Tag Archives: chambers

Dwain Chambers stormed off the track after a poor showing at the European Indoor Championships

Chambers storms off the track after failing to qualify from European indoor heats

By
Laura Williamson

PUBLISHED:

17:07 GMT, 1 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

18:22 GMT, 1 March 2013

Dwain Chambers stormed off the track in anger after being eliminated in the first round of the men’s 60 metres at the European Indoor Championships this afternoon.

The 34-year-old, who won gold in this event in 2009 and a silver medal two years ago, missed out on automatic qualification after coming fifth in his heat.

Chambers’ time of 6.78 seconds – two tenths of a second down on his season’s best – was not enough to guarantee him a place in Saturday's semi-finals as a fastest loser.

Frustration: Dwain Chambers threw off his vest after failing to qualify for the final of the European Indoor Championships

Frustration: Dwain Chambers threw off his vest after failing to qualify for the final of the European Indoor Championships

The European indoor record-holder, who served a two-year ban after testing positive for the anabolic steroid THG in 2003, threw his British vest to the floor in frustration and ignored all interview requests as he left the Scandinavium Arena.

Chambers missed the UK trials in Sheffield to protect a back injury and looked out of sorts at the British Athletics Grand Prix in Birmingham three weeks ago, when he finished fifth.

But the 2010 world indoor champion, who said earlier this year he finally feels ‘part of the team again’ after spending half his time training with UK Athletics’ sprint coach Rana Reider at Loughborough University, had insisted he would not compete in Gothenburg if he was not fully fit.

Speaking after his frustration had subsided, Chambers said: 'The performance was not what I expected and I can only express my disappointment because a lot of time and effort was put into me getting to these championships, and I want to apologise to the people whose time I feel I have wasted.

Out of sorts: Chambers, who has won a silver and gold at the last two championships, struggled to a time 6.78s, not enough to see him go through as a fastest loser

Out of sorts: Chambers, who has won a silver and gold at the last two championships, struggled to a time 6.78s, not enough to see him go through as a fastest loser

'I came here with all the intention
to do well and fight for a medal, which is always what I have been
renowned for doing, but the injury obviously took more out of me than I
had anticipated. So with that I'm really disappointed and feel bad for
letting people down.

'There was no pain. I think what
happened is that I spent all my time getting ready to get on the plane
injury free and I didn't prioritise my time to prepare for the
championships.

'I thought I was going to be all
right, but that was the wrong mind process I'd put myself into – I just
wasn't ready. I'm disappointed that I've let people down.

'In situations like these where you
want to do well, you expect to do well and people expect you to do
well…it hurts. I know what I'm capable of doing and it is
disappointing that I am not able to do that today.

'Now I'm just going to cheer on the rest of the team.'

James Dasaolu, however, cruised through
his heat to post the third-fastest qualification time, easing off before
the line to finish second behind Michael Tumi of Italy in 6.62 seconds.
Harry Aikines-Aryeetey also reached tomorrow’s semi-finals with a
season’s best of 6.65 seconds.

No such problems: Fellow Brit James Dasaolu (centre) made it through to the semi-final

No such problems: Fellow Brit James Dasaolu (centre) made it through to the semi-final

Harry Aikines-Aryeetey said: ‘It's a
seasons best – another good run and we'll take it lower, that's the aim.
It’s another opportunity and I think I've been quite lucky indoors. We
haven't really focused on it, so I've done some speed work over the last
few weeks.

‘Dwain and I
have been training together which has really helped. I'm just going to
take each round as it comes. I'm in a GB vest, so it's not about my
personal gain, it's about representing the country and showing what
we've got.

‘I stumbled out of the blocks a bit, so hopefully in the next round I'll go even better.’

James Dasaolu said: ‘I'm really happy, I wanted to qualify as easily as possible. I don't feel like I've exerted too much energy and I think that's what it's all about – using as little energy as possible. I've run a PB in pretty much every race, so I'm in good shape.

‘In the next round I'm going to be more aggressive and run through the line. It wasn't the quickest of fields, so I knew I didn't have to hammer the start, it was just about getting through.’

Shamed Victor Conte supplies supplements to Amir Khan

Shamed Conte supplies supplements to British light-welterweight Khan

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UPDATED:

00:36 GMT, 23 December 2012

Amir Khan, back on the world title
trail following last week's win over Carlos Molina, has taken nutrional
supplements supplied by Victor Conte, the man jailed for his part in one
of the world's biggest doping scandals.

Conte, sentenced to four months in
prison in 2005 for distributing steroids, is chief executive of a
company called SNAC System Inc, which issued supplements to Khan in the
run-up to his career-saving victory over Molina.

Comeback: Amir Khan after beating American Carlos Molina

Comeback: Amir Khan after beating American Carlos Molina

The 62-year-old was introduced to Khan via the Bolton man's new trainer, Virgil Hunter. Conte told The Mail on Sunday: 'I provided Amir Khan with supplements during his training camp with Virgil Hunter and special pre-fight supplements.'

A spokesman for Khan said: 'Amir did take supplements from a company called SNAC, which I believe is Victor Conte's company.

'Everything he took was declared to USADA, who were regulating the drugs tests for the Molina fight. Everything was cleared by them.'

Conte founded the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative [BALCO], which was raided in 2003 after evidence emerged that Conte had been providing performance-enhancing drugs to elite athletes such as five-time Olympic sprint champion Marion Jones, Tim Montgomery and British runner Dwain Chambers.

Conte has since become an anti-doping advocate and has provided consultation for agencies including the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association [VADA], which caught Lamont Peterson earlier this year before he was due to fight Khan in a rematch.

Khan has stated several times his abhorrence towards drug use in boxing and is one of the few fighters to undergo random blood and urine testing.

The British light-welterweight is still bitter that his hopes of avenging a split-decision defeat by Peterson were scuppered when the American tested positive for a banned substance ahead of their proposed rematch.

Khan has said: 'There are a lot of fighters out there who might be taking [drugs]. Imagine me taking it – I'd be an animal. How many people are on this stuff You just don't know.'

Hillsborough charity single revealed including Alan Hansen, Paul McCartney, Kenny Dalglish and Robbie Williams

Hillsborough charity single revealed: Dalglish and Hansen join McCartney and Robbie in video to raise cash for families of victims

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UPDATED:

18:26 GMT, 4 December 2012

Kenny Dalglish, Paul McCartney and Alan Hansen are among the cast of stars of Justice Collective singing on the Hillsborough charity single: He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother.

They are joined by Robbie Williams, Gerry Marsden, Melanie C, Paloma Faith and Shane MacGowan in the bid to raise vital cash for the families continuing to fight for justice for the 96 Liverpool fans who lost their lives in the 1989.

Liverpudlian Guy Chambers, who is producing the charity single, hopes the single can raise 1million – if it reaches the No 1 spot after official release on December 17.

VIDEO: Justice Collective – He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother

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Jamming: Paul McCartney plays guitar in the charity single

Jamming: Paul McCartney plays guitar in the charity single

Alan Hansen (left) and Kenny Dalglish sings along in the group's bid to raise 1million for the victims' families

Alan Hansen (left) and Kenny Dalglish sings along in the group's bid to raise 1million for the victims' families

He told The Mirror: 'I am deeply honoured to be asked to produce this record for the 96.

'If we can help to raise money to support the families’ legal battle so that they finally get their time in court then our job will be done.

'I spent my teenage years in Liverpool and feel a deep affection for both its musical heritage and the unique solidarity of its people.'

Supportive: Mel C and Co are taking part to get justice for the 96 victims of the Hillsborough disaster

Supportive: Mel C and Co are taking part to get justice for the 96 victims of the Hillsborough disaster

Pitching in: John Bishop joins in with the rendition

Pitching in: John Bishop joins in with the rendition

He ain't heavy: Former manager Kenny Dalglish and Peter Reid

He ain't heavy: Former manager Kenny Dalglish and Peter Reid

Who's singing what

The road is long – ANDY LAWSON

With many a winding turn – ANDY LAWSON

That leads us to who knows where – GERRY MARSDEN

Who knows when – PAUL HEATON

But I'm strong – GLENN TILBROOK

Strong enough to carry him – GLENN TILBROOK

He ain't heavy, he's my brother – JOHN POWER/ROBBIE WILLIAMS

So on we go – JOHN POWER

His welfare is of my concern – MELANIE C

No burden is he to bear – ROBBIE WILLIAMS

We'll get there – ROBBIE/MELANIE C

For I know – REBECCA FERGUSON

He would not encumber me – HOLLY JOHNSON

He ain't heavy, he's my brother- HOLLY JOHNSON/REBECCA F

If I'm laden at all – BEVERLEY KNIGHT

I'm laden with sadness – BEVERLEY KNIGHT

That everyone's heart – PALOMA FAITH

Isn't filled with the gladness- PALOMA FAITH

Of love for one another – ELIZA DOOLITTLE

It's a long, long road – DAVE McCABE

From which there is no return – PETER HOOTON

While we're on the way to there – REN HARVIEU / JON McCLURE

Why not share- JON McCLURE / REN HARVIEU

And the load – DAVE McCABE

It doesn't weigh me down at all – MACCA

Coz he ain't heavy – MACCA

(He ain’t heavy) – SHANE MACGOWAN

He's my brother – SHANE MACGOWAN/ BEVERLEY K

He's my brother – ALL (most)

He ain't heavy, he's my brother … – ALL (most)

Brian Laws apologises for saying Scunthorpe"s defending was "as bad as the Holocaust".

Laws sorry for comparing his team's defending to the Holocaust after 4-0 defeat

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UPDATED:

15:48 GMT, 26 November 2012

Inappropriate: Brian Laws said his team's defending was 'as bad as the Holocaust'

Inappropriate: Brian Laws said his team's defending was 'as bad as the Holocaust'

Brian Laws has been forced to apologise after labelling his team's defending as 'as bad as the Holocaust'.

The Scunthope United manager sparked a furious reaction from BBC radio listeners when he made the ill-thought remarks following Saturday's 4-0 defeat at Doncaster.

Laws' comments come on the same weekend sections of West Ham's support at Tottenham were heard chanting the name of Adolf Hitler and making hissing noises in reference to the gas chambers.

But speaking in a statement on the Iron's website, he said: 'I would like to apologise. The use of the word was not intended to cause offence and was used in the heat of the moment, in the frustration of the defeat.

'It was a poor choice of language to define those emotions and wasn't meant in the true meaning of the word.'

Laws' remarks and the actions of some at White Hart Lane has once again brought the issue of racism in football to the fore.

And reaction to the sorry incidents has been condemned by Board of Deputies of British Jews.

In a statement, they wrote: 'The Board of Deputies of British Jews utterly condemns and is dismayed by reports of antisemitic chanting by West Ham United fans at yesterday’s match against Tottenham Hotspur.

'Antisemitism has no place in football or society in general. For football fans to use Holocaust imagery and chants glorifying Adolf Hitler is grossly offensive to the Jewish community and is a stain upon the character of British football.

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

Thrashed: Scunthrope United were soundly beaten by Doncaster on Saturday

'This in the same week that Tottenham fans were attacked in Rome in an apparently antisemitic attack.

'Events at White Hart Lane yesterday and comments on Saturday by the Scunthorpe United manager describing his team’s defending as being “as bad as the Holocaust” confirm that this phenomenon is not confined to the Continent.

'Clearly there is either a lack of understanding or a lack of compassion within some sections of the British football world about these issues; a lack of understanding or compassion which needs to be addressed.

'We will be writing to the Football Association to urge them to punish those responsible for these chants and to take further steps to rid our national game of these slurs.'

Spurs fans chant "Yid Army" at Europa League clash with police backing

We'll sing what we want! Spurs fans chant 'Yid Army' at Europa League clash… with police backing

|

UPDATED:

23:38 GMT, 8 November 2012

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Jermain Defoe's hat-trick gave Tottenham fans even more to sing about after the Metropolitan Police reassured them they will NOT face prosecution for using the word 'Yid' in matchday chants.

London's police force agreed with the club and their supporters that the 'Yid Army' songs are not anti-Semitic.

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Backing: Tottenham fans cheer on their side against Maribor on Thursday

Backing: Tottenham fans cheer on their side against Maribor on Thursday

SPURS STATEMENT

'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that
requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where
we seek greater support to eradicate.'

Spurs fans often sing songs featuring the expression, and did
so during their Europa League
clash against Slovenian side
Maribor at White Hart Lane, where
a stunning treble from Defoe gave
them a 3-1 win.

Before kick-off, a smattering of
supporters in the South Stand sang
'Yid Army' and, after a third-minute
corner for Spurs, the chant grew
louder with the whole end joining
in. Then, in clear protest at the criticism levelled at them, Spurs fans from all corners bellowed: 'We're Tottenham Hotspur, we'll sing what we want.' Another round of 'Yid Army' then followed.

The club released a statement defending their fans' right to use the expression. It read: 'Our guiding principle in respect of the “Y-word” is based on the point of law – ie. if it is used with the deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any offence, they use it as a chant among themselves.'

The Met have advised Spurs that chants such as 'Yid Army' will not lead to prosecution on the basis that it is used with no 'deliberate intention to cause offence'.

Spurs' conversations with police came after the Society of Black Lawyers threatened to report Spurs to the police if they were not seen to be doing more to ensure the term is no longer used.

Hat-trick hero: Jermain Defoe

Hat-trick hero: Jermain Defoe

SUPPORTER COMMENT: SORRY BUT THE Y-WORD BELONGS TO US

As a youngster growing up supporting Spurs, it took me some time to realise the word 'yid' was an offensive racial slur. I'd never heard it used in a derogatory sense at White Hart Lane, only ever as a collective term – yid army – and as a positive identifier.

If a player was good, he was a yiddo.

But its significance soon became apparent. Though far from the abhorrent gas chamber hissing of some away fans, it's still sensitive. Context is important, though, and its reclamation as a positive term at the ground should not be ignored.

The Society of Black lawyers says use of the word yid, including the tone adopted by Spurs fans, amounts to casual racism. Perhaps they have a point. Perhaps simply substituting the word would be the answer. But Spurs fans are unlikely to take kindly at being told what to do by an external body, especially as it is largely considered a positive, rather than offensive, chant.

David Baddiel tried to stamp out its use by Tottenham supporters but, despite his own Jewish faith, the views of a Chelsea fan were never likely to be accepted by the Spurs majority.

If the word yid really is to be kicked out of White Hart Lane, it would need concerns to be raised from within the Spurs-supporting community, rather than outside pressures.

Andrew Magee, life-long Spurs supporter

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Yid row: Tottenham fans are racist, claims Peter Herbert

You just don't get it, Spurs: Chanting 'Yid Army' is racist, blasts Herbert

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UPDATED:

08:03 GMT, 8 November 2012

Peter Herbert has hit back at Tottenham as the row over the use of the term 'Yid' rumbles on.

Herbert, chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers, originally said that if matchday chants including the word continue, he would ask police to bring a prosecution for racism.

The club responded with a strong
defence of their supporters’ use of the word but Herbert has blasted back, accusing the supporters of casual racism.

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A 'Yid Army' Spurs flag

Tottenham Hotspur fans celebrate in the stands

Traditional support: A Tottenham fan cheers on his side at Wembley during 2008's Carling Cup victory

Jermain man: Defoe limbers up during Spurs training session at their Enfield HQ

Jermain man: Defoe limbers up during Spurs training session at their Enfield HQ

SPURS STATEMENT

'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that
requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where
we seek greater support to eradicate.'

‘The argument sounds like it is 40
years old,’ he said. ‘I’m deeply saddened that a football club that
represents such a diverse area has taken such a view. I don’t want to
have to take my children to a football match and expect to hear
anti-Semitic chants.

‘Tottenham Hotspur Football Club
obviously just don’t get it. It’s almost like saying if a woman refers
to another woman in a derogatory fashion then it is OK.’

Herbert added: ‘What we are trying to
do is change a culture. What we are saying to Tottenham is, “Maybe this
was OK 50 years ago — but it isn’t now”.

‘Even if it comes from Tottenham
supporters, it remains casual racism. We understand it is a difficult,
and for some an uncomfortable, stance to take, but we feel it is the
right stance.’

Tottenham have issued an impassioned defence of their fans’ right to use the term ‘Yid’ in their matchday chants.

Herbert had earlier described the north
London club’s attitude as being ‘40 years out of date’.

The society
claim such chants — either by opposition fans or Spurs supporters
themselves — are anti-Semitic and unacceptable in contemporary society.

As
part of a 10-point plan to tackle racism in football, they are
threatening to report to the police any anti-Semitic chants heard at
White Hart Lane unless Tottenham and the FA agree to take action.

Spurs are steeped in Jewish tradition and large sections of their support refer to themselves as ‘Yids’ in matchday songs.

Herbert also says that ‘hissing’
noises made by away fans at White Hart Lane — a reference to the gas
chambers in the Holocaust — are equally intolerable and will also
provoke a complaint from his organisation.

Herbert told Sportsmail: 'In discussions with members of the
Jewish community, we were made aware that this practice is still
continuing and it has to come to an end.

'If
neither Tottenham FC nor the FA are willing to take a stand then SBL
will report the matter to the Metropolitan Police Service for
investigation and, if necessary, prosecution.

Smiles better: Tottenham's William Gallas Emmanuel Adebayor and Jan Vertonghen during a training session

Smiles better: Tottenham's William Gallas Emmanuel Adebayor and Jan Vertonghen during a training session

WHO IS THIS HERBERT

Peter Herbert is a human rights barrister and chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers. He’s also the man who lodged a complaint with the Metropolitan Police over referee Mark Clattenburg’s alleged abuse of John Mikel Obi.

Herbert was the first chair of the Race-Hate Crimes Forum and, with strong links to the US, has advised on introducing an equivalent to the Rooney Rule in Britain.

'The
report will be made if this behaviour does not cease by 20 November. We
will have monitors in attendance to observe what occurs.'

But Tottenham said in a
statement: ‘The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive
chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself — the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used, i.e. if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it as a chant among themselves.

‘The club believes that real
anti-Semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence.

‘We believe this is the area that
requires a determined effort from all parties and where we seek greater
support to eradicate.’

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

Baddiel

Baddiel

Lineker

Lineker

Herbert

Herbert

SOCIETY OF BLACK LAWYERS' PLAN

A minimum six to nine-month ban for racial abuse, rising to a five-year ban for a third offence

Any fines going directly to Kick It Out to fund grassroots anti-racism initiatives

The creation of representative associations for black players, managers and coaches

Guidance for referees to send off players using racist abuse and the power to call off games where the crowd is using such abuse

A 20 per cent quota at all levels of the FA, PFA, clubs as well as football agents and referees

Racial abuse to be a matter of gross misconduct incorporated into players’ contracts

Clubs to invest in the personal education of all players, including university or college education

Recording referees and assistants during matches to pick up any possible abuse by players.

A
system for reporting racial incidents to be set up with details of
these incidents, both on and off the pitch, published each year

Former Spurs stars Gary Lineker and Ledley King have previously condemned the mimicking of the gas chambers by away supporters.

Tottenham have traditionally been
well supported by members of the Jewish community. Many fans do not
consider references to their faith as offensive. Others,such as comedian
David Baddiel, however, do.

Last year Baddiel
launched a campaign, supported by Lineker, to stamp out use of the word 'yid' in football
chants which mock Jewish and Tottenham supporters.

The Society of Black Lawyers is involved in talks to create a Black Players’ Association
with some professionals, claiming the football authorities are not doing
enough to represent them or to tackle racism in the sport.

The PFA recently introduced its own six-point action plan but the society says this will prove 'ineffective'.

Spurs supporters will be put under the microscope more than ever during the Europa League visit of Maribor.

But Tottenham manager Andre
Villas-Boas is focusing on whether to field a double-pronged strikeforce
of Jermain Defoe and Emmanuel Adebayor against the Slovenian champions.

England striker Defoe has been
Tottenham’s No 1 striker this season, while Adebayor has been forced to
spend most of the season on the bench.

Villas-Boas said: ‘We have had thoughts, between the technical staff, about playing them both — about changing our structure.

‘We have had success in the past with
the system that we are playing. We certainly have played 4-4-2 in some
games when Ade has come on. But whether the right time is tomorrow I am
not sure.’

SUPPORTER COMMENT: SORRY BUT THE Y-WORD BELONGS TO US

As a youngster growing up supporting Spurs, it took me some time to realise the word 'yid' was an offensive racial slur. I'd never heard it used in a derogatory sense at White Hart Lane, only ever as a collective term – yid army – and as a positive identifier.

If a player was good, he was a yiddo.

But its significance soon became apparent. Though far from the abhorrent gas chamber hissing of some away fans, it's still sensitive. Context is important, though, and its reclamation as a positive term at the ground should not be ignored.

The Society of Black lawyers says use of the word yid, including the tone adopted by Spurs fans, amounts to casual racism. Perhaps they have a point. Perhaps simply substituting the word would be the answer. But Spurs fans are unlikely to take kindly at being told what to do by an external body, especially as it is largely considered a positive, rather than offensive, chant.

David Baddiel tried to stamp out its use by Tottenham supporters but, despite his own Jewish faith, the views of a Chelsea fan were never likely to be accepted by the Spurs majority.

If the word yid really is to be kicked out of White Hart Lane, it would need concerns to be raised from within the Spurs-supporting community, rather than outside pressures.

Andrew Magee, life-long Spurs supporter

DM.has('rcpv1952772513001','BCVideo');

Stop fans chanting "Yid Army" or face police complaint, Tottenham Hotspur told to act over anti-Semitic songs by Society of Black Lawyers

Stop your fans chanting 'Yid Army' or face police complaint, Spurs told to act over anti-Semitic songs by anti-racism body
Tottenham also told to clamp down on away supporters 'hissing'
Club warned: home fans' traditional chant is anti-SemiticSpurs stress 'Y-word' is not used to cause anyone offence
Gary Lineker and David Baddiel back campaign to stop use of the 'Y-word'
Society of Black Lawyers reveal blueprint to kick racism out of football

|

UPDATED:

13:13 GMT, 7 November 2012

READ MARTIN SAMUEL'S COLUMN

Martin Samuel

Click here to read: Strictly speaking, we are looking in the wrong place for racism

'Is it any wonder that, in this climate, Ramires of Chelsea believes he heard a white referee, Mark Clattenburg, refer to his black team-mate John Mikel Obi as a ‘monkey’ two weeks ago'

Tottenham have been told to clamp down on their own fans' chanting or face a complaint to the police from the Society of Black Lawyers.

Large numbers of Spurs supporters have historically referred to themselves as the 'Yid Army' but such chants are anti-Semitic and must stop, according to Peter Herbert, the man who lodged a complaint with the Metropolitan Police over referee Mark Clattenburg's alleged abuse of John Obi Mikel.

Herbert is the chairman of the Society of Black Lawyers. He insists that hissing from away fans at White Hart Lane – a reference to the gas chambers used in the Holocaust – is equally unacceptable and will also provoke a complaint from his organisation.

Tottenham have defended their fans' right to use the term 'Yid', stressing that home fans at White Hart Lane 'do not use the term to others to cause any offence'.

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A 'Yid Army' Spurs flag

Tottenham Hotspur fans celebrate in the stands

Traditional support: A Tottenham fan (right) cheers on his side and a flag in the home end at White Hart Lane (left). BOTH IMAGES FILE PICS

Warning: The Society for Black Lawyers has urged Tottenham to act against the anti-Semitic chanting

Warning: The Society for Black Lawyers has urged Tottenham to act against the anti-Semitic chanting

SPURS STATEMENT

Spurs crest

'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of
the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing
factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the
deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of
prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant
as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect
anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any
offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real
anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers
is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that
requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where
we seek greater support to eradicate.'

SOCIETY OF BLACK LAWYERS' PLAN

A minimum six to nine-month ban for racial abuse, rising to a five-year ban for a third offence

Any fines going directly to Kick It Out to fund grassroots anti-racism initiatives

The creation of representative associations for black players, managers and coaches

Guidance for referees to send off players using racist abuse and the power to call off games where the crowd is using such abuse

A 20 per cent quota at all levels of the FA, PFA, clubs as well as football agents and referees

Racial abuse to be a matter of gross misconduct incorporated into players’ contracts

Clubs to invest in the personal education of all players, including university or college education

Recording referees and assistants during matches to pick up any possible abuse by players.

A
system for reporting racial incidents to be set up with details of
these incidents, both on and off the pitch, published each year

Herbert told Sportsmail: 'In discussions with members of the
Jewish community, we were made aware that this practice is still
continuing and it has to come to an end.

'If
neither Tottenham FC nor the FA are willing to take a stand then SBL
will report the matter to the Metropolitan Police Service for
investigation and, if necessary, prosecution.

'The
report will be made if this behaviour does not cease by 20 November. We
will have monitors in attendance to observe what occurs.'

A Tottenham club statement read: 'The club does not tolerate any form of racist or abusive chanting.

'Our guiding principle in respect of the “Y-word” is based on the point of law itself – the distinguishing factor is the intent with which it is used ie if it is used with the deliberate intention to cause offence.

'This has been the basis of prosecutions of fans of other teams to date. Our fans adopted the chant as a defence mechanism in order to own the term and thereby deflect anti-Semitic abuse. They do not use the term to others to cause any offence, they use it a chant amongst themselves.

'The club believes that real anti-semitic abuse such as hissing to simulate the noise of gas chambers is the real evil and the real offence. We believe this is the area that requires a determined and concerted effort from all parties and where we seek greater support to eradicate.'

Former Spurs stars Gary Lineker and Ledley King have previously condemned the mimicking of the gas chambers by away supporters.

Tottenham have traditionally been
well supported by members of the Jewish community. Many fans do not
consider references to their faith as offensive. Others,such as comedian
David Baddiel, however, do.

Last year Baddiel
launched a campaign, supported by Lineker, to stamp out use of the word 'yid' in football
chants which mock Jewish and Tottenham supporters.

The Society of Black Lawyers is involved in talks to create a Black Players’ Association
with some professionals, claiming the football authorities are not doing
enough to represent them or to tackle racism in the sport.

The PFA recently introduced its own six-point action plan but the society says this will prove 'ineffective'.

Herbert added: 'What
we are trying to do is change a culture. What we are saying to Tottenham
is: “Maybe this was okay 50 years ago – but it isn't now.

'Even if it is from Tottenham supporters, it remains casual racism. We
understand it is a difficult, and for some an uncomfortable, stance to
take, but we feel it is the right stance.'

Storm brewing: Referee Mark Clattenburg is under investigation for his clash with John Mikel Obi

Storm brewing: Referee Mark Clattenburg is under investigation for his clash with John Mikel Obi

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

High profile: Incidents involving John Terry and Luis Suarez brought focus on racism in football

Baddiel

Baddiel

Lineker

Lineker

Herbert

Herbert

The Society of Black Lawyers have
published a plan to tackle racism in football and want matches to be
instantly abandoned if there is racial abuse from fans.

The document was published ahead of a meeting between the FA, Professional Footballers’ Association, Premier League and trustees of anti-racism body Kick It Out on Wednesday.

Wednesday's meeting between Kick It Out and a selection of football’s leading authorities is a scheduled get-together of the anti-racism charity’s trustees.

SUPPORTER COMMENT: SORRY BUT THE Y-WORD BELONGS TO US

As a youngster growing up supporting Spurs, it took me some time to realise the word 'yid' was an offensive racial slur. I'd never heard it used in a derogatory sense at White Hart Lane, only ever as a collective term – yid army – and as a positive identifier.

If a player was good, he was a yiddo.

But its significance soon became apparent. Though far from the abhorrent gas chamber hissing of some away fans, it's still sensitive. Context is important, though, and its reclamation as a positive term at the ground should not be ignored.

The Society of Black lawyers says use of the word yid, including the tone adopted by Spurs fans, amounts to casual racism. Perhaps they have a point. Perhaps simply substituting the word would be the answer. But Spurs fans are unlikely to take kindly at being told what to do by an external body, especially as it is largely considered a positive, rather than offensive, chant.

David Baddiel tried to stamp out its use by Tottenham supporters but, despite his own Jewish faith, the views of a Chelsea fan were never likely to be accepted by the Spurs majority.

If the word yid really is to be kicked out of White Hart Lane, it would need concerns to be raised from within the Spurs-supporting community, rather than outside pressures.

Andrew Magee, life-long Spurs supporter

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Crystal Palace 5 Ipswich 0 – match report

Crystal Palace 5 Ipswich 0: Murray treble gives new boss Holloway dream start

|

UPDATED:

00:47 GMT, 7 November 2012

What a start to Ian Holloway's reign at Crystal Palace. Five goals without reply against Ipswich and a five-star performance took the London club to the top of the Championship for the first time in five years.

It extended their unbeaten run to 12 games, following three defeats in their first three matches.

On the spot: Murray scored a hat-trick against Ipswich to fire Palace top

On the spot: Murray scored a hat-trick against Ipswich to fire Palace top

Match facts

Crystal Palace: Speroni, Ward, Delaney, Ramage, Parr, Jedinak, Garvan (Moritz 69), Dikgacoi, Zaha (Moxey 87), Murray (Easter 69), Bolasie.

Subs Not Used: Price, Blake, O'Keefe, Appiah.

Booked: Dikgacoi, Zaha.

Goals: Bolasie 24, Murray 50 pen, 55 pen,63, Moritz 90.

Ipswich: Henderson, Edwards, Higginbotham, Chambers, Cresswell, Martin, Reo-Coker, Drury (Emmanuel-Thomas 70), Wellens (N'Daw 82), Campbell, Murphy (Smith 70).

Subs Not Used: Loach, Chopra, Scotland, Mohsni.

Booked: Reo-Coker.

Attendance: 15,517

Referee: Darren Sheldrake (Surrey).

Latest Championship results, fixtures and table

'As debuts go it doesn't get much better than that,' said Holloway.

'Everybody here is motivated to get
Palace back to where they deserve, to where the fans want and hopefully
it'll be a fantastic journey.'

Holloway did not have to wait long to
see the first goal of his reign. Joel Ward won the ball at right back
in the 24th minute, played a hopeful ball forward that was flicked on by
Owen Garvan and winger Yannick Bolasie ran in behind the Ipswich
defence to delicately loft the bouncing ball, first time, over the
stranded Stephen Henderson from 12 yards.

It got even better in the second
half. The rapid Wilfried Zaha won a penalty on 49 minutes, beating two
men on the left and taking the ball into the area, where he was floored
by Luke Chambers. Glenn Murray calmly netted.

Five minutes later Aaron Creswell
pushed Murray inside the area – and he coolly scored his second penalty.
Only six minutes after that Chambers conceded yet another penalty – but
this time Murray missed.

Perfect start: Holloway's Palace fired five past Ipswich

Perfect start: Holloway's Palace fired five past Ipswich

He did not have to wait long for his
hat-trick, however, netting Ward's low cross from close range on 63
minutes, and substitute Andre Moritz added a fifth in stoppage time.

Holloway credited former Palace boss Dougie Freedman for his work at the club.

He said: 'It's so professional here
it's fantastic. Whatever Dougie and Lennie Lawrence have done, it's
already in place. I sometimes think, pinch me I'm dreaming.'

Mick McCarthy, in his second match in
charge at Ipswich, faced a harsh reality following his win against
Birmingham at the weekend.

He described the match as a sobering
experience and said: 'They murdered us. But people are a little
misguided if they thought we were going to come here against high-flying
Palace and win after the match at the weekend.

'I can't remember a side conceding
three penalties, let alone in 11 minutes. As usual, the players were
telling me it wasn't a penalty. I'll have to look at replays. We've got a
fair bit of work to do.'

West Ham 0 Manchester City 0 – match report

West Ham 0 Manchester City 0: Unfair This bore draw is just the start, Mancini

|

UPDATED:

23:16 GMT, 3 November 2012

An awkward night in the East End of London will pale in comparison to the mission facing Roberto Mancini in Manchester on Tuesday.

For the second consecutive season, he is presented with the prospect of the team he has assembled on Abu Dhabi petro-dollars being eliminated from the Champions League in the group stages. Victory against Ajax on Tuesday is an absolute necessity.

Even then, the odds of survival seem heavily stacked against Manchester City. After Ajax, Mancini will have to conjure further wins over Real Madrid at home and against Borussia Dortmund in Germany — then trust that other results in the group fall favourable.

Tip top: Joe Hart pushes over Yossi Benayoun's effort

Tip top: Joe Hart pushes over Yossi Benayoun's effort

Match facts

West Ham: Jaaskelainen, O'Brien, Reid, Collins (Spence 84), McCartney, Jarvis, Noble, Diame (O'Neil 71), Benayoun, Nolan, Carroll (Cole 77).

Subs Not Used: Spiegel, Maiga, Chambers, Hall.

Booked: Collins, Benayoun, McCartney.

Man City: Hart, Nastasic, Kompany, Toure, Clichy, Barry, Toure, Nasri (Sinclair 90), Tevez (Javi Garcia 84), Dzeko, Balotelli (Aguero 69).

Subs Not Used: Pantilimon, Zabaleta, Kolarov, Razak.

Att: 35,005

Ref: Howard Webb (S Yorkshire).

Latest Premier League table and results

It promises to be an uncomfortable
period in the extreme. For the first time in 16 Premier League games,
City failed to score. And that was after Mancini tried to break West
Ham’s spirited resolve by using, over the 90 minutes, the striking
talents of Carlos Tevez, Edin Dzeko, Mario Balotelli, Sergio Aguero and
Samir Nasri.

All Mancini could conjure at the end
was a hard-luck story. ‘No, it’s not a fair result,’ he said. ‘We missed
four incredible chances. I am happy with the performance but, if you
don’t score, you can’t win.’

He felt particularly aggrieved by the
failure of Balotelli. In the 33rd minute, the volatile Italian striker
had the chance to bring a smile to his manager’s face. A free-kick from
Tevez evaded West Ham’s defence and Balotelli appeared at the far post
with the freedom of Upton Park. He tried to divert the ball into the net
with his right leg almost horizontal to the ground, when perhaps he
would have been better advised to have headed the ball. And on the
stroke of half-time, Balotelli missed the target with a volley.

Mancini’s frustration this season is
deepening. James Milner was withdrawn from the team in the warm-up and,
like Joleon Lescott and David Silva, he is not expected by Mancini to
feature against Ajax. ‘When you win the title, I think the year after is
more difficult,’ said Mancini. ‘We have improved our defensive phase,
but we now need to score (as freely) as last year.

In the 68th minute, Gareth Barry
engineered an opportunity when he arrived late into the penalty area to
catch West Ham’s defence napping.

Taking a tumble: Edin Dzeko goes down under Mohamed Diame's challenge

Taking a tumble: Edin Dzeko goes down under Mohamed Diame's challenge

Causing a scene: Vincent Kompany

Now it's Carroll's turn

Causing a scene: Vincent Kompany appeals for a foul… while Andy Carroll (right) holds his face

He appeared to bring the ball under
control with the upper part of his arm but, without censure, he had
ample chance to score. Instead he shot wide of the far post. ‘Had that
been a goal it would have been a real sickener as he brought the ball
down with his hand,’ said West Ham manager Sam Allardyce.

West Ham are deserving of credit. They
caused moments of anxiety for City and defended with heart over the
final 30 minutes when they kept the champions out. In fact, Kevin Nolan
felt he had given West Ham a fourth-minute lead, but he was judged to
have volleyed Mark Noble’s free-kick from an offside position. ‘City
were a little fortunate with that decision,’ said Allardyce.

Yossi Benayoun thundered a volley
against Joe Hart’s crossbar in the 18th minute, while Andy Carroll’s
overhead kick on the hour from a corner from Matt Jarvis looked
goalbound until it was deflected to safety off the back of City’s
stand-in right back Kolo Toure.

Anything to score: Carroll flings himself at the ball

Anything to score: Carroll flings himself at the ball

Complaint: Gareth Barry appeals to Howard Webb

Complaint: Gareth Barry appeals to Howard Webb

But while Allardyce is enjoying
jousting again at the highest level, Mancini remains a man who cannot
predict with total certainty what the future holds for him.

Last week he was forced to admit that
he had been close to accepting an attractive financial package from
Monaco, the latest club to have a billionaire benefactor bristling with a
desire to reach the top table of European football.

Mancini, clearly, was keeping his
options open. After all, City only delivered the championship —demanded
by the club’s owners and coveted by fans impatient to have bragging
rights over Manchester United — with effectively the final kick of the
season from Aguero.

Oh no, Mario! Balotelli sees the ball evade him

Oh no, Mario! Balotelli sees the ball evade him

What's going on here then Howard Webb looks puzzled as Kevin Nolan sits injured

What's going on here then Howard Webb looks puzzled as Kevin Nolan sits injured

Mancini’s signature on a new five-year contract with City seemed to calm the speculation surrounding his future.

But these are complex times at City.
The arrival from Barcelona of Txiki Begiristain as director of football
and Ferran Soriano as chief executive, has shaken up the administrative
structure at the club. It will hardly escape Mancini’s notice that the
third member of that triumphant triumvirate at Barca, former manager Pep
Guardiola, will be seeking new employment next summer after the
completion of a year-long sabbatical.

Back home: Former Hammer Carlos Tevez was given rapturous applause

Back home: Former Hammer Carlos Tevez was given rapturous applause

Nervous: Sam Allardyce and Roberto Mancini urge their teams on

Oops! Carroll bemoans a missed chance

Nervous: Sam Allardyce and Roberto Mancini watch on while Carroll bemoans a missed chance

Guardiola’s reputation for creating a
team that epitomised football as the beautiful game will cast a giant
shadow on managers across Europe. But only those with deep pockets
should bother calling him.

Mancini endured a tough day at the office. And tougher days beckon, beginning with the visit of Ajax on Tuesday night.

Silence: The teams paid their respects to fallen heroes in advance of Remembrance Day

Silence: The teams paid their respects to fallen heroes in advance of Remembrance Day

West Ham 4 Southampton 1 – match report: Mark Noble Kevin Nolan Modibo Maiga Adam Lallana score

West Ham 4 Southampton 1: Noble and Nolan help Hammers see off sloppy Saints

|

UPDATED:

16:48 GMT, 20 October 2012

Mark Noble's brace helped West Ham continue their fine start to life back in the top flight at the expense of fellow new boys Southampton.

The Hammers have adapted to life in the Barclays Premier League far better than the side that finished above them in the Championship and picked up their fourth win of the campaign.

After a dour first half at Upton Park, Sam Allardyce's men came flying out of the blocks after the restart and netted twice in a three-minute spell.

Happy Hammers: Two-goal hero Mark Noble is grabbed by fellow goalscorer Kevin Nolan

Happy Hammers: Two-goal hero Mark Noble is grabbed by fellow goalscorer Kevin Nolan

MATCH FACTS

West Ham: Jaaskelainen, Tomkins (Spence 88), Collins, Reid, McCartney, Noble, Diame (O'Neil 68), Benayoun, Nolan, Jarvis, Carroll (Maiga 82). Subs not used: Spiegel, Cole, Chambers, Hall.

Scorers: Noble 46, 72 (pen), Nolan 48, Maiga 87.

Southampton: Boruc, Clyne, Hooiveld, Fonte, Yoshida, Puncheon (Mayuka 65), Schneiderlin, Steven Davis (Ward-Prowse 89), Lallana, Rodriguez (Lambert 65), Do Prado. Subs not used: Kelvin Davis, Seaborne, Chaplow, Reeves.

Booked: Hooiveld, Schneiderlin.

Scorer: Lallana 63.

Ref: Neil Swarbrick.

Att: 34,925.

Click here for the latest Premier League results, fixtures and table

Noble broke the deadlock with a
40-yard free-kick that drifted past debutant goalkeeper Artur Boruc,
before captain Kevin Nolan tapped home a Yossi Benayoun cross at the
back post.

Southampton threatened a comeback
when Adam Lallana exquisitely fired home, but Noble netted a penalty
before substitute Modibo Maiga superbly curled home to secure the three
points.

West Ham looked the brighter side
early on but Southampton earned the game's first corner with Jay
Rodriguez inches away from directing home Jason Puncheon's loss cross.

It was one of several threatening moments by the visitors for whom goalkeeper Boruc was looking shaky.

The former Celtic man became the
third different goalkeeper to start for Saints this season and had Andy
Carroll to thank for not making the most of an awful clearance early on.

Boruc was playing behind a re-jigged
backline in east London as Southampton juggled injuries and attempted to
thwart West Ham's aerial threat.

Jos Hooiveld returned to the side as a result of the changes and had to be alert to clear a James Tomkins header off the line.

Mixed fortunes: Both Adam Lallana (left) and Kevin Nolan got on the scoresheet, but West Ham took all three points

Mixed fortunes: Both Adam Lallana (left) and Nolan got on the scoresheet, but West Ham took all three points

The Dutch defender saw his own header
on goal saved by Jussi Jaaskelainen moments earlier and in the 21st
minute Rodriguez put a snapshot just wide.

The 6million striker also fired a
free-kick over as Saints tried to break the deadlock, with team-mates
Maya Yoshida and Guly do Prado soon miscuing their own long-range
efforts.

There were fears for Tomkins when he appeared to twist his knee, but he continued after treatment as West Ham upped the ante.

The home side were struggling to
create any clear-cut chances, though, as Southampton went into half-time
without conceding for the first time since their return to the Premier
League.

However, the Saints defence was breached less than a minute into the second half.

On the run: Matt Jarvis has the beating of Nathaniel Clyne

On the run: Matt Jarvis has the beating of Nathaniel Clyne

Collins could not quite get a toe on Noble's floated 40-yard free-kick, but it bounced in the six-yard box and flew past Boruc.

The opener was followed moments later by West Ham's second after a poor Do Prado pass was not dealt with by Yoshida.

Benayoun won the ball from the Japan
international and his low cross was met at the back post by Nolan, who
tapped home from close range.

Only the fine reactions of Boruc
prevented the Hammers captain making it three in the 61st minute as he
ghosted in and directed a quickly-taken free-kick goalwards.

False dawn: Lallana fires Southampton's only goal of the game

False dawn: Lallana fires Southampton's only goal of the game

The save proved invaluable as Saints
reduced the deficit two minutes later when Lallana turned beautifully to
strike a half-volley past Jaaskelainen from close range.

The goal came thanks to the hard work
– and wayward shot – of Rodriguez, who was replaced by Rickie Lambert
immediately afterwards.

Saints' top scorer was surprisingly
left out of the starting line-up and came on at the same time as
Emmanuel Mayuka, although it was the former that made an immediate
impact.

First the 30-year-old saw a 20-yard free-kick just go over, before heading a Nathaniel Clyne cross wide.

Southampton were threatening to
quieten the home support but undid all their good work when Fonte
handled as he challenged Carroll.

Noble fired home the resulting spot-kick, allowing the Hammers to coast from the 72nd minute onwards.

Mayuka tested Jaaskelainen as West
Ham endured some nervy moments, but Maiga put the match out of sight
three minutes from time, running at the Saints defence and sending a
curling left-footed effort home.