Tag Archives: cricketer

Which football star wants to play club cricket when he retires?

From Blues to whites: Everton skipper Neville wants to play club cricket when he retires from football

By
Phil Gradwell

PUBLISHED:

13:11 GMT, 14 March 2013

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UPDATED:

13:57 GMT, 14 March 2013

Retirement will be a whole new ball game for Everton captain Phil Neville, who says he wants to spend his post-football days playing club cricket.

Neville, 36, may have won 59 England caps, have six Premier League titles to his name and be leading out an established top-flight side but he is relishing the thought of swapping his blue shirt for his whites.

That may not be for a few years yet but the defender – who played alongside Andrew Flintoff in Lancashire's youth set-up and was a good enough cricketer to play for the county's second XI aged 15 – said when his football career is up he will join Bury-based local-league club Greenmount, for whom he played as a junior.

Is that a wide Phil Neville looks as if he is getting into the cricket a bit early during Everton's FA Cup defeat by Wigan

Is that a wide Phil Neville looks as if he is getting into the cricket a bit early during Everton's FA Cup defeat by Wigan

Different kind of whites: Neville played 59 times for England

Different kind of whites: Neville played 59 times for England

WHO ARE GREENMOUNT CC

Greenmount Cricket Club, founded in 1867 (as far as records can establish) are based in Bury, Greater Manchester and play in the Bolton League.

In 2011 they won a treble of the Bolton League, the Lancashire Knock Out and the Hamer Cup.

They have had many famous overseas players including Australians Mark Taylor and Matthew Hayden and West Indian Franklyn Stephenson.

The much more English Neville Neville, father of Phil and Gary, also played for the club.

Neville told the Bolton News: 'One hundred per cent, I will play cricket again in a couple of years time if my career ends.

'That is the first thing I am going to do; I am going to get back doing something I love.

'People sometimes fear retirement but I am looking forward to it because I can go and do something I love.'

Neville was speaking as an ambassador
at the launch of ‘The Lancashire Way’ – an inclusive cricket initiative
launched by Lancashire CCC.

He
added: 'To get the chance at my stage in my life to get back involved
with Lancashire is great because I love going to Old
Trafford to watch.'

Team-mates: Neville played with a young Andrew Flintoff in Lancashire's youth set-up

Team-mates: Neville played with a young Andrew Flintoff in Lancashire's youth set-up

Advice: Everton captain Phil Neville chats to England women's cricketer Lydia Greenway at Lancashire's Old Trafford ground

Advice: Everton captain Phil Neville chats to England women's cricketer Lydia Greenway at Lancashire's Old Trafford ground

Michael Vaughan mocks Australia after innings defeat in India to stoke Ashes fires

England legend Vaughan stokes Ashes fires by mocking Aussies' miserable loss in India

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

12:08 GMT, 5 March 2013

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UPDATED:

12:08 GMT, 5 March 2013

There a few things more enjoyable for an English cricket fan than watching Australia squirm. For former captain Michael Vaughan the feeling is no different.

The 2005 Ashes-winning skipper spent the morning goading England's old foe as the Baggy Green suffered a humiliating defeat at the hands of India in Hyderabad.

The defeat means Australia became the first side in history to suffer an innings defeat having declared in their first innings, and Clarke admits they could have few complaints about the result.

Headache: Australia captain Michael Clarke is in charge of a poor Australia side

Headache: Australia captain Michael Clarke is in charge of a poor Australia side

Flop: Phillip Hughes is struggling again after being recalled as Australia's No 3 batsman

Flop: Phillip Hughes is struggling again after being recalled as Australia's No 3 batsman

Australia are in England this summer for the first of back-to-back Ashes series against Alastair Cook's side, where they will be looking to wrestle back the urn for the first time since 2006.

And after watching Michael Clarke's side toil in India, Vaughan took to Twitter to poke fun.

Those were the days: Michael Vaughan (centre) led England to Ashes glory in 2005, beating the greatest Australian side of them all

Those were the days: Michael Vaughan (centre) led England to Ashes glory
in 2005, beating the greatest Australian side of them all in the five-match series

Raise your bat: Vaughan celebrates his century at Old Trafford in the third Test in 2005

Raise your bat: Vaughan celebrates his century at Old Trafford in the third Test in 2005

Raise your bat: Vaughan celebrates his century at Old Trafford in 2005

In the first of his tweets, he wrote:
'Breaking news. Anyone that has bought a fifth day ticket for this
summer's Ashes will receive full refund due to Aussie team that won't
make it.'

He then added: 'What do you call a great Australian cricketer Retired…..'

Freddie Flintoff wants to open chip shop in London

From battering boxers to battering fish: Flintoff intends to open a chippy in London

By
Sunni Upal

PUBLISHED:

10:37 GMT, 3 January 2013

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UPDATED:

12:07 GMT, 3 January 2013

Freddie Flintoff is so unhappy with the quality of fish and chips shops in London that he wants to open his own.

The former England cricketer is in talks with TV producers about a news series, potentially on Sky One, where he runs a chippy in London with wife Rachael.

A source said: 'Freddie isn’t impressed with the quality of fish and chips shops down south and wants to open his own up in London selling market-fresh fish.

What's this garbage Flintoff is said to be unhappy with the quality of chippys down south

Enlarge

Fishy Flintoff

What's this garbage Flintoff is said to be unhappy with the quality of chippys down south

'He would be front of house but the business would be run by his wife Rachael, who has a background in catering and events.'

The move would be the latest in Flintoff's post-cricket career after he won on his professional boxing debut in Manchester last year.

Flintoff has been a regular on Sky's A League of Their Own as well as starring in ITV4 series Freddie Flintoff Versus The World.

Enlarge

King of the ring: Flintoff celebrates beating Richard Dawson

King of the ring: Flintoff celebrates beating Richard Dawson

Experience: Rachael has worked in the catering industry

Experience: Rachael has worked in the catering industry

Ex-England and Yorkshire cricketer Chris Old opened a fish and chip restaurant in Cornwall

Ex-England and Yorkshire cricketer Chris Old opened a fish and chip restaurant in Cornwall

Gotta keep the best! Pietersen takes to Twitter to demand Chelsea"s Lampard is given a new contract

Gotta keep the best! Pietersen takes to Twitter to demand Chelsea's Lampard is given a new contract

PUBLISHED:

23:21 GMT, 30 December 2012

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UPDATED:

23:21 GMT, 30 December 2012

As someone who knows how it feels to be instrumental to a team's fortunes but be ushered out, it's perhaps no wonder Kevin Pietersen took to Twitter to remind everyone of the virtues of Frank Lampard on Sunday night.

The England batsman and Chelsea fan took delight in Lampard's outstanding performance – and two goals – in Sunday's 2-1 win at Everton and urged owner Roman Abramovich to renew his contract when it expires at the end of the season.

He wrote: 'Lamps shows who the boss is today.. YOU DARE, Roman! #gottakeepthebest' and posted it just after watching a re-run of the Chelsea win on Match of the Day 2.

Support: England cricketer Kevin Pietersen took to Twitter to demand Chelsea's Frank Lampard be offered a new contract

Support: England cricketer Kevin Pietersen (below) took to Twitter to demand Chelsea's Frank Lampard be offered a new contract

England batsman Kevin Pietersen

The hashtag could be interpreted as a reference to his own reintegration to the England cricket squad after being outcast during the summer Test series with South Africa for allegedly sending defamatory text message to members of the opposition squad.

Pietersen was forced to make an apology to his captain Andrew Strauss, coach Andy Flower and other teammates after the text messages emerged and was reinstated for the tour of India this winter.

Food for thought: Lampard's double in an excellent performance at Goodison Park may prompt the Chelsea hierarchy to rethink not offering him a new contract in the summer

Food for thought: Lampard's double in an excellent performance at Goodison Park may prompt the Chelsea hierarchy to rethink not offering him a new contract in the summer

Lampard, 34, is out of contract at Stamford Bridge at the end of this season and, with negotiations over a new deal seemingly a non-starter, his two goals against Everton were a timely reminder of his undiminished abilities.

Pietersen is no stranger to airing his views on Chelsea's fortunes on Twitter – in November 2011, he called then manager Andre Villas-Boas a 'muppet' and gave him six months in the job. This turned out to be true, with the Portuguese sacked a few months later.

Tony Greig dies: Patrick Collins tribute

Brash and tactless he may have been but Greig was also cricket's saviour

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 29 December 2012

The MCC flag on the clock tower at Lord’s is flying at half-mast in memory of Tony Greig.

The former England captain, who died aged 66 following a heart attack at his home in Sydney on Saturday, would have smiled at this tribute from Official England. For no cricketer ever attracted such vituperation from those who ruled the game. Yet no cricketer ever succeeded so completely in transforming the game they once ruled.

Brash and combative, truculent and tactless, Greig will be recalled as much for his role in celebrated controversies as for his status as one of cricket’s finest all-rounders.

66 and out: Former England captain and popular television commentator Tony Greig has died in Sydney at the age of 66

66 and out: Former England captain and popular television commentator Tony Greig has died in Sydney at the age of 66

Job well done: Greig, then captain of England, relaxes with a pint after a Test match at Old Trafford in 1972

Job well done: Greig, then captain of England, relaxes with a pint after a Test match at Old Trafford in 1972

There was his foolhardy promise to make
the 1976 West Indies tourists ‘grovel’. It was a crassly offensive term
in any circumstances; spoken by a white South African at a time when
apartheid still oppressed that benighted country, it was catastrophic.

There was the day in Trinidad when he threw down the stumps of Alvin
Kallicharran as the West Indies batsman walked off the field at the
close of play. Greig appealed, the umpire raised his finger and a major
riot ensued. On the following morning, the appeal was revoked. But the
memory lingered.

Then there was Packer. Most of all, there was Packer. Some 35 years on, it is impossible to convey the depth of the outrage.

All-rounder: Greig scored 3,599 Test runs at an average of 40.43 and was also more than handy with the ball, claiming 141 wickets at an average of 32.20

All-rounder: Greig scored 3,599 Test runs at an average of 40.43 and was also more than handy with the ball, claiming 141 wickets at an average of 32.20

Mentor: Greig offers some words of advice for players of the future during a match for Brighton and Hove CC at Basingstoke in 1978

Mentor: Greig offers some words of advice for players of the future during a match for Brighton and Hove CC at Basingstoke in 1978

Leaders: Deposed England cricket captain Tony Greig (right) and his successor, Mike Brearley, during practice prior to the 1st ODI against Australia at Old Trafford in Manchester on 22nd June 1977

Leaders: Deposed England cricket captain Tony Greig (right) and his successor, Mike Brearley, during practice prior to the 1st ODI against Australia at Old Trafford in Manchester on 22nd June 1977

In 1977, cricketers were seen as being fortunate to play the game. Their
wages were meagre, their financial prospects precarious. Greig had been
captain of England for two years, a popular figure who seemed capable
of regenerating English cricket. But he had signed a secret agreement
with Kerry Packer, the owner of Nine Network in Australia, to set up a
‘rebel’ troupe of international cricketers.

He then — while still captain — began to recruit English and foreign cricketers for the Packer ‘circus’.

The plot became public and, within a week, Greig had lost the captaincy.
He was retained for an Ashes series as an England player, but his
international career then expired. He threw his energies behind Packer’s
successful attempt to popularise the game, especially the one-day
version with its coloured clothing and tumultuous crowds. The sport was
truly transformed.

Meeting of minds: Greig chats with Pakistan cricketer of the sixties Saeed Ahmed in the United Arab Emirates in 1997

Meeting of minds: Greig chats with Pakistan cricketer of the sixties Saeed Ahmed in the United Arab Emirates in 1997

Controversial times: Greig as captain of the World Series Cricket World XI in the 1979 Supertest Grand Final match with Australia in Sydney

Controversial times: Greig as captain of the World Series Cricket World XI in the 1979 Supertest Grand Final match with Australia in Sydney

It all tended to obscure the fact that he was a blissfully talented
cricketer. Six feet six inches in height, he scored 3,599 Test runs at
40.43 and took 141 wickets at 32.20. Once in the West Indies, with
England needing to win to save the series, he experimented with
off-spin. He took 13 wickets, scored a six and three-quarter-hour
century and England won by 26 runs.

An extraordinary talent.

He later moved to Australia and built a career as a commentator on
Packer’s television channel. The energy never dimmed until these last
few weeks, when he was diagnosed with lung cancer and his health swiftly
failed.

Memorabilia: Greig studies the ball used by Indian spinner Harbhajan Singh when he became the first Indian to take a hat-trick in Test cricket at an auction in Bangalore in 2003

Memorabilia: Greig studies the ball used by Indian spinner Harbhajan Singh when he became the first Indian to take a hat-trick in Test cricket at an auction in Bangalore in 2003

He has received a number of glowing obituaries, but many years ago his
former England colleague, Pat ‘Percy’ Pocock, wrote: ‘When the whole
Packer business erupted, the popular cry was that Tony Greig had
betrayed the game. I never believed that, and I think history will be
kind to him. Far from betraying it, I fancy he may just have saved it.’

Tony Greig would have appreciated the MCC flag on the clock tower. But I
suspect that Percy’s tribute would be the one he valued most of all.

WORLD OF CRICKET UNITES TO PAY TRIBUTE TO GREIG

England wicketkeeper, Matt Prior: 'Can't believe one of my heroes Tony Greig has passed away. One of the greatest voices in cricket and will be sorely missed. #RIPGreigy.'

England batsman Jonny Bairstow: 'Today we lost a fabulous man, a family friend and someone who was respected by all not only as a cricketer but a true gentleman RIPTonyGreig'

England opener, Nick Compton:
'Sad day – RIP Tony Greig a fantastic player and a good man, loved his
commentary was one of the best! Cricket world will miss u.'

Legendary Aussie fast bowler, Brett Lee: 'OMG Poor Tony Greig. I feel so sad and shocked right now. Can't believe it.'

England all-rounder, Luke Wright: 'Gutted to hear that Tony Greig has passed away. A legend on and off the field. Our thoughts are with his family and friends #RIPGreigy.'

Australia captain Michael Clarke on www.cricket.com.au: 'I was only speaking with Tony a couple of days ago so news of his passing is absolutely devastating.

'Tony has a long and decorated history with international cricket both as a player and commentator and cricket will be much poorer for his loss.

'Personally, he has also been a great mentor for me, providing great advice through the good times and the bad.'

Former Australian paceman Glen McGrath: My thoughts are with Tony Greig's family today. RIP Tony Greig'

Long-serving Nine Network cricket commentator and former Australia captain Richie Benaud recalled Greig's 'fearless' reaction to the English public following his decision to join the Packer team in 1977.
'There was an enormous amount of pressure on him,' Benaud told the Sydney Morning Herald.

'He was captain of England at the time and played against Australia at Lord's. The English people turned against him.

'He wasn't just a fearless cricketer but a fearless thinker as well. He would not just jump in boots first, but it wouldn't matter how much pressure it put on him, he would stick with it.'

Former Australia fast bowler Dennis Lillee told the same publication: 'Tony was a tough opponent who took on all opposition with aggression and a determination to win.

'We will not forget the way he stirred the viewers in a similar vein to the way he did to opposition teams.'

ICC chief executive David Richardson: 'This is extremely sad news for cricket and the ICC send their condolences to Tony's family and in particular his wife Vivian.

'Tony played a significant part in shaping modern cricket as a player in the 1970s and then provided millions of cricket lovers with a unique insight as a thoughtful and knowledgeable commentator – primarily for the Nine Network in Australia.

'I met with him on several occasions during the recent ICC World Twenty20 in Sri Lanka where he was a senior commentator for our broadcast partner ESS.

'He was also a regular visitor to the ICC offices in Dubai when commentating for Ten Sports.

'I am sure that I will not be alone in saying that he and his wise words will be missed by cricketers, administrators and spectators around the world.

'His figures in Test matches show that he was one of the leading all-rounders of his generation with a batting average of above 40 and a bowling average around 32.'

Lawrence Booth: England were dominant but India took their eye off the ball

Lawrence Booth: England were dominant but India took their eye off the ball

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UPDATED:

10:47 GMT, 17 December 2012

In the end, it was easy. If you’d told England supporters after the first-innings debacles at Ahmedabad with ball and bat that their team could afford to block out the final five sessions of the fourth Test to make sure of a series win for the annals, they would have asked what you were on and where they could get some.

But in providing the ballast for England’s series-clinching 352 for 4, Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell – the two centurions from Warwickshire – merely underlined the momentum shift that has played itself out over the past few weeks.

Dominant at Ahmedabad, India got cocky. MS Dhoni started asking for pitches designed for the sole purpose of humiliating England and wreaking revenge for 2011. They did what no cricketer should ever do: they took their eye off the ball.

Leading from the front: England captain Alastair Cook was dominant with the bat

Leading from the front: England captain Alastair Cook was dominant with the bat

England, meanwhile, were fortified by events in the second half of the first Test. Alastair Cook, a colossus in this series until he was defeated in Nagpur by negative bowling, a duffer of a pitch and the umpiring of Kumar Dharmasena, made 176 and Matt Prior 91. India’s spinners, it turned out, were no Saeed Ajmal, Abdur Rehman or Rangana Herath.

It helped that England picked the right team in Mumbai. In came Monty Panesar for Tim Bresnan, and a pitch of pace and bounce played right into their hands – for the inclusion of Panesar, with his extra pace, meant England now possessed the superior spin attack.

In a spin: England's spin bowlers of Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar out performed the Indian spinners

In a spin: England's spin bowlers of Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar out performed the Indian spinners

It helped that Kevin Pietersen had a post-reintegration point to prove. For attacking intent, only Virender Sehwag’s opening-day century at Ahmedabad could even begin to live with Pietersen’s 186 at the Wankhede.

Batting for glory: Jonathan Trott was able to bat for the majority of the final day to see England home to the draw they needed in the final Test

Batting for glory: Jonathan Trott was able to bat for the majority of the final day to see England home to the draw they needed in the final Test

And it helped that Cook, having told his players that – when it came to fluffing their lines against spin in Asia – enough was enough, was a captain on a mission.

At Kolkata, Jimmy Anderson joined in the fun, finding reverse-swing that proved beyond his Indian counterparts, and combining with Steven Finn on the third afternoon in another game where the nature of the pitch had proved a pre-match distraction for the Indians.

And at Nagpur, England won an important toss – at last! – and so were able to keep control of their destiny on a pitch that ensured the fourth Test was played in slow motion. Joe Root proved an inspired pick, and Anderson was outstanding once more, especially on the third evening, when India’s hopes of a big first-innings lead evaporated in an hour.

For many reasons, this must rank as one of England’s finest series wins – home or away. They arrived with a reputation as poor players of spin in Asian conditions, and with the Pietersen saga still a tangible undercurrent.

They had a new captain, who could have been granted a tougher assignment for his first series as full-time leader. They were up against a team that had lost only four series at home out of 40. And they were written off after the first Test.

At least in Australia two years ago they arrived with hope and a little expectation. Here, victory has been a bolt from the blue. At the end of a wondrous year for British sport, the cricketers have finally joined in.

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.
The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.
MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Saturday debate: Who is best captain of current era?

Saturday debate: Who do you think is the best sporting captain of the current era

PUBLISHED:

22:00 GMT, 7 December 2012

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 7 December 2012

With Alastair Cook and Chris Robshaw guiding the England cricket and rugby teams to memorable victories in the last week or so, we ask our panel of experts which captain in the modern era they think is the most impressive…

PAUL NEWMAN Cricket Correspondent
I have to say Alastair Cook, don’t I To score three centuries in his first three Tests as permanent captain, together with the two he recorded deputising for Andrew Strauss in Bangladesh, is to make an extraordinary start to his reign and the records have just kept on tumbling in Kolkata. More tactical acumen will come. For now, Cook is the epitome of leading by example.

Flying start: Cook has made three centuries in three matches

Flying start: Cook has made three centuries in three matches

MIKE DICKSON Tennis Correspondent

It has to be a cricketer and the outstanding skipper of the past 10 years has been Graeme Smith: tactician, diplomat and leader by example. South Africa have never lost a Test when he has made a hundred, and since taking over aged 22 he has steered a skilful course through his country’s racial politics. Smith has had a personal hand in ending the reigns of three England captains, Nasser Hussain, Michael Vaughan and Andrew Strauss, but may not be around to see off Alastair Cook.

RIATH AL-SAMARRAI Football writer

You don’t watch Barcelona for the centre halves, but it’s worth noting that five years had passed without a worthwhile gong when Carles Puyol took the armband eight years ago. Since then they have won five La Liga titles, three Champions Leagues, two Copa del Reys and have produced arguably the greatest club side in history. Michael Laudrup calls Puyol Barca’s ‘heartbeat’; Edgar Davids says he is ‘essential to the way they play and think’. Puyol has done all right since ignoring Louis van Gaal’s demands to get a haircut after his first Barca training session.

Hair we go: Puyol is a natural leader

Hair we go: Puyol is a natural leader

IAN LADYMAN Nothern Football Correspondent

One club, 15 years, 430 games, 3,000 points and endless bloody noses. Kevin Sinfield may not play one of the world’s most heralded sports and he could walk down the street in most towns without even being recognised. But in terms of what he has done for his club, Leeds Rhinos, and for his sport there are few who have contributed more. Nice chap, too, by all accounts.

JONATHAN McEVOY

Imposing and unyielding, Graeme Smith is the brutal embodiment of the South African cricket team. Averaging just a flick under 50, his obdurate brilliance as an opener goes hand in hand with a spirited leadership that has persisted for 96 Test matches over almost a decade. Three England captains have perished at his hands, the latest this summer with South Africa’s return to No 1 in the Test rankings.

The greatest Smith holds the world No 1 mace after drawing in Australia

The greatest Smith holds the world No 1 mace after drawing in Australia

Shane Warne"s return: Sportsmail looks at others who came back

The Roaring Forties! As Warne targets return, Sportsmail looks at others who couldn't stay away

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UPDATED:

22:31 GMT, 4 December 2012

Australian cricketer Shane Warne has opened the door to a return to international cricket in time for the Ashes this summer.

Here, Sportsmail takes a look back at sportsmen who simply couldn't stay away…

Michael Schumacher

The seven-time Formula One world champion announced his return at 41, driving in the 2010 season for Mercedes.

He finished his first season ninth in the drivers' championship with 72 points and his second in eighth.

After his final race last month in Brazil, he finished 13th in the drivers' championship.

Returning hero: Michael Schumacher went back to Formula 1 after retiring

Returning hero: Michael Schumacher went back to Formula 1 after retiring

Thomas Muster

The winner of the 1995 French Open announced his return to tennis in June 2010 at the age of 43.

Muster played in a Challenger tournament in Germany, but lost in the first round and in his next three tournaments.

His first win came in his fifth Challenger tournament and he finally retired after losing at the Erste Bank Open in October 2010.

Evander Holyfield

The four-time world boxing champion came back in August 2006 aged 42. He defeated Jeremy Bates before losing to Sultan Ibragimov in October 2007 in a WBO heavyweight title fight.

Holyfield was beaten again in December 2008 by Nikolai Valuev and won his last fight against Brian Nielsen in May 2011 by a technical knockout.

Back between the ropes: Evander Holyfield

Back between the ropes: Evander Holyfield

Fred Titmus

IN 1975, the 42-year-old off-spinner made a return to the England team, playing in the fourth Ashes Test, taking seven wickets and scoring 61.

He played in two one-day internationals against New Zealand, taking 3-53 in the second before playing his last full year in 1976 in England. He made his last appearance for Middlesex in 1982, aged 50.

Lester Piggott

The legendary jockey retired in 1985 but in 1987 was convicted of tax fraud and jailed for three years.

After serving 366 days and being stripped of his OBE, Piggott resumed racing in 1990, aged 45.

He won the Breeders' Cup Mile on Royal Academy and the 2000 Guineas on Rodrigo de Triano in 1992.

Piggott rode his last winner in October 1994.

Remember me Lester Piggott, champion flat race jockey, couldn't stay away

Remember me Lester Piggott, champion flat race jockey, couldn't stay away

Mark Spitz

Spitz retired immediately after winning seven swimming golds at the 1972 Munich Olympics, aged 22.

But at 41 he returned to the pool in 1992 to try for a place on the USA swimming team for the Barcelona Olympics.

He finished two seconds outside the qualifying time at the Olympic trials and retired again.

India v England: Stuart Broad hit by illness after just one day of second Test in Mumbai

EXCLUSIVE: Broad hands England major concern after being hit by illness after just one day of second Test

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UPDATED:

17:39 GMT, 23 November 2012

Stuart Broad has been struck down by illness at England's Mumbai hotel.

The paceman, who took no wickets on day one of the Second Test today after a dismal performance, was attended to by England team medics.

Many pundits have questioned whether the 26-year-old should have been selected for the Test at the Wankhede Stadium, with Surrey quick Stuart Meaker making a strong case for inclusion.

Delhi belly: Stuart Broad has been struck down by illness in Mumbai

Delhi belly: Stuart Broad has been struck down by illness in Mumbai

Broad now faces an overnight battle to be fit to take the field on day two with the match delicately poised. India were 266 for six at stumps with Monty Panesar, returning to the side taking four for 91.

Former England coach David Lloyd wrote in his MailOnline column before news of Broad’s illness broke: ‘Stuart Broad is out of sorts… he’s running on empty. I know him well and he will be frustrated that his contribution is not as it should be.

‘Quick bowlers need to be used in short, sharp bursts in India and his pace is down. He needs a break and England should freshen things up for the next Test.

‘They are under no obligation to pick him just because he is vice-captain. Why do we even need one’

Broad missed England’s final training
session before the Second Test and was rated as a major doubt due to
feeling 'under the weather', according to a team spokesman.

MONTY'S SMILE PUTS INDIA IN A SPIN

by Lawrence Booth, in Mumbai

Monty Panesar allowed himself a broad grin as he reflected on the ball that dismissed Sachin Tendulkar, ‘Prince of India’, on his home ground yesterday.

England’s left-arm spinner, controversially left out at Ahmedabad, has never attempted to disguise his hero-worship of the world’s most famous cricketer. He was even barred from bowling to Tendulkar in the nets at Lord’s by coach Andy Flower when India toured England in 2011.

And he still cherishes the moment he trapped Tendulkar lbw more than six years ago in Nagpur to claim his first Test wicket.

But the ball that bowled Tendulkar here will linger equally long in the memory, with Panesar keen to praise England’s spin-bowling coach Mushtaq Ahmed for instilling good habits in the nets.

‘My favourite wicket has to be the Prince of India, Sachin Tendulkar,’ he said. ‘I was absolutely delighted with that.

‘In the last few practice sessions I’ve been working with Mushy quite a lot in trying to get my action right. The previous ball I got my action slightly wrong it. I thought that next ball I had to make sure I get all the processes right and remember the work I’d done with Mushy.

‘It just seemed to click. I got my fingers round the ball and it came out nice.'

Panesar modestly ascribed some of his success yesterday, when he also bowled Virender Sehwag, as well as dismissing the dangerous duo of Virat Kohli and India captain MS Dhoni, to a turning pitch at the Wankhede Stadium.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the Second Test in Mumbai due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Andrew Flintoff: My battle against bulimia

My battle to beat bulimia, reveals Flintoff as cricket hero sheds the pounds for start of his boxing career

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UPDATED:

08:57 GMT, 15 November 2012

England cricketing hero Andrew Flintoff has revealed how he battled with bulimia in the early stages of his career.

The 34-year-old told how he began throwing up in cricket grounds and restaurants after he piled on the pounds.

Flintoff, who has embarked on a sporting comeback as a heavyweight boxer and is set to fight on November 30, revealed his eating disorder in a documentary to be screened later this month.

England cricket star Freddie Flintoff, leaving the Punch Bowl pub in Mayfair with his wife Rachael Wools

England all-rounder Andrew Flintoff tucks into a curry in Durban

Honest: Former England cricketer Andrew Flintoff, left with wife Rachael, and right tucking into a curry during his playing days, has revealed how he suffered from Bulimia

He said: ‘I used to be a really skinny kid, I used to be tall and skinny and I didn’t drink, I didn’t do much.

‘Then I started putting weight on. My lifestyle was great, granted, when I started living on my own. I got to about 19 and a half to 20 stone.

‘It was all a bit deeper than that because to lose the weight, I wasn’t really sure how to go about it. I started being sick, I was sick a lot. I would eat and I would be sick.

‘I would be doing it myself. I would put my fingers down my throat and everyone within the team hierarchy thought it was great because I was losing weight.’

Flintoff, who was instrumental in two Ashes victories against Australia, said he was often called ‘fat lad’ and faced jibes such as ‘who ate all our pies’ He added: ‘I’ve thrown up in cricket grounds around the world, in restaurants, all sorts, and I lost about 15kg by doing that.

‘It’s not the right way to go, which I am very aware of. You start off doing it if you have a bad meal, you eat something you don’t think you should have eaten or you have drunk too much.

‘Then before you know it, even good meals you are getting rid of. It becomes a real habit. The only way really to lose weight is to train more and eat less, eat the right things.’

Andrew Flintoff poses during his boxing training

Back in the day, a larger Flintoff

Lean and keen: Flintoff, left, poses for a shot during his boxing training, and right, sporting a 'fuller figure' during his playing days

All change: As he embarks on his new sports career as a boxer, Flintoff has revealed he used to have serious issues with food

All change: As he embarks on his new sports career as a boxer, Flintoff has revealed he used to have serious issues with food

He hopes that speaking about his battle will raise awareness about bulimia.

A spokesman for the National Centre for Eating Disorders said: ‘It is well known that men get eating disorders, too – look at John Prescott (Mr Prescott revealed he had suffered from bulimia during his time as Deputy Prime Minister). This is a condition more likely to occur in someone who has poor body image or shaky self-esteem.’

The documentary Flintoff: From Lords to the Ring, to be screened on Sky1, details the sportsman’s career change from cricket to boxing. Flintoff also uses the programme to criticise former England team-mates who have since taken up careers in cricket commentating. He said: ‘I could have taken the easy option, saying ‘‘Coming into bat for England at No 3’’. But no, I go and get my head kicked in instead.’

Flintoff has been criticised for entering the sport of boxing as a ‘publicity stunt’.

Andrew Flintoff revealed he has struggled with his weight

Flintoff has yo-yo'd with his weight

Out in the open: Flintoff often received criticism from rival supporters over his weight as a professional cricketer – and now he has revealed how deep the problems went

But the cricketer, who lost 45lbs during a gruelling four-month training camp filmed for a three-part series to be screened on Sky1HD, insists his motives are honourable. ‘You couldn’t go through this for a TV stunt,’ he said. ‘I’m hoping this is something where boxing is celebrated.’

Flintoff was born Andrew but nicknamed ‘Freddy’ after Fred Flintstone. He married Rachael Woods in 2005 and has three children – Holly, eight, Corey, six, and Rocky, four. He announced his retirement from cricket in September 2010.

He is not the only sportsman to suffer from bulimia.

Footballer Paul Gascoigne detailed his battle with the condition in his 2006 autobiography ‘Being Gazza: Tackling My Demons’.