Tag Archives: champs

Mike Tyson: Just who was brave enough to eat one of ex-heavyweight champ"s pigeons?

Just who was brave enough to eat one of ex-heavyweight champ Tyson's pigeons

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

11:33 GMT, 26 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

19:08 GMT, 26 April 2013

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He's famous as a fearsome fighter, but Mike Tyson has a surprising soft spot for his beloved pigeons.

And now the former heavy weight champion has revealed he was traumatised after an unnamed ex-girlfriend cooked and ate one of his birds in front of him.

The 46-year-old, who has called pigeon racing his 'first love' and at one pointed owned up to 350 birds, recalled the incident during a interview on US sports talk-radio show Boomer & Carton.

Scroll down to listen

Pretty bird: Mike Tyson with one of his many beloved pigeons

Pretty bird: Mike Tyson with one of his many beloved pigeons

When asked if he had ever eaten one
of his animals, he said: 'I tried. I was dating this young lady and she
said, “I don’t know why you’re flying those damn birds, you should be
eating them.”

'She happened to grab one and — and she cooked one and proceeded to eat it. And I just couldn’t do it.'

'You loved that pigeon so much,' host Craig Carton responded.

'Well, ‘cause he’s got a relationship with the pigeons,' co-host Boomer Esiason interjected.

'It just wasn’t the right thing to do,' Tyson added. 'That’s why she’s not my woman anymore.'

Audio: Mike Tyson says ex-girlfriend ate one of his beloved…

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Highs and lows: Tyson twice beat Frank Bruno but suffered defeat to Evander Holyfield.. and bit his ear

Highs and lows: Tyson twice beat Frank Bruno but suffered defeat to Evander Holyfield.. and bit his ear

Challenger Evander Holyfield lands a left to the face of Mike Tyson

Mike Tyson bites Evander Holyfield

Mike Tyson bites Evander Holyfield

When
asked why he even allowed the ex-girlfriend to eat the bird in the
first place, Tyson responded: 'It was her house and we were living off
of her dime, so she could do [it].'

The Hangover star, who infamously bit Evander Holyfield ear in a 1997 fight, has previously said he adored birds since he nine.

'They were my escape,' he said. 'I was fat and ugly. Kids teased me all the time. The only joy I had was pigeons.'

Current love: The former heavyweight boxer with third wife Lakiha Spicer at the Scary Movie 5 LA premiere

Current love: The former heavyweight boxer with third wife Lakiha Spicer at the Scary Movie 5 LA premiere

Mike Tyson and Monica Turner

Mike Tyson and Luz Whitney

Days gone by: Tyson with ex-girlfriends Monica Turner (left) and Luz Whitney

Pistorius ready to begin training as murder suspect visits Pretoria training base

Pistorius ready to begin training as murder suspect visits Pretoria training base

By
Associated Press

PUBLISHED:

17:56 GMT, 3 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

07:14 GMT, 4 April 2013

Oscar Pistorius wants to train again and recently went back to visit his regular track in South Africa’s capital.

There was still no decision on an exact time-frame for the multiple Paralympic champion’s return to regular running, but Pistorius told his agent Peet van Zyl and coach Ampie Louw at a Tuesday meeting that he was 'definitely keen to get back on track to resume training,' the agent said.

'When, exactly, is his choice,' Van Zyl told AP on Wednesday.

Granted: Oscar Pistorius was freed on bail after being charged with the murder of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp

Granted: Oscar Pistorius was freed on bail after being charged with the murder of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp

Pistorius had also revisited his practice track in Pretoria on March 24, although he didn’t train, the agent said.

Pistorius last trained on a track over two months ago, and his last competitive race was his victory in the 400m final at the London Paralympics in September last year.

Van Zyl said Pistorius wasn’t ready 'mentally' to compete yet after he was charged with murder in the February 14 shooting of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp at his home.

'From our meeting, it was clear and evident it’s going to take some time for him (to be ready to compete),” Van Zyl said. 'He’s trying to process this whole ordeal.'

Pistorius had also told his agent and coach that he would only consider running at the world championships in Moscow in August if he was in the right shape to run at the top level again.

'He (Pistorius) stated to me clearly yesterday, for the world champs, first he needs to be in some form,' Van Zyl said.

Back on track: Pistorius is keen to make a return to training, according to his agent

Back on track: Pistorius is keen to make a return to training, according to his agent

Still, Pistorius’ first significant move toward a return to the track on his carbon fiber running blades came at the meeting with his management team at the home of his uncle, Arnold Pistorius, on Tuesday night.

The 26-year-old Olympian has been staying at the house in the eastern suburbs of Pretoria since he was granted bail on February 22.

Victim: Steenkamp was shot dead in Pistorius' Pretoria apartment

Victim: Steenkamp was shot dead in Pistorius' Pretoria apartment

Pistorius denies murdering Steenkamp and says he shot her accidentally after mistaking her for an intruder in his house.

Prosecutors have charged him with pre-meditated murder and say he intentionally shot Steenkamp multiple times after the couple argued in the early hours of Valentine’s Day.

His next court appearance is on June 4.

Pistorius had visited his training track at the University of Pretoria with some other athletes, but hadn’t worked out properly, only doing a little jogging, Van Zyl said.

Although a high court ruling last week eased Pistorius’ bail restrictions on appeal and allowed him to travel to compete, Van Zyl said it would still take time to be ready for track meets.

'He hasn’t trained at all since the incident and you can’t expect him to go into competition. More important, mentally he is not there yet, he is some way off,' the agent said.

Long-time coach Louw, who discovered the double amputee’s talent for running when he was still a teenager, was eager, however, for the athlete to get back to training to help his mental process.

'Ampie was quite keen for him to start training as soon as possible so Oscar can get into some kind of routine,' Van Zyl said.

Bradley Wiggins admits he might not accept knighthood

Sir Bradley I'm not sure I could accept a knighthood, admits Wiggins

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UPDATED:

09:00 GMT, 5 November 2012

Bradley Wiggins has cast doubt over whether he would accept a knighthood after his stunning successes in the Tour de France and London 2012 Olympics.

The 32-year-old won the famous race in France this summer before winning gold in the time trial on the streets of the capital.

He has been widely tipped to follow in the footsteps of fellow cyclist Chris Hoy and receive the ultimate honour from the Queen but Wiggins has admitted he struggles with status.

Best of British: Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de France and Olympic gold

Best of British: Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de France and Olympic gold

Here Wiggo again…

Wiggins believes he is far from finished with the sport and is already looking ahead to his next challenge.

'I’ve already started training for next year because it is about doing it all over again,' he said.

'I think initially you think there is nothing else to do. In a sporting sense I’m 32 now and I went from the Champs-Elysees in Paris and winning the Tour de France to winning the Olympic time-trial in London. That is never going to happen to anyone again, perhaps in my lifetime.

'I still don’t think that it’s fully sunk in to be honest how incredible those two weeks at the Olympics were. It was probably the best time of my life in terms of a sporting sense.

'From now on it’s just trying to achieve other things – things that I hold close to my heart like Paris-Roubaix, the Giro d’Italia or maybe even trying to win the Tour again.

'It’s things I want to do and not what others (want me to do) because that could be dangerous if you get drawn into that.'

In his autobiography, My Time, serialised in the Guardian, he said: 'During the Games, there was speculation about whether I might end up with a knighthood in the same way that Sir Chris Hoy did after his great year. People asked me about it, so I did wonder whether I would accept it if it were to come my way.

'The point is that I can never see myself being given a title like Sir Bradley Wiggins. I have never considered myself above anybody else. I have always struggled with hierarchy and status. I don't know what it is – maybe just my upbringing, the area I'm from – but I'm quite happy to play second fiddle.

'I understand my physical capabilities sometimes give me status but, when it's all done and dusted, I struggle with that kind of thing. It's not what happens to kids from Kilburn.'

Wiggins did however admit that he could be forced to accept a knighthood in memory of his grandad.

'My late grandad George was the father figure, the role model in my young life, from the day when my mother Linda and I moved in to my nan and grandad's flat in Kilburn after my father Gary had walked out on us,' he added. 'After the Games, I remember saying to my nan: “So if I get offered a knighthood or whatever, what do you reckon George would make of it if I turned it down”

'She came back, quick as a flash: “He would never have spoken to you again.”

'So if it comes my way, I just might have to take it.'

Meanwhile, the throne Wiggins sat on following his London triumph will be sold at Sotheby's in New Bond Street on Monday with an estimate of 10,000-15,000.

Bradley Wiggins

Bradley Wiggins

Under the hammer: The throne Wiggins sat on in London will go up for sale

P.S. Fame has forced me to ditch my sunburns

Bradley Wiggins became almost as famous for his sideburns as he did his sporting success this summer but he has stunned his fans by shaving them off.

The Brit admitted he was often mobbed due to his facial hair but was growing tired of the attention.

'They
were too recognisable — it was getting a bit much. Now I can put on a
hat and no one knows who I am,' he is quoted as saying in The Sun.

New look: Wiggins has shaved his sideburns (right) to avoid fans' attention

New look: Wiggins has shaved his sideburns (right) to avoid fans' attention

Bradley Wiggins turns back on second Tour de France title to support Chris Froome

Wiggins stuns fans by turning back on Tour de France defence to support Froome after nightmare route is unveiled

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UPDATED:

12:11 GMT, 24 October 2012

Reigning champion Bradley Wiggins has turned his back on a second Tour de France title after agreeing to support Chris Froome's bid for glory.

The move marks a role reversal for the Team Sky team-mates after Froome played a key part in Wiggins' historic victory in July.

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Wiggins has set his sights on winning the Giro d’Italia next year as he attempts to secure all three Grand Tour titles.

Speaking at Wednesday's 2013 route announcement, Wiggins said: 'It's more than likely I'll be there in a helping capacity. For me it was about winning one Tour. I want to win the Giro.'

The 32-year-old became the first
Briton to win the Tour this summer when he beat Froome to the yellow jersey.

This year's race suited Wiggins'
time-trial prowess but next year's event, which starts for the first
time in Corsica, is apparently more mountainous which would not favour
the Briton but instead the likes of Alberto Contador.

Enlarge

The 2013 Tour de France route

The 2013 Tour de France route

the 2013 cycling classic Tour de France route

The Tour – the first since lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven titles – will end on the Champs-Elysees at night, organisers confirmed.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme revealed a 3,360-kilometre, 21-stage route, which takes place entirely in France, beginning on Corsica on June 21 and finishing under floodlights on the most famous boulevard in Paris on July 21.

Organisers made a decision to shorten
the combined length of the race's two individual time trials in part as
a response to the domination in this year's tour by champion Wiggins.

The 65 kilometers (40 miles) of time
trials split evenly between the 11th and 17th stages is almost 40
kilometers (25 miles) less than in the 2012 Tour, which could play into
Olympic time trial champion Wiggins' decision to focus instead on the
Giro d'Italia.

The first individual time trail on July 10 finishes against the backdrop of the Mont Saint-Michel monestary.

Line up: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

The contenders: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Organisers have given sprinters like Mark Cavendish a gift – the June 29 stage finish in Bastia is the first time since 1966 that a sprinter can hope to wear the yellow jersey after the first stage, Prudhomme said.

The traditional Bastille Day stage on July 14 is the race's longest at 242 kilometers (150 miles), ending with the 20.8-kilometer (13-mile) ascent of Mont Ventoux, one of cycling's most mythical climbs.

In another first for the race, which has only stopped for the two world wars since the first Tour in 1903, riders will begin the final stage on July 21 inside the grounds of the Versailles Palace. With the sprawling 17th-century chateau as a backdrop to the race start, 'It's going to be a knockout,' Prudhomme said.

The last stage will start later in the day than traditionally and timed for a finish at about 9 p.m., while there is still enough light to ensure riders' safety, Prudhomme said.

'We wanted the finish of the 100th Tour winner to be unique,' Prudhomme said.

In another change to tradition, the eight laps of the Champs Elysees will send riders all the way around the giant Arc de Triomphe arch at the top of the grand avenue, rather than just passing in front of it as in past years.

Armstrong finished on the top of the podium in a record seven Tours from 1999 to 2005 but was subject to a United States Anti-Doping Agency investigation and stripped of his titles and banned for life.

The UCI, cycling's world governing body, ratified the sanctions on Monday.

Dallas Cowboys beat New York Giants in NFL season opener

Cowboys ride in and spoil the party as New York Giants lose NFL opener

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UPDATED:

07:35 GMT, 6 September 2012

The New York Giants got the defence of their Super Bowl title off to a bad start as the Dallas Cowboys claimed a 24-17 victory.

Dallas quarterback Tony Romo completed 22-of-29 passes for 307 yards and three touchdowns.

Unheralded Kevin Ogletree, who had no touchdown receptions in his first three seasons in the league, caught eight passes for 114 yards and a pair of touchdowns, while DeMarco Murray rushed for 129 yards on 19 carries.

Double trouble: Kevin Ogletree celebrates his second touchdown for the Cowboys

Double trouble: Kevin Ogletree celebrates his second touchdown for the Cowboys

'This is a hostile environment, a tough place to play,' said Dallas coach Jason Garrett. 'When you play the Super Bowl champs at their place on opening night, it's a difficult task. We viewed it as a challenge.'

The opening night programme began with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell ushering in the new season and saluting the Giants to the roars of more than 80,000 fans, but before long it was the Cowboys who were dominating on the ground and in the air.

'Humble pie is basically what it is,' said Giants coach Tom Coughlin. 'Hopefully the competitive nature of our guys, they will come out swinging (next time).

'You're not going to get excuses from us. They beat us.'

Flying start: Quarterback Tony Romo (No 9) led the Dallas Cowboys to victory in New York

Flying start: Quarterback Tony Romo (No 9) led the Dallas Cowboys to victory in New York

The Cowboys built a 24-10 lead with less than six minutes to play after a leaping catch by Miles Austin turned into a 34-yard touchdown before the Giants closed in with a 79-yard scoring drive.

Dallas ran the clock out after Romo connected with Ogletree for 15 yards to convert a third-and-12 with about two minutes left in the game as the Cowboys avenged two late-season losses to New York that kept them out of the play-offs.

The visitors took a 7-3 lead into the intermission and built a 14-3 advantage following the kick-off for the second half when Ogletree, an undrafted receiver out of Virginia in his fourth season, hauled in a 40-yard touchdown pass.

Digging deep: New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning (No 64) calls a play

Digging deep: New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning (No 64) calls a play

New York responded with a 10-yard touchdown run by Ahmad Bradshaw, set up by a 39-yard pass to Domenik Hixon, to make it 14-10.

A 33-yard field goal by Dan Bailey made it 17-10 for Dallas before the teams traded fourth-quarter touchdowns to complete the scoring.

Dallas outgained the Giants 433 yards to 269, and though New York's vaunted pass rush registered a pair of sacks, Cowboys quarterback Romo scrambled out of trouble to make several big completions.

Party time: Fireworks signal the start of the new NFL season as the Giants host the Cowboys

Party time: Fireworks signal the start of the new NFL season as the Giants host the Cowboys

Giants quarterback Eli Manning, the Most Valuable Player of New York's Super Bowl win over New England last season, faced heavy pressure from the Dallas rush and was sacked three times. He completed 21-of-32 passes for 213 yards and a touchdown.

Both teams lost starting players to injuries during the game, with Dallas centre Phil Costa sidelined with back spasms after his third play from scrimmage and New York having their depleted defensive secondary hit further by a hamstring injury to Michael Coe.

The game was marked by sloppy play and a slew of penalty flags thrown by the replacement officials, employed by the league during a contract dispute with the regular crews.

The rest of the NFL's Week One schedule will be played on Sunday and Monday.

Packed in: A crowd of 80,000 gathered in New York as the Super Bowl champions kicked off the new campaign

Packed in: A crowd of 80,000 gathered in New York as the Super Bowl champions kicked off the new campaign

Mark Cavendish set to leave Sky

Cavendish plans his breakaway from Sky after growing tired of playing support role

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 18 August 2012

Mark Cavendish, a key part of Team Sky’s Tour de France triumph with Bradley Wiggins, is to quit the British outfit after just one year.

Cavendish, the current world road race champion and the 2011 Tour de France green jersey winner, will hold talks with Sky’s general manager, Dave Brailsford, next week to extricate himself from the remaining two-and-a-half years of his 1.5million-a-year contract.

Sky will not oppose the breakaway by 27-year-old Cavendish, who is seeking an agreement that he can begin negotiations with other teams. As many as six outfits have expressed an interest in taking him on.

Conflict of interest: Team Sky's Mark Cavendish (left) and Bradley Wiggins

Conflict of interest: Team Sky's Mark Cavendish (left) and Bradley Wiggins

Sky’s dream was to have Wiggins, the first Briton to win the Tour de France, and Cavendish sharing the spotlight but, despite the Manxman winning another three Tour stages last month to become the fourth-highest stage winner on 23, both he and Sky realise that sharing team efforts in an attempt to win yellow and green jerseys has proved impossible.

While Wiggins enjoyed a total team effort on his way to making British sporting history, Cavendish, often little more than a water collector for his team-mates, had to make do with scraps of help, although his final stage win on the Champs Elysees was due in good part to the efforts of his colleagues.

However, the experience has left the 2011 BBC Sports Personality of the Year frustrated and disillusioned and he yearns to return to a team who throw all their energies behind him, as was the case with HTC-Highroad during his green jersey-winning Tour last year.

Pain: Cavendish at the Olympics

Pain: Cavendish at the Olympics

His desire to leave has been fuelled by the realisation that their first aim next year will be another Tour de France win, either through Wiggins or runner-up Chris Froome, who is team leader at the Vuelta a Espana, which started yesterday, and who is seen as a strong contender to win the centenary staging of the Tour.

If Cavendish stayed at Sky, he would have to win sprint stages virtually on his own and then sit back and watch Wiggins and Froome go for yellow.
Officially, all parties concerned say Cavendish is still a Team Sky rider and this remains the case until he and Brailsford meet next week, but heading the queue for his signature are BMC, who helped Cadel Evans win the Tour de France last year.

The Australian was team leader again last month but faded to seventh place in his defence of the yellow jersey and appears to be on his way out. BMC would be changing tack from yellow to green jersey but are keen to team Cavendish with the Belgian, Philippe Gilbert.

Although Liquigas, Rabobank and Lampre have also made inquiries, BMC’s main competition for Cavendish will come from Katusha, the Russian team with oligarch millions behind them, and Omega Pharma Quickstep.

Negotiations are likely to be resolved quickly, with Cavendish, currently preparing for next week’s Tour of Denmark, followed by the Tour of Britain, looking to defend his world title in the Netherlands in five weeks’ time.

Sealed with a kiss: Cavendish teamed up with Jake Humphrey on the BBC

Sealed with a kiss: Cavendish teamed up with Jake Humphrey on the BBC

Brailsford, meanwhile, has spoken of his desire to turn Team Sky into one of the biggest sporting names in the world.

‘I want to build one of the best sports teams in the world, if not the best,’ said the Welshman, ‘and I’m talking all sports. What are the criteria in becoming a Barcelona or a Real Madrid, a New Zealand All Blacks, a Ferrari, an LA Lakers and so on How do the very best go about their business What do they all have in common

‘First and foremost, it means results. Yes, we’ve won the Tour and did it ahead of schedule, but we need to win it again and again. We believe we have the tools and the riders. But it’s also to do with our attitudinal approach to everything connected to us.

‘We want to become the model sports team, a point of reference for not just cycling but world sport to follow in terms of innovation, technology, team building and pushing the boundaries.’

Bradley Wiggins should be knighted – Chris Foy

Brad should be the next knight rider claims Hoy after stunning Tour win

PUBLISHED:

21:30 GMT, 23 July 2012

|

UPDATED:

23:34 GMT, 23 July 2012

Olympics 2012

From the Champs-Elysees to the Mall and on to Buckingham Palace. That was the route Sir Chris Hoy laid out for Bradley Wiggins on Monday.

The world of cycling continues to bow before Wiggins, the magnificent Tour de France winner, and Hoy believes that his fellow Briton deserves to end up on his own bended knee to arise as Sir Bradley.

It was a eulogy from one knight of the round wheels to surely the next in this extraordinary few days for cycling: Wiggins winning in Paris on Sunday, Hoy unveiled as Team GB’s Olympic flag-bearer at the dazzling opening ceremony on Friday.

Honour: Sir Chris Hoy will be the flag bearer at the opening ceremony

Honour: Sir Chris Hoy will be the flag bearer at the opening ceremony

Fair: Hoy says Bradley Wiggins deserves any honours he gets

Fair: Hoy says Bradley Wiggins deserves any honours he gets

Asked if a knighthood would be the appropriate tribute to the 32-year-old Tour winner, Hoy said: ‘Any accolades or honours that come his way would be fully deserved.

‘I’ve known Bradley since he was 16, seen him go through the ranks to be a champion in every single facet of the sport. There’s a side to Bradley that you don’t always see: very funny, very humorous, but he leads from the front. He can produce the goods.

‘The public have warmed to the way he handled himself and performed for three weeks.

‘Over that period, something could go wrong any day — a crash, a puncture — and your dream is over,’ Hoy added.

‘He produced three weeks of perfect racing in the toughest conditions. We are still pinching ourselves at what he and the team have achieved.’

Hoy, 36, admitted he would not even have attended the opening ceremony had he not won the vote, by a clear margin we can reveal. He was due to arrive in the Olympic Village on Saturday, the day after the extravaganza in the stadium.

Watching: Team GB cyclists cheer on Wiggins' Tour de France win

Watching: Team GB cyclists cheer on Wiggins' Tour de France win

‘I am still in shock,’ said the four-time gold medallist of his selection. ‘It is such a huge honour — the stuff of dreams, and when it is your home Games, even more special.’

Hoy has not attended any opening ceremonies since making his Olympic debut in Sydney 12 years ago but now he has the chance to showcase cycling’s burgeoning importance in the nation’s sporting psyche.

Once the choreography of Friday night is over, his sport will look to build on being Britain’s most successful sport in Beijing four years ago.

Hoy will go for his fifth and sixth gold medals in the keirin and team sprints. Wiggins will help Mark Cavendish in his road-race attempt on Saturday and try to win the time trial next Wednesday. Track medals in the iconic new velodrome should abound.

‘We keep mentioning golden eras,’ said Hoy. ‘After Beijing, we thought that was as good as things could be. But then to have this success in a truly global event such as the Tour de France is astonishing. Cycling has received a huge profile boost, and I hope that it will continue in the Olympics.

No rest for the wicked: Wiggins was back on his bike on Monday in the UK

No rest for the wicked: Wiggins was back on his bike on Monday in the UK

‘Hopefully, it will get even more popular in the UK,’ Hoy added. ‘It will mean more people on bikes. That brings so many positives not just for the Olympics, but for the health of the nation and to reduce congestion. I hope that can continue.’

It is a disgrace that so many British team members — perhaps half of the 542 athletes — will not be there to march behind Hoy.

Many, such as sailor Ben Ainslie, who is competing in distant Weymouth 36 hours later, have every reason not to attend the ceremony. But the decision for the whole swimming delegation to stay away en bloc is appalling.

Each individual should be able to determine whether to go based on which Games experience they want and when their first event starts.

Michael Scott, swimming’s performance director, has adopted a one-out, all-out policy in the name of team togetherness. It is inflexibility masquerading as sound psychology. As it happens, the British Olympic Association also see it as misguided.

But, never mind, the team members can all watch Sir Chris on a TV from afar. And that’s the way to build team spirit

Bradley Wiggins wants to win Olympic gold

I have tasted glory in yellow, now I want gold, roars Tour de France hero Wiggins

|

UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 22 July 2012

Bradley Wiggins was crowned the first British winner of the Tour de France on a Champs-Elysees bedecked in Union Flags and immediately turned his thoughts to winning Olympic gold.

Wiggins, who has three gold medals from previous Games, said: ‘If I’m 100 per cent honest, it’s gold or nothing in London now, really. That’s the way I’m treating the next nine days. I can’t sit here and say I’ll be happy with a silver or happy with a bronze.

‘That’s why I’m flying back this evening. That’s why I’ll be on the bike tomorrow [Monday] morning.

Brilliant Brit: Bradley Wiggins crosses the line to win the Tour de France

Brilliant Brit: Bradley Wiggins crosses the line to win the Tour de France

‘It’s a separate thing. As it stands the icing is on the cake. Coming off the back of this, it would add the hundreds and thousands on top.

‘My performance in yesterday’s time trial and how I felt, I was already thinking about the Olympics. I’ve made so many improvements in my time trialling… it’s realistic to think I can win gold now.’

Champagne moment: Wiggins celebrates his victory in Paris

Champagne moment: Wiggins celebrates his victory in Paris

In Paris, Mark Cavendish raced home for a fourth successive victory on the Champs-Elysees, securing his 23rd stage victory in the Tour, elevating him above seven-time winner Lance Armstrong and into fourth place alone in the all-time list.

He said: ‘It’s such a special moment. It means so much to come here, wearing the world champion’s jersey, doing what we’re doing for British cycling, being part of a team that’s just won the Tour de France.’

Bradley Wiggins back training in Eccleston after winning Tour de France

From Paris to Eccleston… hero Wiggins back training in Lancashire hills on day after Tour triumph as he eyes Olympics glory

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UPDATED:

11:17 GMT, 23 July 2012

Bradley Wiggins was back training in the hills around his hometown of Eccleston in Lancashire today – just 24 hours after becoming the first Briton to win the Tour de France.

Wiggins, who was crowned champion on the Champs-Elysees after the epic three-week race, returned to the north-west to focus his training on the Olympics.

Rather than sitting back sipping champagne, Wiggins must now turn his attention to winning gold on home soil.

The cycling ace competes in the time-trial that finishes at Hampton Court Palace on August 1. He also competes in Saturday's road race, when he attempts to help sprint ace Mark Cavendish to glory.

Triumphant: Bradley Wiggins celebrates as he crosses the line in Paris

Triumphant: Bradley Wiggins celebrates as he crosses the line in Paris

All quiet here: Wiggins is used to riding the roads around Eccleston

All quiet here: Wiggins is used to riding the roads around Eccleston

Eccleston, Lancashire

Wiggins will now spend time with the
British Cycling coaches in his bid to make it a perfect summer – and he
has already admitted only gold is good enough.

He said: 'If I'm 100 per cent honest,
it's gold or nothing in London now. That's the way I'm treating the
next nine days. I've set a precedent now for performances.

'I can't sit and say I'll be happy with a silver, or happy with a bronze.'

Top of the tree: Wiggins (centre) is crowned Tour de France champion after three weeks on the road

Top of the tree: Wiggins (centre) is crowned Tour de France champion after three weeks on the road

Cheers: Bradley Wiggins is congratulated by team-mate Michael Rogers after winning the Tour de France

Cheers: Bradley Wiggins is congratulated by team-mate Michael Rogers after winning the Tour de France

Wiggins is level with rowing legend Sir Steve Redgrave as the Brit with the most Olympic medals – six.

Down-to-earth Wiggins moved to
Eccleston after growing up in London and the surrounding slopes are
ideal for him to hone his preparations, while remaining with his wife
Cath and son Ben, 7.

In Paris, just when you thought the
British makeover of the Champs-Elysees was complete, Wiggins stepped up
on to the podium to add a finishing touch that was all his own.
Magnifique: Mark Cavendish celebrates his fourth successive win on the Champs-Elysees

Magnifique: Mark Cavendish celebrates his fourth successive win on the Champs-Elysees

Out in front: Cavendish sprints for the finish line to win his 23rd stage of the Tour de France

Out in front: Cavendish sprints for the finish line to win his 23rd stage of the Tour de France

Mark Cavendish celebrates

Bradley Wiggins of Britain, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey is followed by teammate Mark Cavendish

Perfect ending: Cavendish celebrates his fourth successive win in Paris as Wiggins leads him out (right)

Grasping a microphone that had been
thrust in his hand to replace the trophies which will for ever proclaim
him as winner of the Tour de France, the 32-year-old Londoner surveyed
the faces — half a million of them — pressed towards him from every
angle.

It seemed a daunting
task to set a bike rider and Wiggins looked to be struggling for the
words to express his joy and gratitude. He wasn’t.

‘We’re just going to draw the raffle
numbers,’ he said with a face as straight as that which had betrayed no
emotion to his rivals across the mountains and valleys of France over
the past three weeks.

We
could have been in a bingo hall in Wigan, near where Wiggins lives.
Instead we were on the most exclusive avenue in the world witnessing
history as Britain acclaimed its first winner of Le Tour in its 99-year
history.

Roars of laughter broke out in pockets of the grandstands lining the cobbled avenue.

In other sections there was silence. Language was one barrier, humour a greater one.

Wiggins continued, warming to his audience.

‘Some dreams do come true. My old mother over there, her son’s just won the Tour de France. Thank you, everyone. Cheers. Have a safe journey home and don’t get too drunk.’

And they say English comics don’t travel well. It was an offbeat end to an afternoon without precedent.

Tour de France 2012 winner, Yellow jersey British Bradley Wiggins, (C) kisses his wife Catherine

Fans dressed as Bradley Wiggins celebrate as the cyclist became the first British rider to win the Tour de France during the Investec first test match at the Kia Oval

Party time: Wiggins with his wife Cath (left) while fans at the England vSouth Africa cricket match celebrate

Teamwork: Bradley Wiggins in his yellow jersey with his Sky team-mates during the final stage

Teamwork: Bradley Wiggins in his yellow jersey with his Sky team-mates during the final stage

Unrivalled: Cavendish is honoured after winning his third stage of this year's Tour de France

Unrivalled: Cavendish is honoured after winning his third stage of this year's Tour de France

Wiggins won the yellow jersey, Mark Cavendish crossed the line first, just as he had for the previous three years in Paris.

The Brits had conquered cycling and they had snaffled France’s jewel of a race.

The French Tricolore hung from the arms of every lamppost along the Champs-Elysees, but at ground level it was the Union Flag that was omnipresent.

That and the colour yellow.

Family affair: Cavendish celebrates with his daughter Delilah Grace after winning the final stage

Family affair: Cavendish celebrates with his daughter Delilah Grace after winning the final stage

Funny farm: Wiggins is joined by several sheep as the Tour de France comes to an end

Funny farm: Wiggins is joined by several sheep as the Tour de France comes to an end

Team Sky had replaced the blue stripe on every one of their vehicles for the day, as well as the staff T-shirts, to match the colour of the outfit Wiggins wore as the peloton swept along the avenue time and again.

Eight circuits they made. And with each passing lap a British enclave near the Arc de Triomphe bellowed its partisan approval.

Wiggins added: ‘That turn was just a sea of Brits and the noise was incredible.

British one-two: Wiggins celebrates with team-mate Chris Froome who finished second in the Tour

British one-two: Wiggins celebrates with team-mate Chris Froome who finished second in the Tour

The end is in sight: The pelaton races towards the Eiffel Tower as the Tour de France comes to its conclusion

The end is in sight: The pelaton races towards the Eiffel Tower as the Tour de France comes to its conclusion

‘It was close to what it was like at the Olympics in Athens when I was coming into the home straight. It’s that kind of feeling. It’s phenom-enal. You couldn’t fail to hear it.’

There is only one battle on the final Sunday of the Tour — the final dash to the line.

Etiquette dictates that the man leading the race when the final stage begins will be crowned the victor later in the afternoon.

Brit pack: British fans await the finish of the final stage of this year's Tour de France

Brit pack: British fans await the finish of the final stage of this year's Tour de France

Jerseys: Tejay van Garderen (young) Wiggins, Peter Sagan, (sprinter) and Thomas Voeckler (climber)

Jerseys: Tejay van Garderen (young) Wiggins, Peter Sagan, (sprinter) and Thomas Voeckler (climber)

Even if etiquette had been forgotten, Wiggins’s nearest rival was his own Sky team-mate Chris Froome three minutes back. Third-placed Vincenzo Nibali of Italy was more than six minutes down.

It would have been impossible for Nibali to have overhauled the two Britons, but how much more civilised it is to enjoy a ceremonial roll into Paris from its suburbs, to congratulate the winners of the various coloured jerseys and each one of the 153 (out of an original 198) riders who survived a 2,200-mile slog along coastal roads, through farmlands and over the fearsome peaks of the Alps and the Pyrenees.

Of the 21 stages, including the opening prologue in the Belgian city of Liege, British riders won seven — Wiggins the two time trials, Cavendish three sprints, Froome the final climb to the Planche des Belles Filles and David Millar a defiant breakaway victory.

For the thousands of Brits who had
travelled across the Channel to witness history, there was a joyous
inevitability about Cavendish’s victory, imperious as ever. But there
was even greater delight in watching Wiggins, in sun-kissed yellow, lead
him into the final turn as the peloton exited the Place de la Concorde
for the final time.

Champagne moment: Wiggins takes a drink of bubbly from his team car during the final stage

Champagne moment: Wiggins takes a drink of bubbly from his team car during the final stage

As he crossed the line, Wiggins stretched out his arms in elation. Messages of congratulations had besieged him since he confirmed victory in Saturday’s time trial in Chartres, including one from his style guru Paul Weller, lead singer of The Jam and a musical hero for the ‘Mod’ Wiggins.

‘It’s a strange sensation. Very surreal,’ Wiggins concluded.

It will continue to be so as it unfurls within him as the weeks progress.

Another
tilt at Olympic glory awaits. So, too, for Cavendish although he may
not be a Sky rider next year, with team general manager Dave Brailsford
hinting that they will allow the Manx Missile to leave if it is in his
best interests.

Brailsford
said: ‘We want to become the best cycling team the world’s ever seen.
It’s quite clear we will be coming back next year to try to win the race
again, hopefully to defend it with Bradley.’

An encore on the Champs-Elysees Wiggins will be writing his one-liners already.

Champion: Wiggins leads out Cavendish to win the final stage of the Tour de France

Champion: Wiggins leads out Cavendish to win the final stage of the Tour de France

What they said about King Brad

To see a British rider and a fellow member of British Cycling win is a dream come true for me and all at British Cycling. This is a monumental day for sport in the UK. British Cycling president Brian Cookson

How amazing will it be to welcome back @bradwiggins and @MarkCavendish for #london2012 road race — perfect sporting start to the Olympics. Former Olympic triple jump champion Jonathan Edwards (@JDE66) on Twitter

@bradwiggins a real life legend, congratulations to all involved, amazing moment in British sporting history #allezwiggo Olympic sprint cycling champion Victoria Pendleton (@v_pendleton) on Twitter

This is a great British story and less than a week away from the Olympics this will inevitably give the Team GB cycling squad 6a lift. Team Sky chairman Robert Tansey

The perfect finish! Delighted for @MarkCavendish great win. What a team Sky are. And we all bow down before @bradwiggins on such a win! Former England rugby player Will Carling
(@will_carling) on Twitter

As a nod to the champagne ritual of the last day in Paris Wiggo should toast team and fellow riders with a pint of best. #TdF #SirBrad Former Olympic rowing champion Matthew Pinsent (@matthewcpinsent) on Twitter

Congrats to @bradwiggins on his historic Tour de France victory. Very impressive. Seven-time champion Lance Armstrong (@lancearmstrong) on Twitter

Tour de France results

Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain and SKY Procycling in action during the twentieth and final stage of the 2012 Tour de France

Bumble at the Test: Take a bow, Amla. You"ve earned it!

Bumble at the Test: Take a bow, Amla. You've earned it!

By
David Lloyd

PUBLISHED:

21:05 GMT, 22 July 2012

|

UPDATED:

21:05 GMT, 22 July 2012

When Hashim Amla started out in Test
cricket, they called him a walking wicket. You’d either hit him on the
head or his pads — and he didn’t much like either. But he’s worked so
hard on his batting, and look at him now: a world-class player. Take a
bow!

Majestic: Hashim Amla's 331 not out is the highest ever score by a South African

Majestic: Hashim Amla's 331 not out is the highest ever score by a South African

Tweet and sour

England ended up looking devoid of all
ideas due to the excellence of South Africa’s batting. The tweeters
were getting stuck into England. Sorry, guys — that’s just the way it
is. And the beauty of any sport is that you’ve got to come back
stronger, and accept when the opposition are better.

Cab ranks as best

London cabbies are the best in the
world. I was heading down to Soho on Saturday night for a drink in the
French House, and chatted with the driver all the way. It was an 11
fare. I offered 12. He said: ‘Give us a tenner. I’ve enjoyed talking to
you.’ Probably thought I was Geoff Boycott.

Not Brad at all!

The best moment for British sport at The Oval on Sunday came when the Bradley Wiggins lookalikes in the crowd accepted a standing ovation on behalf of the real bloke, who’d won the Tour de France. Imagine a lad who lives in Lancashire sipping champagne up the Champs-Elysees. He’d have been better off up Blackpool Tower.

Yellow fever: Supporters celebrate Bradly Wiggins's victory

Yellow fever: Supporters celebrate Bradly Wiggins's victory

A ton of class

By the way, in all this Amla euphoria I almost overlooked the fact that Jacques Kallis scored 182 not out. It was business as usual — he’s open all hours, this bloke. Could anyone else in world cricket score that many without you noticing he was there I suspect not.

A fine welcome

The Olympics are round the corner, and I have only one piece of advice for you: keep out of London. You get fined 130 for going in the wrong lane! Only VIPs, diplomats, politicians and third-rate celebs are allowed in. Book a week in Slough — it’s the only solution.

Annoying Aussie

Ended up on one of those boat bars on the Thames the other night, and got chatting to a young Australian lady. She proceeded to tell me that Englishmen were boring, and how she preferred Poles. London was dull, she said. And the weather’s terrible. To think they have the nerve to call us Pommies whingers!