Tag Archives: disapproval

Vincent Kompany tackle: Video special of the football"s challenges

VIDEO: As we face up to a world without tackling, Sportsmail looks back at some memorable challenges

PUBLISHED:

15:49 GMT, 15 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

16:12 GMT, 15 January 2013

There was an outcry of disapproval after Vincent Kompany was given a straight red card for his full-blooded challenge on Jack Wilshere.

The Manchester City captain’s challenge was robust but he won the ball, sending out the message that players will be handed their marching orders for aggressive challenges.

Does this signal the death-knell for the old-fashioned tackle And if the letter of the law is followed, we may never see the likes of these challenges – as nominated by Sportsmail’s reporters – again…

Bad Kompany: The Belgian harshly saw red for this challenge on Arsenal's Jack Wilshere

Bad Kompany: The Belgian harshly saw red for this challenge on Arsenal's Jack Wilshere

COLIN YOUNG

KEVIN BALL (Sunderland) on Duncan Ferguson (Newcastle United), St James’ Park, August, 1999

Very few players in the game, never mind the North East, have relished a tackle as much as former Sunderland captain Kevin Ball. And they certainly like a tackle up here.

But on the night Sunderland pulled off a rare win on enemy territory and with the game in the dying minutes, ‘Bally’ pulled off a typically well-timed, hard but fair challenge on Duncan Ferguson. Only the ball flew from the pair who were 30 yards from goal, over Thomas Sorensen and hit his bar, denying Newcastle an equaliser.

This one of the most memorable Tyne-Wear derbies – Ruud Gullit put Alan Shearer and Ferguson on the bench and paid the price in the endless rain. But if Bally of all people had scored the equaliser, even Sunderland’s former manager and current reserve-team boss wouldn’t have been able to live it down.

NEIL MOXLEY

PAUL McGRATH (Aston Villa) against Helsingborg, Olympia, September, 1996

The big man had just been dropped by Brian Little. If memory serves, he came on as a substitute in this game and was seriously peeved. With about five minutes to go, the ball broke down the right, just in front of the dug-outs. McGrath wasn’t the quickest but, my life, he shifted to make his mark. He took ball, man, trainer’s bag, the lot, right in front of Little – and me, sat in the press box towards the back of a small stand.

It was fair. But it wasn’t so much a tackle as a statement. I remember nothing else about this game. The thought of that challenge has stayed with me throughout my career.

McGrath was a solid bloke and I felt a tinge of sympathy for his opponent that night. Honestly, he absolutely cleaned this guy out.

Hardman: McGrath (left) was known for his tackling prowess

Hardman: McGrath (left) was known for his tackling prowess

JOHN EDWARDS

STEVEN GERRARD (Liverpool) on Phil Jagielka (Everton), Anfield, March, 2008

Never one to do things by halves, Gerrard ignited the home crowd with a typically uncompromising double tackle on Jagielka. An initial block challenge near the halfway line sent the ball spinning towards the corner flag, with Jagielka sprinting after it and Gerrard scrambling to his feet and setting off in hot pursuit.

As Jagielka caught up with the ball, Gerrard was a good four or five yards behind but that didn’t stop him hurling himself into a full-length studs-first tackle that sent the ball flying into the Kop. A blur of red, the Liverpool skipper might have been inviting trouble in the current climate but there were no repercussions then.

Neither should there have been. It was the cleanest of contacts and Jagielka was rattled but unharmed. Gerrard at his most committed, and it soon spread to his team-mates, who dominated and should have won by more than an early Fernando Torres goal.

LAURIE WHITWELL

PHIL NEVILLE (Everton) on Cristiano Ronaldo (Man Utd) Goodison Park, October, 2008

Not many tackles can lay claim to changing the course of a team’s season – but, according to Everton manager David Moyes, this one did. United were cruising at Goodison Park, 1-0 up thanks to a Darren Fletcher goal, but on the hour Phil Neville launched a ferocious challenge on ex-team mate Cristiano Ronaldo, who had already been half-felled by Steven Pienaar. Neville’s lunge sparked fury in the away section and he was booked by Alan Wiley. Later replays showed he got the ball but the whistle had already gone.

The incident (48 seconds into this video) whipped up the crowd and Everton began playing with increased vigour. Soon after, Marouane Fellaini scored an equaliser. They had lost three of four at home up to that point but won their next three Premier League games to finish fifth in May. As for the best overall tackler I have seen – Ryan Giggs takes that accolade. His slides are always silky smooth and generally he wins the ball.

LEE CLAYTON

STUART PEARCE (Wealdstone)

Bobby Gould said he went to watch Stuart Pearce playing for Wealdstone and left after the first tackle when the part-time electrician sent the winger flying. Legend has it the winger ended up closer to Bobby and his wife in the stand than the pitch and Coventry, where Gould was manager, soon paid 300,000 for the player who went on to become England’s greatest left back.

It was a huge amount of money to pay for non-League part-timer but money well spent as Pearce went on to play 78 games for his country (even if most of his success came with Nottingham Forest).

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Anyway, I guess that’s Bobby’s favourite tackle, not mine. I’m going to pick a player I liked watching tackle for England and that’s Paul Ince. I was there in France, during the World Cup, when he was asked about it. He said this: ‘I love tackling, I really love it. It’s better than sex. My wife is not going to be too pleased, but I love the sound of it, the crunch, the noise, the act of tackling. I was born to tackle.’ I think he was too. I wish I could have tackled like Paul Ince.

DOMINIC KING

JAMIE CARRAGHER (Liverpool) on Andriy Shevchenko (AC Milan), Istanbul, May, 2005

The memory of how Liverpool came back from the dead to win their fifth European Cup remains as fresh as ever, with that incredible three goals-in-six minutes flurry, but it sometimes tends to be forgotten that they also had to withstand a late siege from Milan.

As the Italians tried to pilfer a win late on, Shevchenko powered into the Liverpool area and had skipped past Sami Hyypia but just as he was about to pull the trigger, Carragher swept in to spirit the ball from his toe with immaculate timing. Given what was at stake, it has to go down as the best, most important tackle I’ve seen.

That game was also responsible for the best save I have ever seen, too, with Jerzy Dudek’s scarcely believable parry from the hapless Shevchenko.

Master of the art: Carragher dives in to challenge Mark Viduka

Master of the art: Carragher dives in to challenge Mark Viduka

MARK ALFORD

STEVEN GERRARD (Liverpool) on Cristiano Ronaldo (Manchester United), Anfield, March, 2007

Ronaldo – soon to become the most expensive player in the world – and the best tackler on the planet. Gerrard nicks possession just when United are in a threatening position with Ronaldo in possession. Minimum fuss, goes to ground for a split second, nicks the ball and Liverpool are on their way up the field. Pure class.

PHIL GRADWELL

MARK FISH (Bolton) on Michael Owen (Liverpool), Reebok Stadium, November, 1997

The 17-year-old Owen was lightning and nobody could catch him. So when he went through on goal, home fans feared the worst. But Fish, playing one of his first games for Bolton, somehow managed to keep within an outstretched leg of the Liverpool striker and just as Owen was about to shoot slid in, scooped back the ball, got up and played the ball to a midfielder. Easy.

Mark-ed man: Fish (left) gets to grip with Owen once more while at Charlton later in his career

Mark-ed man: Fish (left) gets to grip with Owen once more while at Charlton later in his career

SAM CUNNINGHAM

CHRIS SOLLY (Charlton) on Steve Morison (Millwall), The Valley, March, 2010

Nine minutes into this fierce south London derby Morison, one of the most prolific strikers in League One that season, was sent through on goal by a long ball that caught out centre backs Jose Semedo and Miguel Llera. But 19-year-old left back Solly hurtled towards the middle and produced an unbelievable recovery tackle taking the ball first, then the man, and a large chunk of the turf in the process.

CHRIS CUTMORE

BORIS JOHNSON (England) on Maurizio Gaudino (Germany), Madejski Stadium, May 2006

They say great tackles can change games but this one changed an entire career. Boris was seen as a bumbling buffoon before this remarkable rugby-style tackle. Now he’s still seen as a bumbling buffoon but is somehow in his second term as Mayor of London.

OK, it’s not a proper tackle, so don’t try this one at home, kids (or on the training pitch) – it won’t get your football career very far. But it was very funny.

New Zealand coach Ian Foster criticises Chris Robshaw for his decision making

He'd have been shot! That's what All Blacks would have done to 'calamity captain' Chris

|

UPDATED:

12:19 GMT, 27 November 2012

England’s under-fire captain Chris Robshaw found sympathy in short supply when New Zealand indicated their disapproval of his decision making.

Robshaw has been heavily criticised for directing Owen Farrell to kick for goal when England trailed 16-12 to South Africa with two minutes remaining of Saturday’s clash at Twickenham.

New Zealand assistant coach Ian Foster showed his disdain for Robshaw’s decision when asked how he would react if an All Blacks’ captain made the same call.

Scroll down for video

Not impressed: New Zealand assistant coach Ian Foster had little sympathy for Chris Robshaw

Not impressed: New Zealand assistant coach Ian Foster had little sympathy for Chris Robshaw

Foster pointed an imaginary gun to his head and pulled the trigger while veteran centre Conrad Smith, who was sat beside him, grinned.

Farrell’s attempt was successful but there was no time left to secure victory as the Springboks held out for a 16-15 triumph.

Successive defeats to Australia and South Africa have left England facing a whitewash in their QBE internationals against the southern hemisphere heavyweights.

But Foster refuses to underestimate their
challenge at Twickenham on Saturday as New Zealand attempt to stretch
their unbeaten run to 21 Tests.

Mocked: Robshaw's decision making was being mocked on Twitter with a picture of him competing on Who wants to be a Millionaire

Mocked: Robshaw's decision making was being mocked on Twitter with a picture of him competing on Who wants to be a Millionaire

'It’s a dangerous time to be playing England. We saw that a little bit when we played Wales on Saturday,” Foster said.

'They will have targeted us and there’s no better way for redemption when you’ve had a couple of defeats than to knock over a top team.

'Between that and the youth they have, a little sense of adventure could come into their game.

Getting it wrong: Robshaw tells Owen Farrell to kick for goal rather than kick for the corner

Getting it wrong: Robshaw tells Owen Farrell to kick for goal rather than kick for the corner

'They’ve come off two big games so the energy levels will be pretty even and it will just be about who executes the best.

'They showed during their summer series in South Africa that they can play with a bit of width. They proved they have the ability to do that.

'It’s going to be at least as tough as the Wales match from what we’ve seen.

'That was a very physical game and we were fortunate to execute really well in some moments and pile on a lot of pressure.'

Video courtesy of Sky Sports News

DM.has('rcpv1991203379001','BCVideo');

England versus New Zealand is live on Sky Sports 1 from 2pm this Saturday.

Stuart Pearce gives way to Arsene Wenger and leaves Jack Wilshere out of Team GB squad

Wenger wins Team GB battle as Wilshere is omitted from Pearce's list

|

UPDATED:

10:45 GMT, 11 June 2012

Stuart Pearce has opted not to exacerbate Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger further, by not including Gunners' midfielder Jack Wilshere in his 35-man Team GB Olympic list.

Pearce had, to Wenger's disapproval, selected Wilshere in his initial 80-man list. No more than a month ago, Pearce stated that he would not bow to pressure from club managers.

Out: Jack Wilshere was not included in Stuart Pearce's 35-man list

Out: Jack Wilshere was not included in Stuart Pearce's 35-man list

He even suggested he may be willing to take legal action to secure Wilshere's services at the Games.

In David Beckham is tipped to be part of the squad

In David Beckham is tipped to be part of the squad

But according to the Mirror, Pearce submitted his list to FIFA on Friday, and has decided to leave Wilshere at home as he recovers after a lengthy spell on the sidelines with an ankle complaint.

Wilshere missed the entirety of Arsenal's Premier League campaign after sustaining a stress fracture to his ankle, however FIFA rules state that any Under 23 players selected by their country for the Olympics should be released for duties by their club.

Wenger, who has reiterated on a number of occasions that Wilshere should be left home to recover fully, will be glad of the news that his prized midfielder will be well rested for the start of next season.

The final squad of 18 players will be chosen from the 35-man list. David Beckham is amongst those expected to be included in Pearce's final team to be named on July 6.

Wigan 3 Wolves 2: Violent clashes break out

Violent clashes mar Wigan victory as pitch invasion breaks out at DW Stadium

|

UPDATED:

17:38 GMT, 13 May 2012

Wigan's final home match of the season at home to already-relegated Wolves was marred by a couple of minor skirmishes at the final whistle after fans invaded the pitch.

The Latics won 3-2 to secure an eight successive season in the Barclays Premier League and many of the near sell out crowd came on to the field at the final whistle.

While it began as a good-natured celebration the party atmosphere turned unsavoury with those on the pitch taunting the away end.

Bloody battle: A number of fans were involved in violent clashes

Bloody battle: A number of fans were involved in violent clashes

A couple of Wolves fans broke the line of stewards across the 18-yard line and scuffles were seen to break out with at least one man leaving the field with a bloodied face.

However, the exchanges were very minor in nature and were not allowed to escalate and order was restored very quickly.

With the threat of the players' end-of-season lap of honour being cancelled the playing surface was cleared quickly after an appeal over the stadium's PA system.

Sad scenes: Violence erupted after Wigan supporters flooded onto the pitch

Sad scenes: Violence erupted after Wigan supporters flooded onto the pitch

The majority of the DW Stadium expressed their disapproval with boos and chants of 'Off, off, off.'

Wolves
players returned shortly afterwards to applaud their fans and were
given a warm welcome by all four sides of the ground, before the Latics
came out to thank their fans.

Wigan manager Roberto Martinez was unaware of the incidents after the whistle but said he did not think it was representative of fans' behaviour as a whole.

Finishing on a high: Wigan beat Wolves having already secured safety

Finishing on a high: Wigan beat Wolves having already secured safety

'It was a real emotional game and we have real passion but the last thing you want to see is violence attached to the game,' he said.

'It is a little minority but it will not spoil the feeling of a party and achievement because I thought the fans were incredible throughout the season.

'They deserve a real feeling of satisfaction today.'

Sunderland fined 30,000 after charge of misconduct

Sunderland hit with 30k fine after players surround ref Dowd at City game

|

UPDATED:

14:21 GMT, 20 April 2012

Sunderland have been handed a 30,000 fine by the Football Association after a misconduct charge was found to be proven.

The charge related to the conduct of the Sunderland players towards referee Phil Dowd during the 3-3 draw at Manchester City on March 31.

All around: Sunderland players surround referee Phil Dowd

All around: Sunderland players surround referee Phil Dowd

The Staffordshire official awarded a
controversial penalty in the 43rd minute after adjudging Craig Gardner
had fouled City striker Edin Dzeko in the area.

In the immediate aftermath, several Sunderland players crowded round Dowd to voice their disapproval.

That prompted an FA charge, and the
game's governing body today confirmed the Wearsiders, who denied the
charge, had been fined as well as warned to their future conduct.

David Haye and Derick Chisora commentary

JEFF POWELL COMMENTARY: Ban them both after brawl, or we won't forgive you

The reputation of British boxing has been dragged through a pool of blood on the floor of a German bar. How shameful, how damaging to the hard old game, how humiliating for our sporting nation.

The future of prize-fighting was smeared, too, and only punitive, exemplary action will keep the abolitionists and the opportunist politicians from having their way with the last of the man-to-man blood sports.

The ghastly spectacle of Dereck Chisora, David Haye and their trainers caught up in a primitive, demeaning brawl at the end of a night of world championship boxing has done immeasurable harm to the game these heavyweight Londoners profess to love so much.

Take that: David Haye punches Dereck Chisora while seemingly holding a drinks bottle

Take that: David Haye punches Dereck Chisora while seemingly holding a drinks bottle

Whatever the eventual verdict on who was most to blame, it is imperative that the British Boxing Board of Control send an unmistakeable signal that such shameful conduct will not be tolerated.

Warnings simply will not do. Lengthy suspensions and swingeing fines must be on the agenda of a rigorous court of inquiry.

Anything less and the wolves will be inside the ropes, not just howling at the doors of disapproval of the brutal danger of grown men hitting each other in the head.

Taunt: Haye holds up three fingers to replicate Chisora's third defeat

Taunt: Haye holds up three fingers to replicate Chisora's third defeat

A vital justification for boxing is that it teaches discipline and self control to young men, many of whom are pent up with anger at the poverty of their early lives.

It offers not only an escape from the streets of deprivation but a path to self-respect through courage and achievement.

Head-to-head: Chisora squares up to Haye at the post-fight press conference

Head-to-head: Chisora squares up to Haye at the post-fight press conference

That worthy aspiration was betrayed by the screaming and scuffling of one Londoner, Haye, who has been a world heavyweight champion and another. Chisora, who dreams of becoming so. They disgraced their own achievements and ambitions.

Thus was the noble art, which many of us still truly cherish, so grievously dishonoured.

The legend of Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Robinson, Joe Louis, Sugar Ray Leonard, Rocky Marciano and so many more heroes was sacrificed on the altar of self-serving arrogance and bullying malice. They have made it all the harder for us to argue the placed for prizefighting in civilised society.

Where it should have stayed: Vitali Klitschko had earlier beaten Chisora

Where it should have stayed: Vitali Klitschko had earlier beaten Chisora

That this should happen on the very Saturday night when the wider worlds of boxing and celebrity were gathered in Las Vegas at a star-spangled gala dinner in honour of The Greatest of them all, the 70-year-old Ali, was an obscenity.

That Chisora should drag us into the gutter immediately after giving Vitali Klitshko a run for his WBC world heavyweight title might seem ridiculous. Weren’t 12 gruelling rounds enough for one evening But then he has form.

Squaring up: Chisora and bloodied Adam Booth exchange words after the brawl

Squaring up: Chisora and bloodied Adam Booth exchange words after the brawl

This refugee from oppressed Zimbabwe should have received corrective treatment from the Board when he bit one opponent, then when he was convicted of assaulting a girlfriend.

Chisora’s ranting and ravings before Saturday’s fight — if not deliberate then demented and either way unable to achieve the desired effect of rattling the elder Klitschko — were already further grounds for sanctions.

Haye’s trash-talking offensiveness towards the dignified Klitschkos has now been followed by this crass attempt to procure another hefty but unmerited pay day.

Temperatures rising: Chisora continued to goad Vitali after the defeat

Temperatures rising: Chisora continued to goad Vitali after the defeat

They perform a disservice to boxing and their fellow fighters which the Board cannot afford to let pass. Parodies of London gang wars have no place in any sport.

Nor, if a pictorial compilation proves that either Haye or Klitschko or both threw punches in the Munich melee, are the German forces of law and order likely to conveniently forget that the fists of professional boxers are classified as potentially lethal weapons when used outside the ring.

Centre of attention: Chisora has been involved in several controversial incidents

Centre of attention: Chisora has been involved in several controversial incidents

Heavyweights they may be but neither of these men are bigger than the sport itself.

There has been many a bust-up before and after fights but this one was particularly venal.

Frank Warren, as Chisora’s promoter, is obliged to make a case for his fighter and does so quite manfully but in the depths of this darkest of night he admitted: ‘This is bad for all of us. Our game does not need any of this.’

Spit storm: Chisora was caught on camera blasting Wladimir with water

Spit storm: Chisora was caught on camera blasting Wladimir with water

Vitali Klitschko said: ‘I respect Chisora’s sporting performance but not his human behaviour. In our position in sport we have a duty to set an example, especially to youngsters many of whom look up to us.’ How right they both are.

The British board share in that responsibility. If they get this one wrong, the game really will be up.

And those of us who truly love boxing will not forgive them….any more readily than we will forgive Dereck Chisora and David Haye.

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain vows to keep Andrey Arshavin and Co out of Arsenal side

Oxlade-Chamberlain vows to keep Arshavin and Co out of Arsenal side

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain has vowed to keep his place in Arsenal's starting line-up after impressing for the Gunners on his full Premier League debut.

The 18-year-old, who joined the north London club in a 12million deal during the summer, set up Robin van Persie's second-half goal in the 2-1 defeat by Manchester United.

Speed demon: The youngster impressed on his full Premier League debut

Speed demon: The youngster impressed on his full Premier League debut

But the winger was substituted shortly after the goal much to the disapproval of the Emirates faithful.

Manager Arsene Wenger was roundly booed after replacing Oxlade-Chamberlain with the under-fire Andrey Arshavin after 74 minutes – while a visibly angry Van Persie also appeared to dispute the decision.

'It was a nice performance from me and I've got to make sure I keep my place now,' Oxlade-Chamberlain told Arsenal Player.

Substitution: Oxlade-Chamberlain was replaced much to the disapproval of the Arsenal fans

Substitution: Oxlade-Chamberlain was replaced much to the disapproval of the Arsenal fans

'I was happy to get a start and obviously against opposition like Man United – it doesn't come any better than that.

'I guess it does [show Wenger has faith in him] and that is a positive for me to take away, having the boss' trust. I've got to make sure I repay that with my performances, working hard in training and when I'm on the pitch.

'Overall I was happy with my performance and happy to contribute to Robin's goal. It was positive for me and mentally it puts you in a good position.

'That can always change in football though – you can have one good game and the next game is a bad one. You've got to deal with the highs and the lows.'