Tag Archives: event

Sir Chris Hoy retires from cycling

A Knight to remember: British cycling's Olympic golden boy Hoy rides off into the sunset after stellar career

: February – Wins sprint and keirin at London World Cup, an event which doubles as the Olympic test event. April – Wins keirin world title in Melbourne. Claims bronze in the sprint after being beaten by Kenny in the semi-final. August 2 – Wins fifth Olympic gold medal in London 2012 men's team sprint bringing him level on golds with Sir Steve Redgrave. August 7 – Wins the men's keirin at London 2012, his second gold of the Games and his sixth Olympic gold medal in total making him Britain's most successful Olympian.

2013: April 15 – Calls a media conference for April 18 in Edinburgh, where he is announces his retirement from competitive cycling.

'The desire to race in Glasgow was there, but when I started training again my body wasn't responding,' said Hoy. 'London took an incredible toll. I squeezed out every drop, really emptied the tank' – and in doing so, he won two gold medals, taking his tally to a record six Olympic golds, one more than Sir Steve Redgrave.

'I didn't want to turn up in Glasgow and not be successful,' Hoy continued. 'I didn't want to spend a year-and-a-half putting Sarra (his wife) and everything else to one side. And I don't want to be there to get a tracksuit and wave to the crowd — I wouldn't enjoy that.'

Although Hoy says there was no epiphany, if he had to pick one moment when his thoughts settled on retirement, it came – paradoxically enough – on a bike ride.

It was last month, towards the end of an eight-week holiday with Sarra, as they toured Asia and Australia.

'We were doing a road trip from Cairns to Adelaide,' says Hoy. 'The car had a roof rack with bikes, of course, and I was riding every day, first thing in the morning but also eating what I wanted and relaxing.

'As we got close to Adelaide, we stopped and I got the bike off and rode the last 100km. It was in the Barossa Valley, through the vineyards. Stunning. And I thought, “Yes, this is more like it.”

'I realised that I was associating the bike with pleasure, rather than the pain of training. It reminded me why I got into the sport in the first place.'

And it beat battering his body into
submission in a velodrome. As Hoy explains: 'People think that if you're
a good cyclist or tennis player or rugby player that you simply get out
of bed and do it.

'But you become good at it because of what you do day
after day, year after year. It's why I know I can't just turn up in
Glasgow and be competitive. Your body eventually says,: “Enough”.'

After London 2012 Hoy said he
desperately wanted to carry on to Glasgow, by which time he will be 38. But what
most didn't know at the time was that his build-up to his fourth
Olympics had been so difficult.

He was struck down with a back injury
just weeks before the Games, forcing him to return early from a
training camp in Germany. Then he mistakenly booked a flight home for
the wrong day, forcing a detour to Glasgow and a long journey for Sarra
to drive from their home in Cheshire to collect him.

Next morning, Hoy was called into the
Manchester Velodrome for a meeting with Dave Brailsford and Shane
Sutton.

'You're not riding the sprint,' Sutton told him. 'And the way
you're going, you're not riding the keirin, either.' Hoy was defending
Olympic champion in both events.

Flying the flag: Sir Chris Hoy of the leads out Great Britain at the 2012 Opening Ceremony

Flying the flag: Sir Chris Hoy of the leads out Great Britain at the 2012 Opening Ceremony

Gold star: Hoy shows off his medal after the Men's Keirin Track Cycling Final last year

Gold star: Hoy shows off his medal after the Men's Keirin Track Cycling Final last year

Pedal to the medal: Hoy during the keirin at the London Games

Pedal to the medal: Hoy during the keirin at the London Games

Victory parade: Hoy (right) and Sarah Storey are interviewed by Helen Skelton (left)

Victory parade: Hoy (right) and Sarah Storey are interviewed by Helen Skelton (left)

Sealed with a kiss: Hoy with his wife Sarra Kemp after winning a gold medal in the Velodrome last year

Sealed with a kiss: Hoy with his wife Sarra Kemp after winning a gold medal in the Velodrome last year

THE FUTURE FOR A KNIGHT RIDER

Sir Chris Hoy says he is looking forward to 'a bit of relaxation and living a more balanced life,' though he will also be working as an ambassador for Glasgow 2014 and Glasgow's Youth Olympics bid in 2018.

He is launching his own 'HOY' bike range at the end of May, and says he will step up his commitment to two main charities, Unicef and the Scottish Association for Mental Health.

Then there is motor racing. He competed in three races in Melbourne recently, finishing third in the series, and will take part in the Radical SR1 Cup, over four weekends from June.

'It's a hobby, not something I necessarily see myself doing to a great level. I love it. It reminds me of my early days racing BMX.'

In the end, making it to London at
all was an achievement. Acting as flag-bearer for Team GB at the Opening
Ceremony was an honour. And winning two gold medals, in the team sprint
and keirin, was a triumph.

'I enjoyed the post-Olympic period
far more than after Beijing,' says Hoy. 'It didn't come as such a shock.
But once I'd had my fill of eating, drinking, going to functions and
not exercising, I was desperate to get back into the routine of
training.

'In the autumn I was back in the gym
and on the track. I went to Perth for a training camp, then raced in
Rotterdam at New Year. But my body wasn't responding as I hoped it
would. It was nothing to panic about but I found when I pushed myself
harder I was nailed.

'I felt fit and healthy but I'm talking
about subtle differences and fractions of a second. Some days I'd wake
up feeling great but it was just little things; getting up in the
morning and really aching from a hard training session the day before.

'I didn't want to go to Glasgow and
not be capable of winning. I would enjoy seeing the event and the crowd
but I can do that better from the sidelines and I hope to have a role
as an ambassador or mentor. I'll certainly be there. But by not
competing it'll allow someone else to come into the team and I won't be
stealing the limelight. It won't be me plus team-mates.'

Hoy says he would like to mentor GB athletes at the Rio Olympics as well, 'If they'll have me.'

On
the eve of going public with his decision, Hoy said he had no doubts.
'I'm not in two minds. I'm content. I can walk away at the top level
without any lingering regrets. I would have loved to have a gold medal
from Glasgow, maybe a kilometre world record as well, but you've got to
realise when the time has come to stop.'

Winning personality: Chris Hoy with the 2008 2008 BBC Sports Personality Of The Year trophy

Winning personality: Chris Hoy with the 2008 2008 BBC Sports Personality Of The Year trophy

Oh what a Knight: Hoy with the Knighthood he received from the Prince of Wales at Buckingham Palace in 2008

Oh what a Knight: Hoy with the Knighthood he received from the Prince of Wales at Buckingham Palace in 2008

Asked what he would miss, Hoy said: 'The team, the banter, the routine. I like routine, turning up at the track and seeing the same guys, and being part of that team and being on a journey together.'

It is a journey that has seen cycling move from the margins to the mainstream, with Hoy arguably the central figure in this sporting revolution.

'When I think of how cycling was when I started and then think where it is now, it's been a hell of a ride,' he said.

And the things he won't miss 'The way you feel in the morning after certain sessions, gym sessions in particular, which leave you with residual soreness for several days,' he said.

'Waking up with that muscle soreness, knowing you've got to do it all again, I'll not miss that.

'But that's a very small price to pay for the highs you get from working hard,' Hoy added. 'People say it's a sacrifice, but it's not a sacrifice. You choose to do it, but it's going to be nice to put something else first for a change and get a bit of balance in my life.'

Hoy said he would continue cycling 'to keep myself fit and fight the beer belly'.

As for the future, Hoy has charity commitments, he is launching a range of bikes and becoming an adviser to the Scottish Rugby Union. He will also act as mentor to the Scottish team at Glasgow 2014, and said he would relish a similar role with Team GB at the Rio Olympics – 'if they'll have me'.

Triple crown: Chris Hoy celebrates winning his third gold medal of the 2008 Olympics in the men's sprint final

Triple crown: Chris Hoy celebrates winning his third gold medal of the 2008 Olympics in the men's sprint final

Golden boy (and girl): Triple gold medallist Chris Hoy (left) and double gGold medal-winning swimmer Rebecca Adlington arrive home from Beijing

Golden boy (and girl): Triple gold medallist Chris Hoy (left) and double gGold medal-winning swimmer Rebecca Adlington arrive home from Beijing

Modest to the last, he rejected the
label of 'Britain's greatest Olympian'
despite being the only one with six
gold medals – one more than his
own choice as No 1. 'It's subjective,
but I think Sir Steve Redgrave is the
greatest. To keep going for five consecutive
Games and be at the top, to
me that is a far greater achievement
than winning multiple medals at one
games.'

In the end, in equally typical Hoy
fashion, he said he had no doubts
about retirement. 'I'm not in two
minds. I'm content. I can walk away
at the top level without any lingering
regrets. I would have loved to have a
gold medal from Glasgow, but you've
got to realise when the time has come
to stop.'

BOA chairman Lord Coe paid tribute to
Hoy, saying: 'Throughout his remarkable career, Sir Chris Hoy has
exemplified the values that define an Olympic champion. His pursuit of
excellence has been tireless. His respect for opponents, and commitment
to clean competition, has been unwavering.

And his dignity in victory has set
an example that generations of Team GB athletes will strive to emulate.
Chris is an icon and he has earned a revered place among our nation's
greatest sporting heroes.

'His
gold medal triumphs this past summer in London are two of the defining
moments of the Games, and were a source of pride and inspiration for
millions throughout our country.

'We
are grateful that Chris has chosen to continue his association with the
British Olympic Association by serving as a Glasgow 2018 Champion in
its bid to host the Youth Olympic Games.

'As
he transitions now from his unparalleled competitive career and takes
on a series of new and different challenges, we wish Sir Chris the very
best for continued success, and we thank him for his commitment to Team
GB and the Olympic movement.'

LIFE AND TIMES OF SIR CHRIS HOY – IN HIS OWN WORDS

My three favourite memories

'I can't choose three, so can I have
four The first is 1999, the World Championships in Berlin, and our
first medal in the team sprint. I had this feeling of euphoria and
disbelief.

That the three of us [Craig MacLean and Jason Queally were
his teammates] could have a world championship silver medal, seemed
incredible. It was the first British sprint medal since the Reg Harris
era. There was a feeling that there may be possibilities beyond that,
but I remember thinking: if I do nothing else, I can always say I won a
world championship medal. It's weird to think that now.

'The second is winning the kilo at the
2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester. My first individual title, and so
close to home. There were so many Scottish folk in the crowd, too. To
beat the Olympic champion [Queally] on home soil was special. I felt I
was stepping out of the shadow of Jason and Craig.

'The third is my gold medal in the kilo
at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. The moment that meant most, and which I
remember most vividly, was when I was waiting to step on to the top step
of the podium and I heard my name followed by “Olympic champion.”

'Then, finally, winning gold in the keirin at London 2012. What an amazing way to finish it off.'

My 3 toughest opponents

Jason Kenny

'Jason, my young British team-mate and
good friend, also became one of my toughest opponents. He never has any
fear. He is never affected by pressure, never intimidated. The way he
stepped into the team in Beijing was amazing.

'He took it in his stride
and never fussed about anything. His attitude always seems to be that he
has nothing to lose. And he is the same in any situation. He also has
an incredible turn of speed and acceleration.'

Arnaud Tournant, France

'He was the one I looked up to when I
started doing the kilo [in 2001]. He had an aura about him, and although
he seemed more human after Sydney, where Jason [Queally] beat him, he
was still the benchmark.

'I never managed to beat his world record but we
had some amazing battles. I beat him by a thousandth of a second in at
the world champs in Copenhagen [2002], then he was second to me at the
worlds in Melbourne and in Athens [both 2004]. He's a big, big
personality, a real showman. A really tough opponent, but off the bike
we became good friends.'

Theo Bos, Holland

'Theo is so classy, he had so much style
and flair, and he was almost unbeatable before 2008. When I beat him in
the quarter finals at the world championships that year it was a
turning point for me.

'Knocking him out in Olympic year, in front of a
home crowd [in Manchester], was massive for me. It was also the
beginning of the end for him. He stopped track racing and now rides on
the road.'

My three non-cycling sporting heroes

Gavin Hastings

'Rugby was my sport in my early teens
and Gavin Hastings, 'Big Gav', was my first sporting hero, before Graeme
Obree. Hastings went to the same school as me [George Watson's College
in Edinburgh. Hoy captained Edinburgh Schools at under-15 level]. He was
a great player and a great Scottish captain. Having since had the
honour of meeting him, he is a lovely guy, too.'

Roger Federer

Federer is one of the guys all sports
people aspire to be like. His longevity, his record, the way he handles
himself. He's not a guy who, if he gets beaten, disappears. He's a
classy player and a classy professional athlete.'

Michael Johnson

'The Usain Bolt of his era. I admired
his approach to training. Listening to him talk about his methodical
approach, and his mindset, it was something I could relate to. And he
was just awesome to watch.

'Even more than the 100 metres with Bolt, the gap
would open up, the race was his, and it was a race for second place. It's a
shame he wasn't in the same era as Bolt because it would have been
great to see them go head-to-head over 200m.

Sir Chris Hoy talks of his historic sixth Olympic gold win

DM.has('rcpv1775727057001','BC',
'renderConfig' :

'css' : “videoplayer-large”,
'autoplay' : false,
'muted' : false,
'title' : “Sir Chris Hoy talks of his historic sixth Olympic gold win”,
'videoId' : 7944,
'adsEnabled' : true,
'playerId' : “1989148206001”,
'playerKey' : “AQ~~,AAAAAFSL1bg~,CmS1EFtcMWELN_eSE9A7gpcGWF5XAVmI”,
'objId' : “rcpv1775727057001”,
'videoPlayer' : “1775727057001”,
'width' : 636,
'height' : 358,
'linkBaseURL' : “http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/othersports/article-2310554/Sir-Chris-Hoy-retires-cycling.html”

});

VIDEO: Watch Hoy win his sixth Olympic gold medal at London 2012

Max Whitlock: European Championships in April is the first stage on the road I hope to take to the 2016 Games

Max Whitlock: European Championships in April is the first of many stages before the 2016 Olympic Games

team-mate and boxer Anthony Joshua” class=”blkBorder” />

Close friend London 2012 team-mate and boxer Anthony Joshua

I loved watching the BBC Superstars programme a few months ago and it really inspired me – I’d absolutely love to do something like that and try out the different sports. I was watching it and wishing I could be on it, but I’d like to think I could have given Anthony Joshua a run for his money. He won it so easily!

I haven’t even tried some of the sports they did but I think I’d be alright at some of them. I’d like to think I’d be okay at the swimming and now I’m used to a bit of running so that would be okay, but I’ve never sat in a kayak so that might be a bit tough!

I’ve got some more competitions coming up so am busy preparing for those now. I’ve had the A category World Cup event in France last weekend and then the British Championships in Liverpool at the end of the month. That’s a trial for the European Championships which take place in April in Moscow, so that’s the next big competition to aim for.

Rafael Nadal pulls out of Australian Open

Aussie agony for Nadal as injury rules Spaniard out of first grand slam of 2013

|

UPDATED:

15:43 GMT, 28 December 2012


Aussie ruled: Nadal has pulled out of the showpiece event

Aussie ruled: Nadal has pulled out of the showpiece event

World No 4 Rafael Nadal has pulled out of the Australian Open due to a stomach virus.

The Spaniard has not played since suffering his shock second-round exit at Wimbledon to unheralded Czech Lukas Rosol due to a knee injury.

He had been due to return at this week's exhibition event in Abu Dhabi but the virus forced him to withdraw.

And he has now decided to extend that absence to include the season's opening grand slam event in Melbourne.

Former world No 1 Nadal, a
winner of 11 grand slam titles, including one Down Under in 2009, told
the Australian Open's official website: 'I am sorry and very sad to
announce that I will not play in the Australian Open.

'My knee is coming along okay, but a
stomach virus has left me unable to get ready in time to tackle the
rigours of a grand slam.

'Because of the virus, I have been
unable to get any match practice and simply would not be doing myself or
my friends in Australia justice if I went down there so unprepared.

'You need your body to be at its best for the Australian Open.

'It was a difficult decision and I am extremely disappointed to be missing such a great event.

'I love coming to Melbourne and playing on Rod Laver Arena before the Australian crowds. It brings out the best in me.

'It
hurts to have to wait another 12 months before I get another chance. In
the meantime, the focus is now on desperately trying to get back on the
tour.'

Nadal has now targeted the Abierto
Mexicano Telcel event in Acapulco which starts on February 25 for his
comeback, although he remains optimistic of returning before that.

Wimble-done: Nadal hasn't featured since the defeat to Rosol

Wimble-done: Nadal hasn't featured since the defeat to Rosol

He added on Facebook: 'As my team and doctors say, the safest thing to do is to do things well and this virus has delayed my plans of playing these weeks.

'I will have to wait until the Acapulco tournament to compete again although I could consider to play before at any other ATP event.'

Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley said: 'It is completely understandable and we really feel disappointed for him.

'But without any match practice and without sufficient lead up time on the practice court, it makes it virtually impossible for him to get his body ready.

'We just hope he gets better quickly and we see him back on the tour as soon as possible.

'Tennis fans across the world have been missing him. Our Australian Open staff will very much miss him and his team as he is not only a great player, but also a great guy with good people around him.

'We wish Rafa all the best. I am confident we will see him back on the tour soon and back in Australia for 2014, no doubt as one of the contenders for the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup.'

Prior to the virus, Nadal had spoken of how he was intending to use the first few weeks of his comeback simply as a means of regaining full fitness.

However, his absence, while a blow to tournament organisers and his fans, will be a boost to the other members of the big four – Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Andy Murray.

Ronnie OSullivan set for Crucible comeback

Rocket's return: O'Sullivan set for re-entry at the worlds after break

|

UPDATED:

23:44 GMT, 4 December 2012

Ronnie O’Sullivan is considering an early return to defend his world snooker title at The Crucible.

‘The Rocket’, who is 37 on Wednesday, withdrew from the rest of the current campaign last month, citing personal issues.

However, since then, O’Sullivan has held more talks with World Snooker chairman Barry Hearn and the governing body will give him until February to sign up for April’s blue-riband event.

Comeback Ronnie O'Sullivan could return for the world Championships

Comeback Ronnie O'Sullivan could return for the world Championships

Hearn said: ‘I have said to Ronnie that the only tournament for us if he wanted to change his mind — and that is not unknown — is the world championship.

‘One thing that will not have escaped Ronnie’s attention, because he loves his sport, is how uncompetitive Ricky Hatton was on his return.

‘He is not going to play for first-round loser’s money, or come back to the stage he has graced and given so much pleasure to get embarrassed.’

Ricky Hatton LIVE v Vyacheslav Senchenko

LIVE: Ricky Hatton v Vyacheslav Senchenko – round-by-round coverage of the big fight

|

UPDATED:

23:36 GMT, 24 November 2012

Ricky Hatton's long-awaited comeback against Vyacheslav Senchenko at the Manchester Arena ended in bitter disappointment in front of a sell-out crowd.

Read Sportsmail's live round-by-round coverage of the fight as well as the best of the action from the undercard which featured middleweight Martin Murray as he takes on Jorge Navarro and Scott Quigg's rematch against Rendall Munroe.

Devastating: Ricky Hatton's comeback ended in defeat

Devastating: Ricky Hatton's comeback ended in defeat

THE NIGHT'S BIG FIGHTS

8pm: Scott Quigg v Rendall Munroe (Quigg wins in sixth round)

9pm: Martin Murray v Jorge Navarro (Murray wins in sixth round)

10pm: Ricky Hatton v Vyacheslav Senchenko (Senchenko wins in ninth round)

19:00: Welcome
to Sportsmail's coverage of Ricky Hatton's comeback fight against
Vyacheslav Senchenko. I'm ringside at the Manchester Arena ahead of what
promises to be an explosive, and emotional night of boxing.

I'll
bring you round-by-round updates from the main event as well as the
best of the action from the undercard which features Scott Quigg v
Rendall Munroe (8pm) and Martin Murray v Jorge Navarro (9pm).

Hatton is expected to make his ringwalk at around 10pm for what will be a 10-round fight.

19.05: Sergey
Rabchenko has made a successful first defence of his European
light-middleweight title after a split decision victory over Cedric
Vitu.

The
Belarusian is trained by Ricky Hatton and was given a tough examination
but scraped through on the scorecards: 116-113, 114-115, 116-113.

Vitu, who had 'Cantona 7' on his shorts, suffered his second career defeat from 37 contests.

Ready lads Martin Murray (L) and Jorge Navarro will go head-to-head later on tonight

Ready lads Martin Murray (L) and Jorge Navarro will go head-to-head later on tonight

19.15: Vitu's
corner are furious at the decision but unfortunately my French amounts
to 'merci' and 'oui'. I did hear 'terrible' however which I suspect
means the same in English.

The next fight promises to be a belter. Stephen Foster Jnr takes on Gary Buckland for the British super featherweight title.

It's fair to say the acoustics in here are phenomenal. I doubt the roof will still be in place come 10pm.

19.28: A
lot of holding in the opening three rounds and the referee has been
quick to warn both men but Wales' reigning champion Gary Buckland has
been on top of Foster Jnr thus far.

19.42: Foster Jnr is the home favourite but both men are being well supported in the Arena which is steadily filling up.

The challenger has a nasty cut on his head after the two came together in the sixth round.

The blood looks to be running into the eye which could spell danger. Buckland remains in front on my card.

19.46: The referee calls for the doctor at the start of the seventh but he gives Foster Jnr the ok to continue.

This
fight has suddenly comer to life with both men throwing caution to the
wind. If the fight was stopped now, we would go to the judges' cards.

19.54: Foster
Jnr's corner have pulled their man out at the end of the eighth round
which means Buckland remains his British title. It was a nasty cut but
the Welshman had been on top throughout.

Hyped: Hatton's fans were out in full force at yesterday's weigh-in

Hyped: Hatton's fans were out in full force at yesterday's weigh-in

Hyped: Hatton's fans were out in full force at yesterday's weigh-in

20.00: Ricky Hatton is in his changing room and will be making his ring walk in two hours' time.

Next up is the super-bantamweight rematch between Scott Quigg and Rendall Munroe.

The
two first met back in June when a clash of heads saw the latter badly
cut and the fight stopped in the third round which meant it was scored a
technical draw.

Quigg
is the younger man and will need to win to continue his rise and keep
alive hopes of an all-British showdown with Carl Frampton.

20.05: Both men are in the ring and I'll be bringing you round-by-round coverage from here on in.

If Quigg is to be believed, he was just getting warmed up when the first fight was brought to an abrupt halt.

I expect the Bury man, who expelled himself from school to concentrate on boxing, to prevail on points.

Over and out: Rendall Munroe (right) is downed in the sixth round

Over and out: Rendall Munroe (right) is downed in the sixth round

The
interim WBA world super bantamweight title is on the line here which
doesn't mean a whole lot but will propel the winner closer to a world
title fight.

Munroe
is looking for his second shot at the best in the business after losing
to Toshiaki Nishioka on points for the WBC belt in 2010.

20.18: Round 1: A watchful start from both men but Munroe landed the better punches with a couple of lefts to the head.

A little after at the bell. My score (Quigg first) 9-10.

20.22: Round 2: Quigg
ups the ante in the second session but Munroe tucks up well to deflect
the punches on to his gloves. Nevertheless, the Bury man does enough to
nick it. 10-9.

20.26: Round 3: Quigg
begins and ends the stanza well but Munroe gets thorough with an
uppercut and a strong left hand. A straight right from Quigg on the bell
is not enough to rescue it 9-10.

Hammer: Munroe had no response for the stinging blows to the body

Hammer: Munroe had no response for the stinging blows to the body

20.29: Round 4: both
men are unrelenting and this us shaping up to be a cracker. Quigg is
making a point of targeting the body and is getting through. Munroe has
the greater power though 10-9.

20.32: Round 5: Munroe
bizarrely stops mid round to complain about Quigg hitting round the
back, leaving himself exposed and the Bury man pops out a strong jab.

This session could be the start of Quigg dominating after a fine flurry towards the end 10-9.

20:36: Round 6: All
over! Munroe takes a knee with a minute of the round remaining and
although he's up at four, another flurry from Quigg has the same result
but this time he stays down. An impressive win for Quigg who was getting
in top.

20.50: That was impressive from Quigg and he's made a real statement with that stoppage.

He was clearly targetting the body throughout and it paid dividends in that sixth round.

Never
the most spectacular of shots to watch but the damage is all to clear
to see; just as Yusaf Mack after his defeat to Carl Froch last weekend.

The first rendition of 'Hatton Wonderland' rings round the arena and the band are in fine form.

Next up is Martin Murray against undefeated, but untested Jorge Navarro.

Impressive: Scott Quigg ended the fight in the sixth

Impressive: Scott Quigg ended the fight in the sixth

21.00: Both fighters are in the ring and both bring undefeated records.

Murray
drew with then world champion Felix Sturm in Germany last December but
has a frustrating year since, fighting just once against Karim Achour in
June.

The St Helens man is expected to face Sergio Martinez on April 27 in Argentina if he comes through this one intact.

Navarro
hails from Venezuela and has only a dozen contests to his name, winning
10 by KO. The 27-year-old could be anything but it wouldn't be the
first time we've seen a South American come with a 100 per cent record
only to look below-par when truly tested.

21.07: Round 1:
Perhaps I was a little harsh on Navarro. He comes out looking to fight,
controlling the centre of the ring and forcing Murray back to the
ropes.

But
the Venezuelan doesn't manage to connect with his opponent and looks to
be struggling when Murray lands, as he does with a big right hand that
sends Navarro to the canvas with seconds of the session remaining.

He beats the count and comes under sustained pressure but covers up well. My score (Murray first) 10-8

21.13: Round 2: Navarro
remains keen to take the fight to his opponent despite the knockdown
but I'm not convinced he has the power to hurt Murray who works well off
the jab without ,looking spectacular.

His
middleweight rival Matthew Macklin is commentating on the fight for BBC
Five Live alongside Barry McGuigan and will be an interested spectator
10-9.

21.16: Round 3: Murray knows he has the tools to hurt Navarro but doesn't seem overly concerned about finishing the job early.

Getting some rounds under his belt wouldn't be the worst thing for him but an impressive showing wouldn't go amiss either.

He ends this round with a solid left to the body which leaves Navarro wincing 10-9.

21.20: Round 4: Navarro gets through with a left hook to the body which Murray takes offence to and responds with a swift one-two.

The St Helens man has his hands low at several points in the round as if now unconcerned by his opponent's power.

A couple of decent exchanges ensue but nothing to get us on the edges of our seats. 10-9.

21.25: Round 5: Murray
senses blood now that he's worked our his opponent.

He lands with a
right then a left and then with 50 seconds remaining, peppers Navarro's
marked face but the visitor stays standing 10-9

21.27: Round 6: ALL OVER! Murray looks
impressive when he lets his hands go and Navarro is down again after
another big right.

He rises on eight but its only a matter of time and
he is put out of his misery his corner, they throw in the towel after another unanswered
barrage.

Easy does it: Martin Murray holds his arms aloft with the WBA Interim Middleweight Title in Manchester

Easy does it: Martin Murray holds his arms aloft with the WBA Interim Middleweight Title in Manchester

21.30: Once he started letting his hands go, Murray was impressive but as suspected, Navarro wasn't up to much.

Murray hopes to fight again before taking on Martinez in what will be his toughest assignment to date by a long way.

Next up… Ricky 'The Hitman' Hatton is back!

21.35: We actually have another bout before Hatton. highly-rated Adam Etches will be in action in an eight-round middleweight contest.

21.50: Etches has won his fight. Hatton is on track to be in the ring at 22.00.

Hold onto your hats!

21.55: Michael Buffer is ringside and preparing to step through the ropes to announce the fight.

Heavyweight champion David Price is also in the audience. This should be a cracker!

21.59: Buffer
enters the ring to a rapturous reception. I can only imagine what this
is going to be like when Hatton steps back into the ring.

22.01: The crowd are in full voice now! 'There's only one Ricky Hatton… Walking in a Hatton Wonderland!'

There's a real din in the MEN now.

Ringside,
there's a few celebrities too. Boxing greats Roberto Duran, Joe
Calzaghe as well as former footballers Paul Dickov and John Hartson!

Hatton will be out in just a few minutes now!

22.07: They are still not out. With all this noise, I hope Senchenko hasn't bottled it!

22.08: The
crowd have just caught a glimpse of Hatton waiting to come out on the
screens. He's pacing in the dressing room in his blue-trimmed shorts.
They let out a massive roar!

22.10: This is a 10-round fight at welterweight.

If
the Hitman wins this one, he could face old foe Paulie Malignaggi in a
home and away two-bout showdown starting in New York in spring.

22.14: Senchenko will come out first. He only lost his world title to Malignaggi six months ago in his only career defeat.

He
is taller than Hatton and boxes behind the jab, but if Hatton's as
sharp as he says he is, expect to see him get inside the Ukrainian and
stop this fight late on after a tirade to the body.

22.16: Senchenko, on cue, is on his way out. Cue a chorus of boos from the partisan crowd.

Here he comes: Ricky Hatton makes his long awaited return to the ring

Here he comes: Ricky Hatton makes his long awaited return to the ring

22.20: Here he is! The 34-year-old comes out as the 20,000 fans join in the chorus of Blue Moon!

Hatton is, of course, a lifelong Manchester City fan.

He
joins Senchenko in the ring. It's hard to resist joining in to be
honest. The decibel level rises again as he enters the ring.

But can he roll back the years Over to Michael Buffer again, with both fighters in the ring.

22.23: Hatton is pacing the ring, and Senchenko reveals he's wearing a MANCHESTER UNITED shirt! Cheeky.

Buffer can barely be heard above the din. But they all tune in – and join in – for the 'Let's get ready to rumble!'

22.29: Round 1: We're underway and Hatton has completed his first round in three and a half years.

The
Hitman and Senchenko are battling for the initiative. Hatton catched
his opponent flush on more than one occasion and relentlessly stalks the
Ukrainian, edging the round 10-9.

22.33: Round 2: So much for a more defensive Hatton! He is still that all-action fighter we know and love, with some wild shots coming in.

He has Senchenko in trouble with a sharp left-right, but the visitor shows a little bravado and beckons the Mancunian on.

Hatton is looking good, but must be wary of the taller fighter. 10-9.

Malignaggi has moved to ringside from the pundits' box. Is he preparing to greet the Hitman after an early finish

22.37: Round 3: Hatton is well on top in the third. He's got Senchenko rockingwith a left hook and then a straight right.

The
Ukrainian makes out he's not hurt but he must be. This fight is going
the right way for Ricky, but he's still catching a few of his own.
Senchenko lands a straight flush on the chin late in the round. 10-9.

22.41: Round 4: That was his best round yet. Senchenko tries to showboat again as he holds his arms out after taking a huge hit.

The
final minute is all Hatton though. A right to Senchenko's face, then
hatton pushes him against the ropes and delivers an uppercut.

Hatton smells blood here, and the home crowd are baying for a knockout. He must be patient though.

Senchenko will be hoping he'll tire after three years off!

Ouch: Hatton delivers a blow to Senchenko's body

Ouch: Hatton delivers a blow to Senchenko's body

22.45: Round 5: Senchenko
takes that round. Hatton was a little more sluggish, which could be a
worry for the Mancunian. That was a closer round, but the Briton is
still up in this one for me.

Both fighters are marked, but nothing serious at the half-way point. 10-10.

22.50: Round 6: That
was a worrying round for Hatton. He ships a big right hand and then
slips while attempting a wild left which misses by a mile.

He needs to get those hands back up and fight smart. He was picked off a number of times in the sixth.

There's still four rounds to go and he's got it on points… as it stands. 9-10

At his mercy: Hatton started the fight well but let up as the rounds went on

At his mercy: Hatton started the fight well but let up as the rounds went on

22.54: Round 7: Another round to Senchenko but he does have a nasty cut under his left eye.

He
is beating Hatton to the punch with worrying regularity. The crowd are
really backing Hatton though. It's the jab that does it this time, and
forces Hatton to chase Senchenko down to hit back. 9-10.

22.57: Round 8:
A better round for Ricky, but he is trying too hard for the KO to
impress the fans. A better fighter than Senchenko would have punished
him by this point.

Hatton needs to get through these final two rounds, learn from this and have a warm up fight before taking on Malignaggi. 10-10.

23.02: ROUND 9: HATTON CAN'T GET UP! Hatton is down on his knees after taking a heavy body shot.

He can't beat the count and the
referee stops it. It's over! Hatton's comeback ends in crushing
disappointment after Senchenko ends his night early.

Hatton collapses on the mat and his team are in the ring and to his aid.

He's OK and eventually gets up, but he's crying his eyes out. Emotional scenes and that's surely it from Ricky Hatton.

The Hitman embraces Senchenko and that is that.

23.07: Buffer announces Senchenko as the winner. Some of the fans are booing the Ukrainian.

That's a little harsh. He won fair and square. Perhaps the Manchester United shirt didn't help.

Devastation: Hatton is crushed after being knocked out by a body blow

Devastation: Hatton is crushed after being knocked out by a body blow

G4S nominated for award despite London 2012 Olympics security failure

Sports Agenda Extra: We needed troops to step in yet G4S could land 2012 Games gong

|

UPDATED:

12:05 GMT, 5 November 2012

Bungling security firm G4S, who caused by far the most problems at London 2012, are remarkably on the short-list for a prestigious honour for their botched Olympic work.

The beleaguered company, who failed by massive numbers to provide enough temporary security staff for the Games – the shortfall being 35 per cent on the worst days – are somehow among the finalists at the International Sports Event Management's awards dinner on Wednesday at London's Cumberland Hotel.

National service: Armed Forces had to step in following the failure of contracted security firm G4S to provide 10,000 trained security staff for the Games

National service: Armed Forces had to step in following the failure of contracted security firm G4S to provide 10,000 trained security staff for the Games

To make G4S's appearance at the flagship occasion even more unlikely, their entry relates to setting up temporary accommodation for the army during the Olympics.

And the military only had to be called in because G4S had failed by such a huge margin to train and provide the necessary personnel contracted in the 236m deal.

Speaking up: G4S chief executive Nick Buckles, gives evidence on Olympic security staffing to the Home Affairs Select Committee at the House of Commons earlier this year

Speaking up: G4S (below) chief executive Nick Buckles, gives evidence on Olympic security staffing to the Home Affairs Select Committee at the House of Commons earlier this year

Private security guards G4S secure the entrance to Alexander Stadium, the US athletics team training camp for the London 2012 Olympic Games

One insider described G4S as 'deluded' for even entering the Event Overlay and Facilities award category although it was considered inconceivable that they would win.

The other more worthy short-listed candidates are London 2012 and caterers PKL Group for Games related achievements and De Boer International for the Qatar Masters golf.

David Ferrer beats Jerzy Janowicz in Paris Masters final

Murray's conqueror Janowicz beaten in Paris final by London-bound Ferrer

|

UPDATED:

16:26 GMT, 4 November 2012

Polish qualifier Jerzy Janowicz could not complete his fairytale week after he was dispatched in straight sets in the Paris Masters final by Spaniard David Ferrer.

World number 69 Janowicz has beaten, among others, top-10 players Andy Murray and Janko Tipsarevic en route to Sunday's showpiece event but he proved no match for Ferrer.

The fourth seed ensured he will enter next week's ATP World Tour Finals in London in supreme confidence after a 6-4 6-3 win gave him his first Masters 1000 crown.

David Ferrer celebrates victory against Jerzy Janowicz

David Ferrer celebrates victory against Jerzy Janowicz

Party time: David Ferrer celebrates victory against Jerzy Janowicz

Manchester United v Arsenal live

PREMIER LEAGUE LIVE: Manchester United v Arsenal – as it happens from Old Trafford

|

UPDATED:

12:09 GMT, 3 November 2012

Follow Sportsmail's coverage of the Barclays Premier League as Manchester United host Arsenal to kick off the weekend. Robin van Persie is set to face his former side for the first time since joining the Red Devils last summer and will hope to fire his new club top of the table.

12.10: Good afternoon and welcome to the first big game of the weekend. Manchester United and Arsenal go head to head at Old Trafford for the first time since last season's 8-2 game when Wayne Rooney scored a hat-trick and Ashley Young chipped in with a brace. More of the same today, or will it be a tighter affair

Early main event: Manchester United host Arsenal at Old Trafford

Early main event: Manchester United host Arsenal at Old Trafford

Tom Daley wins gold in 10metre platform at Junior World Diving Championships

Double Daley delight! Individual gold added to synchro title at Junior Championships

|

UPDATED:

10:09 GMT, 13 October 2012

Tom Daley claimed his second gold medal of the week to crown Great Britain's best ever performance at the Junior World Diving Championships.

The Olympic bronze medallist stormed to victory in the boys' 10-metre platform event to follow up his victory alongside Jack Laugher in the 3m synchro earlier this week.

Golden boy: Daley poses with his second gold medal of the week

Golden boy: Daley poses with his second gold medal of the week

The 18-year-old from Plymouth produced a superb sequence of five dives, scoring 108 points with his fourth and 99 with a fifth dive for which he was awarded perfect 10s by five judges and 9 1/2 by the other two.

His total of 663.95 left him 52 points clear of China's Yang Jian, whose compatriot Chen Aisen took bronze. Britain's Daniel Goodfellow did not make the final.

Lydia Rosenthall qualified fourth for the final of the girls' B 3m springboard, but could only finish 11th of 12 after three poor dives in the final.

That meant Britain finished the week with three gold medals, two silver and one bronze.

Laugher also won the 3m springboard solo event and was second in the 1m event, while Alicia Blagg and Hannah Starling were second in the girls' 3m synchro and Starling was third in the 3m springboard.

Steven Gerrard targets new deal at Liverpool

Gerrard reinvigorated by Rodgers' regime and targets new deal at Liverpool

|

UPDATED:

06:12 GMT, 2 October 2012

Steven Gerrard believes he can still play on for at least another three years at Liverpool.

The Reds skipper, aged 32, is finally getting back to his best after first recovering from a serious groin injury and then a severe ankle infection during the past 12 months.

Captain fantastic: Steven Gerrard

Captain fantastic: Steven Gerrard

But Gerrard says he has been reinvigorated by new manager Brendan Rodgers' 'exciting' new regime at Anfield

Gerrard's current deal, signed in January, runs until the end of next season, but the 32-year-old, speaking at a golf event for his charity 'The Steven Gerrard Foundation', says he is more than capable of contributing for the club for many more years.

He told the Liverpool Echo: 'We will have to wait and see. I am contracted for another 18 months or so, and I am really happy here.'