Tag Archives: dance

Rio Ferdinand help charity girl on train after Twitter call

That's so tweet! Rio agrees to Twitter stunt to help out train passenger with her charity

By
John Drayton

PUBLISHED:

22:41 GMT, 9 January 2013

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UPDATED:

08:28 GMT, 10 January 2013

Premier League footballers are often given a hard time but Rio Ferdinand has shown that they can be a generous bunch.

The Manchester United defender was on a train when he was spotted by a girl, who then texted one of her friends.

That person tweeted Ferdinand to mention this – and the former England captain walked up to the girl on the carriage to introduce himself.

Helping out: Rio Ferdinand (left) showed his charitable side on the train

Helping out: Rio Ferdinand (left) showed his charitable side on the train

The woman runs the charity Dance Aid and Ferdinand offered to help her out with any promotion.

Eurosport journalist Tom Adams gave
an insight into the meeting: 'Housemate's girlfriend on train today and
spotted Rio Ferdinand was in her carriage. She texted her mate, who then
tweeted @rioferdy5 to tell him and ask if he could talk to her about
her charity.

'Girlfriend has no idea this
happened, looks up to see Rio sitting down opposite her, unprompted. He
then asks her all about the charity and agrees to do some work for
them.'

When asked if the story was true, 34-year-old Ferdinand tweeted: 'Yep, news travels fast on this Twitter! See if I can help out.'

On the up: Manchester United lead the way in the Premier League

On the up: Manchester United lead the way in the Premier League

Meanwhile, Ferdinand has been looking forward to Sunday's clash with fierce rivals Liverpool.

'A massive game coming up against Liverpool FC – we’ve got to make sure we beat them,' he said.

'They are a team we are big rivals with, loads of history and massive games and goals in the past.

'Hopefully, we can add some more to that and make sure we get the three points on Sunday. We’re confident, training and the focus starts to begin for this weekend. A huge game – make sure you’re behind us.'

Gangnam style: West Ham mascot in Psy tribute

Hey, sexy ladies! West Ham mascot rivals the Crystals and Sammy the Saint in battle for best Gangnam Style tribute

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UPDATED:

12:01 GMT, 10 December 2012

If the Crystal Palace cheerleaders' performance is anything to go by, Hammerhead and Sammy the Saint have a lot to live up to in their bid to deliver football’s finest version of global craze, Gangnam Style.

Korean pop singer Psy's popular dance routine has been impersonated by millions across the world since the smash hit’s release earlier this year.

And yesterday, West Ham took great pride in re-living the highlights of their robot 'superhero' mascot getting carried away in the act.

The Upton Park crowd were treated to a half-time airing of the mascot's dancing skills, which he first previewed during the win over Chelsea just over a week ago.

Hoping it would conjure the same inspiration for their victory over the Blues, the dance failed to deliver another famous win for the east London side, as Liverpool came from behind to celebrate a 3-2 win.

But Hammerhead is not the only Premier League mascot to get wrapped up in the fever.

Southampton's Sammy the Saint delighted the St Mary's faithful ahead of last month's 1-1 draw with Norwich with his take on the trend.

Neither come close to outpointing the Crystals. All together now: ‘Hey, sexy ladies’…

Kevin Pietersen dances Gangnam style on Indian cricket show

It's cricket 'Gangnam Style' as Pietersen tries to imitate Gayle on Indian television show

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UPDATED:

15:16 GMT, 8 October 2012

If anyone is wondering what Kevin Pietersen has been up while his England teammates crashed out of the World Twenty20 in Sri Lanka, then look no further.

While most television pundits offer a few half-formed soundbites to pass the time between the live action, KP has been busy reinventing the job description.

He was challenged to upstage West Indies big hitter Chris Gayle at his favourite dance move – the Gangnam style made famous by Korean rapper PSY.

Scroll down to watch the video

Smooth moves: Pietersen tries to imitate Chris Gayle by dancing Gangnam Style in a TV studio

Smooth moves: Pietersen tries to imitate Chris Gayle by dancing Gangnam Style in a TV studio

Yee-haw! KP goes for the rodeo part of the dance made famous by K-Pop artist PSY

Yee-haw! KP goes for the rodeo part of the dance made famous by K-Pop artist PSY

Gayle has made the thrusting hips, chicken elbows and rodeo arms of the dance craze his trademark on the cricket field as the West Indies stormed to victory in the tournament.

But KP, dressed in a sharp grey suit and shades, gave a pretty good imitation on ESPN-Star's Cricket Extra programme.

Pietersen, who has been re-admitted into the England team following his text message scandal with former captain Andrew Strauss, has been working as a pundit on the show.

Rhythm: Pietersen wins up to his grand Gangnam finale

Rhythm: Pietersen wins up to his grand Gangnam finale

Champion moves: Gayle performs the dance after the West Indies win the World Twenty20

Champion moves: Gayle performs the dance after the West Indies win the World Twenty20

But his moves didn't impress fellow analysts Sourav Ganguly and Wasim Akram, who both said Gayle had the better rhythm.

Gayle was the first to bring the Gangnam style, which has been the number one single in the UK and across Europe, to the cricket pitch.

In a recent interview, Gayle said: 'I saw the video a couple of months ago. When it came out, there was a lot of talk about it. That's how I got into it.

'It depends on what sort of mood I'm in. It's a good dance to be honest. I enjoy it. Everybody does.'

Now watch the video of KP dancing Gangnam Style

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England beaten by Wwst Indies in Super Eights

Gayle leads England a merry dance as Windies claim Super Eights victory

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UPDATED:

18:08 GMT, 27 September 2012

ICC World Twenty20 champions England
suffered a second successive setback as they began their Super Eight
campaign with a 15-run defeat against West Indies at Pallekele.

Eoin Morgan (71no) and Alex Hales
(68) did their best to rescue an unlikely victory, in pursuit of 179 for
five. But in the end, with 23 required off Marlon Samuels' final over,
England had left themselves with just too much to do.

West Indies' bowler Chris Gayle dances

West Indies' bowler Chris Gayle dances

Lord of the dance: Chris Gayle celebrates dismissal of England's Jonny Bairstow

Lord of the dance: Chris Gayle celebrates dismissal of England's Jos Buttler
England v West Indies

England: C Kieswetter (wkt), AD Hales, LJ Wright, EJG Morgan, JM Bairstow, JC Buttler, SR Patel, SCJ Broad (capt), GP Swann, ST Finn, JW Dernbach

West Indies: J Charles, CH Gayle, MN Samuels, DJ Bravo, KA Pollard, D Ramdin (wkt), AD Russell, DJG Sammy (capt), SP Narine, R Rampaul, S Badree

Umpires: S Davis (Aus) and A Rauf (Pak)

Third umpire: A Dar (Pak)

Match referee: J Srinath (Ind)

Click here to read the full scorecard

England wrote off their heaviest loss, and lowest total, in this sprint format against India in Colombo on Sunday as a blip.

On thursday night, there was a much better performance but more disappointment too after they fell short of a tough but achievable target with 164 for four on a decent pitch.

Johnson Charles (84) and Chris Gayle (58) both clubbed half-centuries, after West Indies won the toss; then England's reply suffered a telling initial stumble, before opener Hales and back-to-form Morgan kept them in the contest with a century stand and seven sixes between them.

England's bowlers already knew all about master blaster Gayle, but might have been a little more surprised by his opening partner Charles.

After a stand of 103, Gayle was first to go. But 23-year-old St Lucian Charles, without a century in any form of professional cricket, stayed the course to record his maiden Twenty20 international 50.

On the attacK: Gayle hits a four off England's Steven Finn

On the attacK: Gayle hits a four off England's Steven Finn

Safe hands: Finn takes a catch to dismiss West Indies' Chris Gayle

Safe hands: Finn takes a catch to dismiss West Indies' Chris Gayle

England, by contrast, began their reply
by losing two wickets for no runs in the first three balls to Ravi
Rampaul – and even though Hales responded with 50 containing five fours
and two sixes, and Morgan reached his half-century in a tournament
joint-record 25 balls, it was never going to be quite enough.

Charles had earlier hit 10 fours and three sixes, before mistiming another attempted big hit to long-on off Jade Dernbach.

Gayle predictably first signalled his intent with three fours in one over from Dernbach.

Up for it: West indies bowler Ravi Rampaul (centre) celebrates the dismisal of Craig Kieswetter

Up for it: West indies bowler Ravi Rampaul (centre) celebrates the dismisal of Craig Kieswetter

Impressive: Eoin Morgan plundered 71

Impressive: Eoin Morgan plundered 71

The powerplay yielded a near par 47, but without loss, and that proved to be a platform for the Windies openers to up the ante.

Gayle had one minor moment of fortune on 29 when a wrong-footed Morgan,
perhaps losing the ball in the bright floodlights, found himself
over-committed as the big left-hander pulled Samit Patel high to the
boundary.

The Irishman might have had a chance of holding an important catch, had
he been able to retreat to the fence, but instead saw the first of three
sixes in the over sail over his head.

Those three sixes and six fours took Gayle past 50 in only 29 balls, and the West Indies were in three figures in the 11th over.

Close call: Morgan makes his ground under pressure from Ravi Rampaul

Close call: Morgan makes his ground under pressure from Ravi Rampaul

Clean bowled: England's Alex Hales is dismissed by Marlon Samuel

Clean bowled: England's Alex Hales is dismissed by Marlon Samuel

England should have had a much-needed breakthrough when Steven Finn put down Charles on 39 off Graeme Swann at long-off.

But England would doubtless have swapped that for what happened off the
very next ball, Finn holding his nerve this time to cling on at long-on
and see the back of Gayle.

England celebrated appropriately, and soon had number three Samuels
cheaply too – caught at point by Morgan as Stuart Broad interrupted the
Windies' flow with a wicket-maiden.

Charles was still at large, but England recalled Finn early to test
Kieron Pollard with pace – a move that worked instantly, as the big
hitter skied a catch to the cover boundary from the first ball of the
over to go for just a single.

Watching brief: The England dug out

Watching brief: The England dug out

The openers apart, only Dwayne Bravo and Andre Russell managed
double-figures – and their last-over assault on Dernbach helped to
produce 15 runs, to make the Windies marginal favourites at the
interval.

Three balls after it, their position had strengthened somewhat.

Rampaul's double-wicket maiden saw Craig Kieswetter lob a short ball to
cover for a second-ball duck, and Luke Wright edge some extra bounce to
slip to put the seamer on a hat-trick.

Jonny Bairstow, promoted ahead of Morgan, survived that early crisis.

Hales escaped a 'double-play' on 31 – when he should have been stumped
off Samuel Badree, and then run out had a direct hit come in from short
fine-leg as he stole a bye.

Bairstow's innings was a particular struggle, ending when he finally hit
one well enough down the ground off Gayle but was very well-caught by
Pollard running round from long-on.

Hales and Morgan joined forces with little realistic hope of a
successful chase but had enough firepower to make the Windies sweat
right to the end.

Catalan Dragons 15 St Helens 20: Saints hang on despite Puletua dismissal

Catalan Dragons 15 St Helens 20: Saints hang on despite Puletua dismissal

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UPDATED:

21:53 GMT, 20 July 2012

St Helens climbed above Catalan Dragons in the Stobart Super League table with a hard fought victory in the South of France.

The Merseyside club twice came from
behind and survived the sending off of Tony Puletua six minutes from
time to grab a 20-15 win.

The home side hit the front on six minutes through Vincent Duport, charging over from a set scrum play. Scott Dureau added the goal and then a further penalty goal three minutes later to put his side eight points up.

Saints hit back through a superb solo try from Lance Hohaia under the posts that saw the former Kiwi step, dance and flummox the Catalan would be defenders. Makinson added the simple conversion to narrow the lead.

The visitors then took the lead as Duport had a nightmare five minutes. First he presented a forward pass to Damien Blanch before the winger touched down. He then knocked on to give St Helens great field position and missed the all important tackle on Hohaia before the half-back sent out a long pass to send Francis Meli in at the corner. Makinson missed the tough conversion.

In a see-saw game, the home-side hit the front again with Sebastien Raguin first involved in the build up before backing up a scoop from Leon Pryce to receive the ball and dive over the line to score. Dureau added the conversion to see the Catalans head towards half time with a four point lead. As the hooter sounded, Dureau then added a drop goal to extend the Catalan lead to 15-10.

St Helens attacked from the off and were rewarded when Jonny Lomax came up with a superb short ball to the charging Chris Flannnery who touched-down behind the posts. Makinson added the conversion to see the Saints re-take the lead at 16-15.

Saints continued to attack and went over again six minutes later, a high kick Hohaia was allowed to bounce by the Catalan stand in full-back, Cryil Stacul, and Tommy Makinson managed to juggle the ball before putting it down over the line with one hand.

There was still time for controversy as Catalans got over the line three times only to see efforts for Damien Cardace, Raguin and Cardace again ruled out by the officials.

The two Cardace efforts sandwiched Puletua's sending off for St Helens as the officials ruled he had attacked Gregory Mounis' head in the tackle.

David Haye beats Dereck Chisora – reaction

The fight was only half the story but let's not forget what a spectacle it was

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UPDATED:

06:41 GMT, 15 July 2012

The end, when it came, was beautiful and brutal in a way only boxing can be.

Left followed right in a mesmerising dance of perfectly executed hooks, each leaving an indelible mark on the lumbering frame of Dereck Chisora.

As all 17st plus of the British heavyweight crashed to the canvas for the second time in 30 seconds, his punishment was complete. David Haye, as promised, had performed his role of judge, jury and executioner to perfection.

To the victor, the spoils: David Haye twice knocked down Dereck Chisora

To the victor, the spoils: David Haye twice knocked down Dereck Chisora

What started as a shameful brawl at a press conference in Munich ended in an enthralling contest at Upton Park as Haye reminded the 30,000-strong crowd that he remains a force to be reckoned with in the heavyweight ranks.

A year after limping out of Hamburg after failing to live up to his own hype against Wladimir Klitschko, Haye called out his elder brother for one last hurrah. That plea is likely to fall on deaf ears however as Vitali prepares for a career in politics following a potentially final defence of his WBC title against Manuel Charr in September.

Forty five minutes earlier, after Janis Cernouskis had stopped Karl Brabazon in the final warm-up act, the previously subdued crowd began to stir as the main event approached.

With a smile longer than Haye’s left arm, promoter Frank Warren paced the ring while rubbing his hands; perhaps in delight that his moment had finally arrived. Or perhaps it was a rain dance after the heavens had opened minutes earlier. He certainly revelled in throwing ponchos to the crowd as they sought protection from the elements.

Down he goes: Chisora is sent crashing to the canvas by Haye

Down he goes: Chisora is sent crashing to the canvas by Haye

Warren would later pat himself on the back and reflect on a job well done, taking one final opportunity to lambast his critics, of whom there have been many. One wonders if the Luxembourg flag taking pride of place in the centre of the ring was his way of sticking two fingers up to the British Boxing Board of Control (BBBC) he nimbly sidestepped to stage this grudge match.

The familiar tones of announcer Michael Buffer whipped the crowd into a frenzy as the two fighters emerged from the dressing rooms. As at the weigh-in, Chisora entered to a chorus of boos which drowned out the accompanying Gladiator theme. Dressed in a gown which was covered in the flags of the world with the customary bandana pulled up over his mouth, he was made to wait in the ring by his adversary. Eventually Haye traipsed down the tunnel to the sound of Ain’t No Stopping Us Now, wearing a red Hayemaker t-shirt and trainers, to prevent him slipping in the ring.

The pair dealt with the preliminaries very differently. While Haye paced up and down the ring with a face like thunder, Chisora looked calm and keen to make eye contact, as if to establish some sort of authority. As Buffer implored the stands to get ready to rumble, the fight was underway after the briefest touch of gloves.

Time up: Referee Louis Pabon issues the count as Chisora is beaten

Time up: Referee Louis Pabon issues the count as Chisora is beaten

Despite Haye’s prediction that he would dispense with Chisora inside two rounds, the fear remained that he would instead dance his way through the fight, doing enough to steal the sessions and ultimately triumph on points. But within seconds, that theory was expunged. The 31-year-old started quickly, finding his range with the jab as he circled the ring, probing his opponent’s defences. Chisora meanwhile controlled the centre and looked eager to land the knockout blow.

Indeed, the rest of the fight followed a similar pattern as Chisora, his eyes bloodshot, came forward as he did against Klitschko, looking to walk Haye down. He managed a clean shot at the end of the second round before enjoying his best session to date in the next, deserving at least a share of the spoils.

Although the punches that ultimately ended the contest were spectacular to witness, Haye rarely penetrated Chisora’s high guard in the preceding exchanges. His one obvious opportunity came in the fourth round when he pinned his younger opponent in his own corner and looked set to unleash his right hand. But he hesitated, as if concerned he would leave himself vulnerable if the attack failed.

Whatever his reason, Haye was far from fatigued and the fifth round proved decisive. Setting himself up with the jab, a short right followed before the same hand sent Chisora down for the first time in his career. He beat the count at eight but the end was nigh and just 13 seconds after the restart, Del Boy lay crumpled again. Once more he rose at eight but referee Luis Pabon waved the fight off, a look into Chisora’s eyes enough to determine his fate.

All smiles: Haye and Chisora show their new found respect for one another

All smiles: Haye and Chisora show their new found respect for one another

The loser was attended to by paramedics in his corner as Haye saluted the crowd from the other three bastions of the ring. And then, after the brawl, the fence, the hate and the insults, came the hug; a unique embrace by two men who have shared a stage such as this. This new found respect continued in the aftermath, the threats and taunts from earlier in the week seemingly forgotten.

Chisora made his way from Upton Park at quarter to one on Sunday morning, leaving behind a clean-up operation that was well underway. For many, the mess left by this affair will take longer to deal with. The future of the BBBC remains in doubt after its authority was trampled on and concerns over the emergence of multiple British titles remain in some quarters.

Personally, I believe such fears are overblown. There was widespread reluctance from fighters to appear on the undercard of this fight such was the threat of expulsion by the BBBC. Time and time again we were told this fight would not have taken place had it not been for the fracas in Munich. If that is the case, and it was a one-off, then call back the hounds.

Let this fight be remembered for the spectacle it was.

Strictly star Audley Harrison in TOWIE country for comeback fight

Harrison swaps Strictly for TOWIE as Audley returns to ring for Ali clash

He maybe 40 and spent more time on
the dance floor than boxing canvas since his embarrassing defeat by
David Haye 15 months ago but Audley Harrison still feels he can be a big
hit in the ring.

The former Olympic and European Champion has gone from Fraudley to TV favourite with his nifty footwork in Strictly Come Dancing.

Running scared: Audley Harrison was chastised after his defeat by David Haye

Running scared: Audley Harrison was chastised after his defeat by David Haye

And Harrison has chosen to make his comeback in TOWIE country when he takes on Ali Adams in a 10 round contest at the Brentwood Centre in Essex on April 14.

He wants redemption for his lacklustre performance against David Haye.

'I've never been more disappointed in myself as I felt that night…anyone can lose, but I didn't lose with dignity, so I was never going to retire off that performance,' he said.

Harrison has not fought since losing to then WBA champion Haye inside three rounds in November 2010 and has since appeared on the BBC's Strictly Come Dancing.

Against Haye, the 40-year-old landed just one punch and was sent crashing to the canvas in the third session. The fight was stopped seconds later.

Nifty footwork: Audley Harrison on Strictly Come Dancing

Nifty footwork: Audley Harrison on Strictly Come Dancing

Harrison, who will fight Adams over 10 rounds, said: ‘I’ve never been more disappointed in myself as I felt that night…anyone can lose, but I didn’t lose with dignity, so I was never going to retire of that performance.

‘I’ve been sitting on the shelf for 15 months, so I’m grateful for this opportunity…with my right arm now healed, I’ll have too much for Ali Adams. I intend to show I still have a future in the game.'

Adams, who was born in Iraq, won the lightly regarded International Masters heavyweight title in December.

He said 'Audley is a joke. His fight with Haye was an embarrassment and he still wants to make a comeback. I will give him such a beating that Audley will see he does not belong in a boxing ring again.'

Promoter Steve Goodwin said: 'Audley has a big name in boxing and beyond, as was seen with his success in “Strictly Come Dancing”. We will see whether his fighting days are over.

'Ali is hungry, fit and has tons of heart and believes this is his date with destiny, whilst for Audley it is his final chance; retirement beckons if Audley loses this bout…I'm so confident that Ali has his number; I've put my money where my mouth is and made this fight without TV.'