Tag Archives: exalted

David Lloyd misses Emmerdale star Chas Dingle – Bumble"s Test diary

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: England have picked the wrong team… but why I'm in a tizz over Chas

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UPDATED:

17:52 GMT, 15 November 2012

MONTY, WHERE FOR ART THOU, MONTY

England have picked the wrong team. Monty Panesar should be playing. It’s crying out for two specialist spinners. Samit Patel bowled 14 overs but he is only a supplementary option. Monty is the man for these conditions. England picked three seamers but conditions were against them, and Tim Bresnan only bowled 10 overs. India always play two seamers and two specialist spinners at home and England should have followed suit.

Watching brief: England's Monty Panesar during a nets practice session at the Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad yesterday

Watching brief: England's Monty Panesar during a nets practice session at the Sardar Patel Stadium, Ahmedabad yesterday

SWANN BESTA

Saying that, Graeme Swann has been exceptional. He is in exalted company now after overtaking one of the all-time greats yesterday, Jim Laker.

Swann is right up there, make no mistake. Some say Swann has picked up plenty of wickets because of DRS, but I'd counter that by pointing out that Laker played on uncovered pitches.

Fitness permitting, Swann will pass Deadly Derek Underwood and reach 300 Test wickets.

DROPPED CATCHES LOSE MATCHES

England can’t afford to keep dropping catches. Four chances were missed. I put it down to psychological pressure. It was the same against South Africa and the likes of Hashim Amla (in particular), Graeme Smith and AB de Villiers. The fielding mindset is ‘I can’t afford to drop this class of player’ and you find yourself snatching at chances or going with hard hands. Also, the continuity in fielding positions has not been there. England miss Paul Collingwood. Jimmy Anderson has had a go in the slips and now Jonathan Trott.

Another brick in the wall: Mumbai A's Cheteshwar Pujara earlier this month during England's tour

Another brick in the wall: Mumbai A's Cheteshwar Pujara earlier this month during England's tour

UH-OH THE INDIANS HAVE BUILT ANOTHER WALLL

If Virender Sehwag had a wish list, in first place would be ‘this pitch’. There is no movement, little pace or bounce and he’s just stood there and thought: ‘I’ll smash it everywhere.’

Conditions are 100 per cent in his favour. England will be relieved he ‘only’ got 117.

A quick word about this lad Cheteshwar Pujara, who has replaced Rahul Dravid at No 3. He’s controlled, careful and watchful – oh no, he's a ‘Junior Wall’!

/11/15/article-2233465-160C2F28000005DC-564_306x423.jpg” width=”306″ height=”423″ alt=”No wonder, Bumble misses Chas Dingle…: Emmerdale actress Lucy Pargeter poses in her lingerie” class=”blkBorder” />

No wonder, Bumble misses Chas Dingle...: Emmerdale actress Lucy Pargeter poses in her lingerie

No wonder, Bumble misses Chas Dingle…: Emmerdale actress Lucy Pargeter poses in her lingerie

Chastity Dingle (Lucy Pargeter) panics when she wakes up next to Colin McFarlane (Michael Melia) and discovers he's dead

Chastity Dingle

Just not cricket: Chastity Dingle (Lucy Pargeter,) panics when she wakes up next to Colin McFarlane (Michael Melia) and discovers he's dead (left) and posing all demurely (right)

EARLY START MEANS BEEFY'S FULL OF BULL

As you’d imagine, I had a full English (in a plastic carton) which was very nice. As I said, I woke up at 2am but I didn’t get my breakfast till 5.30am – that’s when the rest of the staff come in.

Sir Beefy took a different approach – he just had an inordinate amount of Red Bull!

AND WHILE I'M AT IT…

Petula Clark was 80 yeterday. I was a big fan back in the day. All together now: 'Downtown…'Finally, I read the other day that Frankel’s stud fee has been set at 125,000. Nice work if you can get it…

Petula Clark

Jockey Tom Queally kisses race horse Frankel, following the Champion Stakes (Class 1), British Champions Middle Distance race at Ascot, England on October 20, 2012

Star-studded: Happy 80th birthday Petula Clark (left), while Frankel (right) has has his stud fee set at 125,000

Follow Bumble on Twitter @BumbleCricket

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray has Roger Federer rattled

The young pretender has Federer rattled: Record books prove Murray knows how to unnerve Swiss maestro

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UPDATED:

21:17 GMT, 7 July 2012

The only thing standing between Andy Murray and Wimbledon glory is the greatest player ever to pick up a tennis racket – but at least the British No 1 knows he can get under Roger Federer's skin.

If there is a player on tour who has really rattled Federer during the Swiss's domination of the sport, it is Murray, who is among a tiny minority of players in having a superior record against Federer, winning eight of their 15 encounters.

Fired-up: Andy Murray has shown more aggression at SW19 this year

Fired-up: Andy Murray has shown more
aggression at SW19 this year

When it matters most, in Grand Slam finals, Federer has won both – in the 2008 US Open and the 2010 Australian Open.

But the point is that Murray has unsettled Federer, on the court and, crucially, between the ears – and if there is a chink in the Swiss star's armour, it is there.

Federer's achievements are already the stuff of legend. He has won a record 16 Grand Slam singles titles, six of them at the All England Club.

He has won 46million in prize money – and many times that much again in endorsements, making him one of the richest sportsmen in history.

Route to the final: How Murray and Federer got there

Route to the final: How Murray and Federer got there

He has spent 285 weeks of his life as the world No 1, just one week short of Pete Sampras's career total of 286.

Should Federer beat Murray on Centre Court, he will return to No 1 tomorrow and be certain of overtaking Sampras's tally.

The Swiss maestro was World Sportsman of the Year for four consecutive years from 2005-2008.

He has also been a Unicef ambassador since 2006.

As if his exalted status needed bolstering any more, last year a poll of more than 50,000 people in 25 countries found him to be the second most respected and trusted public figure in the world – only behind Nelson Mandela.

What is now largely forgotten, however, is that before he embarked on his Slam-gathering heroics, which began with victory in the Wimbledon final of 2003, Federer had trouble controlling himself on court.

He could be stroppy, brattish and rude.

When he learned to keep his emotions in check, his career soared, though traces of his spikiness remain.

His digs at Murray, however subtle, illustrate this best In 2008, Murray beat Federer in Dubai – one of six wins for the Scot in their first eight meetings – and Federer's response was far from gracious.

'I know that he beat me, but he stands way back in the court … he tends to wait a lot for his opponent to make a mistake,' said Federer, chippily.

'Overall, over a 15-year career, you want to look to win a point more often than wait for the other guy to miss. That's what served me well over the years.'

Murray v Federer: John Lloyd's verdict

After reaching the Australian Open final against the British No 1 in 2010, Federer noted in public that Murray would be attempting to win Britain's first men's Slam singles 'for 150,000 years'.

Federer insisted: 'The pressure is big on him. He's in his second Grand Slam final now. I think the first one is always a bit tougher than the second one. But as he didn't win the first one, I think that doesn't help him, you know, for the second one. Plus he's playing, you know, me, who has won so many Grand Slam titles before.'

Master at work: Roger Federer has few weaknesses for his rival to exploit

Master at work: Roger Federer has few
weaknesses for his rival to exploit

Federer then beat Murray in that Melbourne showpiece in straight sets, as he had beaten him in the US Open final in straight sets in 2008.

Murray wept, and then said: 'I can cry like Roger. It's just a shame I can't play like him.'

Had Murray not been so obviously distraught as he said it, those words might have sounded like a barb at Federer's own 'softie' blubbing after numerous big wins.

Instead, it sounded like the throwing in of a towel.

But Federer's icy calm on the court is only an extension of his steely desire to keep winning at the highest level, and he did not let up on the mind games against Murray.

When the Scot won three events back-to-back last autumn in Bangkok, Tokyo and Shanghai, Federer's response was to belittle the strength of the field at those tournaments.

'I'm not taking anything away from what he did but was Asia the strongest this year I'm not sure,' he said.

He added that neither he nor Novak Djokovic had played those events and emphasised that Rafael Nadal was KO'd early in Shanghai.

This time, Murray hit back, pointing out that when Federer won the Paris Masters last November, he did so in the absence of the injured Nadal, and after Djokovic (withdrawal) and he himself had exited at the quarter-final stage.

The subtext was clear: Two can play at this game when it comes to psychological games.