Tag Archives: dereck

Nathan Cleverly v Robin Krasniqi and Dereck Chisora v Hector Avila – LIVE

LIVE BOXING: Nathan Cleverly v Robin Krasniqi and Dereck Chisora v Hector Avila

By
Martin Domin

PUBLISHED:

03:00 GMT, 20 April 2013

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UPDATED:

19:17 GMT, 20 April 2013

Nathan Cleverly fights on home soil for the first time in 14 months when he takes on his mandatory challenger Robin Krasniqi over 12 rounds at Wembley Arena.

The WBO light-heavyweight champion is joined on a stacked card by Dereck Chisora, Liam Walsh and Scott Harrison along with a number of promising young fighters.

Email your thoughts on the big fight to [email protected] or via @martin_domin

8.15pm: Harrison's punches are beginning to carry an air of desperation as Walsh slips and slides his way out of trouble while landing his own to the body. He has extended his lead as we enter the penultimate round.

8.05pm: Halfway through this 10-round contest and I have Walsh just in front. He's landing more accurately, even if Harrison looks to be throwing more punches.

8pm: The saying goes that a boxer's power is the last skill to go and if that is the case, Harrison could be heading for the retirement home. He lands a left hook flush in the fourth but Walsh laughs it off.

I get the feeling that Walsh will be happy to take this into the later rounds when his superior stamina should come into play.

Early action: Liam Walsh (right) misses with a right against Scott Harrison

Early action: Liam Walsh (right) misses with a right against Scott Harrison

7.50pm: Harrison started well in the opening round and looked to land the right hand. Walsh's left eye was cut after a clash of heads but the Scot did enough to take the session.

Walsh was livelier in the second and Harrison was admonished by the referee for failing to stop when requested. The champion then had the better of the exchanges.

7.40pm: Welcome to Sportsmail's coverage of a packed card at Wembley Arena in London.

Scott Harrison has just made his entrance ahead of his clash with WBO European champion Liam Walsh.

The Glaswegian takes on the unbeaten 26-year-old in his third fight since returning from a near seven-year absence.

Great Britain's Nathan Cleverly (left) is pulled away as he faces his challenger Germany's Robert Krasniqi

Boxing deserves cynical Audley Harrison: Patrick Collins

A sport without shame gets the man it deserves in cynical Audley

By
Patrick Collins

PUBLISHED:

21:17 GMT, 27 October 2012

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UPDATED:

23:50 GMT, 27 October 2012

It is a spring evening in May 2001 and
Wembley Arena is packed for the main event. In the red corner, Mike
‘The Jinx’ Middleton from Tampa, Florida. A 33-year-old private
detective, he has lost half of his 18 contests. He stands 6ft 1in,
weighs 15st 7lb and is earning about 3,500 for his night’s work.

In the blue corner, five inches taller
and three stones heavier, Audley Harrison, Olympic champion, national
hero. He is making his professional debut and has signed a long-term,
1million contract with BBC Television.

It is a predictably brief and farcical
encounter. Just two minutes and 45 seconds pass before the referee
waves merciful arms above the stricken Middleton.

Strike a pose: Mike Middleton and Audley Harrison before their farcical bout

The beginning of the end: Mike Middleton and Audley Harrison before their farcical bout

Later, ‘The Jinx’ is asked if he is
disappointed. He laughs, long and loudly. Disappointed! Not a bit. He
knows the score. He has given the punters what they want. Submission was
his highest ambition. Meanwhile, Audley, in a moment of modest
introspection, observes that it might easily take him all of five years
to become world heavyweight champion.

I remember thinking that the end was
nigh. Woefully devoid of talent and authenticity, professional boxing
had downgraded its status from sad joke to protracted pantomime. It was
time to draw the curtains. And yet the joke has endured for a decade
and more, despite the overwhelming evidence of absurdity.

The cast is preposterous. David Haye
and Dereck Chisora, a prize pair of hapless hams, prove that a bar-room
brawl is the perfect promoter. Ricky Hatton, battered by Floyd
Mayweather and laid flat as water by Manny Pacquiao, attempts a comeback
after three years of spectacular self-indulgence and the tickets go
flying from the box office. ‘Freddie’ Flintoff, once a magnificent
cricketer, sheds a few pounds, poses as a heavyweight fighter for a
television stunt and requests a boxing licence. He is famous, you see,
and must therefore be taken seriously.

Bloodied and bowed: Harrison's cut nose is nursed during the one-sided defeat to David Price

Bloodied and bowed: Harrison's cut nose is nursed during the one-sided defeat to David Price

More from Patrick Collins…

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Meanwhile, our Audley remains perhaps
the most shameless figure in a sport without shame. For years, he has
performed with the nervous air of a tightrope walker afraid of heights.
He clearly hates the game, fears the punishment, dreads the humiliation …
but worships the purses.

Now 41, and having recently been
flattened in 82 seconds by David Price, he has taken stock. On the one
hand, he sees the world ratings which place him at 81st among the
heavyweights; just below a Christian Hammer of Hamburg and just above
one Bowie Tupou of Los Angeles. On the other, he recognises that there
is still money to be made.

And so, he issues an official
statement. ‘I’ve decided to carry on. One more shot at glory … A
decision has come from above. He told me, “Son, lace up your gloves.
Your time as a boxer is not quite done”.’

The mocking laughter comes in waves. What is this talk of glory Who could believe the deity is such a terrible judge of boxing Yet Audley ignores the derision. He knows memories are short and hilarity will quickly die. For cheap threats and banal banter still shift tickets; fewer than before but sufficient to keep the wolf from the door. And isn’t that what the game is all about; schmoozing the public, selling notoriety, pushing empty promises while remaining brutally realistic

Outgunned: Harrison reflects on the sixth defeat of his professional career

Outgunned: Harrison reflects on the sixth defeat of his professional career

Mike ‘The Jinx’ Middleton understood that simple truth. Aware of his pugilistic limitations, he became a sparring partner. He sparred with some of the biggest and best and his philosophical insights are instructive.

He said of his patrons: ‘If you give them too much, they’ll send you home. And if you’re too easy to beat up, they’ll send you home. You’re there for the guy who is paying you. Marvin Hagler used to say about sparring partners: “You bring ’em in on a jet and if they’re no good, you send ’em home on a bus”.’

Some of that clear-eyed realism rubbed off on Audley Harrison, who knows just how the cynical caper works. Well enough to keep the show on the road for a while longer. I gave the game a decade to live but I was wrong.

For the actors are still reciting their lines and the gullible are still lapping them up. We live in a credulous age, where talent is redundant and authenticity is an optional extra. At this rate, professional boxing might easily survive another five years.

Stats too much to digest

Question: what do you do when you don’t really like sport but wish to convey an air of blokeish authority Answer: you produce a statistic.

Stats are what they serve up in gastro pubs and Premier League hospitality boxes. Always they are preceded by the crushing query: ‘Did you know’

Each weekend yields a new and gloriously useless crop — the most ‘assists’, the greatest number of ‘flick-ons’ — and Saturday morning’s gem was up there with the best.

Mental block: The number crunchers love how Albion's defence adds up

Mental block: The number crunchers love how Albion's defence adds up

Did you know that West Bromwich have blocked more of their opponents’ shots than any other Premier League side this season A total of 44. Just in front of Sunderland and QPR.

How amazing is that Yes, I’ll have another sandwich, please. Prawn, for preference.

Olympics prove sceptics wrong

While the nation celebrated the extraordinary success of London’s Olympics, the sceptics stood scowling on the sidelines.

A joyless bunch, they had forecast doom, gloom and ultimate despair. The Games, they told us, were too flippant, too frivolous, a vulgar distraction from the sombre tone of the times.

As the days passed and the elation increased, their numbers grew significantly smaller.

Yet there remained an irreconcilable core of flat-earthers; too arrogant to change, too miserable to recognise joyful reality. And they wagged their fingers and addressed us with condescending disapproval.

Magical: The Olympics was a shot in the arm to Britain

Magical: The Olympics was a shot in the arm to Britain

No matter that the capital’s image was being transformed, that the world was looking at Britain in a different light, that the nation was revealing qualities of imagination and organisation we had quite forgotten we possessed: the fact was, we simply couldn’t afford to stage sport’s greatest festival. It was an outrageous extravagance. And anybody who believed differently was either a knave or a fool.

Last week, as you may have noticed, Britain came out of recession after recording one per cent growth in the three months to September. A fragile recovery, perhaps, but the strongest growth figure of the past five years.
And, while it is impossible to be wholly accurate, a substantial proportion of this growth was attributed to Olympic ticket sales.

As vulgar distractions go, I would say that London 2012 served this country rather well.

PS

Andrew Strauss has been reflecting on his last, emotional, act as England captain. He sat down and composed a stream of hand-written letters of appreciation to the players who had served under him.

Did Kevin Pietersen feature on his list, he was asked

‘Um … I didn’t write to KP, actually,’ he said. He added: ‘I texted him.’

By common consent, Strauss is a loyal, decent, honourable man. Who has a wonderfully wicked way with a stiletto.

David Haye and Dereck Chisora settle differences

Haye and Chisora kiss and make up after bruising grudge fight settles row

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UPDATED:

01:12 GMT, 15 July 2012

David Haye and Dereck Chisora declared their feud was over after settling their differences in five breathless rounds at Upton Park.

Haye stopped his sworn enemy in the fifth with a hurtful left hook the decisive punch, sending Chisora to the canvas for the first time in his career.

Five months ago in Munich the rivals brawled at a press conference in scenes that disgraced British boxing, but they hugged after sharing a thrilling fight.

Friends: David Haye (right) and Dereck Chisora hug each other after their enthralling heavyweight showdown

Friends: David Haye (right) and Dereck Chisora hug each other after their enthralling heavyweight showdown

'Any damage that was done by our altercation in Munich is well and truly fixed now,' Haye said.

'People said that was a black eye for boxing, well the bags have gone from boxing's eyes now.

'The crowd have gone home happy with a smile on their face. That's the bottom line.

'Whatever beef I had with Dereck before the fight is over now from my side and I hope it's vice versa.

'After sharing a ring with Dereck I have a new found respect for the man.

'I had respect for his boxing ability but I never believed he could be as good as he was tonight. He raised his game.

No fence required: Haye and Chisora shake hands at the post-fight press conference

No fence required: Haye and Chisora shake hands at the post-fight press conference

'He said to me before the fight 'you'd better bring it' and I was 'yeah right'. I'm glad I did because otherwise it would have gone pair-shaped.

'If I turned up in the same condition as I was for John Ruiz, there's a good chance I'd have lost the fight.

'When you get guys who are similar in size, are willing to put it on the line and throw massive shots, it only helps boxing

'I'm glad the event went as smoothly as it did. All of the negative press before the fight, everyone can eat their words now.'

Knockout: Haye sent Chisora crashing to the canvas twice in the fifth round before the fight was halted

Knockout: Haye sent Chisora crashing to the canvas twice in the fifth round before the fight was halted

Chisora, who was rescued by referee Luis Pabon after the second knockdown, trailed on all three scorecards – 39-37, 39-37, 40-36 – when the fight was stopped.

The 28-year-old, whose pressure style gave Haye problems, agreed their dispute was over and pledged to honour their bet that the loser would donate 20,000 from their purse to the charity of the winner's choice, in this case the Afro-Caribbean Leukaemia Trust.

'The beef is over for me as well….now we can eat in the same restaurants and go in the same clubs. After the fight we made up,' Chisora said.

'It was a great fight and everything is done. Now I'm 20,000 down, but a bet is a bet.

All's well that ends well: Haye and Chisora were all smiles at the end of their grudge fight

All's well that ends well: Haye and Chisora were all smiles at the end of their grudge fight

'I enjoyed the fight, it was a great fight and both of us came to fight. I drew the short straw.'

Frank Warren, Chisora's manager, agreed the reputation of boxing had been restored by events at Upton Park.

'Boxing has redeemed itself and there was respect shown by both boxers after the fight,' he said.

'These guys are fighters and it was important to let them do what boxers do – sort their problems out in the ring.

'The atmosphere was fantastic, the crowd went home happy and this was a great night for British boxing.'

David Haye v Dereck Chisora: British boxing will be damaged

Panto villains will do untold damage as Haye and Chisora finally meet in the ring

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UPDATED:

21:31 GMT, 13 July 2012

Bring out the freaks and take away the fence. At a football ground in east London, a salesman with a granite chin will be sweating on David Haye and Dereck Chisora delivering a pantomime that somehow justifies all the commotion that went into making it happen.

If Frank Warren does a good job of filling Upton Park – 30,000 tickets had been sold as of Friday night for a ground capable of holding 40,000 – then the promoter who has done so much for British boxing will have all the vindication he believes is necessary for a fight with serious ramifications for the sport in this country.

‘People want to see this fight,’ has been his mantra from the start. He said it again this week, in between claims from Haye that he will be ‘judge, jury and executioner’ of a man he says has not been sufficiently punished in the law courts for ‘beating up his ex girlfriend and other transgressions’.

Keep your distance: David Haye (left) and Dereck Chisora weigh in

Keep your distance: David Haye (left) and Dereck Chisora weigh in

Enlarge

David Haye v Dereck Chisora

For his part, Chisora, curiously, has been saying he wants to ‘cut David’s hair off’. In the world of boxing, where spite sells and trash talk needs constant escalation, this grudge match is off the chart for a 10-rounder that is being billed as a bout for the ‘WBA and WBO international titles’. So are the purses, with Haye understood to be pocketing around 2.5million and Chisora at least half a million.

But for Warren, who is not the show’s official promoter but has put his fingerprints all over it, ticket sales, subscriptions to the BoxNation television channel and the likelihood of a dramatic fight surely cannot justify the means.

Civil war has raged in British boxing since it was announced on May 8 that Chisora and Haye will finish in London what they shamefully started with a brawl at a press conference in Munich in February.

Trim: Haye weighed in at 210lbs, 37lbs lighter than his opponent Chisora

Trim: Haye weighed in at 210lbs, 37lbs lighter than his opponent Chisora

Trim: Haye weighed in at 210lbs, 37lbs lighter than his opponent Chisora

The fact that neither was licensed to fight in this country – Haye’s having been relinquished when he retired in 2011 and Chisora’s withdrawn by the British Boxing Board of Control for that brawl – was sidestepped by the unearthing of Luxembourg’s boxing federation and their willingness to sanction the bout. The ingenuity of those involved is regrettably impressive.

Of course, there’s nothing illegal about this fight, but the morality of navigating around the BBBC’s punishment and profiting from such an appalling scrap is vulnerable to serious questioning. Sportsmail has raised several and Warren has not liked it one bit.

The consequences of this match When the legal threats stop bouncing between Warren, the BBBC and Luxembourg we will have a clearer idea.

But the days of having one organisation – albeit a flawed one – running all meaningful professional boxing in this country seem numbered. In an already fragmented sport that is not a good thing.

The punch that stated it all: Haye (right) brawled with Chisora in Munich

The punch that stated it all: Haye (right) brawled with Chisora in Munich

‘Forget the politics,’ Haye said after the announcement. That will be hard if future BBBC punishments hold no water and there is, for argument’s sake, a Luxembourg Boxing Federation British champion in each division.

The fight itself is actually intriguing. Chisora is a far more accomplished heavyweight than he is given credit for, as he showed in taking Vitali Klitschko the distance on the night it all kicked off in February.

He weighed in on Thursday more than two stones heavier than Haye, who at 210lbs, is at his lightest since he was the unified champion of the cruiserweights.

‘Chisora can only fight one way and that is to come forward,’ Haye said on Wednesday. ‘I hope for his sake that he tries something new because when he does what I think he will do he will walk on to something huge.’

Previous: Chisora impressed against Vitali Klitschko in their title fight

Previous: Chisora impressed against Vitali Klitschko in their title fight

Chisora certainly has the authentic heavyweight power to hurt Haye if – and it’ s a big if – he proves he has the craft to get up close, but punch resistance was one of the few areas in which Haye took credit from his retirement-inducing defeat to Wladimir Klitschko last year.

His trainer, Adam Booth, said: ‘In the sixth, there was a shot that Wladimir put all his weight into, got a full shoulder turn and got his weight on to the front leg – the shot I was worried about – and he took it fine. David is not chinny.’

Haye’s movement should be the deciding factor, enabling him to evade Chisora’s attacks before advancing on the likely openings. ‘This fight will be won by knock out,’ Haye said.

Let’s hope so, whichever way it goes. They have agreed a bet whereby a knockout victim has to make a 20,000 donation to the other’s charity. At least then something positive can come from all this.

David Haye vows to KO Dereck Chisora early on at Upton Park

'Crazy' Chisora issues warning after Haye vows to end grudge fight with early KO

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UPDATED:

14:24 GMT, 11 July 2012

Dereck Chisora has responded to David Haye's prediction of an early end to their grudge match by declaring he would be the 'craziest' ever in the ring.

The British rivals, separated by a steel fence and flanked by security guards, came head to head in the final press conference before Saturday's showdown at Upton Park.

Screen test: David Haye (left) Dereck Chisora are kept apart (again)

Screen test: David Haye (left) Dereck Chisora are kept apart (again)

Screen test: David Haye (left) Dereck Chisora are kept apart (again)

The disgraceful scenes in Munich were universally condemned, but they have been given the chance to settle their differences in the ring.

'Dereck's getting knocked out quick. The harder he comes the quicker he gets KO'd,' Haye said.

'My training has been good. I'm healthy, fit and fast.

Haye opened hostilities by declaring
he would knock out Chisora in the opening rounds, but his opponent
insisted he would fight fire with fire.

'I'm going to be the craziest I've been when I come into the ring,' he said.

Wind up: Haye mocks Chisora

All smiles: Haye didn't appear worried by the threat

Wind up: Haye mocks Chisora

Wind up: Haye mocks Chisora

'Everything has gone well for me, I have no injuries and it's going to be a great fight.'

Haye and Chisora traded blows at a press conference in the aftermath of Chisora's loss to Vitali Klitschko in February.

'This training camp has been one of the first I've been able to do everything we planned because nothing has broken down.

'It's a situation I've never been in before and I can feel the difference.

'My sparring partners have felt the difference as well. Unfortunately for Dereck he's fighting the best ever Hayemaker.'

Puerto Rican Luis Pabon has been confirmed as the referee for the fight.

Dereck Chisora plays down punch-up with trainer

Chisora denies showdown with Haye is in jeopardy after bust-up with trainer Charles

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UPDATED:

09:10 GMT, 29 June 2012

Dereck Chisora has played down his punch-up with trainer Don Charles – and insists he remains on course to fight David Haye.

Sportsmail reported on Thursday that the pair came to blows after the 28-year-old heavyweight asked Charles to remove his head gear.

Charles, who has worked with the fighter for a decade, accused Chisora of lacking respect, but the two have apparently reconciled and are working towards the common goal of defeating Haye at Upton Park in a bout sanctioned by the Luxembourg Boxing Federation after the British Boxing Board of Control refused to ratify the bout.

Friends again: Dereck Chisora (left) had a bust-up with coach Don Charles

Friends again: Dereck Chisora (left) had a bust-up with coach Don Charles

Chisora said: 'This has been made out to be a big deal because people don't see what goes on behind the gym doors.

'We are always arguing and rowing ahead of fights, it's nothing new. When a fight as big as this against Haye is coming up, tensions are going to be high because it means everything to me to win.

'We were both cool again soon after and now we're focused on beating Haye.'

Charles compared the incident to Sir Alex Ferguson and David Beckham's bust-up 10 years ago, where the Manchester United manager is alleged to have kicked a football boot which struck the midfielder in the head.

Showdown: Chisora will fight David Haye at Upton Park next month

Showdown: Chisora will fight David Haye at Upton Park next month

'What's happened has happened and we've moved on from it now,' said Charles.

'You see incidents like this in other sports when passions are running high like Alex Ferguson and David Beckham a few years ago. I want Dereck to win the fight as there is so much at stake and that is our primary aim.'

Haye and Chisora meet in the culmination of a feud that has been running since February when the pair brawled in Munich at a press conference which followed Chisora's WBC world title loss to Vitali Klitschko.

Dereck Chisora hit by own coach Don Charles before David Haye fight

Now Chisora is attacked by his OWN coach as grudge fight with Haye is plunged into fresh crisis

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UPDATED:

10:40 GMT, 28 June 2012

Dereck Chisora’s preparations for his heavyweight grudge fight with David Haye are in disarray after he was attacked by his own coach.

The 28-year-old Londoner will settle his differences with Haye at Upton Park on July 14, four months after the pair came to blows at a press conference in Munich.

But Chisora may have to complete his training without long-term mentor Don Charles who revealed he lashed out after his fighter asked him to remove his headgear.

Bust up: Dereck Chisora was attacked by his coach Don Charles

Bust up: Dereck Chisora was attacked by his coach Don Charles

The fight, which will be watched by a bumper crowd at the home of West Ham, has been beset by problems since it was announced.

Neither Chisora nor Haye are licensed by the British Boxing Board of Control (BBBC) which led to the Luxembourg Boxing Federation stepping in.

The BBBC responded by threatening to expel anyone involved in the controversial fight which led to several fighters opting not to appear on the undercard.

The main support bout, Alexander Povetkin’s WBA world heavyweight title defence against Hasim Rahman, will instead take place in Germany due to TV scheduling issues.

Charles was also involved in the infamous brawl in February after Chisora lost his world title fight to Vitali Klitschko.

At one stage Haye swung a camera
tripod violently at the coach after trading blows
with him.

‘I won’t go into
the details as to why he wanted his head gear off,’ Charles told
BoxNation. ‘There’s a way to tell someone something and it’s called
respect.

Head to head: Chisora (right) and David Haye will fight next month

Head to head: Chisora (right) and David Haye will fight next month

‘I’m not a nutter. He asked me to take his head gear off and I physically attacked him.

‘It’s the worst thing that’s happened since I’ve been with him and I’ve been with him for 10 years; I’m like a father to him.

‘There is no father around, he’s the man in his house so he finds it very hard to take instructions from another man. There is definitely a problem there.

‘I regret attacking him because you should never put your hands on someone but I’m a human being with emotions so don’t disrespect me.

‘I will not tolerate it. My mother and father don’t talk to me like that and certainly not someone I’ve helped for 10 years to become the boxer he is.’

With just over two weeks until the talking stops, Charles remains in the dark as to whether he will work with Chisora again.

‘I don’t know if we will rekindle it,’ he added. ‘He employs me to train him as does his manager [Frank Warren] so it’s up to them if I’m fired or not.’

Dereck Chisora takes dig at David Haye

Ain't toe stopping us now! Chisora takes dig at Haye ahead of summer showdown

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UPDATED:

17:08 GMT, 3 June 2012

Dereck Chisora took full advantage of a public workout to poke fun at his forthcoming heavyweight opponent David Haye.

The 28-year-old is preparing for the clash at Upton Park in July and wore a t-shirt with the slogan 'Ain't toe stopping us now', a clear reference to Haye's claims he suffered a broken toe before his world title fight against Wladimir Klitschko last summer.

Chisora's public show of confidence came on the same day that further doubt was cast over whether the fight will go ahead.

On track: Dereck Chisora took part in a public workout ahead of his heavyweight fight with David Haye

On track: Dereck Chisora took part in a public workout ahead of his heavyweight fight with David Haye

The European Boxing Union has taken steps to suspend the Luxembourg Boxing Federation which is due to sanction the fight.

But Frank Warren released a statement claiming the show will go on and that 28,000 tickets have already been sold for the July 14 date.

Take a bow: Chisora performed to a packed crowd as he gets in shape for the Upton Park showdown

Take a bow: Chisora performed to a packed crowd as he gets in shape for the Upton Park showdown

He said: 'The EBU vote [to suspend
the LBF] is not a fair reflection of the actual nations that voted on
this matter as the BBBofC has a far larger vote on EBU decisions than
any other country, because it represents more boxers than any other
country.

'That said, the vote was cast without
any consultation of the British licence holders that they are there to
represent. It may well be that the Federation takes steps against the
EBU, its lawyers have already written to the BBBofC to raise a complaint
and are looking at the options.'

Up close: Chisora will be the underdog when he takes to the ring against Haye in July

Up close: Chisora will be the underdog when he takes to the ring against Haye in July

WBC threaten strip Frank Warren"s licence if David Haye v Dereck Chisora goes ahead

We'll ban you! WBC threaten to revoke Warren's licence if Haye v Chisora goes ahead

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UPDATED:

12:45 GMT, 18 May 2012

The World Boxing Council has waded into the controversy surrounding the David Haye v Dereck Chisora fight, claiming they will remove licences from anyone involved in the bout, including Frank Warren.

The WBC suspended Chisora indefinitely for his behaviour before and after the fight with Vitali Klitschko in February, which was marred by an unsightly brawl with Haye in the post-fight press conference.

Chisora had his licence withdrawn and with Haye already technically retired and without a licence, both men went to the Luxembourg Boxing Federation to be sanctioned to fight.

Ugly: The WBC have waded into the controversial bout between Haye and Chisora

Ugly: The WBC have waded into the controversial bout between Haye and Chisora

'We will not condone such disgraceful behaviour (from Chisora),' said WBC president Jose Sulaiman. 'This boxer has no idea of what good behaviour is.'

Warren has written to boxing bosses seeking clarity over any possible consequences of his role in the forthcoming fight.

The British Boxing Board of Control have claimed that any licence holder involved in the bout – including the promoter, managers, seconds and other fighters – will be deemed to have broken the terms of their membership and be immediately stripped of it.

As Chisora's manager, Warren would fall into the category of those who could be punished by the BBBofC, so he has contacted their general secretary, Robert Smith, to challenge their stance.

Barred: Haye had retired while Chisora had his licence revoked.. but the pair are set to fight at West Ham's Upton Park

Barred: Haye had retired while Chisora had his licence revoked.. but the pair are set to fight at West Ham's Upton Park

Barred: Haye had retired while Chisora had his licence revoked.. but the pair are set to fight at West Ham's Upton Park

He has offered a number of reasons why he believes the validity of the fight or his role in it should not be called into question, and in his letter says: 'I require written confirmation that you will not seek to take away my licence if I remain Dereck Chisora's manager.'

He goes on to add: 'I write to make two complaints.

'The first is there are no substantive grounds to revoke my licence and the second is that you have not properly complied with any procedural requirements.

'Under rule 4.12 of your own Rules and Regulations, as a licence holder I can participate (a) in or be at a promotion which is licensed by the BBBofC; or (b) in or at a Promotion organised by a Federation, Commission, Association or Controlling Authority affiliated to, or recognised by the BBBofC.

Clarity: Warren has written to boxing chiefs

Clarity: Warren has written to boxing chiefs

'The Federation Luxembourgoise De Boxe is a Federation affiliated to and recognised by the Board. Both are affiliated to the EBU (European Boxing Union). As that Federation is sanctioning the Haye v Chisora fight, my participation is not a breach of your rules.'

Warren has claimed ticket sales in the region of 20,000 have already been reported for the bout which is scheduled to take place at Upton Park in east London on July 14.

David Haye v Dereck Chisora fight shows how shameful boxing has become: Patrick Collins

Finally, boxing shows how shameful it has become

PUBLISHED:

00:06 GMT, 13 May 2012

By
Patrick Collins

UPDATED:

00:08 GMT, 13 May 2012

Once upon a time, a sports writer interrupted the American boxing promoter Bob Arum when he was in full flow. ‘That’s what you’re telling us now, Bob’, he said. ‘But yesterday you said something quite different.’ Arum smiled, indulgently. ‘Yesterday, I was lying,’ he explained. They say that Arum himself now tells that tale with a theatrical chuckle, as if it were evidence of his lively sense of self-awareness.

Boxing has always been like that. People don’t really lie, they just do what they need to do to get through the day. Tomorrow, those needs may be different, so their story changes. Everybody understands, it’s the way their world works. Take, for instance, Frank Warren’s initial reaction to the squalid brawl in Munich involving Dereck Chisora and David Haye. He was asked if he would promote any potential bout between the two men. ‘I don’t feel I could do that,’ he said. ‘What happened … was barbaric and shouldn’t be allowed to happen.’

Three months later, and the promoter in all but name, he was trumpeting the prospect of a marginally more legitimate collision between the two barbarians: ‘I believe it will be a sell-out, a huge event,’ he said. ‘It is the biggest fight of the year.’

Preposterous spectacle: David Haye and Dereck Chisora announce their dust up at Upton Park

Preposterous spectacle: David Haye and Dereck Chisora announce their dust up at Upton Park

Warren’s own ‘official’ website makes a stirring case: ‘Clearly there is no love lost between the principals after “The Hayemaker” clubbed “Del Boy” with his bare fists at their infamous press conference dust-up … They are now accorded an opportunity to settle their score and, hopefully, showcase all that is great and noble about our sport, in an old fashioned dust-up with the mitts on.’

Risible claptrap, you may think. Tawdry opportunism cloaked in saccharine cliche. A couple of undisciplined thugs are not really profiting from their notoriety. No, they are being given their chance of redemption through ‘an old-fashioned dust-up’. It’s essentially an exercise in altruism.

Of course, we know it’s no such thing. For the old ways are dead. Over the past 20 years or so, boxing has become aware that it has no future as a serious sport. With one or two exceptions — a Mayweather here, a Pacquiao there — the well has run dry. And so, in the absence of genuine talent, it opts for a freak show. There are people out there — gormless, gullible and vaguely sadistic — who would pay good money to watch a witch burn or a bear baited. Why not treat them to a Saturday night score-settling scuffle between a couple of cobblestone brawlers The Sun can sponsor it and, if they’re asked nicely, then the porn barons who own West Ham will let it go on at Upton Park. Everybody earns.

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True, there are a few carping critics who
find the prospect grotesque and indefensible; lacking the subtlety of
pantomime or the sophistication of mud-wrestling. But their objections
go unheeded, as Haye promises to inflict a ‘slow, concussive beating’
upon the man who once promised variously to ‘shoot’ and ‘physically
burn’ him.

Already,
the exercise has acquired curious overtones of high camp. The press
conference gave us a seven-foot fence to keep the monsters apart and a
brooding chorus line of dark-clad bouncers, hired to ooze muscle and
menace. But the real naffness will be reserved for the big night when
the beautiful people will come out to preen. I’m imagining a ringside
adorned with thespians from The Only Way Is Essex,
a perma-tanned posse of football agents, a pulchritude of Page Three
stunners, and does anyone know what Jim Davidson’s up to these days
All, we may be sure, in the best possible taste.

The
poor old British Boxing Board of Control have, quite properly,
threatened to ban any of their licence-holders involved in the
proceedings. This may make it difficult to find a referee. I understand
that Jeremy Kyle has made himself available. Yet, as things stand, it
goes ahead. History is hilariously rewritten. Why, Haye’s manager Adam
Booth, a man of unbounded comic potential, has been criticising coverage
of the Munich fracas: ‘The way it was handled by the press was quite
aggressive’.

Comical: Frank Warren (left) and Adam Booth share a moment at the Boleyn Ground

Comical: Frank Warren (left) and Adam Booth share a moment at the Boleyn Ground

No official
objections have been made on grounds of possible breaches of public
order. Hugh Robertson, the Minister for Sport, was apparently quite
shocked by the initial brawl. He described it as ‘a disgrace …
completely unacceptable,’ and added: ‘If there is any suggestion that
this is a commercial ploy to push up ratings and interest in a
subsequent fight, it only strengthens the argument for the BBBC to take
robust action’. Last week, Robertson was silent.

And
so, as the world arrives in London to celebrate the Olympic summer, it
will find David Haye and Dereck Chisora ‘showcasing all that is great
and noble about our sport’. Revulsion seems the only appropriate
reaction.

Fergie still game for the fight

The old champion is trapped on the ropes, soaking up the punishment and fearing the final bell. His cause may be hopeless but still he finds the nerve to fling desperate blows. And so, on the eve of the final game of a frustrating season, Sir Alex Ferguson seeks to sow a few doubts.

‘City have got to win [at home to QPR] but it’s an enormous challenge for them because the disappointment of losing the game would be unbelievable. It’s untold at this moment in time what effect it could have on them,’ he says. Then, aware he could do better than that, he adds: ‘A nervous situation could arise if, with 10 or 15 minutes to go, City aren’t winning. The crowd could get a bit uneasy.’

A fight to the death: Sir Alex Ferguson will ensure City are not handed the title

A fight to the death: Sir Alex Ferguson will ensure City are not handed the title

Whatever your views about Ferguson, and he is not a man who attracts unconditional affection, you could never doubt his appetite for the battle. It is that implacable spirit which has sustained him through his turbulent career.

Manchester United may well lose their title today. But be sure that the old champ will go down fighting.

No prizes for guessing the real Premier winners
Heady mix: Richard Scudamore

Heady mix: Richard Scudamore

English football was invented in 1992. There were a few matches before then but they were monochrome affairs contested by paupers on muddy pitches. Then along came the Premier League and out came the sun.

It is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a series of awards. By the happiest coincidence, 2011-12 has been voted the best season ever. Why, the chief executive Richard Scudamore described it as ‘a wonderful cocktail’.

Most awards were conventional but the one which caught the eye is that for Best Goal Celebration.

This is the process by which professional footballers spend hours on the training field practising routines which would look gauche at a primary school disco. Nothing could be more Premier League. Yet surely there are alternatives Why not some recognition for the Richest Agent or the Dodgiest Transfer Deal (perhaps a joint award) Or the Owner with the Worst Human Rights Record (casting vote to Amnesty International) Or even the Owner with the Most Mysterious Fortune (former Portsmouth officials need not apply)

These prizes would reflect the complex nature of a beloved institution.

I must suggest them to Scudamore next time we meet for cocktails.

PS

While Kenny Dalglish concludes a series of graceless press conferences with an insipid defence of his season’s stewardship, Liverpool part company with Ian Cotton, their head of communications.

I am reminded of an old BBC axiom: ‘This is a crisis! Deputy heads must roll!’