Tag Archives: chants

Brian Laws apologises for saying Scunthorpe"s defending was "as bad as the Holocaust".

Laws sorry for comparing his team's defending to the Holocaust after 4-0 defeat

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UPDATED:

15:48 GMT, 26 November 2012

Inappropriate: Brian Laws said his team's defending was 'as bad as the Holocaust'

Inappropriate: Brian Laws said his team's defending was 'as bad as the Holocaust'

Brian Laws has been forced to apologise after labelling his team's defending as 'as bad as the Holocaust'.

The Scunthope United manager sparked a furious reaction from BBC radio listeners when he made the ill-thought remarks following Saturday's 4-0 defeat at Doncaster.

Laws' comments come on the same weekend sections of West Ham's support at Tottenham were heard chanting the name of Adolf Hitler and making hissing noises in reference to the gas chambers.

But speaking in a statement on the Iron's website, he said: 'I would like to apologise. The use of the word was not intended to cause offence and was used in the heat of the moment, in the frustration of the defeat.

'It was a poor choice of language to define those emotions and wasn't meant in the true meaning of the word.'

Laws' remarks and the actions of some at White Hart Lane has once again brought the issue of racism in football to the fore.

And reaction to the sorry incidents has been condemned by Board of Deputies of British Jews.

In a statement, they wrote: 'The Board of Deputies of British Jews utterly condemns and is dismayed by reports of antisemitic chanting by West Ham United fans at yesterday’s match against Tottenham Hotspur.

'Antisemitism has no place in football or society in general. For football fans to use Holocaust imagery and chants glorifying Adolf Hitler is grossly offensive to the Jewish community and is a stain upon the character of British football.

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

'This in the same week that Tottenham fans were attacked in Rome in an apparently antisemitic attack.

'Events at White Hart Lane yesterday and comments on Saturday by the Scunthorpe United manager describing his team’s defending as being “as bad as the Holocaust” confirm that this phenomenon is not confined to the Continent.

'Clearly there is either a lack of understanding or a lack of compassion within some sections of the British football world about these issues; a lack of understanding or compassion which needs to be addressed.

'We will be writing to the Football Association to urge them to punish those responsible for these chants and to take further steps to rid our national game of these slurs.'

Laura Williamson tries taekwondo

I won't be fighting in Rio but you could as taekwondo seeks new stars

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UPDATED:

22:09 GMT, 25 November 2012

Sarah Stevenson, the first British athlete to win an Olympic medal in taekwondo, is trying to teach me how to kick.

This is no mean feat, considering I am about as flexible as the tin man from The Wizard of Oz, but she offers a kind appraisal of my efforts with my right leg.

My left leg, however, is ‘crap’. She doesn’t mince her words, Stevenson, though they are delivered with a smile.

Scroll down to watch a video of Laura in training

Full stretch: Laura Williamson tries out taekwondo with Sarah Stevenson at the UK centre in Manchester

Full stretch: Laura Williamson tries out taekwondo with Sarah Stevenson at the UK centre in Manchester

More from Laura Williamson…

Laura Williamson: Dangerous message that strong isn't sexy for women
18/11/12

Laura Williamson: As Sportsmail enters the ring with an Olympic star, Jonas shows being a warrior woman is worth fighting for
11/11/12

Laura Williamson: Kids have no chance when vile chants are treated like nursery rhymes
06/11/12

Laura Williamson: Wit is the only way to counter football's vile chants
04/11/12

Laura Williamson: After Twenty20 World Cup we must now start taking women's cricket seriously
07/10/12

Laura Williamson: Don't use women's sport just to plug a gap, please Auntie…
23/09/12

Laura Williamson: Thanks to our Ellie, 'normal' has been redefined
16/09/12

Laura Williamson: It was just great, and thank you for putting sport first
09/09/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

‘You can be the best kicker in the
world,’ she adds, more encouragingly, ‘but if you haven’t got the bottle
in this sport there’s no point doing it.

‘I’ve
seen lots of champions in the gym. They’re amazing with their kicking
but they can’t fight. You’ve got do what needs to be done in the ring.’

This, I quickly realise, is part of the ‘hardcore attitude’ that got Stevenson to the Olympics despite a 12-month ordeal nobody should ever have to endure. After becoming world champion in May 2011 she lost her father Roy to a brain tumour in July and then her mother, Diana, to cancer in October.

It almost seems insignificant in comparison, but Stevenson then had surgery to repair cruciate ligament damage in February this year – and yet still made it onto the mat at London 2012. The 29-year-old from Doncaster lost in the first round, but just getting there represented a quite remarkable achievement.

It is this kind of extraordinary ‘bottle’ GB Taekwondo want as they aim to recruit the next wave of Sarah Stevensons in the run up to the Rio Olympics in 2016. Keen to build on the success of the London Games, where Jade Jones won gold in the -57kg category and Lutalo Muhammad – who came through the Talent 2012 scheme – a bronze at -87kg, they are looking for males and females aged between 16 and 26 who have enjoyed national success in a kick-based martial art to transfer to Olympic taekwondo. The only criteria I fit is being female, before you ask.

‘I’d want to see a decent amount of technique,’ said Stevenson, ‘but if they’ve got a good attitude with some all right kicking skills, you can’t teach that.

‘I never really saw any (girls) with that fighting spirit, like I thought I had, until little Jade Jones came along.

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‘Just because you’re a girl doesn’t mean you can’t do this sport. We need to get more girls and we need more depth.

‘Imagine if the girls had the depth as well as the talent we’ve already got We would be smashing it, wouldn’t we’

Stevenson and Jones are used to training with the boys. They believe it has contributed to their success, but it can be demoralising winning only occasionally in sparring sessions, while the timing is different to fighting a girl.

They accept there are stigmas attached to taekwondo that could be off-putting for female athletes – ‘little Jade Jones’ rolls her eyes at the fact people always expect her to be ‘this big, hulk-looking type person’ – but extol the impact it has had on their confidence and self-belief.

Potential: Laura worked with London Olympian Stevenson as part of taekwondo's drive for Rio

Potential: Laura worked with London Olympian Stevenson as part of taekwondo's drive for Rio

Potential: Laura worked with London Olympian Stevenson

‘You do change,’ says Stevenson. ‘You’re not this girl, you’re an athlete. You don’t think about being a girl. You think: “Come on. We’re having a fight.”

‘If you’re going to sign up then you’ve got to know that this is not easy. This is the hardest thing you’re ever going to do.

‘But hopefully it’s going to help other girls to get involved and to be that other person they want to be, rather than sitting at home in pink putting make up on.’

Stevenson pauses and smiles again.

‘You can do that at a weekend,’ she adds.

If you are involved in martial arts and want to find out more about Fighting Chance:Battle4Brazil go to www.uksport.gov.uk/talent.

WHAT I’VE BEEN DOING THIS WEEK…

Visiting Barcelona for the IAAF Athlete of the Year awards, won by Usain Bolt and Allyson Felix. Bolt’s ‘double double’ – becoming the first man to win the Olympic 100-metre and 200m titles at consecutive Olympics – was incredible, but David Rudisha would have got my vote. The Kenyan’s world record-breaking 800m run in London was an extraordinary sporting performance in a stellar year for athletics.

Listening to Arsene Wenger talk about the ‘completely emotional’ world of football on Tuesday.

Winners: Usain Bolt and Allyson Felix were named athletes of the year

Winners: Usain Bolt and Allyson Felix were named athletes of the year

Now they speak of (Roberto) Di Matteo (getting sacked),’ said the Arsenal boss, with incredulity in his voice. ‘He’s just won the Champions League and the FA Cup!’ Some 16 hours later, Di Matteo was out of a job.

Emotional Football this week been more like someone eating their body weight in chocolate and sobbing uncontrollably over a series of rom-coms: completely irrational.

Noting QPR’s decision to announce Mark Hughes’ dismissal via Twitter on Friday. There’s more than a hint of irony there, given the Welshman’s obvious – and understandable – unease with Joey Barton and Tony Fernandes’ propensity to express their opinions in 140 characters.

THEY SAID WHAT

A chap called AJ McArthur is the commissioner of the – wait for it – Bikini Basketball Association, an eight-team league of players (wearing sports bras and tight shorts) with ‘looks, personality and playing ability’, which is slated to start in America next spring.

‘The main point,’ said McArthur, ‘is that this is a sport everyone loves.’ No, I definitely don’t think that’s the main point of this particular endeavour.

PERFORMANCE OF THE WEEK

The England women’s rugby union team came back from 13-3 down to defeat the world champions, New Zealand, 16-13 on Friday. England are now unbeaten in four matches against the Black Ferns. Roll on the next clash on Tuesday.

West Ham fans mock Spurs supporters stabbed in Italy and sing about Hitler

Sickening! FA must act after West Ham fans mock Spurs supporters stabbed in Italy

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UPDATED:

00:59 GMT, 26 November 2012

West Ham United are facing an FA investigation after their fans subjected Tottenham supporters to vile chants at White Hart Lane on Sunday.

Spurs’ 3-1 Barclays Premier League win was overshadowed by sickening songs about the stabbings of the Tottenham fans in Rome last week.

Anti-Semitic taunts were also heard, along with persistent hissing and references to Adolf Hitler.

Let down: West Ham fans hit a new low with their chants at White Hart Lane

Let down: West Ham fans hit a new low with their chants at White Hart Lane

Tweet from Sportsmail's Alex Kay

Lazio' chants have gone on for most of
first half. Not just a few people, hundreds. It's sad and pathetic. Ban
them all.' @Alex_Kay_DM

Hundreds of West Ham supporters chanted ‘Viva Lazio’ at numerous points during the game in a macabre show of support for the hooligans who left at least 10 Spurs fans injured and one needing emergency surgery.

Ashley Mills, 25, of Essex, had to be admitted to hospital for stab wounds to his head and groin after being set upon by a gang of masked thugs while in Rome for Tottenham’s Europa League match against Lazio. Two men have since been charged with attempted murder.

Italian flags were seen in the away section on Sunday and a red flare was also set off. After Tottenham had scored their second and third goals, ‘Lazio’ was chanted, bringing ironic cheers from the home crowd.

The most distasteful chants were saved for towards the end. In reply to Spurs fans chanting, ‘Can we play you every week’ West Ham fans sang: ‘Can we stab you every week’

Anti-semitic chanting, hissing and the references to Hitler then followed.

The FA said they would await reports from referee Andre Marriner and fourth official Mark Clattenburg before taking further action.

At the double: Jermain Defoe scored twice as Tottenham cruised to victory over West Ham

At the double: Jermain Defoe scored twice as Tottenham cruised to victory over West Ham

West Ham manager Sam Allardyce said he had not heard the chanting but agreed his fans ‘should not be doing that’. Spurs manager Andre Villas-Boas branded the chants as ‘stupid’.

Allardyce said: ‘I don’t hear what the fans say or do when I’m concentrating on a game of football.

‘They shouldn’t be doing things like that, should they But it’s the least of my worries at the minute.’

Asked about the Hitler chanting, Allardyce said: ‘If I didn’t hear it, I can’t condemn it. I’ll wait and look at it myself and then I’ll comment after I’ve listened to what they’ve said. I don’t want to be a political animal. I’m in here to talk about football, not what fans are saying or singing.’

Villas-Boas said: ‘We know the animosity
there is between Tottenham and West Ham. As long as it doesn’t reach
stupidity, it is a great rivalry.

Aftermath: The Drunken Ship pub in Rome were Spurs fans were attacked this week

Aftermath: The Drunken Ship pub in Rome were Spurs fans were attacked this week

‘I understand the whole situation is unavoidable although we can’t decipher the complete meaning of what they were singing.’

The two clubs have a long-standing history of abuse between supporters. Former West Ham striker Jermain Defoe, who was booed throughout, scored two of the goals in the win for Tottenham, a victory that takes them one place above the Hammers.

Spurs fans have been the subject of complaints by the Society of Black Lawyers who objected to the White Hart Lane supporters singing ‘Yid Army’ about themselves. Sportsmail has highlighted that this kind of disgraceful chanting is just as despicable as racist abuse, pointing out unacceptable behaviour such as vile abuse Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger is subjected to at various grounds.

Sheffield Wednesday boss Dave Jones, who has been the victim of sustained abuse, said: ‘It is like a form of racism because it is every bit as bad.’

Spurs supporters rushed to condemn their West Ham rivals on Twitter.

Three and easy: Tottenham climbed above the Hammers with this win on Sunday

Three and easy: Tottenham climbed above the Hammers with this win on Sunday

Andrew Leason wrote: 'West Ham fans & their Lazio/Hitler chants showing what utter vile scum they are.'

West Ham fan Andrew Wiseman posted: 'The minority of hammers fans with the Lazio chants should hang their heads in shame. And I'm a Hammer. Pathetic.'

Ed Aarons commented: 'Not surprised at all by reports of moronic Lazio chants by West Ham fans at WHL. Not exactly known for their intelligence.'

West Ham fans were also accused of hissing in reference to the Jews who were slaughtered by the Nazis in concentration camps.

'Hissing, Lazio chants and (letting off) a flare. You classless bunch of p***** are really enjoying your cup final, aren't you West Ham,' posted Louise Page.

And Charlie Parrish added: 'Next to West Ham away fans. Lots of Lazio chants. Football's pretty grim sometimes.'

Lazio"s anti-semitic fans must be punished by UEFA says Spurs boss Andre Villas-Boas

UEFA have to act quickly against Lazio if fans found guilty of anti-Semitic chants, says Villas-Boas

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UPDATED:

22:07 GMT, 22 November 2012

Andre Villas-Boas has urged UEFA to take action against Lazio if their fans are found guilty of chanting anti-Semitic songs at Tottenham during tonight's Europa League draw at the Stadio Olimpico.

The home supporters chanted 'Juden Tottenham' during the first half of the goalless draw, which came the day after fans of the London club were attacked in a vicious scuffle in a city centre pub.

Spelling it out: Lazio fans display a banner and Palestine flags at the Stadio Olympico

Spelling it out: Lazio fans display a banner and Palestine flags at the Stadio Olympico

UEFA fined Lazio 32,500 for their fans monkey chanting at three Spurs players during the reverse fixture in September, and Villas-Boas hopes the organisation move swiftly to establish the facts.

'It will take another investigation,' the Tottenham manager told a press conference.

Furious: Andre Villas-Boas greets Lazio counterpart Vladimir Petkovic after the match - but the Portuguese was livid with the home fans

Furious: Andre Villas-Boas (left) greets Lazio counterpart Vladimir Petkovic after the match – but the Portuguese was livid with the home fans

'It happened last time and it was acted upon quickly by UEFA. We will have to wait and see if there is anything to act upon. If there is UEFA have to act.'

UEFA are expected to decide whether to launch an investigation tomorrow when they receive the match delegate's report.

Overshadowed: Ultras ran amok in Rome's Drunken Ship pub on Wednesday night, injuring several Spurs fans

Overshadowed: Ultras ran amok in Rome's Drunken Ship pub on Wednesday night, injuring several Spurs fans

The game had already been overshadowed before kick-off by the shocking and brutal attack on a group of the club's supporters early this morning.

Around 20 men burst in to the Drunken Sailor pub in Campo dei Fiori at around 1am and beat the fans with sticks and glass bottles. One fan is recovering in hospital after being stabbed in the head and leg.

No way through: Lazio and Spurs conjured a goalless draw

No way through: Lazio and Spurs conjured a goalless draw

Villas-Boas expressed his disappointment at the attack, saying: 'It is an extremely difficult moment for them.

'We have to be aware there is a police investigation and I'm not in control of all facts. But there is massive disappointment and the fear they've gone through is hard.

'To point a finger at this point would be incorrect but (we) give them a message of support. As a club, we will try to help them overcome this.'

Steven Gerrard with school children ahead of 100th England cap – behind the scenes video

VIDEO: Behind the scenes of Sportsmail's exclusive photograph as 99 excited children meet Liverpool and England captain Gerrard

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UPDATED:

23:22 GMT, 12 November 2012

They say never work with children or animals – and taking a photograph of 99 kids so excited to be in the company of Steven Gerrard was something I feared would be difficult.

But the kids were great, as were the staff at Huyton-with-Roby Church of England Primary School, and their reaction when Steven suddenly appeared was brilliant.

Scroll down for the video

Enlarge

Hats off: The England and Liverpool captain poses a number of exclusive snaps taken by Daily Mail Chief Sports Photographer Andy Hooper

Hats off: The England and Liverpool captain poses for a number of exclusive snaps taken by Daily Mail Chief Sports Photographer Andy Hooper

Enlarge

Hats off: The England and Liverpool captain poses a number of exclusive snaps taken by Daily Mail Chief Sports Photographer Andy Hooper

A stunned silence, then some chants of 'Gerrard, Gerrard' and then a moment of pure comedy when a little girl raised her hand and asked to go for 'a wee-wee'.

The idea was for the kids not to see Steven until the last moment, so that it would create a spontaneous moment; a sense of surprise. But I ended up taking about 100 pictures in 40 minutes, with every frame capturing a special moment. You see kids yawning or looking at the friend next to them or pulling a funny face.

At the same time I wanted Steven to be quite serious, just like Bobby Moore was in the 1973 shot, and looking straight at me. I don't display many of my pictures but this one is going on the wall.

Enlarge

To cap it all: Gerrard with 99 pupils from his old school in Huyton

To cap it all: Gerrard with 99 pupils
from his old school in Huyton

VIDEO: Behind the scenes as the excited children meet their hero

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Tottenham fans care more about football than racism, says Society of Black Lawyers

Spurs fans care more about football than kicking racism out of the the game, claims Herbert
Society of Black Lawyers maintain call for 'criminal convictions after November 20'
'Small minority' of Tottenham fans to blame for 'anti-Semitic' chanting, says Herbert
'Their love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism', adds SBL chief
Tottenham have refused to comment on the matter

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UPDATED:

12:26 GMT, 9 November 2012

The Society of Black Lawyers hit out at Tottenham and the Football Association after repeating its threat to go to the police over what it regards as anti-Semitic chanting at White Hart Lane.

Spurs fans sent an open message of defiance to the SBL on Thursday night when they chanted 'We'll sing what we want' and 'Yid Army' throughout the club's 3-1 home win over Maribor in the Europa League.

Despite being a club with a traditionally large Jewish following, Tottenham fans often refer to themselves as 'Yids' or the 'Yid Army' in chants during the club's matches.

Backing: Tottenham fans cheer on their side against Maribor on Thursday

'We'll sing what we want': Spurs fans were in defiant mood on Thursday

Although Spurs claim otherwise, the
SBL say the phrase is anti-Semitic and they have vowed to complain to
the police under the Public Order Act if supporters continue to use the
chant beyond the November 20 deadline it has set.

The SBL had monitors at the north
London ground on Thursday night who heard the chants and this morning it
reiterated its commitment to report any such action to the police
should fans continue their actions.

'We are not going to let go on this,' SBL chair Peter Herbert said.

'After November 20 there is a potential that people will get a criminal conviction. If they want to run that risk then fine.

'We are serious. We aren't in this
for sensationalism. We think the vast majority of Tottenham fans are
sensible and do not engage in anti-Semitism.

'It's a very small minority who obviously don't care about any offence.

'Their love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism.'

Tottenham refused to comment on the
matter. The London club stick by the statement they released on
Wednesday which read: 'Our guiding principle in respect of the “Y-word”
is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing factor is the
intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the deliberate
intention to cause offence. This has been the basis of prosecutions of
fans of other teams to date.

A 'Yid Army' Spurs flag

Flying the flag: Herbert has launched another attack on Tottenham supporters

'Our fans adopted the chant as a
defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it as a chant amongst themselves.'

Herbert believes the club have been
misguided over the issue and claims fans can be prosecuted regardless of
whether the songs are intended to cause offence.

'Under Section Five of the Public
Order Act it doesn't matter what the intent is of the individual or the
crowd, if the words cause harassment, alarm, or distress to anyone
watching then that is sufficient,' Herbert said.

Three and easy: Defoe scored a hat-trick in Tottenham's win on Thursday

Three and easy: Defoe scored a hat-trick in Tottenham's win on Thursday

'If a crowd of men were walking down
Tottenham High Road singing the Y-word causing offence they would be
arrested. It doesn't make sense that they can make White Hart Lane a
no-go area for law.'

Herbert ridiculed Tottenham's
statement and claimed the SBL has widespread support for its campaign
from within the Jewish community.

'We have no doubt there will be complaints (to the police),' Herbert added.

'If the Met Police say they are going to look at prosecutions then there is a good chance it will stop.

'Tottenham's statement is
indefensible. I think if you went to the United States, Canada or South
Africa and you made a statement like that you would face ridicule and
condemnation.

'It is a very sad day for English football when clubs feel they have to defend a term of abuse.'

Herbert also accused the FA of a lack of interest in the Tottenham matter.

'This is an appalling abdication of
responsibility by the FA,' he said. 'It's a complete disgrace that they
have stayed silent on this.

'There is an inertia from the FA over racism and anti-Semitism.

'You can't go and complain about racism and anti-Semitism in Serbia and then have it happening in your own back yard.'

Tottenham fans Yid Army T-shirt fightback

Tottenham fans get shirty over calls to ban 'Yid Army' chants: Spurs supporters launch T-shirt fightback over anti-Semitism claims

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UPDATED:

14:12 GMT, 9 November 2012

Tottenham fans can hit back at attempts to stop them referring to themselves as the 'Yid Army' with a T-shirt protest.

Fans outside White Hart Lane before Thursday night's Europa League victory over Maribor were heard discussing the T-shirt slogan (pictured) which reads: 'YIDARMY WHL N17'.

The T-shirt can be purchased for 11.99 at www.n17club.co.uk. But it has emerged there is a dedicated Yid Army website – www.yidarmy.com – where Tottenham fans can buy a range of clothing emblazoned with the 'Y-word' slogan.

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

Show your support: The T-shirts and jumpers emblazoned with the slogans start at 11.99

A debate has been raging this week over whether use of the word 'Yid' by Tottenham fans is anti-Semitic. High-profile campaigners such as celebrity Chelsea fan David Baddiel insist it is. But Spurs fans – and the club themselves – argue that it is about context.

Tottenham issued an impassioned defence of their fans' right to use the term 'Yid' in their matchday chants.

Peter Herbert, chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers, described the north London club’s attitude as being '40 years out of date', and vowed to make a formal complaint to the Metropolitan Police if chanting the 'Y-word' continued at White Hart Lane.

The society claim such chants – either by opposition fans or Spurs supporters themselves – are anti-Semitic and unacceptable in contemporary society.

'We are not going to let go on this,'
SBL chair Peter Herbert said. 'After November 20 there is a potential
that people will get a criminal conviction. If they want to run that
risk then fine.

'Their (Tottenham's) love of football is greater than their desire to deal with anti-Semitism.'

Baddiel, speaking exclusively to Sportsmail,
said: 'The idea that Spurs fans are reclaiming the Y-word and are
entitled to because so many of them are Jewish is simply not true,' he
said. 'There are only 250,000 Jews in Britain as a whole and I'd say
about three or four per cent of Tottenham's crowd is Jewish.

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

Getting shirty: Defoe bagged three and Spurs fans celebrated with a song about him, which incorporates the 'Y' word

'That means well over 90 per cent of those chanting “Yid Army” are not actually Jewish and that is just one of several reasons why it cannot be right. If, for instance, there was a team in Brixton called Brixton United, and they had a mainly white support who adopted the N-word as their badge of honour and went round chanting “N***** Army”, they would be closed down tomorrow.

'At Tottenham, the club's “Jewishness” is just an historical association with the area. It's doubtful that there are more than five per cent actual Jews in the ground at home games (only 0.4 per cent of the UK is Jewish). So the argument “but it's just like Snoop Doggy Dogg using the N-word” does not apply to most Spurs fans.'

Tottenham's stance over the use of the word 'Yid' is clear and the club have taken legal advice over the matter.

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Controversy: Spurs fans have vowed to keep using the chants, despite calls for prosecution over alleged racism

Spurs said in a statement: 'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself — the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used, i.e. if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it as a chant among themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-Semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence.'

Sing your heart out: The use of the Yid Army chants is deeply engrained among Spurs fans

Sing your heart out: The use of the Yid Army chants is deeply engrained among Spurs fans

Stop fans chanting "Yid Army" or face police complaint, Tottenham Hotspur told to act over anti-Semitic songs by Society of Black Lawyers

Stop your fans chanting 'Yid Army' or face police complaint, Spurs told to act over anti-Semitic songs by anti-racism body
Tottenham also told to clamp down on away supporters 'hissing'
Club warned: home fans' traditional chant is anti-SemiticSpurs stress 'Y-word' is not used to cause anyone offence
Gary Lineker and David Baddiel back campaign to stop use of the 'Y-word'
Society of Black Lawyers reveal blueprint to kick racism out of football

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UPDATED:

13:13 GMT, 7 November 2012

READ MARTIN SAMUEL'S COLUMN

Martin Samuel

Click here to read: Strictly speaking, we are looking in the wrong place for racism

'Is it any wonder that, in this climate, Ramires of Chelsea believes he heard a white referee, Mark Clattenburg, refer to his black team-mate John Mikel Obi as a ‘monkey’ two weeks ago'

Tottenham have been told to clamp down on their own fans' chanting or face a complaint to the police from the Society of Black Lawyers.

Large numbers of Spurs supporters have historically referred to themselves as the 'Yid Army' but such chants are anti-Semitic and must stop, according to Peter Herbert, the man who lodged a complaint with the Metropolitan Police over referee Mark Clattenburg's alleged abuse of John Obi Mikel.

Herbert is the chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers. He insists that hissing from away fans at White Hart Lane – a reference to the gas chambers used in the Holocaust – is equally unacceptable and will also provoke a complaint from his organisation.

Tottenham have defended their fans' right to use the term 'Yid', stressing that home fans at White Hart Lane 'do not use the term to others to cause any offence'.

Scroll down for video

A 'Yid Army' Spurs flag

Tottenham Hotspur fans celebrate in the stands

Traditional support: A Tottenham fan (right) cheers on his side and a flag in the home end at White Hart Lane (left). BOTH IMAGES FILE PICS

Warning: The Society for Black Lawyers has urged Tottenham to act against the anti-Semitic chanting

Warning: The Society for Black Lawyers has urged Tottenham to act against the anti-Semitic chanting

SPURS STATEMENT

Spurs crest

'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that
requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where
we seek greater support to eradicate.'

SOCIETY OF BLACK LAWYERS' PLAN

A minimum six to nine-month ban for racial abuse, rising to a five-year ban for a third offence

Any fines going directly to Kick It Out to fund grassroots anti-racism initiatives

The creation of representative associations for black players, managers and coaches

Guidance for referees to send off players using racist abuse and the power to call off games where the crowd is using such abuse

A 20 per cent quota at all levels of the FA, PFA, clubs as well as football agents and referees

Racial abuse to be a matter of gross misconduct incorporated into players’ contracts

Clubs to invest in the personal education of all players, including university or college education

Recording referees and assistants during matches to pick up any possible abuse by players.

A
system for reporting racial incidents to be set up with details of
these incidents, both on and off the pitch, published each year

Herbert told Sportsmail: 'In discussions with members of the
Jewish community, we were made aware that this practice is still
continuing and it has to come to an end.

'If
neither Tottenham FC nor the FA are willing to take a stand then SBL
will report the matter to the Metropolitan Police Service for
investigation and, if necessary, prosecution.

'The
report will be made if this behaviour does not cease by 20 November. We
will have monitors in attendance to observe what occurs.'

A Tottenham club statement read: 'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where we seek greater support to eradicate.'

Former Spurs stars Gary Lineker and Ledley King have previously condemned the mimicking of the gas chambers by away supporters.

Tottenham have traditionally been
well supported by members of the Jewish community. Many fans do not
consider references to their faith as offensive. Others,such as comedian
David Baddiel, however, do.

Last year Baddiel
launched a campaign, supported by Lineker, to stamp out use of the word 'yid' in football
chants which mock Jewish and Tottenham supporters.

The Society of Black Lawyers is involved in talks to create a Black Players’ Association
with some professionals, claiming the football authorities are not doing
enough to represent them or to tackle racism in the sport.

The PFA recently introduced its own six-point action plan but the society says this will prove 'ineffective'.

Herbert added: 'What
we are trying to do is change a culture. What we are saying to Tottenham
is: “Maybe this was okay 50 years ago – but it isn't now.

'Even if it is from Tottenham supporters, it remains casual racism. We
understand it is a difficult, and for some an uncomfortable, stance to
take, but we feel it is the right stance.'

Storm brewing: Referee Mark Clattenburg is under investigation for his clash with John Mikel Obi

Storm brewing: Referee Mark Clattenburg is under investigation for his clash with John Mikel Obi

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

Baddiel

Baddiel

Lineker

Lineker

Herbert

Herbert

The Society of Black Lawyers have
published a plan to tackle racism in football and want matches to be
instantly abandoned if there is racial abuse from fans.

The document was published ahead of a meeting between the FA, Professional Footballers’ Association, Premier League and trustees of anti-racism body Kick It Out on Wednesday.

Wednesday's meeting between Kick It Out and a selection of football’s leading authorities is a scheduled get-together of the anti-racism charity’s trustees.

SUPPORTER COMMENT: SORRY BUT THE Y-WORD BELONGS TO US

As a youngster growing up supporting Spurs, it took me some time to realise the word 'yid' was an offensive racial slur. I'd never heard it used in a derogatory sense at White Hart Lane, only ever as a collective term – yid army – and as a positive identifier.

If a player was good, he was a yiddo.

But its significance soon became apparent. Though far from the abhorrent gas chamber hissing of some away fans, it's still sensitive. Context is important, though, and its reclamation as a positive term at the ground should not be ignored.

The Society of Black lawyers says use of the word yid, including the tone adopted by Spurs fans, amounts to casual racism. Perhaps they have a point. Perhaps simply substituting the word would be the answer. But Spurs fans are unlikely to take kindly at being told what to do by an external body, especially as it is largely considered a positive, rather than offensive, chant.

David Baddiel tried to stamp out its use by Tottenham supporters but, despite his own Jewish faith, the views of a Chelsea fan were never likely to be accepted by the Spurs majority.

If the word yid really is to be kicked out of White Hart Lane, it would need concerns to be raised from within the Spurs-supporting community, rather than outside pressures.

Andrew Magee, life-long Spurs supporter

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Arsenal fan and son sing song about Robin Van Persie – video

Arsenal fan posts appalling video of his three-year-old reciting vile chants about Van Persie

|

UPDATED:

10:33 GMT, 6 November 2012

A sickening video of an Arsenal fan and his three-year-old son singing a vile song about Robin van Persie has been posted online.

The dad films the youngster in his Gunners top and leads him in a song referring to the Dutch striker's arrest in 2005 after a false allegation of rape was made against him.

Scroll down to watch the video

Shocking: The young Arsenal fan filmed by his dad singing about Robin van Persie

Shocking: The young Arsenal fan filmed by his dad singing about Robin van Persie

Shocking: The young Arsenal fan filmed by his dad singing about Robin van Persie

Sportsmail says…

Dave Jones: Disgusting chants are every bit as bad as racism

Click to read more

In the 38-second clip, the boy, named as Kye, also calls the Manchester United striker a c***.

The pair sing: 'She said no, Robin, she said no' three times while the dad ends the video by chanting 'The Arsenal'.

The shocking clip comes after Van Persie joined United from their fierce rivals in a 24million deal in August.andle

The 29-year-old signed a 250,000-a-week deal at Old Trafford and scored against his former side last weekend in a 2-1 win.

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Arsenal fans ignored the pre-match
plea of manager Arsene Wenger to respect their former hero — the
Dutchman scored an incredible 37 goals for the Gunners last season — and
booed Van Persie at every touch. But the striker insisted his big day
had gone like a dream.

Wenger himself has
been the subject of disgusting chants from opposition fans around the
country for years. But on Monday night Wenger said: ‘I know who I am and I’m the
only person who matters.’

The
songs often make reference to Wenger as a ‘paedophile’. And the abuse
hit a new low recently with West Ham and Manchester United fans
inventing chants comparing Wenger to Jimmy Savile.

Main man: Van Persie scored against his former club Arsenal in Manchester United's win at the weekend

Main man: Van Persie scored against his former club Arsenal in Manchester United's win at the weekend

Target: Robin van Persie joined Manchester United from Arsenal in a 24million deal this summer

Wenger
has often spoken about his disdain for the chants that follow him
around the grounds, but the Frenchman on Monday insisted that these fans
are wasting their breath.

‘Honestly,
I do not even worry about that any more, I don’t even hear it,’ said
Wenger. ‘When I see my face in the mirror, I can look at it.

‘You want respect but I can’t master people’s abuse.’

Do you know the father involved If so call the MailOnline newsdesk on 0203 615 0000 or email [email protected]

Sunderland are in trouble – Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure: Just how can O'Neill reverse Sunderland's fortunes

|

UPDATED:

15:56 GMT, 6 November 2012

Ever get the feeling it’s just not your day/week/month/season That’s what Martin O’Neill, and his players, must surely be thinking after the week they’ve just endured.

The Capital One Cup exit at the hands of a useful and vibrant Middlesbrough team last week was a massive blow. Local bragging rights aside, this was a competition Sunderland were looking at with serious intent.

O’Neill won it four times as player and manager, and he recognised, like every Sunderland fan, the possibility of winning it this season. He might not also know that it would have put an end to the Newcastle 'have you ever seen a Mackem in Milan’ chants.

Head in hands: Sunderland's woeful form continued when they were beaten by Aston Villa

Head in hands: Sunderland's woeful form continued when they were beaten by Aston Villa

More from Colin Young…

Northern Exposure: Wear-Tees derby may not be as mad as the big one but there's all to play for
29/10/12

Northern Exposure: Time to come up for air before next Newcastle v Sunderland battle
22/10/12

Northern Exposure: Super Sunday as Newcastle and Sunderland prepare for battle
19/10/12

Northern Exposure: Newcastle and Sunderland head into derby on back of Manchester mauling
09/10/12

Northern Exposure: Ba on his way out of Toon There's no smoke without fire…
18/09/12

Northern Exposure: Forget Trapattoni's wrath, Twitter mischief-maker McClean must face O'Neill
12/09/12

Northern Exposure: Trapattoni ready to go against instincts and unleash McClean
05/09/12

Northern Exposure: Toon Army can look forward to more top trips around Europe
28/08/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

Lifting the first trophy since 1973 was a considerable way off, as Tony Mowbray acknowledged after his side were handed their 13th away cup draw in a row and given a trip to Swansea for next month’s quarter-final.

But last eight, semi-finals and Wembley in touching distance would all have helped lift the doom which has unexpectedly engulfed the Stadium of Light this season.

Sunderland then followed that with a home defeat to an Aston Villa side, who were reckoned to be really struggling and were three points behind them and without an away win all season.

And they probably deserved it too. If Lee Cattermole’s drive had flown a few inches lower, the first half, and outcome, might have been very different. But Sunderland are not having a lot of luck on top of Stephane Sessegnon, Adam Johnson and James McClean inexplicably and collectively being unable to deliver.

Villa just looked the bigger threat and once Gabriel Agbonlahor had ended a 28-league game wait for his goal, Sunderland never looked likely to equalise, for all their desperation and kitchen-sink style attacking play.

On top of all this, James McFadden signed last week and in hindsight might have been a fairytale in waiting on the bench but was overlooked for the latter stages of the Boro defeat for the McClean. But now he looks likely to miss out on the opportunity to impress for the next two months after suffering a hamstring injury on Thursday. It never rains…

This is all a serious test for O’Neill, who has asked for time to be judged and pointed out he endured similar difficulties in the early stages of management at Leicester and Villa. Even winning titles at Celtic didn’t come without its setbacks.

And he will know he has to get it right quickly. Just four points above third from bottom Reading, who are the home game in hand next month, Sunderland have a hectic and challenging period ahead.

You try and work out where the points are coming from. They face Fulham (A), West Brom and QPR (H), Norwich (A) before they really get into December.

Plenty to ponder: Martin O'Neill's appointment has not had the desired affect at the Stadium of Light

Plenty to ponder: Martin O'Neill's appointment has not had the desired affect at the Stadium of Light

They then have Chelsea (H) before the Reading re-match, followed by Manchester United (A), Southampton (A) and on Boxing Day Manchester City (H) before the month ends with Tottenham (H).

Testing times for Toon

Alan Pardew is also counting the cost of last week.

His Newcastle side came so close to ending their Anfield hoodoo, but what he'd give for a point and a clean bill of health after Sunday’s 1-1 draw.

Instead, Demba Ba, Yohan Cabaye and James Perch – the type of Newcastle players (yes, Perch included) who Sir Bobby Robson would have put in his `blue chip’ brigade – departed with injuries likely to leave them out of action for a few weeks.

And captain Fabricio Coloccini’s uncharacteristic moment of madness, even if he did try to pull out of a full-scale assault on Luis Suarez, has ruled him out of three Barclays Premier League games. He is always missed.

Blow: Demba Ba (right) added his name to Newcastle's growing injury list

Blow: Demba Ba (right) added his name to Newcastle's growing injury list

The downside of the deserved qualification to the Europa League was always going to be the test to the Newcastle squad. And at the beginning of the season, Pardew made no secret of his desire to see his fringe and younger players using the competition as a springboard to full-scale league involvement.

Pardew has used his men well and they sit top of their group, knowing a win in Bruges this week, and a favourable result between Maritimo and Bordeaux, puts them in next year’s knock-out phase. Progress indeed.

Thousands will make the trip to Belgium on Thursday, many without tickets, in a real show of force to mark Newcastle’s return to European action. Bruges is considerably easier, and cheaper, to get to than Mauritius and Athens.

Those who will be inside the Jan Breydel Stadium will not want to leave disappointed. This is the Belgian side’s last chance, and they will want to make an impression on home turf and end a run of six games without a win which cost seasoned campaigner George Leekens his job this week. They are likely to face a vastly inexperienced Newcastle team but the pressure is on the home side and caretaker coach Philippe Clement. It promises to be a testing night.

Return: Newcastle take on Bruges looking to qualify for the Europa League knockout phase

Return: Newcastle take on Bruges looking to qualify for the Europa League knockout phase

With points in the bag, Newcastle can afford a defeat. Maritimo at St James’s Park is an entirely different proposition in a fortnight and could prove to be the night for qualification. After that it is Bordeaux, when the majority of fans might appreciate the option of saving some money.

One criticism from supporters during the summer, was the lack of new signings. The new numbers of players alone didn’t match up.

The board believed they had the resources, and Pardew has never suggested he is unhappy with the cards he has been dealt. But this month tests the squad to the absolute limit and presents challenges he could do without as he looks to gain a stronger presence in the Premier League.

Newcastle have two months to get to the January transfer window. How they deal with its opening may depend on whether they limp or leap into the New Year.