Tag Archives: criminal

Robert Guerrero arrested for attempting to take gun on a plane while promoting Floyd Mayweather fight

Guerrero arrested for attempting to take a GUN on a PLANE while promoting upcoming world title fight with Mayweather

By
Declan Warrington

PUBLISHED:

20:38 GMT, 28 March 2013

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UPDATED:

22:11 GMT, 28 March 2013

Robert Guerrero was today arrested at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport following his attempt to board an airplane with a handgun.

The welterweight, who is scheduled to fight Floyd Mayweather Jr. in Las Vegas on May 4, was reported to to have brought the gun – a .40-caliber Smith & Wesson – and three bullet magazines with him for the flight to the same California location.

The southpaw, who had been in New York to promote the upcoming fight, is to be charged with one count of criminal possession of a firearm and three counts of third-degree criminal possession of a weapon. It is thought the charges will not affect the fight's status but he could regardless face up to four years in prison if found guilty.

Floyd Mayweather

Robert Guerrero

Controversial: Robert Guerrero was arrested while attempting to promote his fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr

According to the police report Guerrero, who it is understood has a permit to carry a gun in California but is not licenced to do so in California, allegedly told the authorities that he had the weapon with him upon arrival in New York from Virginia.

'I hope that Mr. Guerrero fights better than he thinks,' said Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown.

'For anyone who hasn't gotten the message, let me be crystal clear. You cannot bring an unlicensed weapon — loaded or unloaded — into this county or this city. And if you do you will be arrested and face felony charges.'

Roy Hodgson calls time on Rio Ferdinand and John Terry

Game over Terry and Ferdinand unlikely to return to England as Hodgson says he's 'moved on' from controversy

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UPDATED:

17:31 GMT, 18 November 2012

England manager Roy Hodgson has poured cold water over the prospect of Rio Ferdinand or John Terry returning to the international side.

The former West Brom and Liverpool manager has said he has no intention of calling up Ferdinand, despite England leaking four goals in Stockholm on Wednesday.

Hodgson is also refusing to ask John Terry to reconsider his decision to retire from international football.

Out in the cold: Rio Ferdinand (right) is unlikely to return to the international fray

Out in the cold: Rio Ferdinand (right) is unlikely to return to the international fray

He said: 'I’ve moved on from the Ferdinand and Terry debate and I think the team has moved on from it as well.

'We are now looking at other players that we can play at centre-half and we already have some pretty interesting alternatives.

'We’ve had Phil Jagielka and Joleon Lescott who have done well, Gary Cahill and Steven Caulker did well against Sweden and I am also looking for Chris Smalling and Phil Jones to come through.

'That is what I have got to do, to make certain that amongst that group of players someone will come through and force his way into my attention.

'I have to find a couple of players who are good enough to do the job in the way that John Terry and Rio Ferdinand did when they were playing.'

Down and out: John Terry (left) is also unlikely to return after his retirement from England

Down and out: John Terry (left) is also unlikely to return after his retirement from England

Moving on: Roy Hodgson says he wants to focus on the next crop of players

Moving on: Roy Hodgson says he wants to focus on the next crop of players

Terry decided to quit international football after he was charged by the FA for racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton, at Loftus Road last season.

The Chelsea captain was cleared of criminal charges earlier this year.

Ferdinand, meanwhile, was exiled by Hodgson when he selected Terry over the Manchester United centre back in his Euro 2012 squad.

Hodgson acknowledged the stellar work of the pair over the years for England, but hopes the newer recruits can step up and fill the void left by two vastly experienced centre backs.

'I have to hope that amongst that group of players – and maybe someone else will come on the scene and force his way in – I can find a couple of players who can do the job in the way John and Rio were when they were playing a few years ago.'

Tottenham fans care more about football than racism, says Society of Black Lawyers

Spurs fans care more about football than kicking racism out of the the game, claims Herbert
Society of Black Lawyers maintain call for 'criminal convictions after November 20'
'Small minority' of Tottenham fans to blame for 'anti-Semitic' chanting, says Herbert
'Their love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism', adds SBL chief
Tottenham have refused to comment on the matter

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UPDATED:

12:26 GMT, 9 November 2012

The Society of Black Lawyers hit out at Tottenham and the Football Association after repeating its threat to go to the police over what it regards as anti-Semitic chanting at White Hart Lane.

Spurs fans sent an open message of defiance to the SBL on Thursday night when they chanted 'We'll sing what we want' and 'Yid Army' throughout the club's 3-1 home win over Maribor in the Europa League.

Despite being a club with a traditionally large Jewish following, Tottenham fans often refer to themselves as 'Yids' or the 'Yid Army' in chants during the club's matches.

Backing: Tottenham fans cheer on their side against Maribor on Thursday

'We'll sing what we want': Spurs fans were in defiant mood on Thursday

Although Spurs claim otherwise, the
SBL say the phrase is anti-Semitic and they have vowed to complain to
the police under the Public Order Act if supporters continue to use the
chant beyond the November 20 deadline it has set.

The SBL had monitors at the north
London ground on Thursday night who heard the chants and this morning it
reiterated its commitment to report any such action to the police
should fans continue their actions.

'We are not going to let go on this,' SBL chair Peter Herbert said.

'After November 20 there is a potential that people will get a criminal conviction. If they want to run that risk then fine.

'We are serious. We aren't in this
for sensationalism. We think the vast majority of Tottenham fans are
sensible and do not engage in anti-Semitism.

'It's a very small minority who obviously don't care about any offence.

'Their love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism.'

Tottenham refused to comment on the
matter. The London club stick by the statement they released on
Wednesday which read: 'Our guiding principle in respect of the “Y-word”
is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing factor is the
intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the deliberate
intention to cause offence. This has been the basis of prosecutions of
fans of other teams to date.

A 'Yid Army' Spurs flag

Flying the flag: Herbert has launched another attack on Tottenham supporters

'Our fans adopted the chant as a
defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it as a chant amongst themselves.'

Herbert believes the club have been
misguided over the issue and claims fans can be prosecuted regardless of
whether the songs are intended to cause offence.

'Under Section Five of the Public
Order Act it doesn't matter what the intent is of the individual or the
crowd, if the words cause harassment, alarm, or distress to anyone
watching then that is sufficient,' Herbert said.

Three and easy: Defoe scored a hat-trick in Tottenham's win on Thursday

Three and easy: Defoe scored a hat-trick in Tottenham's win on Thursday

'If a crowd of men were walking down
Tottenham High Road singing the Y-word causing offence they would be
arrested. It doesn't make sense that they can make White Hart Lane a
no-go area for law.'

Herbert ridiculed Tottenham's
statement and claimed the SBL has widespread support for its campaign
from within the Jewish community.

'We have no doubt there will be complaints (to the police),' Herbert added.

'If the Met Police say they are going to look at prosecutions then there is a good chance it will stop.

'Tottenham's statement is
indefensible. I think if you went to the United States, Canada or South
Africa and you made a statement like that you would face ridicule and
condemnation.

'It is a very sad day for English football when clubs feel they have to defend a term of abuse.'

Herbert also accused the FA of a lack of interest in the Tottenham matter.

'This is an appalling abdication of
responsibility by the FA,' he said. 'It's a complete disgrace that they
have stayed silent on this.

'There is an inertia from the FA over racism and anti-Semitism.

'You can't go and complain about racism and anti-Semitism in Serbia and then have it happening in your own back yard.'

Tottenham fans Yid Army T-shirt fightback

Tottenham fans get shirty over calls to ban 'Yid Army' chants: Spurs supporters launch T-shirt fightback over anti-Semitism claims

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UPDATED:

14:12 GMT, 9 November 2012

Tottenham fans can hit back at attempts to stop them referring to themselves as the 'Yid Army' with a T-shirt protest.

Fans outside White Hart Lane before Thursday night's Europa League victory over Maribor were heard discussing the T-shirt slogan (pictured) which reads: 'YIDARMY WHL N17'.

The T-shirt can be purchased for 11.99 at www.n17club.co.uk. But it has emerged there is a dedicated Yid Army website – www.yidarmy.com – where Tottenham fans can buy a range of clothing emblazoned with the 'Y-word' slogan.

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

A debate has been raging this week over whether use of the word 'Yid' by Tottenham fans is anti-Semitic. High-profile campaigners such as celebrity Chelsea fan David Baddiel insist it is. But Spurs fans – and the club themselves – argue that it is about context.

Tottenham issued an impassioned defence of their fans' right to use the term 'Yid' in their matchday chants.

Peter Herbert, chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers, described the north London club’s attitude as being '40 years out of date', and vowed to make a formal complaint to the Metropolitan Police if chanting the 'Y-word' continued at White Hart Lane.

The society claim such chants – either by opposition fans or Spurs supporters themselves – are anti-Semitic and unacceptable in contemporary society.

'We are not going to let go on this,'
SBL chair Peter Herbert said. 'After November 20 there is a potential
that people will get a criminal conviction. If they want to run that
risk then fine.

'Their (Tottenham's) love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism.'

Baddiel, speaking exclusively to Sportsmail,
said: 'The idea that Spurs fans are reclaiming the Y-word and are
entitled to because so many of them are Jewish is simply not true,' he
said. 'There are only 250,000 Jews in Britain as a whole and I'd say
about three or four per cent of Tottenham's crowd is Jewish.

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

'That means well over 90 per cent of those chanting “Yid Army” are not actually Jewish and that is just one of several reasons why it cannot be right. If, for instance, there was a team in Brixton called Brixton United, and they had a mainly white support who adopted the N-word as their badge of honour and went round chanting “N***** Army”, they would be closed down tomorrow.

'At Tottenham, the club's “Jewishness” is just an historical association with the area. It's doubtful that there are more than five per cent actual Jews in the ground at home games (only 0.4 per cent of the UK is Jewish). So the argument “but it's just like Snoop Doggy Dogg using the N-word” does not apply to most Spurs fans.'

Tottenham's stance over the use of the word 'Yid' is clear and the club have taken legal advice over the matter.

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Spurs said in a statement: 'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself — the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used, i.e. if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it as a chant among themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-Semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence.'

Sing your heart out: The use of the Yid Army chants is deeply engrained among Spurs fans

Sing your heart out: The use of the Yid Army chants is deeply engrained among Spurs fans

Scott Harrison sentenced to four years in prison

Harrison sentenced to four years in Spanish prison after brothel brawl

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UPDATED:

08:51 GMT, 6 November 2012

Shamed former world champion Scott Harrison has been sentenced to four years in a Spanish jail after being convicted of assault.

The Scotsman, 35, returned to the ring in June after almost seven years in the wilderness and had hoped to fight for another world title.

But Harrison, who intends to appeal the verdict, was found guilty of assaulting three men at a brothel after a trial in Malaga.

Return: Scott Harrison (right) in action against Joe Elfidh in September

Return: Scott Harrison (right) in action against Joe Elfidh in September

He received two years each for the two most serious assaults and a fine for the attack on the third victim.

Harrison's dad Peter told the Daily Record: 'Scott will be appealing this, 100 per cent.

'He has already said he is innocent and that remains the case. He’s down but determined to clear his name.

'Scott is a victim here – and I’m not just saying that because I’m his dad.'

Harrison was only released from a Spanish prison in September last year after spending 30 months behind bars for an assault in 2005.

But despite the sentence, Harrison hopes that by appealing, he can continue his comeback in the ring by fighting John Simpson in Glasgow on December 1.

Guilty: Harrison in a Spanish court

Guilty: Harrison in a Spanish court

He has also set his sights on a Scottish showdown with WBO world champion Ricky Burns.

Lead judge Julian Cruz said: 'Harrison is not a first-time offender and his criminal record reflects a prior assault conviction.

'We’re also taking into account the dangerous nature of this attack, the serious injuries inflicted and the fact one of the accused was a professional boxer with extensive experience in fighting.'

Harrison, from Cambuslang near Glasgow, was warned it could take up to a year before his appeal is settled.

But a Spanish legal source said: 'For the appeal to be successful, Harrison will have to show the other witnesses, or victims, lied. Because there is an appeal, everything will be frozen until the appeal is heard.'

Harrison looked sluggish when fighting on the undercard of Burns' stunning victory over Kevin Mitchell in September when he struggled to a points win over Joe Elfidh.

That followed a knockout win over Gyorgy Mizsei Jnr earlier on his return, a far cry from his glory days as a featherweight world champion.

Serbia Under 21 brawl latest: Steven Caulker and Tom Ince to discover criminal charges fate

FA set to discover Caulker and Ince fate over criminal charges from Serbia

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UPDATED:

11:27 GMT, 2 November 2012

The Football Association are hoping to hear from Serbia about criminal charges laid against England Under 21 internationals Steven Caulker and Tom Ince, plus coach Steve Wigley.

Communication with the Balkan nation has been difficult and frustrating and establishing exactly what is happening in the process has been confusing.

Local reports suggested the files had been handed over to British jurisdiction, but embassy officials in Belgrade have been working since Thursday to discover whether that is the case.

Attacked: England coach Steve Wigley (centre) was surrounded in the mass brawl in Serbia

Attacked: England coach Steve Wigley (centre) was surrounded in the mass brawl in Serbia

The charges arose in the wake of
England Under-21s' stormy qualifier in Krusevac last month but whether
prosecutions are to follow is unclear.

In the interim, Tottenham manager
Andre Villas-Boas is confident his 20-year-old defender Caulker is fully
focused on football ahead of the visit of Wigan.

'We spoke to the player,' said the Spurs boss.

'At the moment we don't have enough
information, nor do the FA, although there is contact between the FA,
the government and the embassy in Serbia to try to find out more
information about the speculation that is coming out.

'Regarding the player I think he will be ready to play.

'I think he obviously has a good chance because he has been doing quite well to make selection.

'I am not worried yet with the consequences of what can happen.

'We are still finding out more information.'

Progress was slow on Thursday and,
having issued a statement in the morning, the Football Association did
not get any further updates.

'The FA continues to remain in close
contact with the UK Government regarding the continued media reports of
Serbian police charging England U21 players and staff,' said a statement
.

'There remains no formal communication of any charges to the FA or the government.

Violent conduct charge: Tottenham and England Under 21 defender Steven Caulker (second left)

Violent conduct charge: Tottenham and England Under 21 defender Steven Caulker (second left)

'However, we understand there has
been a verbal communication of the names of the individuals concerned,
which we now believe to be England players Steven Caulker and Tom Ince,
and coach Steve Wigley.

'The FA would like to reaffirm its
support for all of our players and staff and we have spoken with the
players' clubs and those named to express this.

'The FA has been taking legal advice in both the UK and Serbia to provide appropriate protection should any charges be brought.

'We welcome the support we are receiving from the UK government.'

Trouble flared at the match on
October 16 after England's Connor Wickham struck in injury time to
secure a 1-0 win and passage to next summer's finals in Israel courtesy
of a 2-0 aggregate success.

Missiles were thrown and things
turned ugly as some fans got on to the pitch, while there were clashes
involving players and staff from both teams.

The Serbian Football Association
(FSS) handed lengthy bans to two of their own players and two officials
for their part in the confrontations.

Charged: Trouble erupted in Krusevac after the Euro 2013 play-off tie

Charged: Trouble erupted in Krusevac after the Euro 2013 play-off tie

But the trouble also played out against a backdrop of alleged racial abuse from the stands towards England players.

Defender Danny Rose, who made a
specific complaint, was sent off after the final whistle for kicking a
ball away in anger amid the chaos.

European governing body UEFA launched
their own disciplinary proceedings, charging the FA over the behaviour
of their players and the FSS with the same and for the alleged racist
chanting.

UEFA's control and disciplinary body
will convene on November 22 to deal with the case, but the police
investigation will have no bearing on that meeting.

Serbia Under 21 brawl latest: Steven Caulker and Tom Lees to discover criminal charges fate

FA set to discover Caulker and Lees fate over criminal charges from Serbia

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UPDATED:

09:44 GMT, 2 November 2012

The Football Association are hoping to hear from Serbia today about criminal charges laid against England Under 21 internationals Steven Caulker and Tom Lees, plus coach Steve Wigley.

Communication with the Balkan nation has been difficult and frustrating and establishing exactly what is happening in the process has been confusing.

Local reports suggested the files had been handed over to British jurisdiction, but embassy officials in Belgrade have been working since Thursday to discover whether that is the case.

Attacked: England coach Steve Wigley (centre) was surrounded in the mass brawl in Serbia

Attacked: England coach Steve Wigley (centre) was surrounded in the mass brawl in Serbia

The charges arose in the wake of
England Under-21s' stormy qualifier in Krusevac last month but whether
prosecutions are to follow is unclear.

In the interim, Tottenham manager
Andre Villas-Boas is confident his 20-year-old defender Caulker is fully
focused on football ahead of the visit of Wigan.

'We spoke to the player,' said the Spurs boss.

'At the moment we don't have enough
information, nor do the FA, although there is contact between the FA,
the government and the embassy in Serbia to try to find out more
information about the speculation that is coming out.

'Regarding the player I think he will be ready to play.

'I think he obviously has a good chance because he has been doing quite well to make selection.

'I am not worried yet with the consequences of what can happen.

'We are still finding out more information.'

Progress was slow yesterday and,
having issued a statement in the morning, the Football Association did
not get any further updates.

'The FA continues to remain in close
contact with the UK Government regarding the continued media reports of
Serbian police charging England U21 players and staff,' said a statement
.

'There remains no formal communication of any charges to the FA or the government.

Violent conduct charge: Tottenham and England Under 21 defender Steven Caulker (second left)

Violent conduct charge: Tottenham and England Under 21 defender Steven Caulker (second left)

'However, we understand there has
been a verbal communication of the names of the individuals concerned,
which we now believe to be England players Steven Caulker and Tom Lees,
and coach Steve Wigley.

'The FA would like to reaffirm its
support for all of our players and staff and we have spoken with the
players' clubs and those named to express this.

'The FA has been taking legal advice in both the UK and Serbia to provide appropriate protection should any charges be brought.

'We welcome the support we are receiving from the UK government.'

Trouble flared at the match on
October 16 after England's Connor Wickham struck in injury time to
secure a 1-0 win and passage to next summer's finals in Israel courtesy
of a 2-0 aggregate success.

Missiles were thrown and things
turned ugly as some fans got on to the pitch, while there were clashes
involving players and staff from both teams.

The Serbian Football Association
(FSS) handed lengthy bans to two of their own players and two officials
for their part in the confrontations.

Charged: Trouble erupted in Krusevac after the Euro 2013 play-off tie

Charged: Trouble erupted in Krusevac after the Euro 2013 play-off tie

But the trouble also played out against a backdrop of alleged racial abuse from the stands towards England players.

Defender Danny Rose, who made a
specific complaint, was sent off after the final whistle for kicking a
ball away in anger amid the chaos.

European governing body UEFA launched
their own disciplinary proceedings, charging the FA over the behaviour
of their players and the FSS with the same and for the alleged racist
chanting.

UEFA's control and disciplinary body
will convene on November 22 to deal with the case, but the police
investigation will have no bearing on that meeting.

Paul Kimmage takes legal action against UCI leaders over whistle blowers

Former cyclist Kimmage takes legal action against UCI leaders over whistle blowers

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UPDATED:

23:52 GMT, 1 November 2012

Irish journalist Paul Kimmage has
lodged a criminal complaint against International Cycling Union
president Pat McQuaid and honorary president Hein Verbruggen in a move
which will subject the leadership of the world governing body to further
scrutiny.

The UCI, McQuaid and Verbruggen last
week announced they were suspending defamation proceedings against
former Sunday Times journalist Kimmage pending the results of an
independent report.

Claims: Reporter Paul Kimmage (centre)

Claims: Reporter Paul Kimmage (centre)

Now former rider Kimmage, who has been hugely critical of the UCI leadership's response to doping in cycling, has launched proceedings of his own as the impact of the Lance Armstrong affair shows no sign of abating.

Kimmage wrote on Twitter: 'I have lodged a criminal complaint against Hein Verbruggen and Pat McQuaid.

'I have initiated these proceedings not for myself – this is not about Paul Kimmage, but on behalf of the whistle blowers – Stephen Swart, Frankie Andreu, Floyd Landis, Christophe Bassons, Nicolas Aubier, Gilles Delion, Graeme Obree and every other cyclist who stood up for truth and the sport they loved and were dismissed as “cowards” and “scumbags” by Verbruggen and McQuaid.'

John Terry promotes Kick It Out campaign in Chelsea captain programme notes

Terry promotes Kick It Out campaign in Chelsea captain's programme notes

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UPDATED:

09:56 GMT, 28 October 2012

Chelsea skipper John Terry has backed the Kick It Out campaign in his programme notes ahead of the game against Manchester United, stressing the club's wish to banish all forms of discrimination from football.

Terry – who enjoyed a night out with his wife Toni at London nightclub Mahiki on Saturday – will serve the second game of his four-match ban for racially abusing QPR defender Anton Ferdinand.

All smiles: Terry enjoyed a night out on the tiles with his wife Toni

All smiles: Terry enjoyed a night out on the tiles with his wife Toni

Kick It Out: terry has used his matchday notes to back the anti-discrimination cause

Kick It Out: terry has used his matchday notes to back the anti-discrimination cause

Kick It Out: Terry has used his matchday notes to back the anti-discrimination cause

The last few days appear to have
heralded the first signs of peace breaking out between the Ferdinand
brothers and Blues duo Terry and Ashley Cole.

Anton Ferdinand took part in Saturday's anti-racism initiative by wearing a Kick It Out T-shirt in the warm-up ahead of his team's match at Arsenal.

This gesture is expected to be followed by a handshake between his brother, United centre-back Rio, and Cole before the game.

As revealed by Sportsmail, in his 'captain's notes' in the matchday programme, Terry wrote: 'This is our dedicated match for the Kick It Out One Game, One Community campaign.

'We continue to be committed to eradicating all forms of discrimination from our game and creating a great atmosphere around the stadium.'

Cole gave evidence on behalf of Terry in the criminal case relating to the October 2011 incident, leading Rio Ferdinand to endorse a tweet which referred to Cole as a 'choc ice'.

Ferdinand was subsequently fined by the Football Association for re-tweeting the offending tweet.

Getting shirty: Brothers Anton and Rio have been at the centre of the race row

Getting shirty: Brothers Anton and Rio have been at the centre of the race row

Getting shirty: Brothers Anton and Rio have been at the centre of the race row

John Terry racism affair has harmed England"s reputation – David Bernstein

Terry racism row has damaged England's reputation… and the FA must do more, admits Bernstein

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UPDATED:

08:18 GMT, 19 October 2012

The reputation of English football has been harmed by the John Terry affair, admits FA chairman David Bernstein, who has vowed to clamp down on racism incidents in future.

Bernstein hopes a line can finally be drawn under the Terry racism case after the Chelsea captain's decision not to appeal against his punishment.

Terry was suspended for four games and fined 220,000 by an independent FA regulatory commission after he was found guilty of racially abusing QPR defender Anton Ferdinand in a game last season.

The row that divided football: John Terry (left) and Anton Ferdinand (right)

The row that divided football: John Terry (left) and Anton Ferdinand (right)

The time taken for the FA to handle the case has been criticised, although their investigation was held up by the need to defer to the police and the Crown Prosecution Service’s criminal proceedings.

The governing body’s verdict was finally announced two weeks ago and Terry accepted the sanction ahead of Thursday's deadline.

And a statement from Bernstein on the FA’s website read: 'The decision by John Terry not to appeal his FA charge hopefully brings to a close a difficult period for the domestic game in England in which, unfortunately, the reputation of English football has been damaged.

'John Terry has now been sanctioned and held accountable for his actions. I am pleased he has apologised and we must now draw a line under this matter.

'We too will learn from the case. We have noted criticisms made by the Independent Regulatory Commission as to how matters could and should be improved.

'I will ensure any lessons that arise from the ruling will be learnt quickly and appropriately.

'It is a shame that one high-profile incident has had such a major impact.
The damage of this affair is not irreparable, but as events this week have shown there are still many lessons to be learnt in the wider fight against racial abuse and discrimination of all types.'

England’s Under 21 team, and in particular full-back Danny Rose, suffered abuse in Serbia on Tuesday while Lazio were fined 32,500 by UEFA for monkey chants by their fans during a Europa League tie against Tottenham.

Bernstein continued: 'No player should suffer the intolerable abuse the likes of which Danny Rose was subjected to in Serbia.'

Shame in Serbia: Danny Rose (left) suffered racial abuse on Tuesday night

Shame in Serbia: Danny Rose (left) suffered racial abuse on Tuesday night

There has also been criticism from black players of the Kick It Out campaign, with Reading’s Jason Roberts leading players stating they will not wear organisation’s T-shirts during their current 'Weeks of Action' as it has not been hardline in its response to the Terry and Luis Suarez abuse incidents.

Suarez was hit with an eight-match ban last season for racially abusing Manchester United’s Patrice Evra, with Bernstein noting: 'Many have highlighted the difference between this sanction (for Terry) and the eight matches imposed on Luis Suarez.

'In the case of Suarez, however, the commission found that repetition of the insulting language used was a further aggravating factor.'

He also defended Kick It Out, saying: 'This coming fortnight's “Kick It Out” campaign is a valuable reminder of the strength of the game when addressing these issues together, and it is this positivity that our game must harness.

'I hope this time next year when we are marking 20 years of the “Let’s Kick Racism Out of Football” message we will be reflecting once again on the positive power of football to publicly oppose all forms of discrimination and ensure our sport is inclusive to all.'