Tag Archives: cook

Cricket fan hit on head with ball in Dunedin – New Zealand v England

VIDEO: Knocked for six! Cricket fan is clobbered on the head as Kiwi openers punish lacklustre England

By
Joe Ridge

PUBLISHED:

11:45 GMT, 7 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

12:16 GMT, 7 March 2013

Just one six was hit on the second day of the first Test between New Zealand and England and Dunedin – but one poor lad wore it right on his temple.

Having skittled England out for a pitiful 167, Kiwi openers Hamish Rutherford and Peter Fulton had seen off the new ball and were just settling into their stride when Monty Panesar was brought into the attack by Alastair Cook.

Scroll down to to watch the video…

Clean hit: Hamish Rutherford launches Monty Panesar towards the long on boundary

Clean hit: Hamish Rutherford launches Monty Panesar towards the long on boundary

Incoming: Hamish Rutherford launches Monty Panesar towards the long on boundary

But while the watching public were waiting to see if the spinner could extract any turn from a decent pitch, one unlucky punter took his eye off the ball as the left-handed Rutherford sent the ball sailing over the long-on rope.

The ball clattered into the unsuspecting spectator's head but don't worry, he's OK, and he'll have it all on tape to look back on – once the swelling has gone down, of course.

Unsuspecting: The fan is seen chatting to friends just before the ball hits him

Unsuspecting: The fan is seen chatting to friends just before the ball hits him

Unsuspecting: The fan is seen chatting to friends just before the ball hits him

Stinger: The fan is in pain, but he's OK

Stinger: The fan is in pain, but he's OK

VIDEO: Watch fan get hit on the head by Hamish Rutherford six

Stumped! Cricket ball hits fan on the head

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England lose Test warm-up game by three wickets to New Zealand XI

Watling's second half-century gives Cook and Co plenty to ponder ahead of first Test as England lose tour match

By
David Clough, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

07:33 GMT, 2 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

07:33 GMT, 2 March 2013

England suffered an unexpected defeat as BJ Watling's second half-century of the match proved too much for the tourists at the Queenstown Event Centre ground.

Watling (89no) followed his unbeaten 66 in the first innings with another telling contribution to help a New Zealand XI chase 334 to prevail in a tight finish with eight balls and three wickets to spare.

England, in their first red-ball fixture of a double-Ashes year in this warm-up for the first of three Tests in Dunedin, were losing in a first-class tour match for the first time in almost seven years – the last defeat came against an India board XI in Vadodara.

Trudging off: England captain Alastair Cook alongside Kevin Pietersen and Stuart Broad react after losing to the New Zealand XI

Trudging off: England captain Alastair Cook alongside Kevin Pietersen and Stuart Broad react after losing to the New Zealand XI

Watling finished with eight fours and two sixes from 122 balls, in a run chase which featured three other individual scores between 40 and 50 as England – without rested frontline seamers James Anderson and Steven Finn – paid for an unconvincing performance with the ball in particular.

Graham Onions lost his way, and it is hard to see him being considered as the go-to back-up Test seamer if needed after recording match figures of one for 213.

Inconsistent batting from the top six was also part of the problem – with Kevin Pietersen, Jonathan Trott and Nick Compton all short of runs as the Test series looms.

There was no particular shame in losing to a team in which all but Carl Cachopa have international experience, and five – including wicketkeeper Watling – are in the squad to face England again next week.

It is hardly the start Alastair Cook would have wanted nonetheless as his side seek to follow up their historic series win in India with more success here over the next three weeks.

After England declared on their overnight 256 for nine, progress was initially unremarkable for both sides.

Openers Hamish Rutherford and Tom Latham began the chase with their second stand of 56 in this match, at four-an-over on a cloudy morning which yielded no immediate headway for Stuart Broad and Onions with the new ball.

Rutherford even climbed into an upper-cut which deposited a short ball from Broad high over point and into the enclosure in front of the players' pavilion for six.

Soon afterwards, Broad hit the same batsman on the head with a sharp bouncer.
But it was first-change Chris Woakes who made the first breakthrough when Rutherford cut him into the hands of point.

Woakes was rewarded for a spell which was much-improved from his first-innings efforts, and Broad also struck in the next over when he switched to a fuller length and bowled a static Cachopa for a third-ball duck.

Onions looked a slightly more likely wicket-taker too for a time, but no one could find a way past Latham or Neil Broom up to lunch.

Their stand had extended to 64 by the time Swann got Latham two short of his half-century, apparently caught-behind as he tried to sweep.

Then with the first ball after mid-session drinks, Broad saw off Broom lbw playing no shot.

When Dean Brownlie went too before tea, neatly caught low at second slip by Swann off the returning Woakes, the hosts were running out of frontline batsmen.

But Watling and Corey Anderson, who had battered England for a rapid century stand in the first innings, were once more in occupation.

They almost repeated the dose too, in a partnership of 82 this time which took the hosts to well within 100 runs of their target with more than 20 overs remaining.

Onions had suffered at Anderson's hands yesterday, and did so again today in two overs which cost 23 runs and contained three no-balls.

A much-needed wicket came from an unlikely source in Joe Root, who did Anderson in the flight as he aimed another big hit to leg and was bowled.

Swann, off the field for several overs previously, returned only to almost immediately drop Watling on 47 off Broad at gully.

It proved a costly miss – because, even after Jimmy Neesham had pulled a Root long-hop straight into Broad's hands at square-leg, Watling saw the job through against the second new ball in an unbroken half-century stand alongside Neil Wagner.

Joe Root not resting on laurels after England beat India

Long way to go: Root not resting on laurels after Rajkot win

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

11:07 GMT, 12 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

12:04 GMT, 12 January 2013

Joe Root is confident England will not rest on their breakthrough success over India in yesterday's first one-day international.

England claimed a first 50-over win over India on their home soil in seven years, and 13 games, after securing a nine-run success in Rajkot.

The tourists had been whitewashed 5-0 in their previous two visits but, after a long-awaited Test success in the country last month, Root said the limited overs team would not get ahead of themselves in the five-match series.

Runs: Root was not required to bat in the first ODI as England racked up 325-4

Runs: Root was not required to bat in the first ODI as England racked up 325-4

'We all know how tough it is out here and there is still a long way to go in the series,' he told Sky Sports News.

'We are all up for it and ready to go for the second match (in Kochi on Tuesday).

'We are only concentrating on the next game and making sure we put in a good performance like we did in the first ODI. If we do that then we will be up there.'

Root was not required to bat on his ODI debut yesterday as England posted 325-4 on the back of a 158-run opening stand between Alastair Cook (75) and Ian Bell (85).

Partnership: Bell (85) and captain Cook (75) shared an opening stand of 158

Partnership: Bell (85) and captain Cook (75) shared an opening stand of 158

The 22-year-old revealed he had begun the day expecting to come in at four but, after England's start, was shunted down the order.

It meant his nine handy overs of part-time spin – which conceded 51 runs – were his major contribution, although the Yorkshireman was hardly complaining.

'I was told I was going to bat four but the key to success everywhere is being able to adapt and we did that fantastically well yesterday,' he said.

'We're going to have to continue to do that throughout the tour if we are to be successful.

'I'm happy to play and be a part of it all so I'm not worried at all.'

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

How Nolberto Solano convinced Harrogate Town goalkeeper Mark Cook to move to Peru

From Harrogate to Peru… How Nobby Solano lured Mark Cook to a land of beaches, jungles and needles in unspeakable places!

|

UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 25 December 2012

Think of the more peculiar transfers in British football over the past 12 months, and Barnet signing Edgar Davids or Robert Earnshaw going on loan from Cardiff to Maccabi Tel Aviv might spring to mind.

But it’s fair to say the deal that saw Mark Cook, a goalkeeper with non-league Harrogate Town, join the biggest club in Peru takes some beating.

The link in this rather unlikely scenario is Nolberto Solano, the former Newcastle United midfielder, who until recently was manager of Club Universitario de Deportes, Peru’s most successful team and one that fills its 80,000-capacity Estadio Monumental for local derbies in Lima.

Tall order: Mark Cook is not certain he will stay in Peru

Tall order: Mark Cook is not certain he will stay in Peru

Solano knew Cook from his time as reserve-team keeper at Newcastle and a brief spell together at Hartlepool. Still, moving to South America was the last thing on Cook’s mind when he received a call while training at a gym in Newcastle in July.

'Nobby was in Peru,’ he recalls. ‘He was looking for a goalkeeper and wanted to know my situation. He said it was a hot country with nice beaches, nice weather and nice food. I thought, “that’ll do me!” ‘Obviously I was bit anxious about what Peru was going to be like — I knew absolutely nothing about Peruvian football — but I said yes straightaway even before I’d asked my girlfriend.

'Harrogate are a brilliant club but I wanted to be playing full-time football again.’ Within a month the 24-year-old Geordie had swapped the Blue Square Bet North for Peru’s Primera Division. However, even though Solano and his friends had taken care of the paperwork, they forgot to warn Cook about what to expect at the airport.

A far away land: Cook training with Nobby Solano in Peru

A far away land: Cook training with Nobby Solano in Peru

'Nobby’s very famous in Peru and knows everyone in Lima,’ says Cook, who played under Shay Given and Steve Harper at Newcastle. ‘So some guy tapped me on the shoulder and took me through passport control and customs. Visa stamped, straight through.

'But when I came out of the doors I was surrounded by about 40 reporters. I couldn’t see a thing because there were that many flashes.

'At Harrogate the most media attention I got was from the club’s website guy and one or two local papers.’

It was a similar story when Cook accompanied two of his new teammates to a signing session at a supermarket in Lima.

‘It was crazy. There were thousands of fans surrounding me and the other lads. I had to escorted back to the car by eight security guards which I found weird.’ North Shields-born Cook made his debut in front of 35,000 in a 1-0 defeat to Sport Huancayo at the beginning of September, the first of two Primera Division appearances for Universitario. The second, away to Cobresol, taught him what it was like to play at altitude.

A new start: Cook shows off his Universitario shirt

A new start: Cook shows off his Universitario shirt

‘It’s hard to breathe and the ball moves around really quickly because the air’s thinner,’ says Cook. ‘If you play outside Lima it’s like going to a different country. One time we landed and had to drive three hours through desert, another it was through a jungle.

AND HE’S NOT THE ONLY BRIT TO GO ON AN ADVENTURE…

ROHAN RICKETTS

After spells at Arsenal, Tottenham and Wolves, Ricketts embarked on a world tour in 2009, taking in clubs in Canada, Hungary, Moldova, Germany and Ireland before moving to Dempo SC in the Indian I-League in August.

GRANT HOLT

The Norwich frontman has spent most of his career at various English clubs, but in 2001 he made a brief trip to the far east. Holt signed for Singapore side Sengkang Marine before returning to play for Barrow.

LEE HENDRIE

Hendrie made his name playing in midfield for Aston Villa. But after a series of short spells at clubs in the midlands, he moved to Bandung in the Liga Primer Indonesia.

JLLOYD-SAMUEL

After playing for Aston Villa, Bolton and Cardiff, the 31-year-old signed for Esteghlal in the Iranian Pro League.

TERRY COOKE

After struggling to break through at Man Utd, Cooke moved to Manchester City before finding success in the MLS playing for Colorado Rapids. In 2010, he teamed up with manager Tony Adams at Azerbaijan club Gabala.

NICKY BUTT

The former Man Utd and Newcastle midfielder headed to Hong Kong in 2010, signing for South China FC.

ROBERT EARNSHAW

After falling out of favour at Cardiff, the Wales striker joined Israeli side Maccabi Tel Aviv on loan in September 2012.

PAUL IFILL

The former Millwall man plays his football in New Zealand. The 33-year-old left Crystal Palace and signed for Wellington Phoenix in July 2009.

The fans are the best I’ve seen and that’s saying something coming from Newcastle.
'Every game they sing for 90 minutes non-stop, jumping up and down behind the goal, setting off flares and banging their drums.

'Until then, the biggest crowd I’d played in front of was 4,000 for Newcastle reserves.’ Universitario finished the regular season in mid-table but faded after the Primera Division split into two separate leagues for the last 14 games.

'They make the rules up as they go along, to be honest with you,’ says Cook.

'I played about six or seven games altogether including friendlies but I only played twice for the first-team before injuring my finger which meant I couldn’t train for two or three weeks.

'As soon as you get any kind of injury they stick an injection in your bum to make you better. Every time. I don’t know what it was. If you were tired, they stuck a needle in your bum. To be fair, the next day you felt brilliant.’

It was after an exhibition game against fierce rivals Alianza Lima in Miami earlier this month that Solano told his players he might be leaving the club. Shortly after returning to Peru, he was gone.

Solano’s departure has cast doubt over Cook’s future at Universitario. He has flown home to the north-east for Christmas unsure whether he will go back for the new season which starts in February.

'I was massively shocked when Nobby went,’ says Cook. ‘He pulled them out of trouble because they were second bottom and struggling, and then all of a sudden it came out that he wasn’t going to be there any more. I’m not sure if he got sacked or he walked away.

'I still have year left on my contract but they’ve got a new manager in now so I need to speak with him and find out what their plans are for me.

'I’m just enjoying Christmas with my family and then we’ll see what happens.’ Cook and his girlfriend Sarah are already missing their 14th floor apartment in the upmarket area of Miraflores, just two minutes’ walk from the beach.

'I always wanted to be a footballer and I thought I would play in the Football League but nothing massive. It never crossed my mind I’d end up in a place like that in Peru.’

Alastair Cook says beating India is as good as winning in Australia

On par with the Ashes: Captain Cook believes beating India is as good as triumph over Australia

|

UPDATED:

00:04 GMT, 18 December 2012

Alastair Cook marked the victorious end of his first series as Test captain by saying England's win felt as good as when they captured the Ashes in Australia.

Centuries from Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell saw Cook's side safely home to a draw in the final game in Nagpur to secure a 2-1 triumph and the first series win in India by an England team in nearly 28 years.

And Cook, named man of the series for his 562 runs which turned the tide after a first-Test defeat, said: 'I think it is on a par with the Ashes.

Loving it! James Anderson, Graeme Swann and Alastair Cook (right) celebrate winning the Ashes in Australia in 2010

Loving it! James Anderson, Graeme Swann and Alastair Cook (right) celebrate winning the Ashes in Australia in 2010

'As an Englishman, winning in Australia after so long meant a huge amount. But in that dressing room there for that last half an hour, knowing what wehad achieved, it was a very special place and it will live long in my memory.

'It has been an incredible tour. It was a pretty nervy dressing room for the last 150-odd overs, knowing how close we were to something very special, but to go out and do it as convincingly as we did was great.'

England now have series away and at home against New Zealand next year before an Ashes defence on home soil from July.

Team director Andy Flower spoke of how the team had done their country proud while Cook, only the fourth England captain to win a Test series in India, admitted even he was surprised at how things turned around after starting with a nine-wicket defeat in Ahmedabad.

He said: 'I was not surprised at the way we stood together, but I was at the level we managed to achieve so soon after Ahmedabad.

'I talked about playing to our potential, but I was surprised we managed to do it straightaway.

'When you go to bed realising you can play here – that is very encouraging.

'After that second innings in Ahmedabad we thought: yes, we can score runs out here. Everyone has contributed and I can't praise the guys enough. The willingness to learn and to front up to a very tough challenge was fantastic.'

Accomplished: Cook oversaw a momentous win in India as captain

Accomplished: Cook oversaw a momentous win in India as captain

India captain MS Dhoni put a brave face on his country's first home defeat since Australia toured in 2004-05, and admitted England were 'a very well-balanced side'.

He added: 'Their two spinners are very good, and James Anderson bowled very well throughout on wickets where there was no help for the fast bowlers. He was the major difference.'

Asked whether he thought Sachin Tendulkar – off the field for most of Monday nursing a stiff neck – would play another Test, Dhoni replied: 'I hope so.'

Pushed on whether Tendulkar had told his captain about his plans, Dhoni said: 'No.'

It felt a suitably inconclusive end to one of the most disappointing home series India have known.

Picture dispute: We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

England win Test series in India for first time in 28 years

England end 28-year wait for series victory in India as Trott bats hosts into submission

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UPDATED:

12:05 GMT, 17 December 2012

England scored a famous 2-1 Test series victory over India after centurions Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell shut the hosts out to confirm the stalemate they needed in Nagpur.

Trott (143) and Bell (116no) barely had a moment's anxiety in a stand of 208 before England declared on 352 for four in the final session, with a lead of 356 which rendered an India second innings unnecessary.

It is almost 28 years since England last won a Test series here, under David Gower and when current captain Alastair Cook was a babe in arms only weeks old.

Party time: Prior celebrates victory with England back room staff

Party time: Prior celebrates victory with England back room staff

Cook has been one of the foundations
of this success, with centuries in his first three Tests after replacing
Andrew Strauss as permanent captain.

But it was Trott and Bell who today
ensured an achievement all the more notable after England's crushing
nine-wicket defeat in the first Test in Ahmedabad.

There was much reason for personal
satisfaction too – in Trott's second hundred of 2012 while Warwickshire
team-mate Bell registered his first since making 235 against these same
opponents at The Oval in 2010, and in a country where he had previously
passed 50 just once in three tours.

Cook, Kevin Pietersen and spinners
Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann had begun England's comeback in Mumbai;
then the captain was at it again in Kolkata last week, when Steven Finn
and in particular James Anderson's mastery of reverse-swing completed
England's skills set.

It was heartening that Trott and Bell
should be involved in the home straight, though, after their relative
troubles in a year which has seen England lose seven of 15 Tests as well
as their position at the top of the International Cricket Council
rankings.

After Trott's ducks in Ahmedabad and
Mumbai, he contributed significantly at Eden Gardens and here –
completing the process with a typically cussed near five-hour hundred
and also passing 1,000 runs after all in the past 12 months.

England's number three reached three
figures with a trademark boundary wide of mid-on off leg-spinner Piyush
Chawla, and celebrated with feeling.

All around him India, minus veteran
master batsman Sachin Tendulkar who was off the field with a sore neck,
wore glum faces resigned to a first home series defeat in eight years.

Bell did nothing to lighten their mood
either and, having had just one escape on 75 when a fierce cut at
Piyush Chawla was edged and put down by Virender Sehwag at slip, reached
his painstaking six-hour hundred from 293 balls.

Getting shirty: KP enjoys a beer in his shirt signed by all the players

Getting shirty: KP enjoys a beer in his shirt signed by all the players

Along the way, there had been 13 fours and a six over long-off from the bowling of Ravindra Jadeja.

Soon after that blow to bring up the
200 stand, Trott was finally gone – India's only success of the day when
he was caught at leg-slip off Ravichandran Ashwin from the 310th
delivery he faced.

He and Bell had joined forces at a
wobbly 94 for three when Pietersen was bowled shouldering arms at Jadeja
last night, and Trott's only alarm came on 106 when he missed a Chawla
top-spinner but survived the lbw appeal.

England arrived here needing only a
draw, but Cook was at pains beforehand to spell out the danger of
settling for limited ambition with stakes so high.

In the event, conditions dictated that
the stalemate would have to do on a mesmerisingly slow surface which
precluded a scoring rate much in excess of two an over throughout.

Despite its crazy-paving cracks from the outset, the VCA Stadium strip never deteriorated either.

Unwatered and unrolled for almost
three weeks before the match, the intention seemed to be to provide a
'result' pitch in the hope India's four spinners could outbowl England's
two.

If those were the expectations, it was soon abundantly clear the hosts were barking up the wrong tree.

Solitary seamer Ishant Sharma was by
far the pick of their attack in the first innings, when low bounce from
his high trajectory posed the biggest threat to England.

But after the tourists recovered from
16 for two to top 300, it was hard to see India getting far enough in
front quickly enough to apply the pressure.

So it proved as, even after a near
double-century fifth-wicket stand between Virat Kohli and captain
Mahendra Singh Dhoni, they ended up declaring with a marginal deficit.

England knew then they merely needed
to bat long in increasingly benign conditions to claim the prize of a
historic series victory.

Thanks to their relentless fourth-wicket pair, it was never in doubt.

Unstoppable: Trott's 143 laid the foundations for England's decisive draw with India

Unstoppable: Trott's 143 laid the foundations for England's decisive draw with India

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Alastair Cook is just shy of Ken Barrington"s 50 year old record

Top spin at the Test: Captain Cook just shy of 50 year record

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UPDATED:

21:47 GMT, 16 December 2012

Cook falls just short

Alastair Cook’s second iffy dismissal
of the Test — given out caught behind off Ashwin when replays showed he
didn’t hit it — meant he finished the series with 562 runs at an
average of 80. He didn’t beat Ken Barrington’s England record for most
runs in a series in India: 594 in 1961-62 (from five Tests to Cook’s
four). But Cook has now scored more Test runs in India in his career
than any other Englishman: 866, beating Mike Gatting’s 862.

Close: The iffy dismissal of Alastair Cook meant the England captain was just out of reach of Ken Barrington's record of must runs in a series against India

Close: The iffy dismissal of Alastair Cook meant the England captain was just out of reach of Ken Barrington's record of must runs in a series against India

One giant leap for Mankad

Ravi
Ashwin said he wouldn't ‘Mankad’ Jonathan Trott if he backed up too far
— a practice immortalised by India’s Vinoo Mankad when he ran out
Australia’s Bill Brown at Sydney in 1947-48. But India’s off-spinner has
previous. In a one-dayer against Sri Lanka at Brisbane in March, Ashwin
ran out Lahiru Thirimanne at the non-striker’s end — but only after
warning him about leaving his crease. It needed Sachin Tendulkar to
persuade then captain Virender Sehwag to withdraw the appeal.

Who bats at the top

What batting line-up will England plump for when they play three Tests in New Zealand in March The performance of Joe Root in the first innings suggested it can’t be long before he is asked to assume the role he fills at Yorkshire at the top of the order. But Nick Compton finished with a creditable 208 runs in the series at an average of nearly 35 — and must now hope for another chance to impress against the Kiwis.

Duel: Nick Compton (left) faces a battle with Joe Root for a spot at the top of the England order

Duel: Nick Compton (left) faces a battle with Joe Root for a spot at the top of the England order

History is against India

India will have to make history of their own if they are to win this Test today and square the series at 2-2. Discounting the 1999-2000 Test at Centurion between South Africa and England (later found to have been fixed by Hansie Cronje), only two teams have ever won a Test after declaring behind on their first innings, as MS Dhoni did here. Both games took place at Bridgetown, and on both occasions West Indies lost — to England in 1934-35, and Australia earlier this year.

Slow play stuns Anderson

India’s tactics in the first hour of play seemed designed to help England in their quest to limit the time they needed to bat in their second innings. In 12.5 overs, the Indians added only 29 runs for the loss of No 10 Pragyan Ojha, before Dhoni’s bold declaration. ‘We were a little bit surprised,’ admitted Jimmy Anderson. ‘We certainly thought Ashwin would come out and be more aggressive than he was. It took time out of the game, which was fine for us.’

Pleased: James Anderson (pictured) was pleasantly surprised by the slow over rate employed by India

Pleased: James Anderson (pictured) was pleasantly surprised by the slow over rate employed by India

We
are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a
dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and
international news organisations.

The
BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies
Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India v England: Alastair Cook run out case of after you Claude – David Lloyd

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: It's a case of 'after you Claude' for captain Cook but England can rely on their attack

|

UPDATED:

18:16 GMT, 7 December 2012

The Alastair Cook run out was a classic case of “after you Claude”.

It’s just a quirk of the game. As usual, the players didn’t know the law but it is very clear – if he had ever grounded his bat he would have been not out.

Umpire Rod Tucker knew straight away, Cook had never regained his ground so he had to go.

After you Claude: Cook was run out in bizarre fashion

After you Claude: Cook was run out in bizarre fashion

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India on the ropes

England are exactly where they want to be. That last session they really stepped on it and scored at four-and-a-half an over as India wilted in the field – their fielding was almost comical again.

England are now looking to get a lead of 250, which puts India out of the game.

This pitch will not get any better, there are already signs of wear and tear, and I fully expect England to go 2-1 up unless India can produce something extra special.

No comparison

I expect England to win because their bowlers are infinitely better than their Indian counterparts.

In terms of pace and bounce, India have nobody to match Steven Finn (and he will be a real handful now the bounce is uneven), Jimmy Anderson has completely outbowled Zaheer Khan in terms of swing and the spinners Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann have simply been too hot for India.

Tall order: Finn offers far more pace and bounce than India's seamers

Tall order: Finn offers far more pace and bounce than India's seamers

For whom the Bell tolls

In terms of England’s batting, it’s big ticks for Cook, Nick Compton and Jonathan Trott, plus we had a little cameo from Kevin Pietersen.

But Ian Bell is a touch player and it is so hard to wander back in to Test cricket (after he went home for the birth of his boy) when you are in no form at all and to play well straight away.

Give Samit a good go

I’d really like Samit Patel to get a run in the side at No 6. I think he’s an excellent player and deserves to play ahead of Jonny Bairstow and Eoin Morgan.

Six of the best: Patel deserves a good go

Six of the best: Patel deserves a good go

He scored 33 quality runs but he will know he has still not done enough. However, he should get a prolonged run and play the Tests here and in New Zealand. One thing he is not is an all-rounder. He’s a batter who can roll his arm over.

Shane gets a tonking

Anyone who watched the Big Bash cricket from Australia will have seen Shane Warne bowl two overs for 41! It was so funny.

Warne was miked up and was saying “I’m going to bowl the slider now”… and it disappeared 12 rows back! Next ball he said “right, I’m bowling the googly” and that went even further! Ever the showman he took his cap and said: “Think I’ll go and hide now.”

Maybe that Ashes comeback should be put on ice…

Alistair Cook"s bizarre dismissal the latest in a long line of unusual wickets

Captain Cook will be kicking himself for his freak dismissal in Kolkata… but he's not the first batsman to be left scratching his head

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UPDATED:

11:21 GMT, 7 December 2012

England captain Alastair Cook lost his wicket in bizarre circumstances on day three of the third Test in Kolkata.

He failed to ground his bat on returning to his crease and jumped out of the way of Virat Kohli's shy at the stumps.

Cook hung low on his bat for a second as the realisation of what he had done sank in.

And he joins the list of batsmen – including a couple of fellow England captains – to lose their wickets in bizarre circumstances after looking well set at the crease.

Bizarre dismissal: Alistair Cook, ten shy of a double hundred, forgot to ground his bat when leaping out of the way of Virat Kohli's throw at the stumps

Bizarre dismissal: Alistair Cook, ten shy of a double hundred, forgot to ground his bat when leaping out of the way of Virat Kohli's throw at the stumps

Graham Gooch v Australia – Old Trafford (1993)

The England opener was on 133 in the opening Ashes Test in Manchester and slowly but surely was guiding England towards an improbable draw when he was undone by a steep riser from Merv Hughes.

As the ball bounced down towards the stumps, Gooch brushed the ball away with his glove and umpire Dickie Bird had no option but to raise his finger.

His dismissal made him only the fifth batsman in history to be given out for handling the ball and ended any remaining hope of England saving the Test.

Decent fist of it: Graham Gooch punches the ball away as a Merv Hughes bouncer heads for the stumps in the second innings of England's Ashes first test defeat in 1993

Decent fist of it: Graham Gooch punches the ball away as a Merv Hughes bouncer heads for the stumps in the second innings of England's Ashes first test defeat in 1993

Michael Vaughan v India (2001-02)

Needing a win to level the series on their 2001 tour of India, England weren't helped when Michael Vaughan was given out for handling the ball in their first innings.

Attempting to sweep Sarandeep Singh, the Yorkshire batsman, who was well set on 64, missed completely and the ball trickled underneath his pads towards the stumps.

Without thinking, Vaughan knocked the ball away with his right hand to prevent it hitting. It didn't fool Virender Sehwag at short leg and Vaughan became the seventh batsman to be dismissed for handling the ball in Test cricket.

The Test was eventually drawn and the series lost 1-0.

Not much comfort: Mark Ramprakash tries to find the right words for Michael Vaughan after the latter knocks the ball away with his hand to stop it hitting the stumps on England's 2001 tour of India

Not much comfort: Mark Ramprakash tries to find the right words for Michael Vaughan after the latter knocks the ball away with his hand to stop it hitting the stumps on England's 2001 tour of India

Wayne Phillips v England (1985)

An incident that cost Australia the fifth Test of the 1985 Ashes series and many believe should never have been given out.

Wayne Phillips, offering stout final day resistance on 59, hit a ball from Phil Edmonds onto the instep of Allan Lamb, who was trying to get out of the way at silly point.

The ball ricocheted tamely for David Gower, standing a couple of yards away, to take a simple catch.
Umpire David Shepherd, not having a clear view of the incident, asked square leg umpire David Constant for his version of events. He said conclusively that the ball had not touched the ground.

England had wrapped up victory 48 minutes later when it seemed an Old Trafford Test full of rain delays would fizzle out into a draw.

Out! Australia's Wayne Phillips lost his wicket in a freak incident that saw his shot rebound off the foot of Allan Lamb into the grateful hands of David Gower

Out! Australia's Wayne Phillips lost his wicket in a freak incident that saw his shot rebound off the foot of Allan Lamb into the grateful hands of David Gower

Kevin Pietersen v West Indies (2007)

Pietersen was going well on 68, punishing the West Indian bowlers in the third Test at Old Trafford in 2007, when he was removed in the most bizarre way.

A Dwayne Bravo bouncer struck Pietersen on the helmet, dislodging it and sending it flying onto the stumps.

The look on KP's face as he staggered round is one of pure disbelief, but he had no choice but to walk. It didn't affect the result too badly – England won the Test by 60 runs and the series 3-0.

Disbelief: Kevin Pietersen looks on in horror after a Dwayne Bravo bouncer dislodges his helmet onto the stumps in the third test with the West Indies at Old Trafford in 2007

Disbelief: Kevin Pietersen looks on in horror after a Dwayne Bravo bouncer dislodges his helmet onto the stumps in the third test with the West Indies at Old Trafford in 2007

Ian Bell v India (2011)

Bell was on 137 when Eoin Morgan had played the ball towards the long leg boundary where the fielder made a diving attempt to stop the ball, before falling over the boundary rope.

The fielder in question, Praveen Kumar, thought the ball had gone for four and threw it back towards the stumps. The ball ended up in the hands of Abhinav Mukund, who broke the wicket.

But by this time Bell and Morgan were about to make their way up the steps, back to the pavilion for tea, thinking 'over' had been called.

Cue much lobbying during the break where India captain MS Dhoni and coach Duncan Fletcher agreed to reinstate Bell who scored another 12 runs.


Run out: Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan (bottom left) are already heading in for the tea interval, unaware that Bell has been run out

Run out: Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan (bottom left) are already heading in for the tea interval, unaware that Bell has been run out

Debate: Bell and Morgan are prevented from leaving the pitch for tea as the decision is reviewed

Debate: Bell and Morgan are prevented from leaving the pitch for tea as the decision is reviewed

Alastair Cook factfile: England"s record-breaking run machine in figures

Captain Cook by numbers: The lowdown on England's record-breaking run machine

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UPDATED:

02:00 GMT, 7 December 2012

Alastair Cook's 23rd Test century is an England record, breaking a figure that had stood for 73 years — since Wally Hammond scored his 22nd ton against West Indies in 1939.

Since then, it has been equalled four times — by Colin Cowdrey (v Pakistan in 1969), Geoff Boycott (v India in 1981), Cook himself — on the second day of the Mumbai Test — and Kevin Pietersen, who followed his captain two overs later.

Top man: Alastair Cook

23 tons: Alastair Cook

Portrait of a master: The legendary Paul Trevillion captures Alastair Cook (left) alongside his 23 Test centuries

Cook was already the first player to make a hundred in each of his first four Tests as captain. At Nagpur, he will have the chance to stretch the record to six.Cook passed Ted Dexter’s mark for the most runs by an England captain in a Test series in India. Dexter made 409 runs in 1961-62.How Cook compares at 27 with the top Test run scorers

Cook……………………………………………….. 7,048
Tendulkar…………………………………………..6,720
Ponting……………………………………………..4,195
Dravid……………………………………………….3,322

When Cook moved to 88, he took Sachin Tendulkar’s place as the youngest player to score 7,000 Test runs. Tendulkar was 28 years and 193 days when he reached the landmark, Cook 27 years and 347 days. But Tendulkar needed only 136 innings to Cook’s 151. At the age of 27, Cook already has more runs than the top three all-time Test run scorers did at the same age.During the course of his unbeaten 136 on the second day, Cook’s Test average moved the right side of 50 for the first time in six years. Of the 10 English batsmen to have scored more than 7,000 Test runs, only Cook and Hammond have averaged over 50.Cook became the first England batsman to score 100 in three successive Tests since Andrew Strauss — who made 169 in Antigua in 2009, followed by 142 in both Barbados and Trinidad.Among non-Asian batsmen, only South Africa’s Jacques Kallis has scored more Test tons (eight) on this continent than Cook (seven).