Tag Archives: depression

Newcastle"s Yohan Cabaye talks about his battle with depression

Cabaye reveals battle with depression and how words from Wilkinson and Nadal helped him bounce back

. It was then depression caught up with him.

Cabaye told L’Equipe: ‘Depression I am not afraid to say that. It was that.

Back to his best: Yohan Cabaye has struggled to recapture his brilliant first year, until now

Back to his best: Yohan Cabaye has struggled to recapture his brilliant first year, until now

‘I was reassured reading the books of Jonny Wilkinson and Rafael Nadal, who both talked about the same thing. They talked about post competition depression and the need to have a break.

‘Euro 2012 was the first big international competition I had played. It is completely different than what you could experience in daily life with your club.

‘My season was long in a league where the pace is higher than in Le Championnat. I started with Newcastle early in July 2011 and finished late in June 2012 and, for the very first time, I didn’t have any winter break so then to resume in July 2012, it was very difficult.

Fatigue: Cabaye suffered the effects of the domestic season when he joined up with France for Euro 2012

Fatigue: Cabaye suffered the effects of the domestic season when he joined up with France for Euro 2012

'Maybe it is difficult to start again after a big competition such as the Euros, but my body didn’t allow me to do what I wanted to do.

‘On a morning when I woke up, I could still feel tiredness. I wanted to think about something else rather than football.’

Cabaye believes that rather than a curse, his groin injury at the end of last year helped reignite his time at Newcastle.

‘I am lucky to earn a living with my passion, but it was the right moment for a break. So my groin injury at the end of the year was finally not such a bad thing. Maybe that is why I was back earlier than expected.

Help: Books by Jonny Wilkinson and Rafael Nadal helped Cabaye combat his depression

Help: Books by Jonny Wilkinson and Rafael Nadal helped Cabaye combat his depression

Help: Books by Jonny Wilkinson and Rafael Nadal helped Cabaye combat his depression

‘I asked myself a lot of questions. As long as you didn’t experience it (depression) you cannot understand. But I was not worried.

‘My injury allowed me to have some rest, meet my family and friends in Lille. When I was back in Newcastle in December I knew I felt better.’

Ian Thorpe on his depression and suicidal thoughts

Depression and thoughts of suicide: Swimming legend Thorpe opens up about troubles

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UPDATED:

00:27 GMT, 14 November 2012

Australian five-time Olympic champion Ian Thorpe has revealed more about his fight against depression and thoughts of suicide which plagued his record-breaking career.

In a revealing interview on BBC Radio 5 Live the 30-year-old opened up about his troubles away from the pool that led him to consider taking his own life.

Amongst his revelations Thorpe said he had been treated for depression since he was a teenager and that it had led him to drink during the night in the lead-up to the 2004 Athens Olympics.

Revealing: Five-time Olympic swimming gold medallist Australia's Ian Thorpe explained more about his depression

Revealing: Five-time Olympic swimming gold medallist Australia's Ian Thorpe explained more about his depression

He also recounted that he had been too 'embarrassed' to tell even his family about the disease until this year.

While Thorpe believes he has now learned to control the problem enough to speak about it publicly – he has also released an autobiography entitled 'This Is Me' – he admitted there were 'still times that are really tough for me'.

'I realised that I had desperation early. I was having treatment for desperation when I was a teenager,' he said.

'Depression comes in bouts. You can feel okay most days and then just get hit with it. I experienced that through what was mostly a very successful swimming career.

Autobiography: This is me

Autobiography: This is me

For sale: Thorpe has had his autobiography published, pictured right

'I have struggled with it before but I feel like I am on the other side of it. There are still times that are really tough for me, but I feel as though I know enough about it.

'There's no way that I'll ever say that I'm cured because I know where I can go back to.

'It's the first time that I've been comfortable talking about it because I feel as though I have some sort of control.'

Asked whether he had ever contemplated suicide during a glittering career that also saw him claim 11 world titles, he added: 'Yeah, I wouldn't talk about it otherwise. It's not something that is a throw-away line.

Admission: Thorpe said he had thought about suicide

Admission: Thorpe said he had thought about suicide

'I actually think it's quite normal
for people to consider what it would be like to commit suicide. I think
it is a normal thing to think 'what would that feel like, would it be so
terrible'

'But usually that's all you think
about, that's it. When you go through what the process of what it would
be like and it becomes and obsession in your mind where all rational
thought is devoid in that situation you realise that this has gone
beyond just a thought.

'When you are trying to get it out of
your mind rationally and you can't. To consider it as being a rational
solution to the way you are feeling you realise this is a problem, that
this isn't just a fleeting thought or feeling.

'This is a very clear guideline that
you do need more help and that you're not in control of your life and
that the irrational thought has taken over.'

Popular: Thorpe is one of Australia's most recognised sports people

Popular: Thorpe is one of Australia's most recognised sports people

Disguise: Thorpe felt he could hide the truth from his colleagues

Disguise: Thorpe felt he could hide the truth from his colleagues

Thorpe revealed that a key moment in
his recovery was realising the extent of his problems in the lead up to
the 2004 Olympics, when he was drinking to avoid his demons.

He said: 'Leading up to Athens Olympics I was actually drinking in the night to try and avoid be depressed.

'Everyone knows that doesn't work.
It's a stupid thing to do and so you wake up the next morning, have a
hangover and you are more depressed than you were the day before.

'I was fortunate that I woke up to
this. I needed to seek more treatment. It's not that I got over it –
there is no way of getting over this – it was that I have a little bit
more control over my depression.'

Winner: Thorpe shows his gold medal after winning the 400m freestyle at the Olympic Games in Athens, Greece

Winner: Thorpe shows his gold medal after winning the 400m freestyle at the Olympic Games in Athens, Greece

Thorpe made an unsuccessful attempt to qualify for the London Olympics after coming out of a four-year retirement in late 2010.

Despite that failure he revealed he
still harboured ambitions to compete at Rio in four years and that he
would look to add to his Commonwealth titles in Glasgow in two years.

'I'm going to work in two-year cycles.
I'm looking to swim until the Commonwealth Games and then make a call
on whether to swim through until the Olympics after that,' he said.

'Starting out when I came back I knew the odds were stacked against me (to qualify for the Olympics).

'I thought it was 50-50. Realistically I thought it would take three years to get back.'

Ronnie O"Sullivan speaks out about snooker quit threat

Take me out of snooker and I couldn't do life: O'Sullivan speaks out about quit threat

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UPDATED:

12:33 GMT, 7 November 2012

Ronnie O’Sullivan has hinted his sabbatical from snooker could mean 'the chapter’s over'.

O’Sullivan announced on Tuesday that he will not compete again this season, a move attributed by his manager Django Fung to 'Ronnie's own personal problems, his health, travelling, children, family and so on' and one which casts doubt on whether he will be seen on the tour again.

On a break: Ronnie O'Sullivan is on the verge of quitting snooker after pulling out of the rest of the season

On a break: Ronnie O'Sullivan is on the verge of quitting snooker after pulling out of the rest of the season

On a break: Ronnie O'Sullivan (left) is on the verge of quitting snooker after pulling out of the rest of the season
SPEAKING OUT ABOUT DEPRESSION

Rugby star Toby Flood: 'It made me ask myself if it was something I really wanted to do. I was very disillusioned. I wasn't enjoying my rugby, my form dipped and, looking back, it was pretty scary.'

Boxer Ricky Hatton: 'I was near to a nervous breakdown, depression, suicidal. Most mornings my girlfriend would have to come downstairs and take a knife out of my hand. I had a knife at my wrists, I was in a really bad way, just hysterically crying for no reason.

Everton striker Victor Anichebe: 'There were plenty of times when I was at a low ebb. To come back after 12 months, get injured again, and then again, I began to ask whether it was worth it. It's hard for people to know what really understand what it is like being injured. It is not just physical, it is mental too.'

Golfer Paul Lawrie: 'I had no energy and didn't want to play or practise. I couldn't get out of bed. I didn't want to be with the kids. I didn't even want to see them. I went through tablets without feeling any more positive. I'd just lie on the couch and watch television.'

Cricketter Tim Ambrose: 'I was awake 24 hours a day, with things going around in my head' he said. 'I was beyond miserable. It felt like I had this duvet that was soaking wet wrapped around me, and I couldn't get it off.'

And speaking on Ronnie O'Sullivan:
Sports Life Stories, a pre-recorded documentary broadcast on ITV4, the
four-time world champion gave an insight into the emotional difficulties
he has suffered during his career.

'The most important thing, the
biggest love of my life, is my snooker,' he said. 'I've never been so
emotionally ingrained in something – in a person, an object, anything –
as I have in snooker.

'I don’t think I suffered with
depression, I don’t think I’m a depressed type of person – I just think I
suffered a depression to do with snooker, and I just couldn’t handle
it.

'I could go out and play, but take me
out of there and I couldn’t do life.

'It was a nightmare, my life just
felt like a bit of a nightmare.'

The problems came to a head in 2001, ahead of his first World Championship win.

'A week before that World
Championship, I was down the doctor's,' he said. 'Then I was in my room
in Sheffield and they said “can you do a radio interview” I felt so
brittle – I said yes, but I thought “how am I going to get through this,
and not let them know that I'm suffering”

'I was blabbering on, spurting words
out, and it was live but I just said, “do you know what, I ain’t feeling
too good. I’m suffering here, talking to you – I’m struggling”.

'I just thought, ‘I can’t hide any more’. I felt like I was going insane.'

No return O'Sullivan has taken several breaks from snooker throughout his career

No return O'Sullivan has taken several breaks from snooker throughout his career

Troubled: O'Sullivan

Troubled: O'Sullivan

The 36-year-old’s career has been peppered with regular threats to retire in recent years, but
O’Sullivan admitted he was driven to continue by the pride of his
father, who remained a key influence on his son’s career even while
spending 17 years in prison for murder.

'I talked about letting go of it but I
just couldn’t do it, I couldn’t walk away because I hadn’t achieved
what I wanted to,' O’Sullivan said. 'I knew if I stopped the snooker, a
lot of my demons would be gone, but I couldn’t walk away.

'My dad said “every time I see you on
the telly, it’s like a visit”. And he had 10 years left, so I had to
play for at least another 10 years. I wanted to walk away, but there was
that pressure there of trying to do the right thing for somebody else.'

Reflecting on a career which has
brought him four UK and four World Championships among 24 ranking
titles, he said: 'I’ve got through it – that’s all I’ve done really.

'All right, I've been successful –
I’ve ticked the boxes, I’ve won the world titles, won this, won that,
become a multiple world champion.'

The most recent of those came in May
of this year and, recalling the win and the emotional celebrations with
his son Ronnie Jr, he said: 'For me that’s like the final chapter. I’ve
done what I’ve had to do. I don’t have to prove myself any more.

'The more they doubt me, the more
it’ll make me want to come back and prove them wrong again, and I don’t
want to have to go through it again. I’ve done it. The chapter’s over.'

Ronnie O"Sullivan could quit snooker after pulling out of season

Are you serious this time, Ronnie O'Sullivan on verge of quitting snooker (again) after taking extended break

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UPDATED:

14:06 GMT, 6 November 2012

Ronnie O'Sullivan will not defend his world title next year after pulling out the rest of the snooker season – casting serious doubt over whether he will compete again.

The 36-year-old's career has been dogged by controversy and personal problems and it is believed a recurrence of his depression is a contributing factor to his decision.

O'Sullivan has repeatedly threatened to quit the sport and recently pulled out of The International Championship in China on medical grounds.

On a break: Ronnie O'Sullivan (left) is on the verge of quitting snooker after pulling out of the rest of the season

On a break: Ronnie O'Sullivan (left) is on the verge of quitting snooker after pulling out of the rest of the season

O'Sullivan's previous threats to quit

2005 – Said he would play truncated season

2010 – Row over 147 led to quit threat at World Open

2011 –

March – Hinted at retirement after China Open

December – Considered calling it a day after UK Championships

2012

April – Said World Championship could be his last

World Snooker Chairman Barry Hearn said: 'I have spoken to Ronnie and he has decided to withdraw from any events he has entered, and he will not be playing for the rest of this season. He has some personal issues which he needs to resolve and we wish him all the best for the future.'

The reigning world champion has slumped down the rankings to No 20, the first time he has been outside of the elite top 16 since entering it in the 1994/95 season.

In June, O'Sullivan refused to sign to sign the official players' contract, complaining that he did not want to be tied down at this stage of his career.

He relented two months later and returned to action at the Players Tour Championship in September where he was beaten by little-known Simon Bedford.

O'Sullivan has also come under fire from new world No 1 Judd Trump who claimed 'The Rocket' is no longer snooker's main man.

No return O'Sullivan has taken several breaks from snooker throughout his career

No return O'Sullivan has taken several breaks from snooker throughout his career

O'Sullivan has also come under fire from new world No 1 Judd Trump who claimed 'The Rocket' is no longer snooker's main man.

'I don’t think there is one main man any more in snooker as there was with Ronnie going back a few years,' Trump said. 'Anyone in the top 40 is good enough to win tournaments.

'There are too many good players — Neil Robertson, Ding Junhui, Mark Allen and many others.

'Even when Ronnie was at his best he wouldn’t have won anywhere near the titles he has in today’s game. The standard is so high these days.'

Ricky Hatton reveals how close he came to suicide

Hatton: I came so close to suicide that my girlfriend prised a knife from my hand

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UPDATED:

12:30 GMT, 28 October 2012

Ricky Hatton has revealed just how close he came to committing suicide following during his three-year retirement from boxing.

The 34-year-old said his girlfriend often had to prise a knife from his hand as depression took its toll on his life.

Hatton, who has had had well-publicised battles with drink, drugs and depression after his loss to Manny Pacquiao in his last fight since May 2009, will return to the ring against Ukraine's Vyacheslav Senchenko next month.

Back again: Ricky Hatton will return to the ring on November 24 in Manchester

Back again: Ricky Hatton will return to the ring on November 24 in Manchester

He told Radio Five Live's Sportsweek programme: 'I was near to a nervous breakdown, depression, suicidal. Most mornings my girlfriend would have to come downstairs and take a knife out of my hand. I had a knife at my wrists, I was in a really bad way, just hysterically crying for no reason.

'I've always liked a little bit of a drink, but my drinking had gone way off the Richter scale, I was having blackouts.

'And even if I was stone cold sober I was trying to kill myself. The real lowest point was when my little girl came along, who is one-year-old now. [Hatton's son] Campbell had the misfortune to see his dad in such a bad way, I am not going to do it any more to my kids and I'm not going to put my family though it any more.'

Hatton claims his life now is 'really rosy', but admitted in his eyes he was returning to the ring 'ashamed' and as a 'failure'.

Old days: Hatton enjoyed a drink or two

Old days: Hatton enjoyed a drink or two

'I feel sad because I feel ashamed of
myself,' he said. 'It doesn't matter how many people say, “Ricky,
everyone has problems and you got beaten my (Floyd) Mayweather (Jr) and
Pacquiao who are the two best fighters of our generation, you did the
country proud”.

'That's very kind of people to say, but they don't have to deal with this little fella who sits on my shoulder every day telling me that I'm a failure and I've let my family and my fans down and British sport, British boxing down.

'I feel a failure and it doesn't matter how many people say, “Don't be too hard on yourself”, that's how I feel and that's how I'm coming back. I feel I've got to redeem myself.

'It's more than a boxing match for me. For me everything I've done in my career, all the world titles and great wins have all been for nothing. That's how I feel.

'I feel I have to come back and redeem myself as a man to my fans, my family, my friends, loved ones, just the whole of British sport to be honest. Because it doesn't mater how many people say it to me, I feel like I've let everyone own. I've got to put the demon and those ghosts to rest.'

Hatton said he had thought about how he would handle a defeat against Senchenko on November 24, saying: 'I would rather get flattened again so I could look at myself in the mirror and say, “You know what Ricky, you gave it your best shot”. Whether I win, lose or draw, I've already won from where I came in.”

'I want people to look at me as a
four-time world champion, man of the people and not look at me as this
joke I feel I've become.'

Knocked out: Hatton was last in action when losing to Manny Pacquiao

Knocked out: Hatton was last in action when losing to Manny Pacquiao

Hatton said his current weight of 11 stone two pounds was 'music to his ears” one month out from a fight at which he must be 10st 7lbs.

He revealed during retirement he ballooned to 14st 10lbs.

'For 5ft 6in in height that's nothing short of heart attack material,' he said.

Hatton also claimed he would surprise the doubters in the ring.

'The way I'm performing in the gym I think everyone is going to be shocked at the Ricky Hatton that comes back,' he said.

Ian Thorpe suffered crippling depression through career

Swimming legend Thorpe afflicted by 'crippling depression' through career

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UPDATED:

08:37 GMT, 13 October 2012

Australian swimming great Ian Thorpe has opened up about living with 'crippling depression' throughout his career.

In excerpts from an upcoming biography, the five-time Olympic champion has revealed the illness was so bad at times he thought of suicide.

The 30-year-old said there were times in his life that made him 'shudder' at what he might have done as he planned potential places to end his life, although he was quick to add he is still uncertain whether he could have gone through with it.

Admission: Ian Thorpe says he has suffered from depression

Admission: Ian Thorpe says he has suffered from depression

And Thorpe – one of Australia's most recognised sports people – also revealed that at some of the worst times he turned to alcohol in a bid to quell the thoughts running about his head.

'It was the only way I could get to sleep,' revealed Thorpe in an extract from his upcoming book This Is Me: The Autobiography.

'It didn't happen every night, but there were numerous occasions, particularly between 2002 and 2004 as I trained to defend my Olympic titles in Athens, that I abused myself this way – always alone and in a mist of disgrace.'

Thorpe said he was able to hide the effects of alcohol from team-mates and coaches and continued to enjoy one of the best periods of his career, despite his private battle with depression.

Disguise: Thorpe felt he could hide the truth from his colleagues

Disguise: Thorpe felt he could hide the truth from his colleagues

The swimmer said he also felt the need to stay silent about his depression, thinking it was a 'character flaw'.

As a result he has never spoken about it to his parents.

'Not even my family is aware that I've spent a lot of my life battling what I can only describe as a crippling depression,' he wrote.

'Now I realise it's time to be open.

'I need to talk to them about it…I know how Mum will react; she'll cry and ask me why I didn't tell her and then she'll tell me how proud she is that I've finally talked about it.

'Dad is different. I'm not sure how he'll react. I know it'll take time for him to come to terms with it and how it fits in with his religious beliefs.

'I hope it does because family means a lot to me.'

Samba Diakite fighting depression

EXCLUSIVE: QPR ace Diakite returns home in fight against depression

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UPDATED:

22:49 GMT, 6 September 2012

Fight: Diakite has flown back to France

Fight: Diakite has flown back to France

Queens Park Rangers midfielder Samba Diakite has returned home to France to battle depression.

It is unclear what has triggered the problem, but Rangers will give the 23-year-old as much time he needs to recover.

The Mali man started QPR's first two Premier League matches but missed last weekend's clash against Manchester City without any explanation.

It is thought Diakite was given 10 days leave after the 1-1 draw at Norwich on August 25. However, 13 days after going to France, he is yet to return.

It is unclear whether Diakite will be available for the clash against Chelsea a week on Saturday.

QPR's club doctor has made regular trips across the channel to check on the midfielder, who is on a specially devised fitness regime in France.

Hughes made Diakite one of his first signings as manager in January – and he played a key role in the club's top-flight survival last season while on loan. QPR paid 3.5million for Diakite in the summer.

His case further highlights the problem of depression among footballers. The Professional Footballers' Association sent a booklet on how to handle the illness to their members last season.

Ricky Hatton prepares for November comeback

Hatton steps up training ahead of November comeback as Hitman eyes Malignaggi

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UPDATED:

08:55 GMT, 22 August 2012

Ricky Hatton is preparing for a ring return in November – three years after he was destroyed inside two rounds by Manny Pacquiao.

The 33-year-old former two-weight world champion announced his retirement last summer and struggled with a cocaine addiction, spiralling into depression.

Hatton has since recovered and established himself as a respected trainer and promoter but has always regretted the way his career ended on the canvas in Las Vegas.

Comeback: Ricky Hatton is reportedly set to return to the ring in November

Comeback: Ricky Hatton is reportedly set to return to the ring in November

Reports in the Daily Star suggest 'The Hitman' has lost 34lbs since returning to training and has set his sights on a rematch with WBA welterweight champion Paulie Malignaggi who he beat in 2008.

But that ambition is complicated by the fact that Malignaggi is scheduled to face Pablo Cesar Cano in New York on October 20.

But the American feels he has unfinished business with Hatton and is desperate to do himself justice second time round.

‘I’m hearing that Ricky Hatton is interested in a comeback and I’m hearing rumours that I’m the target of that comeback,' Malignaggi said last month.

‘I’ve had three rematches in my career and I’m 3-0 in those rematches.

‘In
our fight, he did very well. I’d like to think there are a lot of
things that I could have done better and I’d like to think that I’ve
made a lot of changes on my team that have really, really brought out
the best in me.

Bitter end: Hatton's career came to a shuddering halt against Manny Pacquiao

Bitter end: Hatton's career came to a shuddering halt against Manny Pacquiao

‘It’s a loss that I’ve had to live with. It’s a loss that hindered me and every day I think about that loss and it bothers me.

‘It’s unfortunate because I should have done much better.

‘The rematch is something that interests me. I have nothing but respect for Ricky, his fans and his family.

‘They were nothing but respectful to me during the entire promotion and I expect nothing less in the rematch.

‘I know that he wants to come back
and win a title to reclaim old glory but it’s my time now and I know I
can beat Ricky Hatton.’

Rematch: Hatton could face Paulie Malignaggi (left) for a second time

Rematch: Hatton could face Paulie Malignaggi (left) for a second time

That fight would form part of a two-fight deal which Hatton hopes will be promoted through his own company.

Should
he come through against Malignaggi, he could seek another showdown with
Pacquiao despite being floored three times against the Philippine in
2009.

Another option for Hatton could be Australian-based South African Lovemore Ndou.

The 41-year-old holds the WBF world welterweight title and said last week: 'Him (Hatton) and I have unfinished business.

'He chose to relinquish the (IBF world) title instead of fight me.'

Ndou drew with Hatton's brother Matthew in England in 2009 in a fight he was convinced he had won.

Student dodges jail over racist tweets to Stan Collymore

Student dodges jail over volley of racist abuse fired at pundit Collymore on Twitter

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UPDATED:

13:41 GMT, 21 March 2012

A law student who sent Stan Collymore a series of racist tweets has been spared jail.

Joshua Cryer, 21, admitted using the social networking site to bombard the football pundit with abuse in an attempt to 'snare a celebrity', a district judge at Newcastle Magistrates' Court heard.

Cryer told police he hoped to gain a reaction from Collymore, who is a broadcaster for talkSport, campaigns against racism and is a supporter of the Depression Alliance charity.

Walking free: Joshua Cryer, 21, leaves Newcastle Crown Court on Wednesday

Walking free: Joshua Cryer, 21, leaves Newcastle Crown Court on Wednesday

The Newcastle University student, who lives in the Jesmond area of the city, claimed his account had been hacked. He later admitted a charge under section 127 of the Communications Act of sending grossly offensive messages.

District Judge Stephen Earl ordered that he complete a two-year community order with 240 hours unpaid work, and pay 150 costs to the court.

Targeted: talkSPORT pundit Stan Collymore was the victim of the abuse

Targeted: talkSPORT pundit Stan Collymore was the victim of the abuse

Cryer, from Burnley, Lancashire, was arrested in January after Collymore, a former England striker, reported online abuse to Staffordshire Police and they passed the matter to their Northumbria Police counterparts.

Collymore, 41, originally from Cannock, Staffordshire, played for a string of top clubs, including Liverpool, Aston Villa and Nottingham Forest.

Following the sentence, Collymore posted on his Twitter account: 'Would like to thank Northumbria & Staffordshire Police for their professionalism in dealing with this case.'

Stan Collymore Twitter: Joshua Cryer denies racism charge

Law student denies charge of alleged racial abuse on Twitter to Collymore

A law student denied today that he racially abused former England striker Stan Collymore on Twitter.

Joshua Cryer, 21, of Newcastle upon Tyne, faced a public order charge following a complaint from the football pundit.

Cryer, a student at Newcastle University, appeared before city magistrates to deny sending messages that were 'grossly offensive'.

Making a stand: Collymore reported Cryer over alleged abusive Twitter messages

Making a stand: Collymore reported Cryer over alleged abusive Twitter messages

He gave his address to the court as Coal Clough Lane, Burnley, Lancashire.

The case will be heard on April 2 and
is expected to last two hours. The defence called for one specific
witness, unnamed in court, to attend on that day.

Cryer was arrested last month after
Collymore reported the alleged online abuse to Staffordshire Police and
they passed the matter to their Northumbria Police counterparts.

Collymore, 40, originally from
Staffordshire, played for a string of top clubs, including Liverpool,
Aston Villa and Nottingham Forest.

He works as a broadcaster for
talkSPORT and Channel 5, campaigns against racism and is a supporter of
the Depression Alliance charity.