know what's on the table, what you can accomplish.

'I missed a few shots at the end that I probably wouldn't miss if it was the quarters of a Challenger and not trying to get to the round of 16 at Wimbledon.

'It is crazy, what's going on. But I'm still trying to stay focused on the task at hand and not get too wrapped up in it.

'Because once you do that, I think it's tough to be able to play your best tennis once you're happy that you've been there.

'So I'm trying every match to go in there hungry and try to win the next one instead of thinking, “I'm in the round of 16 of Wimbledon, this is awesome”.'

Wimbledon 2012 Novak Djokovic will gatecrash Britain"s summer party says John Lloyd

John Lloyd: Djokovic will gatecrash Britain's summer party by winning Wimbledon

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UPDATED:

20:45 GMT, 23 June 2012

After a lifetime in the game, I believe Andy Murray is the greatest player in history never to have won a major championship. It is not how Murray will want to be remembered, of course. And over the next fortnight, he will again put himself in a position to win Wimbledon, the tournament that I’ve always thought is his best chance for success.

His early defeat at the pre-Wimbledon event at Queen’s Club will not handicap him.

He finds it easier than most to transform his game for grass. Who is going to beat him over five sets in the first two rounds at Wimbledon Nobody. So, Murray will be up and running at the tournament where he has been a semi-finalist for the last three summers.

Tough stretch: Andy Murray is the best player to not win a grand slam

Tough stretch: Andy Murray is the best player to not win a grand slam

Murray’s misfortune is that he is playing at a time when the game is blessed with three great champions, Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. I played when Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe brought tennis to a new, wider audience. Tennis became box-office — it was a special era, one I never thought could be bettered.

While it is an imprecise science to compare one era of the game with another — the courts, rackets and tennis balls have all evolved — I now think Federer, Nadal and Djokovic have raised standards to an unimaginable level. They may not bring the bedlam and controversy of Connors and McEnroe, or the brooding brilliance of Borg, but the sustained quality and power of Nadal and Djokovic, and the princely presence of Federer, have entertained and alerted us to possibilities on a tennis court never seen before.

Djokovic’s dream of holding all four major titles at the same time, a feat last achieved by Rod Laver 43 years ago, failed only because Nadal produced another masterclass of claycourt tennis at Roland Garros. After losing against Djokovic at Wimbledon 12 months ago, in New York in the autumn and in Melbourne earlier this year, Nadal was playing for his sanity in Paris. If he had not won a record seventh French Open, the psychological damage might have destroyed him.

World class: Novak Djokovic was beaten by Rafa Nadal in Paris

World class: Novak Djokovic was beaten by Rafa Nadal in Paris

Against men of such fierce mental strength, Murray has so far floundered. He reacted to this by hiring Ivan Lendl at the start of this year. Lendl has to keep Murray focused so that he doesn’t become involved in unnecessarily long matches in the early rounds. He will need all his powers for the second week of Wimbledon.

Since Lendl arrived, Murray’s body language has improved. But he still managed to invite criticism at the French Open for hobbling around holding his back in a match against Jarkko Nieminen, although there was no doubt the Briton was injured. Yet at times he was like a footballer rolling over on the ground after the slightest tap. Then, the next moment, he’d race across court like a greyhound.

Does it look good No. Murray’s antics similarly upset another opponent, Richard Gasquet. He was booed by the French. But Murray doesn’t care what people think — and if he’s not breaking the rules, it’s up to his rivals to take advantage of any problems he has. His job is to take care of business on his side of the court, and he seems to be doing that better than ever. Only Federer’s demeanour escapes criticism. Nadal and Djokovic are slow between points and this will not change until the rules are applied more rigidly.

Elegant: Roger Federer

Elegant: Roger Federer

Murray is seeded No 4 at Wimbledon but he’s the most likely to benefit if Nadal or Djokovic fall below their best, not Federer. Wimbledon still offers the Swiss his best opportunity for a 17th Grand Slam as he moves so well on the grass and has lifted six titles on the Centre Court. But he has not won a major since the Australian Open in January 2010 and you have to wonder how long he will go on if he comes up empty this year.

He’ll be 31 in August and his twin daughters are growing up. But Roger still gives the impression he just loves the game — just as my old mate Connors did.

In the summer of the Jubilee and the London Olympics, wouldn’t it be apt for Murray to be crowned champion Unfortunately for British fans, I think that honour will go to Djokovic.

Wimbledon 2012: Roger Federer feeling in fine fettle

Federer feeling in fine fettle as Swiss star aims to secure seventh Wimbledon title

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UPDATED:

14:00 GMT, 23 June 2012

Roger Federer goes into Wimbledon feeling 'perfect' and confident of ending the grand slam domination of Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal.

Nadal's win over Djokovic in the final of the French Open two weeks ago was the fourth consecutive time they had met in a slam decider, setting a new record.

Federer was no match for Djokovic in their semi-final at Roland Garros, losing in straight sets, but the six-time Wimbledon champion thinks things can be different at the All England Club this year.

Aiming high: Federer is hoping to beat Nadal and Djokovic to the Wimbledon title

Aiming high: Federer is hoping to beat Nadal and Djokovic to the Wimbledon title

The 30-year-old Swiss said: 'I think it's up to somebody else to break that mould. They have done amazingly well the last few years, not just the last year or so.

'Hopefully it's my time of the year now. It's exciting times ahead. I fancy my chances here and at the US Open.'

Federer added of Djokovic and Nadal: 'As long as they're No 1 and No 2, they face each other in the final. It's maybe a good thing for them, a hard thing for us.

'At the same time, I'm very close to breaking that, and hopefully I can make a run here at Wimbledon.

'My confidence is very good. I've won very many tournaments, so many matches the last year or so that I feel perfect in this regard. I'm match-fit. I'm match-tough right now, and I think that's also key going into a grand slam.'

Federer will begin his Wimbledon campaign against Spain's Albert Ramos on Monday on the back of a shock defeat by German veteran Tommy Haas in the final of the Gerry Weber Open in Halle last weekend.

Shock: Federer was beaten by Tommy Haas at Halle last weekend

Shock: Federer was beaten by Tommy Haas at Halle last weekend

But the world No 3 has been very happy with his preparation for Wimbledon, saying: 'This year things have been very good. I haven't felt tired at all.

'I took a couple of days off after Halle when we got here. I've been able to get the practices in even with the rain.

'I don't feel like I have to work on anything specific because I feel everything is working in my game. Physically I have no lingering injuries. I'm in a good spot right now.'

Victory for Federer in a fortnight's time would see him equal Pete Sampras' record of seven titles and give him a first grand slam title in two and a half years.

The Swiss has lost in the quarter-finals for the last two years, first to Tomas Berdych and then 12 months ago to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who became the first player ever to beat Federer at a grand slam from two sets down.

'I am dreaming of the title,' said Federer.

'There's no denying that. I want to do better. I have to do better in this event because I could have gone further the last couple of years.

'Maybe I was a bit unfortunate at times. Maybe the other guys were just too good. Maybe I wasn't quite at my best. Who knows what the combination was But it's up to me to make that difference now and take it to the next step.

'Then once, hopefully, I am there, I can reach for the title. A seventh would be amazing. That would be tying Pete, which would be absolutely fantastic because I admired Pete when I was younger.'

Wimbledon 2012: Maria Sharapova and Venus and Serena Williams in London early at WTA pre-Wimbledon party

Women tennis players in London already ahead of SW19 at WTA pre-Wimbledon party

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UPDATED:

22:40 GMT, 21 June 2012

The biggest female stars of world tennis were in London a bit early ahead of their appearance at Wimbledon on Monday, as they celebrated at a party at The Roof Gardens in Kensington.

World No 1 Maria Sharapova, Serena and Venus Williams, Caroline Wozniacki and Elena Vesnina swopped their trainers for heels for the WTA's pre-Wimbledon party.

The women dazzled on the green carpet, but they will be even keener to showcase their tennis prowess at SW19 next week.

In it to win it: Maria Sharapova hopes to win another Wimbledon title

In it to win it: Maria Sharapova hopes to win another Wimbledon title

Sharapova, 25, will be hoping to continue her stellar run of form at Wimbledon.

The Russian won The French Open at Roland Garros, and the world No 1 may well be the woman to beat.

The number one seed, who looked elegant in a white dress, was met by old rivals the Williams sisters at the party.

Centre stage: Maria Sharapova is expected to reach the advanced stages of the tournament

Centre stage: Maria Sharapova is expected to reach the advanced stages of the tournament

Centre stage: Sharapova is expected to reach the advanced stages of the tournament

Spent force Venus (left) and Serena Williams (right) have waned in recent years

Sister moment: Venus and Serena Williams walked the green carpet together

Serena Williams, who is seeded at number six for the tournament, was accompanied by her sister, who will also be playing at SW19, but will be unseeded.

Venus Williams, who has slipped to 55 in the rankings, sported a white dress with a deep V-neck.

Old rivals: Serena Williams is hoping to win another Grand Slam

Fading star Venus Williams has failed to make an impact in recent years

Sisters: Serena (left) and Venus Williams (right)

Other players in attendance included Caroline Wozniacki, and the Dane will be hoping to make an impact at Wimbledon after slipping to No 7 in the WTA rankings.

Russian Vesnina also appeared alongside her fellow competitors, wearing a green dress.

Vying for the throne: Caroline Wozniacki will hope to make an impact at Wimbledon

Vying for the throne: Elena Vesnina will hope to make an impact at Wimbledon

Vying for the crown: Caroline Wozniacki and Elena Vesnina will hope to make an impact at Wimbledon

Wimbledon aim to avoid clash with clay court season

Exclusive: Wimbledon aim to avoid dash for the grass with schedule change

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 18 June 2012

Wimbledon is set to push for a break from more than 100 years of tradition to create a three-week gap between itself and the French Open.

The All England Club’s leadership want to extend the grass court season by another week to avoid clashes with other major sports events and allow players more time to adjust from clay to grass.

Proposal: The All England Club are hoping for a longer break between the French Open and Wimbledon

Proposal: The All England Club are hoping for a longer break between the French Open and Wimbledon

Not since the late 1800s has Wimbledon ever finished later than July 9, but such a move, which would not be achievable for at least two years, would see the world’s premier tournament finish around the middle of the month.

It is a sound idea on a number of fronts, especially in an age of a massive summer football tournament every two years.

There is also a clash this year with the British Grand Prix, which will happen on the same day as the men’s singles final.

Historic move: Wimbledon has not finished later than July 9 since the 19th century

Historic move: Wimbledon has not finished later than July 9 since the 19th century

The world’s top players currently face a dash to get ready for grass due to Roland Garros and Wimbledon being crammed into a six-week period.

Crucially, All England chairman Philip Brook appears to have the backing of the Lawn Tennis Association, who own and run the grass court tournaments in Britain that lead up to the main event.

Although neither body was prepared to comment on Monday it is understood they have already taken informal soundings from representatives of the men’s and women’s tours about a shift of date.

French Open final 2012: Rafael Nadal beats Novak Djokovic

Seventh heaven! Nadal secures record French Open title with triumph over Djokovic

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UPDATED:

12:46 GMT, 11 June 2012

Rafael Nadal became the first man ever to win seven French Open titles as he defeated Novak Djokovic 6-4, 6-3, 2-6, 7-5, in their rain-delayed final at Roland Garros.

The Spaniard, who has now surpassed Bjorn Borg, had trailed 2-1 in the fourth set when they resumed following Sunday night's suspension but he immediately retrieved the break and clinched victory when Djokovic double-faulted.

The world No 1 had been bidding to become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four grand slam trophies at once following three successive victories over Nadal, but this time the king of clay turned the tables.

Pure delight: Rafael Nadal has won a record seventh French Open title with victory over Novak Djokovic

Pure delight: Rafael Nadal has won a record seventh French Open title with victory over Novak Djokovic

Pure delight: Rafael Nadal has won a record seventh French Open title with victory over Novak Djokovic

Pure delight: Rafael Nadal has won a record seventh French Open title with victory over Novak Djokovic

Sunday's first part had certainly not been short on drama, whether it was the fluctuating fortunes of both men or the weather itself.

It had rained for almost the whole three hours, and the wet and heavy conditions affected Nadal both physically and mentally during the third and fourth sets.

The Spaniard was getting increasingly irate as they continued to play, the balls so wet and laden with clay that he could not impart his vicious spin.

King of clay: Nadal is the most successful player ever at Roland Garros

King of clay: Nadal is the most successful player ever at Roland Garros

No response: Djokovic rallied before the weather enforced overnight break

No response: Djokovic rallied before the weather enforced overnight break

From two sets and a break up, he lost eight games in a row before composing himself to win the final game last night, which looked very important when he promptly broke in the first game today to level the fourth set at 2-2.

The slow but dry conditions were perfect for the Spaniard, although he got a huge slice of luck with a net cord on break point that left Djokovic helpless at the net as the ball whizzed past him.

With Nadal leading 4-3, the rain resumed, although it was light, and the Spaniard's feelings were obvious when he sprinted from his chair before the umpire had called for play to restart.

Djokovic looked briefly perturbed but, as has done so often over the last 18 months, he steeled himself to find a way through the game.

Heavens above: Djokovic was the most affected by the weather and subsequent stoppages

Heavens above: Djokovic was the most affected by the weather and subsequent stoppages

... but Nadal had his problems too and questioned some of the decisions being made in the chair

… but Nadal had his problems too and questioned some of the decisions being made in the chair

He could not threaten on Nadal's serve, though, and the second seed moved to within one game of victory with a love hold.

Suddenly the rain was falling much harder, bringing tournament referee Stefan Fransson onto court, but the players stayed on in their seats while the worst of it fell and then resumed after a brief delay.

Djokovic withstood the first challenge as he served to stay in the match, but at 5-6 Nadal sensed blood and he brought up a first match point with a thundering forehand.

The Serb's resistance crumbled and he ended the match on a double fault, with Nadal sinking to his knees on the clay as he savoured a moment of history.

Putting on a show: The two best players on the planet produced a match worthy of a showpiece

Putting on a show: The two best players on the planet produced a match worthy of a showpiece

Putting on a show: The two best players on the planet produced a match worthy of a showpiece

Nadal climbed into the stands to embrace his support team before taking his customary bite of the Coupe des Mousquetaires.

The Spaniard, who has moved level with Borg and Rod Laver on 11 grand slam titles, said of overtaking the great Swede: 'It's an honour but the most important thing is this tournament. It's unforgettable, one of the most special moments in my career.'

Djokovic joined Roger Federer, who twice saw his hopes of holding all four trophies ended by Nadal in Roland Garros finals, but the Serb had no complaints with the result.

He said: 'I feel really privileged to be in this position, being in the final at Roland Garros for the first time. I enjoyed the match, Rafa was the better player. I hope to come back next year and play even better.'