Tag Archives: dwain

Dwain Chambers stormed off the track after a poor showing at the European Indoor Championships

Chambers storms off the track after failing to qualify from European indoor heats

By
Laura Williamson

PUBLISHED:

17:07 GMT, 1 March 2013

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UPDATED:

18:22 GMT, 1 March 2013

Dwain Chambers stormed off the track in anger after being eliminated in the first round of the men’s 60 metres at the European Indoor Championships this afternoon.

The 34-year-old, who won gold in this event in 2009 and a silver medal two years ago, missed out on automatic qualification after coming fifth in his heat.

Chambers’ time of 6.78 seconds – two tenths of a second down on his season’s best – was not enough to guarantee him a place in Saturday's semi-finals as a fastest loser.

Frustration: Dwain Chambers threw off his vest after failing to qualify for the final of the European Indoor Championships

Frustration: Dwain Chambers threw off his vest after failing to qualify for the final of the European Indoor Championships

The European indoor record-holder, who served a two-year ban after testing positive for the anabolic steroid THG in 2003, threw his British vest to the floor in frustration and ignored all interview requests as he left the Scandinavium Arena.

Chambers missed the UK trials in Sheffield to protect a back injury and looked out of sorts at the British Athletics Grand Prix in Birmingham three weeks ago, when he finished fifth.

But the 2010 world indoor champion, who said earlier this year he finally feels ‘part of the team again’ after spending half his time training with UK Athletics’ sprint coach Rana Reider at Loughborough University, had insisted he would not compete in Gothenburg if he was not fully fit.

Speaking after his frustration had subsided, Chambers said: 'The performance was not what I expected and I can only express my disappointment because a lot of time and effort was put into me getting to these championships, and I want to apologise to the people whose time I feel I have wasted.

Out of sorts: Chambers, who has won a silver and gold at the last two championships, struggled to a time 6.78s, not enough to see him go through as a fastest loser

Out of sorts: Chambers, who has won a silver and gold at the last two championships, struggled to a time 6.78s, not enough to see him go through as a fastest loser

'I came here with all the intention
to do well and fight for a medal, which is always what I have been
renowned for doing, but the injury obviously took more out of me than I
had anticipated. So with that I'm really disappointed and feel bad for
letting people down.

'There was no pain. I think what
happened is that I spent all my time getting ready to get on the plane
injury free and I didn't prioritise my time to prepare for the
championships.

'I thought I was going to be all
right, but that was the wrong mind process I'd put myself into – I just
wasn't ready. I'm disappointed that I've let people down.

'In situations like these where you
want to do well, you expect to do well and people expect you to do
well…it hurts. I know what I'm capable of doing and it is
disappointing that I am not able to do that today.

'Now I'm just going to cheer on the rest of the team.'

James Dasaolu, however, cruised through
his heat to post the third-fastest qualification time, easing off before
the line to finish second behind Michael Tumi of Italy in 6.62 seconds.
Harry Aikines-Aryeetey also reached tomorrow’s semi-finals with a
season’s best of 6.65 seconds.

No such problems: Fellow Brit James Dasaolu (centre) made it through to the semi-final

No such problems: Fellow Brit James Dasaolu (centre) made it through to the semi-final

Harry Aikines-Aryeetey said: ‘It's a
seasons best – another good run and we'll take it lower, that's the aim.
It’s another opportunity and I think I've been quite lucky indoors. We
haven't really focused on it, so I've done some speed work over the last
few weeks.

‘Dwain and I
have been training together which has really helped. I'm just going to
take each round as it comes. I'm in a GB vest, so it's not about my
personal gain, it's about representing the country and showing what
we've got.

‘I stumbled out of the blocks a bit, so hopefully in the next round I'll go even better.’

James Dasaolu said: ‘I'm really happy, I wanted to qualify as easily as possible. I don't feel like I've exerted too much energy and I think that's what it's all about – using as little energy as possible. I've run a PB in pretty much every race, so I'm in good shape.

‘In the next round I'm going to be more aggressive and run through the line. It wasn't the quickest of fields, so I knew I didn't have to hammer the start, it was just about getting through.’

London Olympics 2012: Now we"ll see if Usain Bolt can do it

Now we'll see if we've been hoodwinked as sprint final beckons

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 4 August 2012

If Usain Bolt has something sensational to bring to these London Olympics, then he has yet to offer a clue.

Olympics 2012

A casual canter through the Stratford afternoon gave no indication of his fitness for the task of successfully defending his 100metres title.

He insists that he is ready to go to work, and his entry into the Olympic Arena was bashfully discreet; his tracksuit hood pulled over his head, as if the ploy might somehow disguise his identity.

Easy does it: Usain Bolt qualifies in first from his heat

Easy does it: Usain Bolt qualifies in first from his heat

His cover was quickly blown by the sensitive stadium announcer. 'Loosen up your larynxes!' he bawled. 'For the fastest man in history!'

Bolt rubbed his head with both hands in that distinctive way he has.

He exchanged a quick chuckle with one of the volunteers.

Then he loped down the track with unrevealing economy of effort in 10.09sec, a time which would qualify him as the ninth-quickest man in the field.

Yohan Blake, Bolt's countryman, world champion and potentially his closest rival, was equally inscrutable in returning 10.00sec.

Inscrutable: Yohan Blake qualified without trouble

Inscrutable: Yohan Blake qualified without trouble

He was never pushed, never remotely stretched, suggesting that he, too, is concealing a formidable hand.

Certainly he was in no mood to match the dramatic performance of America's Ryan Bailey, whose scintillating run of 9.88sec was the fastest first round ever achieved at any Olympic Games. Bailey seems certain to play a central role in this event, along with the other sprinting titans, Asafa Powell of Jamaica, America's Tyson Gay and his fellow American, the reinstated drugs cheat Justin Gatlin.

Speaking of drugs, Britain's Dwain Chambers qualified fourth in 10.02, his fastest of the season.

The generous crowd awarded him a reasonable ovation and the prodigal managed a brief dance of celebration.

Half-an-hour later, he discovered that his semi-final will include both Bolt and Bailey.

With only two certain to qualify, Chambers may find little reason for dancing.

The other Britons also achieved qualification, with James Dasaolu returning 10.13sec and young Adam Gemili – who was palpably delighted just to be here – doing even better in 10.11sec.

One for the future: GB's Adam Gemili was in excellent form

One for the future: GB's Adam Gemili was in excellent form

While their chances of progress may be small, the experience will be beyond price.

With the extravagant quality of the field and on a track built for sprinting, this evening has the makings of a truly memorable Olympic 100m final.

When it is done, we should have a champion to set alongside the great ones; from Harold Abrahams and Jesse Owens, through Bob Hayes and Jim Hines, on to Carl Lewis and the man from Trelawney, the joker who hid behind his hood when introduced to London.

Focussed: Usain Bolt prepares for his heat

Focussed: Usain Bolt prepares for his heat

There will be no joking before the job is done, for the task is too formidable and the field too daunting.

But Usain Bolt made his reputation by making the improbable seem almost mundane.

He will need to do something wonderful if his crown is to be preserved – but few will be surprised if the magician works his Olympic trick one more time.

London 2012 Olympics: Adam Gemili vows to beat 10sec barrier

Gemili ready to take on Bolt and Co as world's quickest teenager believes he can run sub-10sec

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UPDATED:

23:01 GMT, 22 July 2012

Adam Gemili thinks he can run sub-10sec in the Olympic 100 metres and is undaunted about running against the likes of defending champion Usain Bolt.

Earlier this month, the 18-year-old from Dartford, in Kent, confirmed his status as the quickest teenager on the planet by claiming the 100m world junior title in Barcelona in a championship record time of 10.05sec.

Quick as a flash: Adam Gemili (centre) believes he can run the 100m in under 10-sec

Quick as a flash: Adam Gemili (centre) believes he can run the 100m in under 10-sec

It meant he overtook Dwain Chambers as Britain's fastest junior and is now the best prospect of becoming the nation's first 100m Olympic finalist since Chambers finished fourth in Sydney 2000.

Gemili, who is aiming to reach the final on August 5, said: 'I'm just going there to enjoy myself. Hopefully, I can run my quickest time ever but the main thing is just to savour every moment of it. I know I'll never get the opportunity to go to a home Olympics again.

'A final is not out of the question. It's very possible if I perform well and get the right circumstances.

'I'd like to make it to the semi-final at least and then hopefully do well there.

Medal hope Gemili has his work cut out for him if he is to get a place on the podium on August 5

Medal hope Gemili has his work cut out for him if he is to get a place on the podium on August 5

'I'm getting closer and closer (to that 10-second barrier).

'It could potentially come at the Olympics. Obviously every sprinter wants to do it one day.'

Gemili said how at the start of the year he had been planning on watching the 100m on TV at home, adding: 'I might have even been on holiday. The fact that I'm in it is unbelievable.

'It's been very overwhelming. It's been very nice, everyone's been really lovely. Some people will occasionally be, “Oh, are you that sprinter Can we have a picture” It's nice people are familiar with you.'

London 2012 Olympics: Jamie Baulch lashes selectors

Baulch lashes GB chiefs for overlooking Paralympian Roberts yet selecting 'drug cheats'

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UPDATED:

22:45 GMT, 16 July 2012

Jamie Baulch has blasted Great Britain for taking drug cheats to London 2012 rather than proven champions.

The Olympic silver medallist was left seething after fellow Welshman David Roberts was left out of the Paralympic swimming team, while former drug cheats Dwain Chambers and David Millar were selected in the Olympic party.

Overlooked: Roberts (left) has missed out on a 2012 berth

Overlooked: Roberts (left) has missed out on a 2012 berth

Baulch said on Twitter: 'This would have made @swimmerdai the greatest #paralympic athlete ever. But instead we take people who have knowingly taken drugs!!!! #joke.'

Roberts appealed against the decision in June but British Swimming upheld it on Monday.

London 2012 Olympics: Dwain Chambers hopes his presence will deter drug taking

Chambers hopes his presence in London will deter athletes from taking drugs

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UPDATED:

23:54 GMT, 12 July 2012

Sprinter Dwain Chambers believes his presence at the Olympics should serve as a warning to anyone thinking of doping.

The 34-year-old was cleared to compete at London 2012 earlier this year when the British Olympic Association's lifetime ban on drugs cheats was overturned.

'I hope my presence makes people think twice and not do it,' he told The Times. 'I hope they never contemplate it because it really doesn't help.

Second chance: Dwain Chambers' Olympic ban was overturned this year

Second chance: Dwain Chambers' Olympic ban was overturned this year

'You may look at times and statistics but it doesn't help your life. It ruins your life and you will regret it for ever.'

Chambers tested positive for THG in August 2003 and served a two-year ban.

He feels doping did him and his career nothing but harm – a fate he hopes other athletes can avoid.

'I got worse on drugs,' he said. 'It did not help me in any capacity. It made me a very unsociable person and ruined my career and the image of the sport.

'I hate to think I caused that. That is guilt.'

London 2012 Olympics: Team GB track and field team revealed

Drugs cheat Chambers completes turnaround by sealing place in Team GB's Olympics squad

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UPDATED:

14:50 GMT, 3 July 2012

Dwain Chambers has been named in the Great Britain athletics team for London 2012, 12 years on from his last appearance at an Olympic Games, but the stunning pick of Lynsey Sharp as the only athlete in the women's 800 metres provided the headline selection.

Controversial sprinter Chambers will compete over 100m in the capital next month after being included in a 71-strong squad for the Games named by the British Olympic Association.

Chambers, 34, finished fourth in the 100m in Sydney in 2000, but has not featured in the Olympics since following his two-year suspension for systematic drug use and the imposition of the BOA's lifetime ban.

London calling: Goldie Sayers, Andrew Osagie, Sophie Hitchon, Greg Rutherford Yamile Aldama, Rhys Williams and Lisa Dobriskeywill be representing Team GB at the Games

London calling: Goldie Sayers, Andrew Osagie, Sophie Hitchon, Greg Rutherford Yamile Aldama, Rhys Williams and Lisa Dobriskeywill be representing Team GB at the Games

However, the BOA ban was overturned by
the Court of Arbitration for Sport earlier this year, paving the way
for him to compete at a home Olympics.

Chambers was not able to secure his
place in London automatically as, despite winning the trials in
Birmingham, he failed to run the 'A' qualifying standard of 10.18
seconds.

However, that victory ahead of his domestic rivals as well as his past performances have proved enough to gain selection.

His
place on the team had looked a certainty ever since he was given the
option of not chasing the qualifying time at last week's European
Championships in Helsinki.

Looking ahead: Adam Gemili, Sayers, Osagie, Hitchon, Rutherford and Aldama can now look forward to the Olympics

Looking ahead: Adam Gemili, Sayers, Osagie, Hitchon, Rutherford and Aldama can now look forward to the Olympics

Chambers was joined in the 100m by
teenager Adam Gemili, the British number one this season, and James
Dasaolu, who were second and third at the trials and have both run the
'A' standard.

'It is a real honour to be selected as part of Team GB today,' he said.

'For me representing my country in
an Olympics is a privilege that should never be taken for granted. To
be given the opportunity to do so in my home town has been a dream that
at times has seemed very distant and is now a reality.

'It is now my responsibility to
prepare fully for the 100m, the relay, to support all my fellow athletes
and all my other colleagues within Team GB.

Thumbs up: Shamed sprinter Dwain Chambers is set to realise his Olympic dream after being selected

Thumbs up: Shamed sprinter Dwain Chambers is set to realise his Olympic dream after being selected

'It is a very proud day and I thank the selectors for the confidence and faith they have placed in me.'

Jessica Ennis has been selected to represent Britain in both the
Heptathlon and the women's 100metre hurdles in which she is highly
fancied to strike gold.

She said: 'I am really excited to
have made my first Olympic team, and cant wait to compete in London on
the 3rd & 4th August in front of a home crowd.

Flying the flag: Jessica Ennis is one of Team GB's brightest gold medal hopes in the Heptathlon

Flying the flag: Jessica Ennis is one of Team GB's brightest gold medal hopes in the Heptathlon

'I have been training really hard and
feel in great shape and am really looking forward to competing – I know
the atmosphere will be amazing!'

Edinburgh
athlete Sharp won last month's trials in Birmingham and then went on to
win silver at the European Championships in Helsinki, but she did not
have an 'A' standard.

Picking
her, therefore, meant selecting no-one else as athletes with the 'B'
standard can only be selected if no-one with the 'A' is chosen.

Phillips Idowu will go for glory in the triple jump

In a spin: Lawrence Okoye

All in: Phillips Idowu (triple jump) and Lawrence Okoye (right, discus) will be going for glory at the Games

Marilyn Okoro and Emma Jackson, the
British number one and two this year who performed poorly at the trials,
were also left out, as was Jemma Simpson, who was second in Birmingham.

Meadows, who has not raced in 2012
because of an Achilles injury, had indicated before the selection she
would appeal if she was left out and she is unlikely to be the only one
to do so.

UK Athletics head coach Charles van
Commenee has already said he is bracing himself for a 'heap of appeals'
from desperate athletes.

Teenage kicks: Adam Gemili will go against Jamaican speedsters Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake in the 100m

Teenage kicks: Adam Gemili will go against Jamaican speedsters Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake in the 100m

Any appeal must be lodged within 24
hours of the team announcement and then heard within 48 hours. The
appeals panel consists of UKA chairman Ed Warner, UKA president Lynn
Davies and an independent barrister.

Okoro was included in the 4x400m relay squad.

Van Commenee, who has set a target of
eight medals, including one gold, for the Games, said: 'I am very proud
to have nominated such a strong team of athletes to Team GB. Our
collective philosophy since Beijing has been one of raising the bar as
we work towards London 2012.

World 400m hurdle champion Dai Greene

Christine Ohuruogu will defend her 400m gold medal in London

Going the distance: World 400m hurdle champion Dai Green and defending Olympic 400m champion Christine Ohuruogu (R) will be looking to win in front of their home crowd at the Olympic Stadium

'I believe this team is well prepared
to go out there, be competitive and achieve on the greatest sporting
stage in front of a home crowd.'

Chambers was joined in the squad by
another athlete previously barred due to a drugs ban, with Carl
Myerscough selected in the shot put.

Elsewhere, European champion Rhys
Williams took the third spot in the 400m hurdles, world bronze medallist
Andy Turner the third spot in the 110m hurdles and Michael Rimmer
joined Andrew Osagie in the 800m.

Over she goes: American-born Tiffany Porter will represent Team GB in the hurdles

Over she goes: American-born Tiffany Porter will represent Team GB in the hurdles

Van Commenee said the decision to pick Sharp in the women's 800m was because she was the athlete in the best form.

The UK Athletics head coach also said the other hopefuls had not helped their own cases.

He
said at a press conference: 'I mentioned it was a selection meeting (to
pick GB team) that took six hours. Two hours of those six were spent on
one event, the 800m women.

'There
were five women in contention, basically, four of them had notable 'A'
standards, one, Lynsey Sharp, had a few 'B' standards.

On a wing and prayer: 1500m star Hannah England will look to go beyond her silver medal success achieved at last year's World Championships

On a wing and prayer: 1500m star Hannah England will look to go beyond her silver medal success achieved at last year's World Championships

'The panel had to decide whether to go for one athlete with 'B' standards, or one, two or three on 'A' standards.

'After
all the deliberations, thoughts and arguments were compared, it was
decided that most important is to have the right performance at the
right time.

'Lots of people had the right performance at the wrong time.

'Lynsey
Sharp has done very good business recently and performed at the trials,
beat everybody, did very well at the European Championships, beat
athletes who have run 1.57, 1.58, 1.59… she beat Jemma Simpson on both
occasions, and we decided that Lynsey Sharp is the one with the best
current form.

'This was difficult basically because not one of these athletes actually took control of their own destiny.

'The
athletes made it difficult by not doing what they're supposed to do.
Once a selection panel has to spend two hours on selection, that's
already a bad sign.

'The panel is convinced the athlete is selected who has the best chances to perform at the Games.'

Great expectations: Mo Farah will be hoping to deliver success in the 5000m and 10,000m events

Great expectations: Mo Farah will be hoping to deliver success in the 5000m and 10,000m events

GOING TO THE GAMES: TEAM GB's TRACK AND FIELD SQUAD
MEN

Adam Gemili – 100m and 4 x 100m (age: 18, born: London, lives: Dartford)
Dwain Chambers – 100m and 4 x 100m (age: 34, born: London, Lives: London)
James Dasaolu- 100 and 4x100m (age: 24, born: Croydon, lives: Loughborough)
Christian Malcolm- 200m and 4x100m (age: 33, born: Cardiff, lives: Newport)
James Ellington- 200m and 4x100m (age: 26, born: Lewisham, lives: London
Martyn Rooney- 400m and 4x400m (age: 25, born: Croydon, lives: Loughborough)
Conrad Williams- 400m and 4x400m (age: 30, born: Kingston, Jamaica, lives: Hither Green)
Nigel Levine- 400m* and 4x400m (age: 23, born: Bedford, lives: Bedford)
Andrew Osagie- 800m (age: 24, born: Harlow, lives: Twickenham)
Michael Rimmer – 800m (age: 26, born: Southport, lives: Manchester)
Ross Murray- 1500m (age: 22, born: Gateshead, lives: Twickenham
Andrew Baddeley- 1500m (age: 30, born: Merseyside lives: London)
Nick McCormick- 5000m (age:30, born: Newcastle, lives: Loughborough)
Mo Farah- 5,000 and 10,000 (age:28, born: Somalia, lives: Portland, USA)
Chris Thompson – 10,000m (age: 31, born: Barrow-in-Furness, lives Oregon USA)
Stuart Stokes – 3000mSC (age: 35, born: Bolton, lives: Bolton)
Lawrence Clarke- 110mh (age: 22, born: London, lives: Bath)
Andrew Pozzi- 110mh (age: 19, born: Leamington Spa, lives: Bristol)
Andy Turner- 110mh (age: 31, born: Nottingham, lives: Sutton)
Dai Greene- 400mh and 4x400m (age: 26, born: Llanelli, lives: Trowbridge)
Jack Green- 400mh and 4x400m (age: 20, born: Maidstone, lives: Bath)
Rhys Williams – 400mh (age: 28, born: Cardiff, lives: London)
Robbie Grabarz- high jump (age: 24, born: Enfield, lives: Birmingham)
Steve Lewis- pole vault (age: 26, born: Stoke on Trent, lives:London)
Greg Rutherford- long jump (age: 24, born: Milton Keynes, lives: Milton Keynes)
Chris Tomlinson- long jump (age: 30, born: Middlesbrough, lives: London)
Philips Idowu- triple jump (age: 33, born: Hackney, lives: Birmingham)
Mervyn Luckwell – javelin (age: 27, born: Milton Keynes, lives: Loughborough)
Lawrence Okoye- discus (age: 20, born: Croydon, lives Croydon)
Brett Morse – discus (age: 23, born:Cardiff, lives: Penarth)
Abdul Buhari – discus (age: 30, born: Nigeria, lives: London)
Carl Myerscough – Shotput (age: 32, born: Blackpool, lives: USA)
Alex Smith – Hammer (age:24, born: Hull, lives Hull)
Daniel Awde – Decathlon (age: 24, born: Essex, lives Essex)
Dominic King – 50k Walk (age: 29. Born: Colchester. Lives: Colchester)
Danny Talbot – 4x100m (age 21, born: Sailisbury, lives: Trowbridge)
Simeon Williamson – 4x100m (age: 26, born: London, lives: Enfield)
Mark Lewis-Francis – 4x100m (age: 29, born: Birmingham, lives: London)
Richard Buck- 4x400m (age: 25, born: York, lives: Loughborough)
Luke Lennon-Ford – 4x400m (age: 23, born: Sutton Coldfield, lives: London)
Rob Tobin- 4x400m (age: 28, born: Lincoln, lives: Basingstoke)

WOMEN

Abi Oyepitan – 100m and 200m (age: 32, born: London, lives: London)
Anyika Onuora- 100m* and 200m (age: 27, born: Liverpool, lives: London)
Margaret Adeoye- 200m (age: 27, born: London, lives: London)
Christine Ohuruogu- 400m and 4x400m (age: 28, born: London, lives: London)
Shana Cox- 400m and 4x400m (age: 27, born: Brooklyn, USA, lives: London)
Lee McConnell – 400m* and 4x400m (age: 33, born: Glasgow, lives: Glasgow)
Lynsey Sharp – 800m (age: 21, born: Edinburgh, lives: Edinburgh )
Laura Weightman- 1500m (age: 21, born: Alnwick, lives: Leeds)
Lisa Dobriskey- 1500m (age:28, born: Ashford, lives:Loughborough)
Hannah England- 1500m (age: 25, born: Oxford, lives: Birmingham)
Jo Pavey- 5000m and 10,000m (age: 38, born: Exeter, lives: Exeter)
Julia Bleasdale – 5000m* and 10,000m (age: 30, born: Surry, lives: Surrey)
Barbara Parker- 5000m and 3000mSC (age:29, born: King’s Lynn, lives: California, USA)
Eilish McColgan- 3000mSC (age: 21, born: Dundee, lives: Carnousie )
Johanna Jackson 20km walk (age: 27, born: Middlesbrough, lives: Leeds )
Tiffany Porter- 100mh (age: 24, born: Michigan, USA, lives: London)
Perri Shakes-Drayton- 400mh (age: 23, born: London, lives: London)
Eilidh Child- 400mh (age:25, born: Perth, lives: Kinross/Bath)
Holly Bleasdale- pole valut (age: 20, born: Preston, lives: Chorley)
Kate Dennison- pole vault (age: 28, born: Durban, SA, lives: Loughborough)
Shara Proctor- long jump (age: 23, born: Anguilla, lives: Atlanta, USA)
Yamile Aldama – triple jump (age: 39, born: Havana, Cuba,lives: London)
Sophie Hitchon- hammer (age: 20, born: Burnley, lives: Loughborough)
Goldie Sayers- javelin (age: 29, born: Newmarket, lives: London)
Jessica Ennis- heptathlon and 100mh (age: 26, born: Sheffield, lives: Sheffield)
Katarina Johnson-Thompson – heptathlon (age: 18, born: Liverpool, lives: Liverpool)
Louise Hazel- heptathlon – heptathlon (age: 26, born: Southwark, lives: Birmingham)
Marilyn Okoro- 4x400m (age: 27, born: London, lives: London)
Nicola Sanders- 4x400m (age: 30, born: High Wycombe,lives: Bourne End)
Emily Diamond – 4x400m (age:21 born: Bristol, lives: Bristol)

European Championships: Jo Pavey wins 10,000m silver in Helsinki

Joy for Jo as Pavey scoops Britain's sixth medal in 10,000m in Helsinki

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UPDATED:

15:42 GMT, 1 July 2012

Jo Pavey has won Britain's sixth medal of the European Championships with silver in the 10,000 metres in Helsinki.

Pavey was unable to stay with eventual champion Dulce Felix of Portugal when she made the decisive break with eight laps to go, and found herself third at the bell behind Ukraine's Olha Skrypak.

But the 38-year-old Devon athlete
overtook Skrypak in the home straight to secure silver in 31 minutes
49.03 seconds, with Ireland's Fionnuala Britton in fourth.

Silver lining: Jo Pavey came second behind Portuguese winner Dulce Felix in the women's 10,000m final in Helsinki

Silver lining: Jo Pavey came second behind Portuguese winner Dulce Felix in the women's 10,000m final in Helsinki

Pavey's team-mate Charlotte Purdue was sixth in 32mins 28.46secs, with Gemma Steel ninth in 32:46.32.

Pavey only returned to track action after her Olympic marathon gamble backfired in April.

She opted to miss the London Marathon and hope that her time from last year's race was enough to claim the last available place alongside Paula Radcliffe and Mara Yamauchi, but watched on TV as both Claire Hallissey and Freya Murray eclipsed her time, with Hallissey subsequently selected.

'It's been a real blessing in disguise,' said Pavey, who is likely to run both the 5,000 and 10,000m at the Olympics.

Joy of six: Pavey scooped Britain's sixth medal of the European Championships

Joy of six: Pavey scooped Britain's sixth medal of the European Championships

'I would have taken a marathon place if I was given it because it would have been a massive gamble not to accept it.

'It was kind of nice not to have any choice and it's made me feel young. I'm really thrilled to get a medal. Doing track this year after two years on the road has been really fun.'

Hopes of another medal in the men's 4x100m relay lasted barely 10 seconds however, with Christian Malcolm on the first leg and Dwain Chambers on the second failing to exchange the baton – another relay failure coming the day after the women's team were disqualified and failed to secure a place at their home Olympics.

London 2012 Olympics: Harry Aikines-Aryeetey admits Olympic dream is over

Aikines-Aryeetey admits Olympic dream is over after Lemaitre shines in Helsinki

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UPDATED:

00:01 GMT, 29 June 2012

France's Christophe Lemaitre retained
his European 100 metres title as Britain's Harry Aikines-Aryeetey
admitted his slim chance of an individual Olympic place was over.

Lemaitre maintained his concentration
during a bizarre race which featured a yellow card, one false start and
only five finishers, clocking 10.09 seconds to edge out compatriot
Jimmy Vicaut (10.12secs), with Norway's Jaysuma Saidy Ndure claiming
bronze.

Lead man: Christophe Lemaitre wins 100m

Lead man: Christophe Lemaitre wins 100m

Aikines-Aryeetey finished fourth in 10.31s, but suffered a hamstring injury after 40m and will not have done enough to overhaul Dwain Chambers and James Dasaolu for the discretionary places in the British team alongside teenager Adam Gemili.

'I am massively upset,' Aikines-Aryeetey, 23, admitted. 'When I won the World Youths in 2005 the first question I got asked was 'Are you aiming to be there (London)' And I thought 'Ooh, I wouldn't mind that,' so every day since then I've been dreaming about being there.

'But this year has just been terrible to me after last year being so good, just missing out on a world final by one spot. At the start of the year nothing went right for me, as much as I wanted it, as much as tried to do everything I could, nothing went my way.

Gold medallist Christophe Lemaitre (C) of France powers to the line ahead of silver medallist Jimmy Vicaut (2nd L) of France

Gold medallist Christophe Lemaitre (C) of France powers to the line ahead of silver medallist Jimmy Vicaut (2nd L) of France

'Even going to the Olympic Stadium for the test event I tore a muscle walking, how unlucky can you get I had to walk from the station to the warm up, from the warm up to the track and it's quite a long distance.'

The final began with Lithuania's Rytis Sakalauskas receiving a yellow card, apparently claiming he could not hear the first start, before Italy's Simone Collio was disqualified for a true false start.

The race got under way at the third time of asking, but Sakalauskas again dwelt in his blocks before running a few yards and giving up, while Latvia's Ronalds Arajs at least managed around 70m before collapsing to the track with an injury.

London 2012 Olympics Adam Gemili to take Team GB place, assures Charles van Commenee

Gemili to take his place with Team GB, assures head coach Van Commenee

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UPDATED:

20:01 GMT, 26 June 2012

Adam Gemili, Britain’s teenage sprint sensation, has taken the advice of Britain’s head coach Charles van Commenee and will accept his Olympic place in the 100 metres.

Gemili’s personal coach Michael Afilaka said on Sunday that the 18-year-old was an ‘emotional wreck’ after putting himself in the frame for the Games and measured the likelihood of him accepting at 51 per cent.

Is that the way to the Olympics: Adam Gemili will compete in London, says Charles van Commenee

Is that the way to the Olympics: Adam Gemili will compete in London, says Charles van Commenee

But Van Commenee intervened and painted a very different picture.

‘A lot of people in athletics make it sound as if they are having a hard life, as if they are going down the coal mines in Azerbaijan,’ said the head coach.

‘Athletes and coaches shouldn’t forget that he is going to an Olympic Games. We’re not sending him to fight Al-Qaeda. I’ve been to five Games. It’s enjoyable. It’s fun. We’ll look after him.

‘I didn’t see a nervous wreck (when I talked to him) the day after, but a very happy 18-year-old. He is looking forward to being at the best sports event in the world. Of course he is. He selected himself and it’s his intention to compete.’

Respect: Gemili and Dwain Chambers embrace

Respect: Gemili and Dwain Chambers embrace

Gemili confirmed that to his local BBC radio station in Kent.

‘It feels really good — 18 and I’ve qualified for the Olympic Games. To be picked at this age in front of the other sprinters in the whole country, it feels amazing. People train their whole lives and I’m lucky in that I’ve come along at the right sort of time and I’ve done well.’

Gemili has also been named for the 100m at the World Junior Championships in Barcelona, which start on July 10.

London 2012 Olympics: Dwain Chambers 100 Team GB selection imminent

Chambers expecting Olympics nod despite falling to meet qualifying standard

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UPDATED:

13:53 GMT, 25 June 2012

Dwain Chambers seems certain to be selected for the British team at the Olympics after being told he does not need to chase the 'A' qualifying time in this week's European Championships.

Chambers won the 100 metres at the weekend's Olympic trials in Birmingham, but was unable to achieve the 'A' standard of 10.18 seconds to secure automatic qualification for London.

The 34-year-old was therefore expected to compete in the individual 100m in Helsinki this week to get the time before Sunday's deadline, but was today only named in the 4x100m relay team when UK Athletics cut their initial squad from 109 to 82 athletes.

London calling: Chambers is expected to be handed Olympic berth

London calling: Chambers is expected to be handed Olympic berth

Teenager Adam Gemili is the only sprinter to be guaranteed a place in the 100m in London after finishing second behind Chambers at the Alexander Stadium after running 10.08secs in Germany earlier this month.

The other two places now look likely to be handed to Chambers and James Dasaolu, who was the only other man to have the 'A' standard and finished third at the trials.

Chambers had previously been banned from the Olympics under the British Olympic Association's bylaw which barred drugs cheats for life, but that bylaw was overturned by the Court of Arbitration for Sport earlier this year.

Speaking after Saturday's win, Chambers – who had to apologise for swearing into a television camera after crossing the line, said: “I would like to be selected outright.

All smiles: Gemili has done enough to feature later this summer

All smiles: Gemili has done enough to feature later this summer

'If there's a way the selectors can look on my history I will gladly take that opportunity, but hopefully I am able to secure the qualifier in Helsinki.

'It's been rough this summer. Running 10.18 is something that I could do with my eyes closed, but for some reason it's just not materialising this year.

'It (the dream) is alive, there's a rainbow but the pot of gold ain't there yet, I've still got to get the qualifying time.'