Tag Archives: czech

ATP World Tour Finals 2012: Novak Djokovic book semi-final spot

Djokovic books O2 semi-final spot with comfortable win over Berdych

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UPDATED:

16:40 GMT, 9 November 2012

Novak Djokovic made it three wins out of three at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals to qualify for the semi-finals at London's O2 Arena.

The world number one was in impressive form as he saw off Tomas Berdych 6-2 7-6 (8/6), saving three set points in the second set.

Djokovic is now guaranteed to top Group A while Berdych is out, and Andy Murray only needs a set against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga tonight to ensure he will also qualify for the last four.

Serb and volley: Djokovic has advanced to the semi-finals

Serb and volley: Djokovic has advanced to the semi-finals

Berdych had beaten Djokovic only once
in 11 previous meetings, in the semi-finals of Wimbledon in 2010, and he
was soon under pressure.

Djokovic's famed returns were rushing
the Czech and, although he clawed his way back from 0-40 in the third
game, a fourth chance arrived and the world number one took it.

Djokovic, whose best performance at
the O2 was a semi-final appearance in 2010, looked extremely sharp and
he made it five games in a row before Berdych finally stopped the rot.

The top seed comfortably held to win the set, though, and with that assured himself qualification for the last four.

Berdych appeared to have no answer
when Djokovic broke again in the third game of the second set but he
began to take the fight to his opponent a bit more and hit back to level
at 2-2.

Czech mate: The big-server fought back in the second set

Czech mate: The big-server fought back in the second set

Czech mate: The big-server fought back in the second set

The crowd were keen to see a good match and got behind the Czech, who saved more break points to edge ahead in the set.

Berdych was beginning to match
Djokovic from the back of the court and making his extra power count,
and he made a flying start to the tie-break, winning five of the first
six points.

But Djokovic did not give up and saved
two set points on his own serve before another trademark return at
Berdych's feet levelled matters at 6-6.

The top seed then added a fourth point in a row and clinched victory when Berdych fired a return long.

Safarova seals back-to-back Fed Cup titles for the Czech Republic

Safarova seals back-to-back Fed Cup titles for the Czech Republic

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UPDATED:

23:29 GMT, 4 November 2012

Lucie Safarova sealed back-to-back Fed Cup titles for the Czech Republic, who beat Serbia 3-1 in Prague.

The Czechs needed just one victory on Sunday after taking a commanding 2-0 lead, with Safarova seeing
off Ana Ivanovic and Petra Kvitova powering past Jelena Jankovic.

White hot: Czech Republic celebrate Fed Cup success

White hot: Czech Republic celebrate Fed Cup success

In the reverse singles, Ivanovic gave Serbia hope in the opening rubber with a 6-3, 7-5 victory over Kvitova and they would have been further buoyed by the fact Jankovic had won five of her six previous meetings with Safarova.

But the former world No 1 was brushed aside 6-1, 6-1 by Safarova to seal glory for the Czechs, who beat Russia 12 months ago.

Their male counterparts have the chance to complete a team double when they take on Spain in the Davis Cup final in Prague later this month.

Victoria Azarenka stays world No 1 with win in Istanbul

Queen Victoria: Azarenka stays world No 1 after win over Na in Istanbul

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UPDATED:

23:06 GMT, 26 October 2012

Victoria Azarenka ensured herself the No 1 spot until the end of the year with a straight-sets win over Li Na in the WTA Championship in Istanbul.

The Belarus player and No 1 seed defeated her eighth-seeded Chinese opponent after being pushed hard in the opening set.

Azarenka went to take it on the tie-break before dominating the second set to win 7-6 (7/4) 6-3.

On top of the world: Victoria Azarenka kept her No 1 spot after beating Li Na in Istanbul

On top of the world: Victoria Azarenka kept her No 1 spot after beating Li Na in Istanbul

On course for victory: Azarenka on her way to victory over Na

On course for victory: Azarenka on her way to victory over Na

Maria Sharapova swept past Sam Stosur 6-0 6-3 but that was not good enough to take the No 1 ranking after Azarenka's win.

The Russian second seed made it three wins but was already qualified for the semi-finals before she faced Australian Stosur, who had replaced defending champion Petra Kvitova after the Czech Republic player withdrew with illness.

Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland reached the
semi-finals when she edged Sara Errani of Italy 6-7 (6/8) 7-5 6-4 in a
match that lasted three-and-a-half hours.

Fighting hard: Li Na can't prevent being beaten by Azarenka

Fighting hard: Li Na can't prevent being beaten by Azarenka

Job done: Azarenka is congratulated by Na at the end of the match

Job done: Azarenka is congratulated by Na at the end of the match

The fourth-ranked Radwanska will now play Serena Williams on Saturday after the American finished her three group matches undefeated.

Azarenka was thrilled with her achievement in securing the year-end world number one spot.

'It's a dream come true and I feel great,' she said.

'Now I just want to play my last matches
of the year and then after that I can relax and enjoy this moment more.
Right now I'm in competition and trying to focus on every single day –
there's still a lot of challenge in this tournament.'

Not quite enough: Maria Sharapova beat Samantha Stosur but could not claim top spot in the rankings

Not quite enough: Maria Sharapova beat Samantha Stosur but could not claim top spot in the rankings

The 23-year-old will face world No 2 Sharapova in the last four. She leads the Russian 7-4 in head-to-head meetings and has won their last six hardcourt encounters.

On the victory, Azarenka reflected: 'I felt like the first set was a bit of a rollercoaster – she was playing well at some points and I was playing well at some points, and we're both big shot-makers, so it all depended on who was getting control at what time.

'The momentum was going back and forth, but I'm glad I stayed through it and fought hard, even though I didn't feel I was executing well.'

Petr Cech to have elbow operation in summer

Cech-out: Chelsea ask Czechs to rest No 1 keeper in bid to stave off elbow operation until summer

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UPDATED:

17:48 GMT, 10 September 2012

Fantasy football 2012

Chelsea are hoping that Petr Cech can last the season with an elbow injury before the Blues No 1 undergoes surgery this summer.

The European champions are hoping to manage Cech through the season and they have asked the Czech Republic to rest him from friendly internationals.

The Czech national coach Michal Bilek has agreed to Chelsea's request.

Worry: Chelsea are concerned that Petr Cech may not be able to cope through the season

Worry: Chelsea are concerned that Petr Cech may not be able to cope through the season

'An investigation showed a bit of ossification in his elbow, so they (Chelsea) are planning a surgery in England after the season,' Krejci told the Czech news agency CTK.

'They have asked us if we could rest him in friendly fixtures. We have come to an agreement with coach Michal Bilek and decided to be on good terms with Chelsea.

'We are going to grant their wish and rest him.

'Petr cannot stretch the arm properly. If he has to stretch the elbow, it hurts him sometimes.

'There is nothing to be worried about, though. There is basically nothing that could make this problem worse.

'The only thing that could force an
immediate surgery is if the intensity of pain would get much higher or
if the elbow was blocked in some way.'

Cech captained the Czech Republic in
Saturday's World Cup qualifier against Denmark in Copenhagen, which
ended in a 0-0 draw, but he will sit out the Tuesday's friendly against
Finland.

Cech's fitness provides a concern for Chelsea boss Roberto Di Matteo, as Ross Turnbull and Henrique Hilario are the only viable replacements for the Czech No 1.

Get off! Cech appeared for Chelsea in their 4-1 defeat by Atletico Madrid

Get off! Cech appeared for Chelsea in their 4-1 defeat by Atletico Madrid

Get off! Cech appeared for Chelsea in their 4-1 defeat by Atletico Madrid

LONDON 2012 PARALYMPICS: David Stone wins road race gold

Stone retains Paralympic title by winning gold in road race at Brands Hatch

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UPDATED:

11:59 GMT, 8 September 2012

David Stone successfully defended his Paralympic Games title with victory in the mixed T1-2 road race at Brands Hatch on Saturday.

The 31-year-old relinquished his time-trial title on Wednesday and was disappointed with bronze.

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Stone, who has cerebral palsy and rides a tricycle, bounced back in the 24-kilometre road race to win his third Paralympic gold medal, seven seconds ahead of Italy's Giorgio Farroni.

David Vondracek of the Czech Republic was three minutes 17 seconds behind in third.

Briton Stone said: 'I made my move, but the Italian (Farroni) stayed with me. It was so hard.

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

'It makes it better to win today because it was so disappointing not winning in the time-trial.

'Compared to Beijing, the competition was so much better, it's good. It pushes me. It makes it a much better sport.'

More to follow…

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trial on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

London 2012 Paralympics: David Stone wins gold

Golden service resumes for Stone as Brit bounces back to defend Paralympic title

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UPDATED:

10:51 GMT, 8 September 2012

David Stone successfully defended his Paralympic Games title with victory in the mixed T1-2 road race at Brands Hatch on Saturday.

The 31-year-old relinquished his time-trial title on Wednesday and was disappointed with bronze.

Stone, who has cerebral palsy and rides a tricycle, bounced back in the 24-kilometre road race to win his third Paralympic gold medal, seven seconds ahead of Italy's Giorgio Farroni. David Vondracek of the Czech Republic was three minutes 17 seconds behind in third.

Flying the flag: Stone claimed victory at Brands Hatch on Saturday morning

Flying the flag: Stone claimed victory at Brands Hatch on Saturday morning

London 2012 Olympics: Tomas Berdych crashes out

Darcis bounces Berdych out of singles as Czech's Wimbledon woe continues

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UPDATED:

13:16 GMT, 28 July 2012

Tomas Berdych's miserable summer on the Wimbledon grass continued as he was knocked out in the first round of the Olympics by Belgium's Steve Darcis.

The Czech sixth seed lost his opener on Centre Court at the Championships to Ernests Gulbis, and it was deja vu as he slumped to a 6-4, 6-4 defeat against world No 75 Darcis.

Shocker: Belgium's Steve Darcis was too good for Tomas Berdych in the first round of the men's singles

Shocker: Belgium's Steve Darcis was too good for Tomas Berdych in the first round of the men's singles

Berdych reached the final of Wimbledon two years ago, losing to Rafael Nadal, and had been expected to provide a challenge to home favourite Andy Murray in the quarter-finals here.

Seventh seed Janko Tipsarevic had no such problems against Argentina's David Nalbandian, the Serb coming through 6-3, 6-4 to set up a meeting with Germany's Philipp Petzschner, while Darcis next faces Santiago Giraldo of Colombia.

More to follow…

Down and out: Tomas Berdych's bid for singles glory at the Olympics is over after a first-round defeat

Down and out: Tomas Berdych's bid for singles glory at the Olympics is over after a first-round defeat

WIMBLEDON 2012 LIVE: day five news as it happens

WIMBLEDON 2012 LIVE: Follow all the latest news from day five at the Championships

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UPDATED:

07:00 GMT, 29 June 2012

SW19 essentials

All the latest Wimbledon news

Full results from the singles

Today's order of play

Join
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Wimbledon Championships.

We'll bring you all the latest news, scores and
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Our
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Czech mate: Lukas Rosol was in sensational form to beat Rafael Nadal on day four

Czech mate: Lukas Rosol was in sensational form to beat Rafael Nadal on day four

Euro 2012 If Cristiano Ronaldo wins this, it will be the best we have seen

If Ronaldo wins this for Portugal, it will be the best we've seen

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UPDATED:

22:09 GMT, 24 June 2012

If Portugal, by some miracle, are crowned champions of Europe next Sunday, it will be an achievement to eclipse even Greece’s triumph against the odds at the equivalent tournament in 2004.

Denmark’s victory from the beach in 1992 will not compare, either, nor various Italian World Cup successes that always seem to come when their domestic game is in disarray.

For a Portuguese win in Kiev would be, in essence, the work of one man. Cristiano Ronaldo would have won the 2012 European Championship.

Not literally, but metaphorically.

Going it alone: Ronaldo attempts an overhead kick against Czech Republic

Going it alone: Ronaldo attempts an overhead kick against Czech Republic

Euro 2012 email button

Take him away, and it isn’t just that Portugal would not be in Wednesday’s semi-final with Spain; they would not be at the party, full stop.

No narrative here is quite as mesmerising as Ronaldo’s quest for glory. We have to search through almost three decades for a precedent, and to another figure who polarised opinion. This is Ronaldo’s 1986 World Cup; and he is this tournament’s Diego Maradona.

For Portugal to win here, overcoming first Spain and then in all likelihood Germany in the final, it is going to take the greatest feat of individual influence since Maradona made Argentina champions of the world in Mexico.

Sometimes an individual is stronger than the whole: Robin van Persie propelled Arsenal into the Champions League last season and Matt Le Tissier spent his career keeping Southampton up, but it is hard to remember the last time a country went so far into a major international event on the instincts of one majestic player.

Portugal squeaked here by the narrowest margin as it was: finishing second in qualifying Group H on goal difference from third-placed Norway.

The campaign began badly. Portugal drew 4-4 with Cyprus at home, then lost away in Oslo, both without Ronaldo.

Leading the way: Maradona lifts the World Cup in 1986

Leading the way: Maradona lifts the World Cup in 1986

At this point Carlos Queiroz, Sir Alex Ferguson’s former assistant at Manchester United, was sacked as coach and replaced by Paulo Bento, since when, the story goes, Portugal have never looked back.

Yeah right. Portugal could have been coached by Fray Bentos – it means Friar Benedict and, yes, he did exist – and it wouldn’t have made the slightest bit of difference without Ronaldo’s return. Undoubtedly, Bento is getting more from his best player than Queiroz did and for this he deserves credit – but the fact remains that without Ronaldo he would have been powerless.

Portugal, like Manchester United, like Real Madrid, are transformed by his presence. There is nobody quite like him in the game today; no player who can hit a shot that just by its flight identifies him as the shooter.

The ball looks different when Ronaldo strikes it, taking on a unique yet familiar trajectory that starts low, rises, and then sharply dips like a bucking stallion.

The greats have contributed turns and tricks to football’s evolution but Ronaldo is arguably the first player in history to as good as trademark a talent as commonplace as shooting. Ferguson insists it’s only practice.

He must spend hours.

Dedicated: Ronaldo juggles a ball during training in Poznan

Dedicated: Ronaldo juggles a ball during training in Poznan

So, in this campaign, Ronaldo’s return coincided with Bento’s appointment and in the next 12 competitive games – eight qualifiers, four in these finals – Portugal have lost once and he has scored 10 goals and made three others.

Remove him and, without doubt, Norway would have finished runners-up to Denmark and played Bosnia-Herzegovina for Portugal’s place.

Teams featuring Ronaldo, however, do not miss out on goal difference. Manchester United would have won the Premier League last season had he still been at the club. So having dragged Portugal east, he has steered them out of the group (both goals in a 2-1 win over Holland) and through the quarter-finals (the only goal of the game against the Czech Republic). It has been a tour de force, an act like no other in world football right now.

Lionel Messi is surrounded by great players wherever he goes. Yet the moment Helder Postiga – 12 appearances for Tottenham Hotspur in 2003-04, two goals, sold after 12 months at a loss of 3.63m – appears to lead Portugal’s line, it is obvious the task Ronaldo faces.

His match-winning attempts are almost comical in their desperate intensity. He has had 29 shots in this tournament – 14 on target – which is more than Greece over four matches. Approximately every 12.5 minutes, Ronaldo has a crack. You would, too, if Postiga was your match-winner.

Of course, Maradona’s statistics from 1986 are simply mind-blowing.

Indebted: Paulo Bento (right) has Ronaldo to thank for his success

Indebted: Paulo Bento (right) has Ronaldo to thank for his success

'This is Ronaldo’s stage, Ronaldo’s time, and if he can be
Portugal’s Maradona, the debate about the world’s greatest footballer
will open wide again'

He played every minute of every game and of Argentina’s 14 goals, scored five and made as many, having a hand in all three in the final. He attempted or created more than half of Argentina’s shots at goal, made 90 dribbling runs (three times more than any other player) and was fouled 53 times (winning twice as many free-kicks as any rival).

His second against England was tagged the goal of the century and a statue celebrates it outside Mexico City’s Azteca Stadium.

Ronaldo has a way to go before matching that roll of honour, yet time has also helped Maradona’s legend grow. It is now said that he was the lone talent in Argentina’s World Cup-winning team, but he is not as isolated as Ronaldo is now.

Argentina 1986 would have murdered Portugal 2012. They were not a stellar side, and Maradona’s gift would have eclipsed many far greater, but were better than is widely recalled.

Argentina let just five goals in over 630 minutes in that tournament and kept three clean sheets.
Oscar Ruggeri is still regarded as one of the greatest defenders the country has produced.

Jorge Valdano had won a league and UEFA Cup double that season with Real Madrid; six of the Argentina starting 11 in the final had won the Copa Libertadores, the highest honour in South American club football – and Maradona wasn’t one of them.

Three and easy: Ronaldo's goals saw off Holland and Greece

Three and easy: Ronaldo's goals saw off Holland and Greece

What is Ronaldo working with by comparison

Some fine players, not least Joao Moutinho, but their worth without him was revealed when the qualifying campaign began.

Drawn
in the toughest group here, with Germany, Holland and Denmark, few
expected even Ronaldo’s inspiration to be enough to get Portugal to the
knockout rounds.

And it looked that way, at first, with the pressure at its height.

Facing Germany in the opening game, it must have appeared a daunting task to thrust this team into the later stages.

Maybe this is why Ronaldo started slowly, improving as the tournament wore on.

The
final group game with Holland was a straightforward knockout, so too
the quarter-final against the Czech Republic. And knockouts he can
influence simply by being the greatest player on the field.
Orchestrating
the entire campaign, a run of six matches viewed uphill from the foot
of the toughest group, must have appeared more intimidating.

Incumbent: Messi is widely regarded as the current best player in the world

Incumbent: Messi is widely regarded as the current best player in the world

He is two away now, though, and getting stronger.

Logic suggests the quest must end in the Donbass Arena against Spain, that one man cannot ride the famous passing carousel and win.

Yet Spain are not Barcelona.

Ronaldo will be well aware who is missing and the point he has to prove. Sandro Rosell, president of Barcelona, said the club have an entire team with more talent than Real Madrid’s Ronaldo.

But they haven’t. They’ve got one guy who is arguably better. And he’s not here. So this is Ronaldo’s stage, Ronaldo’s time, and if he can be Portugal’s Maradona, the debate about the world’s greatest footballer will open wide again.

For frankly, without Ronaldo, Portugal would have about as much chance of winning this European Championship as Lionel Messi.

Two steps away: Portugal take on Spain on Wednesday night

Two steps away: Portugal take on Spain on Wednesday night

UEFA are great… at ruining a spectacle

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Great team, Lithuania. Came fourth of five in European Championship qualifying Group I, winning one match in eight. Some feat that, considering there were two ties with Liechtenstein. Lithuania drew the one at home, and lost away. Still, a great team.

Almost as great, one imagines, as Bulgaria, bottom of European Championship qualifying Group G, having matched Lithuania’s solitary campaign win by securing three points in Wales.

Bulgaria did not win or score at home and, like Lithuania, conceded 13 goals in eight matches.
Great team, Bulgaria.

Playing fast and loose with the definition of greatness here is Martin Kallen, UEFA’s tournament director for Euro 2012 and a supporter of the expansion of the competition to include 24 finalists in 2016.

‘There are great teams who are not here,’ said Kallen, reeling off a list that included Bulgaria, Lithuania, Switzerland (finished behind Montenegro, never won a match away), Romania (won three matches in 10, two against Luxembourg, and finished six points off second-placed Bosnia-Herzegovina) and Slovenia (won four games in 10, scoring 11 goals, two of the wins and seven of the goals coming against the Faroe Islands).

‘The Scots are also not here – they bring a lot of emotions, a lot of atmosphere with them,’ Kallen added.

And a lot of fairly ordinary footballers, too, which is why they have not qualified for a major international tournament this century. Scotland have had it tough in some qualifying groups, true, pegged behind the likes of Spain, Italy, France and Germany, but have also failed to overcome Norway (twice), Belgium and Croatia.

The system wasn’t inadequate, their football was. Nobody is absent from Poland and Ukraine who deserves to be here. Indeed, it could be argued, given the Republic of Ireland’s showing, that the quality of international football in Europe is at its uppermost limit with 16 teams. Poland wouldn’t have merited inclusion without home advantage, either.

Mixing it up: UEFA's Euro 2012 Director Martin Kallen (left) has advocated a change in the tournament format

Mixing it up: UEFA's Euro 2012 Director Martin Kallen (left) has advocated a change in the tournament format

What is so infuriating about UEFA’s ruination of the world’s best football tournament is that they think we’re all stupid. For Kallen, who is a UEFA executive and we therefore suppose knowledgeable about football, to insist that the presence of a team who dropped four points to Liechtenstein in qualifying wouldn’t damage the standard of the competition is preposterous.

Unless Kallen is a fool, he knows the truth, as does UEFA president Michel Platini – but they do not entertain it because the motivations are financial and political. Letting in the also-rans secures national association votes and more qualifiers increases revenue, so who cares about the quality of the tournament

Some believe that Platini and UEFA are great custodians of the game in Europe. And they may well be. Great like the Bulgarian team that lost at home to Wales and Montenegro. Great in the manner of the Lithuanians, defeated 2-0 in Vaduz in front of 1,886 people.
Great the way steaming great pillocks are great. Great like that.

Lucky No, German success is self-made

Germany will have two extra rest days on their semi-final opponents, and played a Greece team so weak at the quarter-final stage that they could afford to rotate three first-choice players, give Marco Reus a competitive debut, and still win comfortably, 4-2.

Once again, this is no coincidence.

This is tournament management at its best and, including qualifying matches, Germany’s current 2012 European Championship record reads: Played 14, Won 14, Goals For 43, Against 11.

Flexing their muscles: Germany rotated their squad on Thursday night

Flexing their muscles: Germany rotated their squad on Thursday night

There is no real precedent for this at a European tournament. The Soviet Union won the first competition in 1960 with a 100 per cent record, but that amounted to four matches, and they were given a bye into the finals because Spain refused to travel east.

France won every game on the way to lifting the trophy in 1984, but as hosts did not have to qualify, so won five games.

The only world champions to win every match, start to finish, were the Brazilians in 1970 – six qualifiers, followed by six wins at the finals in Mexico. Germany are 14 and counting, with two to go. A streak like that is not luck.

Our Plastic Brits would have been also-rans in the US

Where would Tiffany Porter’s Great Britain Olympic trial time have got her, had she stayed loyal to the United States, her country of birth Eighteenth.

Yes, you read right. Porter’s 100 metre hurdles run in Saturday’s final was 13.21 seconds.

She was beaten into second place by a multi-eventer, heptathlete Jessica Ennis. Yet at the equivalent competition taking place in Eugene, Oregon, there were 17 athletes who got inside Porter’s time.

The slowest qualifier for the final, Nia Ali, ran 13.02. To make the United States Olympic team, Porter would have had to beat third-placed Lolo Jones’s 12.86.

She has managed that in her career, but
not very often. And, in American athletics, history truly is bunk
because there is no wildcard place, as exists in Britain.

Off the pace: Porter (left) lost out to Jessica Ennis in the 100 metres hurdles final at the British Olympic athletics trials in Birmingham on Sunday

Off the pace: Porter (left) lost out to Jessica Ennis in the 100 metres hurdles final at the British Olympic athletics trials in Birmingham on Sunday

Porter could have finished last this weekend and still made the Olympic team if selectors admired her past performances and deemed the trials an off-day.

So deep is America’s talent pool, however, that USATF take the first three trial runs, without exception.

Yet it is often insisted that Porter did not declare for Great Britain because she could not take the heat in her own country.

To suggest so, to believe it is wrong that Porter has dubiously claimed the Olympic place of a home-produced athlete, or wrongly wiped the achievements of one very dedicated British runner, Angie Thorp, from the record books, is to invite hostility from UK Athletics head coach Charles van Commenee.

Porter is his captain and would have been an Olympic contender for the States had she not chosen to embrace her British heritage, it is claimed.

True – she just wouldn’t have been a very successful one.

(In other news, Shana Cox, Britain’s imported 400m runner, qualified for the Olympics with a time of 52.87. This would have given her the 13th berth in America’s trials – meaning she would not have made Sunday’s final – being faster than Ebony Eutsey’s 53.22 but not quite up there with 12th-placed Rebecca Alexander’s 52.69. Not that she is here for convenience, either. No, like Porter, she just fancied a change.)

Portugal great Eusebio taken to hospital in Poznan as a precautionary measure

Portugal great Eusebio taken to hospital in Poznan as a precautionary measure

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UPDATED:

00:23 GMT, 24 June 2012

Eusebio was taken to hospital on Saturday in Poznan where he has been watching matches at Euro 2012, the Portuguese Football Federation said in a statement.

The former Benfica and Portgual great, 70, travelled with the national team to Poland and was pictured watching the 1-0 victory over the Czech Republic sitting next to Luis Figo.

'Portugal's football ambassador Eusebio felt indisposed on Saturday when he was at the hotel with the national team in Opalenica,' the FPF said in a statement.

In hospital: Eusebio (left) chats to Figo in Warsaw

In hospital: Eusebio (left) chats to Figo in Warsaw

'After a first observation and contacting his doctor in Lisbon, he went to a hospital in Poznan as a precaution where he is being examined.'

Eusebio has been admitted to hospital three times since December. He has been suffering from hypertension and his doctors have said he must have regular examinations.