Tag Archives: fencing

London Paralympics 2012: Day six five athletes to watch

Rachael Latham's five Paralympians to watch on day 8

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UPDATED:

23:24 GMT, 5 September 2012

One of our original Magnificent 7, Rachael made two swimming finals in Beijing but injuries forced her to retire in 2010. Now she is part of Channel 4’s coverage of the Games and here she selects her daily viewing highlights for day eight…

Silver service: Louise Watkin

Silver service: Louise Watkin

LOUISE WATKIN (SWIMMING)

Louise, 20, has won two medals already but it will be tough to beat South African Natalie in the 200m individual medley. Du Toit took gold ahead of Louise at the world championships but Louise has a quiet determination.

TIME: Heats 9.40am. Final 5.38pm.

TOM HALL-BUTCHER (FENCING)

Wheelchair fencing may not sound like it works but it does. Tom, 22, is in the sabre class A and was 14th at last year’s world championships. He could do better with home support. He has four qualifying matches then it’s knockout.

TIME: 11am.

JONNIE PEACOCK (ATHLETICS)

The 19-year-old runs in the T44 100m final. It is the most anticipated event of the Games and world record holder Jonnie is a favourite. It’s a tough field, including Oscar Pistorius, but Jonnie has the talent and belief to win.

TIME: 9.24pm.

In front: Jonnie Peacock (centre) shone in the 100m heats

In front: Jonnie Peacock (centre) shone in the 100m heats

TERRY BYWATER (BASKETBALL)

Terry, 29, scored 19 points in wheelchair basketball against Japan and 23 v Turkey in the quarter-final — they call it having ‘hot hands’. He doesn’t care who scores the points as long as Britain beat Canada today and they have a medal.

TIME: 9.15pm.

HELENA LUCAS (SAILING)

Helena looks a near-certainty to secure Britain’s first Paralympic sailing gold, needing a top-nine finish to do so. She is the only woman in a fleet of 16 in the single-person keelboat 2.4mR class and she has racked up four wins in 10 races.

TIME: 11.10pm.

London 2012 Olympics modern pentathlon: Samantha Murray wins silver

Murray helps Team GB end Olympics smiling with modern pentathlon silver

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UPDATED:

17:18 GMT, 12 August 2012

Samantha Murray delighted Team GB fans by claiming a silver medal in the women's modern pentathlon as the London Olympics drew to a close.

Murray was an outside shot to win in the discipline which involves fencing, swimming, showjumping and shooting and running in a combined event.

She was in fourth place before the combined event finale, but overhauled Yane Marques and Amelie Caze to finish second behind Laura Asadauskaite.

More to follow.

Delight: Samantha Murray ended up winning silver

Delight: Samantha Murray ended up winning silver

London 2012 Olympics: David Svoboda wins men"s modern pentathlon

Svoboda banishes Beijing heartache by winning men's modern pentathlon

PUBLISHED:

18:59 GMT, 11 August 2012

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UPDATED:

19:23 GMT, 11 August 2012

Czech David Svoboda won gold in the
men's modern pentathlon as British duo Nick Woodbridge and Sam Weale
could only finish 10th and 13th.

The home pair went into the final
event, the combined run and shoot, in the top 10 but they could not make
up ground on the leaders in front of a huge crowd at Greenwich Park.

Olympic champion: David Svoboda savours triumph

Olympic champion: David Svoboda savours triumph

Svoboda, who saw his Beijing hopes dashed when his horse fell on him during the show jumping, went into the combined event in first place and overhauled China's Cao Zhongrong on the final one-kilometre run while Adam Marosi of Hungary won bronze.

Woodbridge's 10th place matched the finish of Weale in Beijing, which was the best by a British man for 16 years.

In the first event of the day, the fencing, Woodbridge and Weale both finished with 17 wins from 35 fencing bouts at the Copper Box, which was a little below par, for Woodbridge in particular.

The world number nine was on top form to start with, winning his first five bouts and at one stage topping the leaderboard, but he tailed off rather and had to settle for joint 13th.

The format in pentathlon involves each of the 36 men fighting each other in one-minute bouts, with one hit enough for victory.

Below par: Nick Woodbridge (left)

Below par: Nick Woodbridge (left)

Weale's morning progressed in the opposite way to his team-mate's, with the 30-year-old losing seven of his first nine bouts but recovering to finish in the top half of the field.

Next up was the 200 metres freestyle swim at the Aquatics Centre, which is one of Woodbridge's best events, and his time of one minute 57.32 seconds was the second fastest of the day and enough to move him up to eighth place.

Weale swum his fastest time of the year, 2min 03.40sec, while the event was won by Egypt's Amro El Geziry, who broke his own Olympic record with a time of 1min 55.70sec.

Svoboda was the leading athlete in the fencing, the Czech equalling the Olympic record with 26 victories for 1024 points.

The show jumping is often a game changer, with the athletes drawing their horses at random and having only 20 minutes to acquaint themselves with their animal.

Woodbridge and Weale both performed well to keep themselves in contention, knocking down one fence apiece, although Woodbridge did rack up quite a few time faults.

His score of 1156 was enough to lift him into seventh place, while Weale was ninth after accumulating 1176 points, the seventh best ride of the day.

Hungarian duo Robert Kasza and Marosi both managed clear rounds, as did Italy's European champion Riccardo De Luca.

London 2012 Olympics: Pentathlon: Sam Weale and Nick Woodbridge make modest start

Woodbridge and Weale make modest starts in bid for GB pentathlon glory

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UPDATED:

14:43 GMT, 11 August 2012

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Nick Woodbridge and Sam Weale both finished with 17 wins from 35 fencing bouts as they got their Olympic modern pentathlon campaigns under way at the Copper Box on Saturday morning.

In this most unpredictable of sports, both British athletes began with hopes of a medal but 808 points was a little below par for Woodbridge in particular.

The world number nine was on top form to start with, winning his first five bouts and at one stage topping the leaderboard, but he tailed off rather and had to settle for joint 13th.

Gotcha: Nick Woodbridge (left) takes a hit from his German opponent Steffen Gebhardt

Gotcha: Nick Woodbridge (left) takes a hit from his German opponent Steffen Gebhardt

The format in pentathlon involves each of the 36 men fighting each other in one-minute bouts, with one hit enough for victory.

Weale's morning progressed in the opposite way to his team-mate's, with the 30-year-old losing seven of his first nine bouts but recovering to finish in the top half of the field.

Czech David Svoboda led the way with 26 wins and 1024 points, equalling the Olympic record.
World champion and gold medal favourite Aleksander Lesun of Russia and China's Cao Zhongrong were one win behind in joint second.

After completing the fencing, the athletes headed over to the Aquatics Centre for the second event of the pentathlon, the 200 metres freestyle swim.

Blow: Woodbridge will be disappointed he tailed off after a short stint on top of the leaderboard

Blow: Woodbridge will be disappointed he tailed off after a short stint on top of the leaderboard

Blow: Woodbridge will be disappointed he tailed off after a short stint on top of the leaderboard

On you go: Woodbridge walks past Sam Weale in the Copper Box

On you go: Woodbridge walks past Sam Weale in the Copper Box

The swim is one of Woodbridge's best events and his time of one minute 57.32 seconds was the second fastest of the day and enough to move him up to eighth place.

Weale swum his fastest time of the year, 2min 03.40sec, and will go into the next event, the show jumping at Greenwich Park, sitting in 14th place.

Egypt's Amro El Geziry set the pace in the pool, with his time of 1.55.70 breaking the Olympic record, but the leader after two events is Cao of China, who added a third place in the swim to his joint second in the fencing.

The world number 25 leads Svoboda by 48 points with Lesun well placed in third, one spot ahead of his Russian team-mate Andrei Moiseev, who is looking to become the only pentathlete to win three consecutive Olympic golds.

The riding phase is often a game changer, though, with athletes drawing horses at random and then having only 20 minutes to acquaint themselves with their animal.

Quick time: Woodbridge recorded the second quickest time in the 200m freestyle swim

Quick time: Woodbridge recorded the second quickest time in the 200m freestyle swim

Work to do: Weale sat in 14th place after a season's best in the swim

Work to do: Weale sat in 14th place after a season's best in the swim

London 2012 Olympics: Fencing – medal hopes over for Great Britain

Fencing medal hopes over for Great Britain as Italians march on

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UPDATED:

11:41 GMT, 5 August 2012

Britain's last chance of a fencing medal came and went at the ExCeL on Sunday – but how they gave it their best efforts against top seeds Italy.

The Italians, Olympic champions six times, survived to the semi-finals by a 45-40 margin.

Richard Kruse, James Davis and Husayn Rosowsky had beaten Egypt 45-33 to reach the quarter-finals and after Laurence Halsted replaced Rosowsky were level 35-35.

Valiant effort: Great Britain's team show their dejection after losing quarter final of the foil team event

Valiant effort: Great Britain's team show their dejection after losing quarter final of the foil team event

Kruse went into the last bout against Andrea Baldini trailing 38-40, but Italy's losing semi-finalist in the individual event saw them through.

Former European silver medallist Halsted had travelled to the last two Games as Kruse's training partner and then was left out of the individual competition, but when his first chance of Olympic action finally came he grasped it by beating world No 8 Valerio Aspromonte 6-5.

'It was almost exactly to plan,' he said. 'We just needed to be really close at the end – we knew we were not going to run away with it against the best in the world.

Close encounter: Valerio Aspromonte (right) faces Lawrence Halsted

Close encounter: Valerio Aspromonte (right) faces Lawrence Halsted

'To be in it at the end with a chance was definitely what we meant to do, but they had just a class finisher.

'We felt like we had a real shot at it being on home turf after winning the test event here and we came so close.

'I think we could have beaten anybody else and we showed we could have beaten them as well.'

Kruse, a quarter-finalist in Athens, had looked completely down in the dumps after losing straightaway in the individual, but he and Davis, both really pumped up, had some great moments.

Down and out: Britain's Husayn Rosowsky (left) fences against Italy's Andrea Cassara (right)

Down and out: Britain's Husayn Rosowsky (left) fences against Italy's Andrea Cassara (right)

Davis, only 21 and already 23rd in the world, thrashed Aspromonte 9-4 to turn a 15-11 deficit into a 20-19 advantage and then beat current world champion Andrea Cassara 6-5.

But Baldini won all his three contests and kept his nerve to set up a last-four clash with the United States later in the day.

The other semi-final was between Japan and Germany.

London 2012 Olympics: Fencing – Italian dream team claim gold

Dominant Italian 'dream team' claim gold in fencing foil at ExCeL arena

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UPDATED:

21:57 GMT, 2 August 2012

Italy's version of the 'Dream Team' did what was expected of them at the ExCeL fencing arena on Thursday, adding team gold to the three individual medals they won on Saturday in the women's foil.

Valentina Vezzali, Elisa Di Francisca – now a double gold medal-winner in London – and new world No 1 Arianna Errigo were in unstoppable form all day and took the title with a 45-31 victory over Russia.

That was especially sweet. The Russians were the defending champions, having defeated Italy by a single point – 22-21 – in the semi-finals in Beijing.

Dream team: Ilaria Salvatori, Arianna Errigo, Valentina Vezzali and Elisa Di Francisca of Italy celebrate with their gold medals

Dream team: Ilaria Salvatori, Arianna Errigo, Valentina Vezzali and Elisa Di Francisca of Italy celebrate with their gold medals

They even felt comfortable enough to bring on substitute Ilaria Salvatori for one bout near the end so she too could receive a gold.

She lost it 9-5, but it did not matter – their only other defeat in 27 three-minute contests during the entire competition was Vezzali's in the very last head-to-head.

Bronze went to South Korea after they got the better of France 45-32, while hosts Great Britain finished eighth, beating Egypt, but then losing to Italy, Poland and Japan.

For 38-year-old Vezzali, their flag-carrier at the opening ceremony, it meant a sixth gold of her glittering career – and that equals the Italian record of fellow fencers Edoardo Mangiarotti and Nedo Nadi.

The police officer had hoped she
would reach that landmark last Saturday. That would have made her the
first woman in any sport to win solo gold in four successive Games, but
she had to settle for bronze after losing to Errigo, who then lost to Di
Francisca.

Golden moment: Vezzali drops to her knees to celebrate gold

Golden moment: Vezzali drops to her knees to celebrate gold

Italy
opened with a 42-14 demolition of the 13th-ranked British, finishing the
contest while the other three quarter-finals were only just passing the
halfway stage.

They did not lose any of the nine three-minute bouts in that and the same was true of their 45-22 victory against fourth seeds France.

Vezzali, who intends to be still competing in Rio aged 42, actually fell 1-0 down at the start of the final, but that was as good as it got for the Russian trio of Inna Deriglazova, Larisa Korobeynikova and Aida Shanaeva.

Britain's Anna Bentley said of facing
the Italians: 'It's like trying to beat Barcelona and there's three of
them, not one. There's not a weak link and they don't make mistakes.

'They're
super-experienced, come out really confident and are quite arrogant on
the piste – maybe we need to learn a bit more of that. This is a massive
learning curve.'

As it
has been for the entire 10-strong squad. Not one of them made the last
16 in the individual events, there is only the men's team foil to come
on Sunday – and they will also have to face top seeds Italy in the last
eight if they first beat Egypt.

Italian job: The team celebrate with their coaches

Italian job: The team celebrate with their coaches

Bentley did at least lose only by 5-3 to Errigo and 5-2 to the other two, while Polish-born Natalia Sheppard held Vezzali 2-2 and took Errigo to 5-4, but Sophie Troiano scored only one point in her three fights.

Reserve Martina Emanuel – omitted from the individual line-up despite being ranked higher than Troiano and Bentley – was brought in for Bentley during the final match, but the Italians were already well ahead and did not slacken off.

Sheppard said: 'We started a bit apprehensively against Egypt and obviously we were a little bit up against it with the Italians. It's so much about momentum and we didn't get it.

'It was a bit of a rollercoaster. One of the fencers (Di Francisca) beat us 15-2 – it's a competition, so you don't always fence 100 per cent, but it wasn't due to lack of hard work or will to succeed.'

Troiano stated: 'We all did our best. It just wasn't our day.

'I was so excited to come competing here. It's been really emotional, I've enjoyed every minute of it and we're going to stay at the village until the end so as to enjoy the very last bit of the Olympics.'

London 2012 Olympics: Husayn Rosowsky lost first-round match

Team GB fencer Rosowsky falls at first hurdle… and is left requiring treatment

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UPDATED:

11:02 GMT, 31 July 2012

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What was potentially a huge day for British fencing began poorly with Husayn Rosowsky losing his first-round match at the ExCeL and needing treatment.

The 21-year-old from Sheffield went down to Tunisian Mohamed Samandi, ranked two places lower than him at 58th in the world, 15-8 after suffering a thigh injury midway through the fight.

The contest was stopped for nearly 10 minutes at 12-6 and Rosowsky managed to take it into the final three-minute period, but could not find a way back.

Flat out: Rosowsky was left requiring treatment after suffering a thigh injury midway through the fight

Flat out: Rosowsky was left requiring treatment after suffering a thigh injury midway through the fight

That left hopes pinned on Britain's top two. Richard Kruse, a quarter-finalist in Athens eight years ago, and rising star James-Andrew Davis received byes into the second round and were entering the fray at lunchtime.

Britain has not won a fencing medal since 1964 and has yet to see one of its squad make even the last 16 so far this week.

Rosowsky said: 'I had a bit of a hamstring injury – it happened about a week ago – but didn't think it would bother me.

Clash: Rosowsky said he suffered a hamstring injury a week ago

Clash: Rosowsky said he suffered a hamstring injury a week ago

'As soon as I did my first lunge about a minute and a half into the contest I could feel it.

'I could have been better, but I'd not fought him before and he was very good. He surprised me.

'That's the way things go in sport. Hopefully it's fine for the team event on Sunday.'

Rosowsky, Kruse and Davis are the three-man team, but reserve Laurence Halsted, the son of two Olympic fencers and the 2008 European silver medallist, can be brought on.

London 2012 Olympics Natalia Sheppard overcomes compatriot Sophie Troiano

Sheppard beats compatriot Troiano but falls to Maitrejean in fencing second round duel

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UPDATED:

11:25 GMT, 28 July 2012

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Natalia Sheppard beat British teammate Sophie Troiano 12-9 in a wonderfully tense opening women's foil contest in the Olympic fencing at the ExCeL Arena.

Ranked 56 places above her opponent at 42nd in the world, Polish-born Sheppard went 6-2 up midway through the fight, but Londoner Troiano got the deficit back to one point on no fewer than five occasions.

Sheppard, who came through a European qualifier to earn her spot, refused to let her opponent get back on level terms, however, and two hits in the final six seconds took her through to a second round contest against France's world number six Corinne Maitrejean.

Battle of the Brits: Natalia Sheppard (left) claimed victory against Sophie Troiano

Battle of the Brits: Natalia Sheppard (left) claimed victory against Sophie Troiano

Sheppard failed to make it through to the last 16, losing 15-5 to the much slicker Maitrejean.

It was 8-1 to the experienced French fencer after just two minutes and, try as she did, Sheppard could not apply any real pressure or find inspiration from the fans.

London Olympics 2012: 10 vivid Games memories Neil Wilson

Murder and magic… my Olympic story: Our veteran of 19 Games recalls 10 vivid memories

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UPDATED:

22:45 GMT, 24 July 2012

Masked evil: A hooded Palestinian terrorist on the balcony of the Israeli quarters

Masked evil: A hooded Palestinian terrorist on the balcony of the Israeli quarters

MUNICH — Sept 5, 1972

Security was not tight at the Athletes’ Village in Munich, as the Palestinian terrorists had discovered four hours earlier. I ran into the Village, wearing a British tracksuit hastily ‘borrowed’ from an athlete’s husband still asleep on the couch in my media apartment. The armed guard, seeing an Olympic accreditation card dangling round my neck, waved me through an open gateway, assuming I was an athlete returning from a morning run. Minutes later the village was shut to outsiders.

The only information I had from my London office was that someone had been killed, thought at that time to be a chef. I spent the next 13 hours in an upper floor of the Italian team quarters overlooking 31 Connellystrasse where the Israeli athletes had been taken hostage, communicating what I could see on the internal phone to a colleague in the media village who filed it on to London.

MONTREAL — 1976

Hard
to believe but the controversy of those Games was in modern pentathlon.
Boris Onischenko — ‘Dis-honest-Chenko’ as Fleet Street named the Soviet
— rigged a device in his fencing epee which registered hits when he
pressed a button. British veteran Jim Fox spotted something was up and
asked for the weapon to be examined. With the game up, Soviet officials
rushed their man out of the country but poor Fox was left devastated.

None
of Fleet Street’s finest had been present — the five-day event was
given little coverage and the fencing section none — and when they
arrived hot foot after news spread, they demanded a press conference.
The competition was stopped, Fox was called to account for himself and,
unsurprisingly, returned to one of his worst days, winning only 23 of
his 55 contests. Fortunately, two younger team-mates kept GB in
contention and all three ran a blinder on day five to win Britain’s
first gold in the sport. Years later Fox said: ‘It took an experienced
idiot like me nearly to lose the medal.’

MONTREAL — 1976

No beating around the bush: Jim Rosenthal

No beating around the bush: Jim Rosenthal

Only since Moscow have the press been excluded from the Athletes' Village. Before that we could wander into the British block at will. I conducted several interviews with British athletes seated on their beds. Jim Rosenthal, then covering for the string of BBC local radio stations, had a unique method of obtaining interviews for local consumption. He would stand at the door of the British block and intercept anybody passing in a GB track suit or blazer with three questions: ‘Who are you, what do you do and where do you come from’

TEST EVENT, MOSCOW — 1979

One year out from the Games, before the infamous boycott threatened, the world’s media descended on Moscow to view the test event, the Spartakiad. The basement bar in our hotel was an evening mecca for one and all in a city short on nightlife but for those not staying there transport home after the witching hour was a nightmare.

It was solved on one occasion for Britain’s chief athletics coach Frank Dick by a journalist friend pressing wads of roubles into the fist of the driver of a 56-seater coach parked outside which persuaded him to drive Dick in solitary splendour back to his hotel. The panic an hour later when the massed personnel of a US TV company found their booked transport to their studios missing was a Pythonesque moment.

MOSCOW — 1980

Never was tighter security imposed upon the media at an Olympic Games than in Moscow. Hundreds were accommodated in a single gigantic hotel, the Rossiya, then the world’s largest with more than 3,000 rooms. Entry was permitted only to the accredited and only through one door and airport-style X-ray machines.

Cold War paranoia affected some so much they turned televisions in their rooms to the wall in case they were being filmed. All felt cut off from the real world, an impression brought home when two Dutch journalists, seeking a night on the town, asked the stony-faced doorman where they would find the nearest nightclub. ‘Helsinki,’ he replied.

SEOUL — 1987

There are times when you cannot report what you see and hear because you are in a privileged position. Chatham House rules, the lobby writers call those moments. It happened to me when I was asked to represent the British media on a British Olympic Association recce of the Games venues one year out. Travelling with us was one of Princess Anne’s police bodyguards.

The detail he demanded of bemused Koreans went far beyond the need for her security. ‘Where is the nearest toilet’ he asked at the hockey venue. Why did he need to know ‘If she asks and I don’t know, it’s me who’s in the khazi,’ he replied.

US TRIALS, INDIANAPOLIS — 1988

The US media were never fond of Carl Lewis. Too calculating, too fond of himself. But he would go out of his way for the British, recognising probably that Europe was where his bread was most thickly buttered. Three of us approached his manager, Joe Douglas, when we arrived in Indianapolis for a British-only interview with Lewis and he promised we would have it when the Trials ended.

On the final afternoon, with still nothing arranged, we sought out Joe. ‘He’s has to do a dope test first, then he’s seeing his mother and then he’s flying by a private jet to appear on the David Letterman Show. But somewhere he’ll fit you in.’ The call came mid-evening to meet him at midnight in a restaurant in a shopping mall where he would be eating with his sister Carol. He talked to us on every possible subject for two hours and then went straight to the airport.

Busted: Ben Johnson breaks from the pack during the 100m final in Seoul

Busted: Ben Johnson breaks from the pack during the 100m final in Seoul

SEOUL — Sept 27, 1988, 2am

The news that Ben Johnson had given a positive test reached the media village as a drinks party was winding down. That day’s work was long done and the next was a scheduled rest day in the Olympic Stadium, so the worst case scenario had seemed a nasty hangover. Instead, as lights came on across the media tower blocks and word spread, the eight-hour time difference meant a new day’s work was beginning for the same day’s paper.

The Mail’s heroine of the hour, incredibly, was Carol Thatcher, daughter of the Prime Minister and guest at the party, who tore sheets from columnist Ian Wooldridge’s typewriter after he wrote every second paragraph of a lengthy opinion piece and dictated his words to copy-takers in London against the imminent deadline. /07/24/article-0-033846DD000005DC-625_634x448.jpg” width=”634″ height=”448″ alt=”Return to the ice: Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean took bronze in Lillehammer” class=”blkBorder” />

Return to the ice: Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean took bronze in Lillehammer

ATLANTA — 1996

Security was tight, and tighter still after a bomb in downtown Atlanta. Official media buses to the main press centre involved lengthy checks through X-ray machines but the Mail team, staying in an upmarket hotel reserved for officials, found that the bigwigs’ buses took a short cut where there were no checks.

All worked splendidly for a week until we boasted of our dodge in the bar one night. A Sunday newspaper back home revealed the flaw as an example of weak security that led to the bomb blast and, surprise, surprise, the Mail team were sent to join the long queues.

London 2012 Olympics: British Fencing want to put Keith Cook selection row behind them

British Fencing want to put Cook selection row behind them

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UPDATED:

21:50 GMT, 12 June 2012

British Fencing maintain it is time to put selection rows behind them as focus turns towards delivering a successful Olympics performance.

Scottish fencer Keith Cook appealed against his exclusion from the squad on Monday for London 2012 – claiming British Fencing had failed to follow their written Olympic selection policy and procedures.

The final three places will be announced today so Britain can compete in the men's and women's team foil competitions at the ExCeL Arena.

Not going: Keith Cook did not make the fencing squad

Not going: Keith Cook did not make the fencing squad

There was some controversy surrounding the individual squad announcement at the start of June.

Sophie Williams and Louise Bond-Williams have been selected for the women's sabre, despite the fact Joanna Hutchison and Chrystall Nicoll are both ranked higher.
Only two of the seven actually qualified – Richard Kruse and Polish-born Natalia Shepherd in the foil – while the other five have been awarded Host Nation spots.

Williams and Bond-Williams are joined by foilist James Davis, Corinna Lawrence in the women's epee and James Honeybone in the men's sabre.

No British fencer has won an Olympic medal since 1964, but Kruse, 28, reached the quarter-finals in Beijing eight years ago and has been ranked as high as fifth in the world.

British Fencing communication director David King said: “We have made what we think are the best decisions, both for 2012 and 2016.

'We have a good squad and it is time for everyone to get behind them and let's go forward.'

Former European silver medallist Laurence Halsted, the son of two Olympic fencers, is expected to make the foil team, with Martina Emanuel and Anna Bentley also candidates for the discretionary places in the women's squad.

The ones who are going: British Olympic Association announce the remaining fencing athletes selected for Team GB

The ones who are going: British Olympic Association announce the remaining fencing athletes selected for Team GB

However, Cook – the 2010 British champion and five-time Commonwealth Games medallist – has missed out.

The 31-year-old, who opted out of British Fencing's 'Olympic Pathway' two years ago for family reasons, was told in correspondence from British Fencing officials that while he was included in general discussions for selection, because performance manager Alex Newton had not been given contact details, as set out in Section 13 of the selection policy document, he was not informed that he had not been selected and the deadline for any appeal was passed.

Chief executive Piers Martin explained in an email to Cook that because the Section 13 information was not received British Fencing 'did not consider that you wanted to be considered for selection'.

Cook, ranked 95 in the world and still in the British top six having battled against recent injury, believes proper procedure was not followed.

'I e-mailed the performance manager and asked to be let known what was going on because I had not received any information,' Cook said.

'I got one back saying it was to do with not giving your e-mail address and phone number – and I said 'you must be joking'.

'I have had constant e-mails, text messages and phone calls from the performance manager, I was part of the team who have been there for six years. They have got my phone number.

'I said 'no way are you going to do it on a technicality like that'.'

Cook added: 'Basically they have broken their own process. 'I can't argue about who they have picked because it is discretionary places, but they did not give me a chance and did not follow the process of Olympic selection.'