Tag Archives: fours

If you thought England"s first innings against India in Nagpur was slow… remember Graham Thorpe in Lahore?

And you thought that was a slow day for batting… remember Thorpe in Lahore

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UPDATED:

21:33 GMT, 13 December 2012

When Joe Root and Matt Prior left the field with the scoreboard reading 199 for five, it was England’s lowest first-day total in a Test match since they finished on 195 for four against Pakistan at Lahore in 2000-01.

That, however, was off only 84 overs, compared with the 97 they faced on the opening day at Nagpur.

The Lahore Test, which ended in a bore draw, was most famous for an innings of incredible skill and patience from Graham Thorpe, who is now the ECB’s batting coach.

Nuggety: Graham Thorpe hit 118 runs off 301 balls in Lahore

Nuggety: Graham Thorpe hit 118 runs off 301 balls in Lahore

Thorpe hit only one boundary in reaching three figures, and by the time he was out for 118 from 301 deliveries, he had hit all of two fours.

If you thought that was slow scoring, how about the Test between Pakistan and Australia at Karachi in 1956-57.

On the opening day of a game played on matting wickets, only 95 runs were scored as Pakistan reached 15 for two in reply to Australia’s 80 all out. At least there were plenty of wickets.

The fewest runs scored in a day in a Test in England was the 151 managed on the third day of the Lord’s Test against New Zealand in 1978.

Hampshire eliminated from Twenty20 Champions League

Mahmood's all-round class sends Hampshire crashing out of Champions League

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UPDATED:

14:52 GMT, 10 October 2012

Five wickets with the ball and an unbeaten 55 with the bat from Azhar Mahmood led Auckland Aces to a comfortable eight-wicket victory over Hampshire at Centurion to send the county side crashing out of the Twenty20 Champions League.

The triumph sends the New Zealanders into the group stage of the event as winners of Pool One, while Hampshire and Sialkot Stallions, who face off tomorrow in Johannesburg, are eliminated.

Hampshire's below par score of 121 for eight from their 20 overs never looked enough as Martin Guptill's 38 and Mahmood ensured the win with over five overs remaining.

Menace with bat and ball: Azhar Mahmood celebrates taking the wicket of James Adams as the Auckland Aces beat Hampshire

Menace with bat and ball: Azhar Mahmood celebrates taking the wicket of James Adams as the Auckland Aces beat Hampshire

After being put in by the Aces, Michael Carberry's knock of 65 was the only score of note for the English side with Sean Ervine's 16 the next highest total.

Hampshire made a fast start as Carberry cut Kyle Mills for six with just the second delivery of the innings but that was a rare high point as Azhar took control.

After James Vince smashed the Pakistani for six over long on before he mistimed to Andre Adams at mid-on trying to repeat the trick.

And another! Mahmood took five wickets as Hampshire posted an under-par score of 121-8 in their innings

Azhar Mahmood celebrates another wicket as the Auckland Aces beat Hampshire

Too good: Mahmood took five wickets as Hampshire posted an under-par score of 121-8 after being put in to bat by the Auckland Aces

Group winners: Andre Adams celebrates the wicket of Shahid Afridi as Auckland progressed top of their group

Group winners: Andre Adams celebrates the wicket of Shahid Afridi as Auckland progressed top of their group

Jimmy Adams and Shahid Afridi both went for ducks to Azhar before Sean Ervine became Ronnie Hira's first victim, skying to long on to leave Hampshire in trouble at 64 for four at the start of the 12th over.

Glenn Maxwell hit two fours off Azhar before he went to Hira forcing Liam Dawson and Carberry to rebuild rather than attack.

Dawson (11) then Dimitri Mascarenhas fell in the 18th before Carberry's attritional knock ended midway through the final over for a run a ball 65.

Hitting out: Michael Carberry's knock of 65 was the only score of note for Hampshire

Hitting out: Michael Carberry's knock of 65 was the only score of note for Hampshire

Michael Carberry batting for Hampshire

Knowing they had a low total to chase Auckland made a measured start with Guptill and Lou Vincent pushing their score onto 50 from their first six overs, before Vincent went for 19 off the bowling of Wood.

That brought in Azhar who was in no mood to hang around , smashing a six of Chris Wood in the last ball of the seventh and off Dawson in the 10th.

Guptill went the next ball off Afridi, but Azhar continued to attack reaching his half century with a six in the 14th over before hitting the winning runs in the next over.

World Twenty20: Australia beat South Africa

Australia cruising towards last four after emphatic win over South Africa

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UPDATED:

13:47 GMT, 30 September 2012

Tournament top-scorer Shane Watson again provided a telling contribution as Australia beat South Africa by eight wickets to stay bang on course for an ICC World Twenty20 semi-final.

Watson added 70 runs to Xavier Doherty's three for 20 with the ball as Australia won their second successive Super Eight match at the R Premadasa Stadium, by chasing down the Proteas' 146 for five with 14 balls to spare.

Watson had shared a century opening stand with David Warner in Friday's success against India, but this time lost his first-wicket partner early.

Main man: Shane Watson was in fine form as Australia beat South Africa

Main man: Shane Watson was in fine form as Australia beat South Africa

It did not faze him, though, as he reached his third half-century in four innings with his second six – over square-leg off Wayne Parnell – to go with six fours from 35 balls.

Doherty had earlier given Australia a wonderful start after they had won the toss.

The slow left-armer had South Africa eight for two in the third over – Richard Levi somehow playing inside the line to be bowled leg-stump for a duck and then Jacques Kallis edging behind to go cheaply too.

It would have been 16 for three had Michael Hussey managed a direct hit from point to run out JP Duminy by yards.

Marching on together: Australia are heading towards the semi-finals

Marching on together: Australia are heading towards the semi-finals

But Watson saw off Hashim Amla with his medium-pace and doubled up with another big wicket – AB de Villiers caught at cover – when he returned for a second spell.

It was therefore only a late flurry from Robin Peterson and Farhaan Behardien, in an unbroken stand of 60, that kept South Africa competitive.

Morne Morkel and Dale Steyn then bowled well with the new ball, and the pressure told on Warner.
He responded to three tight overs by making room to hit Morkel but failed to make contact and was bowled middle-stump.

Toil: South Africa struggled to cope with the Australians' batting

Toil: South Africa struggled to cope with the Australians' batting

Australia did not manage a boundary until Kallis replaced Steyn for the fifth over, and Watson immediately cut him for four.

The destructive opener did not put a foot wrong until he mishit Peterson on 52 but escaped as Parnell could not quite hold a tough catch, diving in from wide long-off.

Watson eventually holed out off Peterson at long-on to end a stand of 99 with Hussey (45no).
But South Africa still never came close to getting off the mark in a group currently dominated by the Australians – and Watson in particular.

World Twenty 20: Sri Lanka beat West Indies in Super Eights

Semis loom for Sri Lanka as Jayawardene oversees nine-wicket win over West Indies

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UPDATED:

17:19 GMT, 29 September 2012

Hosts Sri Lanka put one foot in the ICC World Twenty20 semi-finals with a nine-wicket trouncing of the West Indies at Pallekele.

A capacity and partisan crowd celebrated every run as captain Mahela Jayawardene (65no) oversaw a composed run chase after the Windies had made 129 for five.

Jayawardene always had things under control, in a 45-ball half-century containing eight fours, to ensure Sri Lanka completed their straightforward task with almost five overs to spare.

In control: Sri Lanka romped to an easy win thanks to some cool batting from Kumar Sangakkara (left) and Mahela Jayawardene

In control: Sri Lanka romped to an easy win thanks to some cool batting from Kumar Sangakkara (left) and Mahela Jayawardene

Sri Lanka v West Indies

Click here for a full scorecard

He shared an unbroken century stand
with Kumar Sangakkara and Sri Lanka therefore lead Super Eight Group E
as the only team with two wins to their name.

Marlon Samuels (50) and Dwayne Bravo
were largely responsible for the Windies mustering as many as they did
after Darren Sammy unsurprisingly chose to bat first on an awkward, used
surface.

Skilful seamer Nuwan Kulasekera
conceded only seven runs in his first three overs, but 21 to Samuels and
Andre Russell when he came back for his last.

Up in the air: Denesh Ramdin and Jayawardene look to the skies

Up in the air: Denesh Ramdin and Jayawardene look to the skies

Kulasekera was still in credit,
having picked up the key wicket of Chris Gayle when the West Indies'
dangerman edged behind as he chased an attempted cut at a wide ball.

Number three Samuels bided his time,
in a stand of 65 with Bravo, as Ajantha Mendis continued to make life
difficult and returned figures of two for 12 in favourable conditions
for his brand of slow bowling.

Samuels upped the ante in the later overs – apart from the penultimate, in which Lasith Malinga proved tough to get away – to complete a 34-ball half-century containing four fours and two sixes.

Strike bowler: Ajantha Mendis recorded figures of 12 for two

Strike bowler: Ajantha Mendis recorded figures of 12 for two

One of those maximums was a straight
one off Kulasekera which carried more than 100 metres to become the
biggest hit of the tournament so far.

But Samuels and his team must hope
they have more than that to celebrate when they return here on Monday,
to face New Zealand, in search of their second Super Eight victory – and
a shot after all at a place in the knockout stages in Colombo.

London 2012 Olympic rowing: Great Britain win Gold in men"s four

Golden touch: Britain retain Olympic title in men's four after smashing the Aussies

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UPDATED:

10:56 GMT, 4 August 2012

Great Britain produced a sensational performance to beat Australia and win Olympic gold in the men's coxless fours.

Andrew Triggs Hodge, Pete Reed, Tom James and Alex Gregory led from the start to extend Britain's dominance over the Olympic event to 16 years.

Britain won their fourth successive coxless fours title by a quarter of a length from the Australians with the United States winning the bronze medal.

More to follow…

Golden touch: Great Britain's Men's Four of Andrew Triggs Hodge, Tom James, Pete Reed and Alex Gregory won the men's four final

Golden touch: Great Britain's Men's Four of Andrew Triggs Hodge, Tom James, Pete Reed and Alex Gregory won the men's four final

MEN'S FOUR FACTFILE

1979: Andrew Triggs Hodge born on March 9 in Aylesbury. Will go on to start rowing at Staffordshire University.

1981: Pete Reed born July 1981 in Seattle, United States. A Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, Reed will later take up rowing at the University of the West of England.

1984: Alex Gregory and Tom James both born on March 11. James will learn to row at Evesham while Gregory will take up the sport through the GB Rowing Start scheme.

2003: James makes his Great Britain debut in the eight, stroking the boat to bronze at the World Championships.

2005: Hodge and Reed win the Boat Race with Oxford and are part of the British four that wins gold at the World Championships.

2006: Hodge and Reed are part of the men's four that wins gold at the World Championships at Eton Dorney.

2007: James competes in his fourth Boat Race for Cambridge, tasting victory for the first time.

2008: Hodge, Reed and James beat Australia to win Olympic gold with a stunning late charge for the line.

2009: Hodge and Reed move into the pair and win silver at the World Championships. Gregory switches to sweep rowing and wins gold in the men's four.

2010: Hodge and Reed win silver at the World Championships, finishing just three tenths of a second behind New Zealand. Gregory is in the men's four crew that finishes a disappointing fourth.

2011: James returns to the GB squad and joins Gregory in the men's four that wins gold at the World Championships. Hodge and Reed again have to settle for silver behind the Kiwis.

2012: May – Hodge and Reed move back into the four alongside Gregory and James, winning World Cup gold at Belgrade and Lucerne.

June – The British four are beaten twice by Australia in the final World Cup regatta in Munich, taking silver.

August 4 – Britain win gold at the Olympic Games.

London 2012 Olympics: Rowing team going for gold

In Grob we trust! Legend coach back with rowing team to take on the world

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UPDATED:

01:56 GMT, 28 July 2012

Olympics 2012

They have long since put on hold careers such as soldier, Treasury official, PE teacher or prison officer to come together as what has been proclaimed ‘the best team British rowing has brought to the Games’.

That was the description applied this week by performance director David Tanner to the group of 47 athletes who will row down the 2,000-metre lanes at Eton Dorney in pursuit of their place in history.

At the top end of the course, sheep grazing in nearby fields will be visible. Then, as the muscles start to burn, the rowers will soon enough hit a wall of sound when approaching the corridor of huge metal stands housing 20,000 spectators. It will be a sporting theatre of very British contrasts.

Going for gold: The men's coxless fours look set to be among the medals

Going for gold: The men's coxless fours look set to be among the medals

If Tanner is right, this man-made lake will contain a rich seam of medals for GB. Rowing is the only sport that has delivered at least one gold to Britain in every Olympics since 1984 and the last three Games have seen the tally of medals go from three to four to a haul of six in Beijing four years ago.

GB rowing fans use the phrase ‘In Grob we trust’, putting their faith in the famed ability of head coach Jurgen Grobler to bring his crews to peak at the right time.

The current crop of rowers do not enjoy the same profile as the country’s cyclists, but if things go well they could come close to making a similarly weighty contribution to Great Britain’s aggregate total of medals.

‘We are never going to have the fantastic year-on-year things like the Tour de France, and none of us are going to be buying mansions off the back of this, but we accept our lot,’ says Andy Triggs Hodge, stroke of the coxless four and, with his shock of blond hair, one of the more recognisable figures.

Main man: Coach Jurgen Grobler

Main man: Coach Jurgen Grobler

‘But in terms of high performance and commitment we are up there with anybody. This is what we’ve been working for and there is a great feeling in the squad.’

The four has been the symbol of British excellence since Sydney 2000, seeing off all-comers at each Olympics and three of them — Triggs Hodge, Pete Reed and Tom James — are back to defend their title. (Incongruously, the other from 2008, Steve Williams, was last seen winning the final of Dancing On Ice Goes Gold).

They won by dramatically rowing down the Australians in the last 250 metres, although those same rivals believe they can reverse that result this year, with some Ashes-style sledging from veteran Drew Ginn spicing things up.

Ginn maintains that the GB four were ‘scared as hell’ by losing the most recent World Cup in Munich six weeks ago, when the Australians beat them in the semis and final.

A mixed bag of British performances in Germany slightly dampened original expectations that the home Games will bring a bumper haul, with the cognoscenti believing the count is likely to end up being between six and eight medals of different colours.

None of Grobler’s gold medal-winning crews have ever won the main regatta preceding the Olympics, so Munich may not be an accurate form guide. Since then there have been training camps in Austria and Portugal, designed to bring out the best when it matters most.

If anyone is most favoured for gold, possibly in any sport involving GB, it is the women’s double scull of Anna Watkins and Katherine Grainger, who have proved unbeatable in the past three years.

There will not be a dry eye in the house next Friday if the immensely popular Grainger ends up with something better than the silver medals she has taken home from the last three Olympics.

Less conspicuously in the pairs, Helen Glover and Heather Stanning have emerged from opposite ends of the kingdom — they were born in Cornwall and Scotland respectively — as genuine chances for a gold after an excellent build-up and they are first off in Saturday morning’s heats.

The latter, an all-round sportswoman who enjoys sailing and surfboarding, is a Sandhurst-trained Royal Artillery officer who could find herself in Afghanistan before the end of the year.

Golden girls: Heather Stanning (right) and Helen Glover have enjoyed an impressive build-up

Golden girls: Heather Stanning (right) and Helen Glover have enjoyed an impressive build-up

There are longer shots for gold, such as defending champions in the men’s lightweight double Zac Purchase and Mark Hunter, whose form has been ropier than expected, or their underrated fellow lightweights in the four.

British rowing is trying to shake off its fairly staid and middle class image and the poster boy for its growing diversity is Mohamed Sbihi, one of the powerhouses in the unpredictable and eclectic men’s eight, who on a given day might trouble the German favourites.

With a Moroccan heritage but brought up in Surbiton, Sbihi is GB’s first rower who is a practising Muslim, and has elected to postpone his fasting during the current Ramadan after discussions with his family and religious figures.

Instead, he has made a sizeable donation to a charity that gives food to deprived children in Morocco and he will visit there later in the year.

The challenges for GB will come from far and wide, with small nations like New Zealand especially strong in rowing.

The Olympics is the summit in this sport and while there is no name as celebrated as Pinsent or Redgrave among the GB 47, there is no greater chance to forge one than at a home Games.

The rowing coverage will be unlike ever before on TV, with the use of a 250,000 camera developed by the US military that follows the boats down the course. The camera is suspended on three wires stretched between two 92 metre towers at either end of the lake. The camera can rotate 360 degrees and drops to just eight metres above the boats.
BRITS TO WATCH

Women’s Coxless Pair — Heather Stanning and Helen Glover

The West Country-based duo have impressed in the three World Cups this year and won silver at the 2011 World Championships. Feared by their rivals, but they need to watch out for New Zealand in particular.

Men’s Eight

Injuries have meant reshuffling but they gave Germany a scare at the World Cup in Belgrade and are more settled after the return of stroke Constantine Louloudis. The eight includes Greg Searle MBE, who competed in his first Games in 1992 and came out of retirement three years ago.

Men’s lightweight coxless four

Chris Bartley, Rob Williams and brothers Pete and Richard Chambers have improved greatly this year and could upset Australia and Denmark.

Rowing London 2012 Olympics

Australia wallop Essex by 179 runs

Food for thought for Cook as Clarke and Hussey help Australia wallop Essex

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UPDATED:

22:52 GMT, 26 June 2012

England's one-day international captain Alastair Cook was given plenty to think about at Chelmsford after Australia warmed up for their NatWest Series with a thumping 179-run win over Essex.

Australia captain Michael Clarke and David Hussey both made unbeaten half-centuries as Australia notched up 313 for nine.

Essex, with England duo Cook and Bopara in their ranks, were well off the pace in their reply and were all out for 134 in 32.4 overs, with Pat Cummins taking an impressive three for 26.

On the defensive: Alastair Cook reached just five

On the defensive: Alastair Cook reached just five

Cook's hopes of having a good look at Australia's bowling attack were ruined by Clint McKay in the fourth over of the Essex innings.

After an imperious shot to the cover boundary from the second delivery, he was despatched with the sixth as an intended drive was edged to Michael Clarke at first slip.

Cook's contribution was five from 15 deliveries and his removal from the scene more or less ended the county's hopes of maintaining a serious challenge.

Bopara, also set to turn out in the first encounter at Lord's, fared better and struck six fours until dabbing an easy catch behind off Shane Watson.

James Foster defied Australia for 36 balls while making 41 containing six fours but the 19-year-old Cummins was to have him caught by Stephen Smith at backward point, with the rest of the Essex line-up folding meekly.

Having won the toss and elected to bat, Australia's major batsmen all managed to get among the runs before Friday's duel against the old enemy.

Watson and David Warner produced an opening stand of 51 in just under seven overs before they departed for 33 and 26 respectively.

Warner drilled Graham Napier to Ryan ten Doeschate at midwicket while Watson was the first of Reece Topley's four victims when he was caught behind.

But it was skipper Clarke and Hussey who provided the backbone of the innings without looking in the slightest trouble.

On the lash: Michael Clarke reached 76 before retiring

On the lash: Michael Clarke reached 76 before retiring

Eschewing any risks, they found the gaps with ease while putting together a partnership of 137 in 20 overs.

That ended only when Clarke, having struck 76 in 73 balls with the aid of nine fours, decided to retire out to give others a taste of action out in the middle.

Hussey's innings of 67 from 66 deliveries, six of which he hit for fours, ended when he despatched left-arm spinner Tim Phillips to Bopara at deep cover, a dismissal that paved the way for Matthew Wade to inflict further punishment on Essex's toiling bowlers.

He helped himself to 47 from 43 balls, Napier finally bringing his innings to an end when Foster took a huge skier running towards square-leg.

Topley, the young left-arm pacemen, picked up four for 46 from eight overs to emerge as Essex's most successful bowler while Napier and Phillips each claimed two wickets.