Tag Archives: cameras

Hawk-Eye miss out on goal-line contract with FIFA after GoalControl seal deal

Germany 2 England 1 in goal-line technology saga as Hawk-Eye miss out on FIFA contract (but they could win Premier League deal)

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Net gains: John Terry makes a controversial clearance in England's 1-0 win over Ukraine at Euro 2012

How will it work
Each goal has seven high-speed cameras which track the position of the ball in three dimensions to millimetre precision every two milliseconds.

Within a second of the ball completely crossing the line, the referee is alerted by a vibration and a flashing light on his watch. All camera footage is stored and can be replayed at any time.

How much will it cost
It costs around 170,000 per stadium to install and 2,800 per match to operate

What does it mean for fans
Besides no more missed goals, an instant replay can project a 3D view of the ball’s movement on a virtual pitch to TV viewers at home or to supporters in the stand via the big screen.

PS…

But despite all that technology, referees still retain the authority to make the final decision.

It will cost around 170,000 per stadium to instal and a further 2,800 per match to operate.

GoalControl uses 14 high-speed
cameras to track the 3D position of the ball and promises to alert
referees within a second of the ball completely crossing the line via a
vibration or flashing light on a watch.

FIFA said the German company was
chosen owing to its ‘ability to adapt to local conditions’ in
Brazil. The bids were also ‘judged on cost and project management
factors such as staffing and time schedules for installation’.

The contract, however, is subject to
independent ‘installation tests’ at each of the six stadiums due to be
used for the Confederations Cup – three of which have still not been
completed.

Match officials will also carry out
their own tests before each game, just as they did during the FIFA Club
World Cup in Japan last year.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter has urged using goal-line technology in Brazil after Frank Lampard had a clear goal disallowed against Germany at the 2010 World Cup.

Ball-tracking: FIFA hope this system will be a success

Ball-tracking: FIFA hope this system will be a success

Putting it on the line: Hawk-Eye goal-line technology is trialled at Southampton's St Mary's Stadium last year

Putting it on the line: Hawk-Eye goal-line technology is trialled at Southampton's St Mary's Stadium last year

Inconclusive: Chelsea were awarded a dubious goal in the 2012 FA Cup semi-final when the ball was adjudge to have crossed the line

Inconclusive: Chelsea were awarded a dubious goal in the 2012 FA Cup semi-final when the ball was adjudge to have crossed the line

HAWK-EYE REACTION

'Sport teaches us many lessons, including accepting defeat graciously and having confidence in your ability to bounce back strongly. Hawk-Eye wishes FIFA and the appointed GLT supplier every success at The FIFA Confederations Cup 2013.'

Statement released by Hawk-Eye

A FIFA statement said: 'While all
four companies had previously met the stringent technical requirements
of the FIFA quality programme, the final decision was based on criteria
relating more specifically to the tournaments in Brazil, including the
company's ability to adapt to local conditions and the compatibility of
each goal-line technology system in relation to FIFA match operations.

'The respective bids were also judged
on cost and project management factors such as staffing and time
schedules for installation.

'The use of GoalControl-4D in Brazil
is subject to a final installation test at each stadium where the system
will be installed.'

Goal-line: GoalControl-4D's magnetic field system

Goal-line: GoalControl-4D's magnetic field system

In black and white: Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final against Germany

In black and white: Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final

VIDEO GoalControl in action

Ashley Barnes referee trip red card

VIDEO: Brighton's Barnes faces long ban after straight red card for tripping referee during defeat to Bolton

By
Joe Ridge

PUBLISHED:

11:11 GMT, 10 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:14 GMT, 10 March 2013

Brighton forward Ashley Barnes is facing a lengthy ban after being sent off for appearing to deliberately trip referee Nigel Miller at Bolton's Reebok Stadium on Saturday.

With his side trailing the npower Championship clash 1-0 deep into stoppage time, Barnes left a foot dangling in front of Miller as the official ran past him.

The trip did not send Miller to the floor, but it was enough to break the referee's stride. He then immediately stopped the game, turned to Barnes and gave him a straight red card.

Scroll down to watch footage of the incident…

Marching orders: Barnes is dismissed by referee Nigel Miller

Marching orders: Barnes is dismissed by referee Nigel Miller

Lengthy ban: Barnes has been sent off twice this season

Lengthy ban: Barnes has been sent off twice this season

Lengthy ban: Barnes has been sent off twice this season

The forward's face was a picture of disbelief as he was pointed to the tunnel, but despite the cameras not capturing the incident, this video evidence recorded by a fan in the stands is pretty damning.

VIDEO: Watch Barnes's trip on referee Miller from 50 seconds in

Final moments of Bolton Wanderers 1-0 Brighton & Hove Albion

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Miller did not address the media after the game, but The Argus report that a Bolton official who spoke to the referee said: 'It was for misconduct, trying to trip the ref.'

Seagulls boss Gus Poyet felt Barnes deserved his red card, though he sympathised with the 23-year-old.

Poyet told Sky Sports: 'In football sometimes you do things that regret after, but (I have) nothing to complain about.

Unhappy trip: Brighton were beaten thanks to a goal from Marcos Alonso (left)

Unhappy trip: Brighton were beaten thanks to a goal from Marcos Alonso (left)

'I think you would normally probably say you're not happy with him (Barnes).

'Angry It's difficult to say because I played football, I know when you're on the pitch you do things which sometimes you regret after but I was one of those players so I'm not going to say anything to Ashley Barnes – I hope it doesn't happen too much.

'He knows what he's done and I'm not going to kill him, you try to make sure he controls himself better the next time.'

The red was Barnes's second dismissal of the season. He was sent off only last month for violent conduct as he kicked out at Sheffield Wednesday's Kieran Lee during a 3-1 loss at Hillsborough.

Sympathy: But Poyet (left) felt that Barnes deserved his red

Sympathy: But Poyet (left) felt that Barnes deserved his red

As a result, the former Plymouth player will miss the next four games of Brighton's run-in, starting with Tuesday night's trip to Barnsley.

Barnes' absence leaves Poyet facing a striker crisis. Craig Mackail-Smith has been ruled out for the season with an achilles injury picked up during last week's 0-0 draw at Bristol City, leaving Leonardo Ulloa as Brighton's only fit frontman.

Marcos Alonso's winner for Bolton on Saturday saw Brighton slip out of the Championship play-off places. They now sit one place and point adrift of Nottingham Forest in sixth, but they do have a game in hand on Billy Davies's side.

Millwall to investigate allegations of racism after TV cameras pick up abusive fans

Millwall to investigate allegations of racism after TV cameras pick up abusive fans

Olympics, has faced racial abuse on social media websites.

He said: 'We're a developed, multi-cultural society. It's surprising it can still go on – but it doesn't exactly shock me.

'We can't be silent about it. We need to make people aware that there is a problem going on and only when people are aware of the problem can it be sorted out.

'As long as people are brave enough I'd say to come out and say exactly what's happened to them then I think we'll be going in the right direction because the first thing that needs to happen is that we can't be silent about it.'

The 21-year-old admitted abuse can inspire him, adding: 'Sometimes it gives me that bit more fire to prove people wrong and that I can rise above it.'

Manchester City mascot confused during Sunderland handshake

VIDEO: What's going on City mascot confused during Sunderland handshake

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UPDATED:

16:16 GMT, 27 December 2012

Flashbulbs, television cameras, tens of thousands of people, household names and an unforgettable afternoon.

Well, who wouldn’t want to miss their chance of soaking up the atmosphere, especially when you’re a Manchester City mascot

This young man will have probably spent hours every weekend watching Premier League action, including the traditional handshakes before each kick-off.

But sometimes the dazzling nature and anticipation of a top flight clash can make you forget the rituals.

Forget, that is, until a friendly hair-ruffling from the opposition’s Carlos Cuellar brings you back down to earth.

Scroll down for video

confused kid

confused kid

confused kid

confused kid

FA"s 92-point action plan to rid football of racism with quotas for referees and coaches

SPORTSMAIL EXCLUSIVE: We'll kick out the bigots… FA's 92-point action plan to rid football of the scourge of racism
The Football Association will introduce ethnic quotas for referees and coaches early in the new year
The latest video technology, including spy cameras, will be used to catch racist fansTough crackdown on offending clubsMoves to increase the involvement of women, ethnic minorities and disabled people

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UPDATED:

23:42 GMT, 12 December 2012

English football will introduce quotas for referees and coaches as part of an unprecedented campaign to tackle racism.

The plan will be adopted early in the new year and include the demand that at least 10 per cent of entry level officials and coaches throughout the game are from ethnic minorities.

There will also be moves to increase the involvement of women, ethnic minorities and disabled people in all forms of football, while Asian role models will be sought to encourage Asian children to play the game.

Confidential hotlines will be set up for players to report any form of bullying and discrimination, and fans will be able to text, email or maybe even tweet their complaints about any form of racism.

Race disgrace: John Terry (covering mouth) was banned for abusing Anton Ferdinand

Race disgrace: John Terry (covering mouth) was banned for abusing Anton Ferdinand

In addition, the latest video and audio technology will be used to identify supporters guilty of racist gestures or chanting at matches.

The far-reaching plan comes after a period in which football has been scarred by the racist behaviour of John Terry and Luis Suarez, and by the false accusation of racial abuse levelled at referee Mark Clattenburg.

PFA back ban call

The Professional Footballers’ Association will support the FA proposal of a minimum five-game ban for racist abuse.

PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor said: ‘We want to illustrate the seriousness of our approach to this issue.’

The extent of the fight against racism can be revealed by Sportsmail, who have seen the FA’s 92-point Football Inclusion and Anti-Discrimination Action Plan.

FA chairman David Bernstein has also given his personal guarantee in a letter to Culture Secretary Maria Miller, copied to Prime Minister David Cameron, that all the recommendations will be carried out once they have been rubber-stamped by football’s stakeholders.

The anti-racism education process being introduced will not just involve cultural lessons for overseas players and managers coming to England.

All sections of the game, including match stewards, will be given advice on how best to combat discrimination and the procedures to follow when it happens.

The FA will also establish an Inclusion Advisory Board to provide guidance on all equality matters and monitor the implementation of the plan.

Flashpoint: Luis Suarez (left) was in an ugly clash with Patrice Evra last season

Flashpoint: Luis Suarez (left) was in an ugly clash with Patrice Evra last season

The document has been distributed to all 92 League clubs, who will be expected to sign the charter for action against homophobia and transphobia launched by the Government last year.

Contracts with players and managers will have a mandatory reference to behaving in an inclusive and non-discriminatory manner.

A timetable has been set out as far ahead as the 2017-18 season as to when the 92 points will be implemented.

They start this month with the football organisations publicising the roles and responsibilities of each body — FA, Premier League, Football League, clubs, League Managers’ Associations, Professional Footballers’ Association and County FAs — in promoting inclusion and dealing with discrimination in football.

Also beginning immediately is the FA mandate that the proportion of ethnic minority coaches starting at the lowest level of qualification does not fall below 10 per cent.

And by season 2015-16: ‘The FA in conjunction with county FAs will ensure that 10 per cent of the referee workforce is from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities, which is reflective of national demographics.’

Shirt shrift: Manchester City's Joleon Lescott refuses to wear a Kick It Out top

Shirt shrift: Manchester City's Joleon Lescott refuses to wear a Kick It Out top

The proposals are the FA’s response to
the Prime Minister calling for the game to take tougher action after an
anti-racism-in-football summit last February.

Bernstein is making the fight against racism his personal FA legacy before he stands down next May. In his letter to Miller he writes: ‘Let me give you my own personal reassurance that this is an issue at the very top of my agenda.

‘It is one that I know we are all determined to address both speedily and collaboratively subject to the approvals processes of our respective organisations.

‘There is no doubt that recent events have brought into sharp relief the impact that race and other forms of discrimination can still have on the game. Incidents involving high-profile players cast a shadow over the sport and can undermine much of the collective good work achieved.

‘Despite the substantial progress English football has made in this area over many years we fully recognise that the work to eliminate discrimination based on race, ethnic origin, colour and nationality is still not complete.’

Official inquiry: The FA want more non-white referees to follow Uriah Rennie

Official inquiry: The FA want more non-white referees to follow Uriah Rennie

Bernstein was referring to the Terry, Suarez and Clattenburg cases and the FA plan seeks to prevent any repetition.

The hotline strategy follows Jason Roberts’ complaints about some black players not trusting the authorities to fight racism.

To counter that lack of faith in the authorities, the planned support structure will ‘ensure those who wish to report incidents of discrimination or bullying within the game, whether trainees, players, coaches, managers, other employees or fans, can do so in confidence and receive the support they may require’.

Ironically Bernstein also puts on record his strong support for anti-racism group Kick It Out, whose chairman Lord Ouseley has threatened to quit the FA Council in protest at their ‘mealy- mouthed’ response to the Terry and Suarez issues.

The recommendations may be tweaked after feedback from stakeholders. But they are broadly expected to be introduced following club meetings next February. It is envisaged that the final version will be presented in a ‘more user friendly and punchy format’.

Crackdown: Chelsea banned this supporter for making a gesture at Manchester United's Danny Welbeck

Crackdown: Chelsea banned this supporter for making a gesture at Manchester United's Danny Welbeck

Other key proposals include:

The Football League introducing mandatory minimum standard club codes of conduct.Social media guidelines for players and club staff to follow throughout professional football.Crowd management measures to guide professional and semi- professional clubs.Mandatory lessons for all to educate and change attitudes and ensure they are informed of the procedures to follow when incidents occur.Closer working relationships with police over hate crime in football incidents.Football authorities to discipline clubs who repeatedly fail to sanction employers who breach code of conduct, or deal adequately with fans in relation to discriminatory language or behaviour.A review of the recruitment process for managers and coaches at the top level.New programmes to help black and Asian coaches gain qualifications to challenge for top professional roles.Talent programmes specifically for Asian men and boys and the promotion of Asian male and female role models.Improve the reporting and analysis of in-stadium offences.

The FA are not just attempting to eradicate racism in their grand plan.

The commitment is to ‘promote inclusion and eliminate discrimination whether by reason of race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, age, gender, gender reassignment, sexual orientation, marital status, religion or belief, ability or disability’.

Ugliness has tarnished football: month-by-month

Goal-line technology: Hawk-Eye claim to have edge on GoalRef

Hawk-Eye claim to have the edge on goal-line technology rivals GoalRef

|

UPDATED:

14:47 GMT, 8 December 2012

The head of the company which makes the Hawk-Eye system – one of two goal-line technology systems being used at the Club World Cup – says experience gives the product an edge over the competition.

Hawk-Eye is already used for tracking balls in tennis and cricket. For football, its system uses seven high-speed cameras set up at different angles at each goal to calculate whether the ball has crossed the goal-line or not.

Info: The Hawk-Eye system tells the referee if the ball has crossed the line thanks to cameras like this (below)

Info: The Hawk-Eye system tells the referee if the ball has crossed the line thanks to cameras like this (below)

On the look out: A Hawk-Eye camera

On the look out: A Hawk-Eye camera

It is being used for Club World Cup games at Toyota Stadium, while GoalRef, a magnetic-field-based system developed by German company Fraunhofer, will be deployed at Yokohama Stadium.

'Our experience that we have
consistently delivered over the years makes us a brand that people can
trust,' Hawk-Eye managing director Stephen Carter said on Saturday. 'Our
system has been installed in more than 230 stadiums worldwide over a
period of 12 years.'

Talk: Stephen Carter, managing director of Hawk-Eye, explains the goal-line technology

Talk: Stephen Carter, managing director of Hawk-Eye, explains the goal-line technology

Demonstration: A FIFA official shows off the equipment

Demonstration: A FIFA official shows off the equipment

Another advantage of Hawk-Eye, Carter
says, is that it doesn't interfere with the field of play. GoalRef uses
magnetic sensors in the goal posts and the crossbar to track a special
ball.

'We don't need to interfere with the field of play in any way,' Carter said. 'It's a totally passive system.'

The competition: GoalRef technology was used for the first time during the FIFA Club World Cup in Yokohama on Thursday

The competition: GoalRef technology was used for the first time during the FIFA Club World Cup in Yokohama on Thursday

GoalRef sensors are set up in the goal

GoalRef uses a microchip in the ball and low magnetic waves around the goal

Like GoalRef, the technology of Hawk-Eye can allow an outcome to be delivered within one second.

Before each match, officials will test
the system is working in both goals. The referee will continue to have
full autonomy in making any final decision during the match, using
goal-line technology as an additional aid.

The data from the Club World Cup will
be used to help FIFA decide, by the end of March, which technology it
will use for the six venues at the 2013 Confederations Cup in Brazil.
Now all the tournament needs is a controversial goal.

'It would be nice to have a phantom
goal at some point in the tournament so we can prove how well our system
works,' Carter said.

Matchwinner: Sanfrecce Hiroshima's Toshihiro Aoyama (second left) celebrates scoring the only goal in the first match in which the technology has been used

Matchwinner: Sanfrecce Hiroshima's Toshihiro Aoyama (second left) celebrates scoring the only goal in the first match in which the technology has been used

Back of the net: Auckland City goalkeeper Tamati Williams (right) reacts after Hiroshima's goal

Back of the net: Auckland City goalkeeper Tamati Williams (right) reacts after Hiroshima's goal

FIFA decided to introduce both systems
after they won 'unanimous' support from the International Football
Association Board panel. FIFA president Sepp Blatter was a member of the
IFAB panel.

Blatter was initially opposed to the
idea of using goal-line technology but changed his stance two years ago
when he saw England denied a clear goal by midfielder Frank Lampard
against Germany at the 2010 World Cup.

Two days later, Blatter said FIFA must
reopen the debate, though insisted it must involve only goal-line
decisions. Video replay remains off limits for judgment calls, such as
penalties or offside.

Steve Clarke cutting it as No 1 at West Brom

After years in the shadows, Albion manager Clarke is cutting it as a No 1

|

UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 16 November 2012

Steve Clarke surveyed the mess that littered West Brom’s training ground and did not like what he saw. Not one little bit.

The detritus from the morning’s work was scattered all around the pitches where his players had been going through their drills.

It wasn’t so much the fact that drinks bottles, bibs, cones and training tops had been discarded at random.

Main man: Steve Clarke has hit the ground running at West Brom

Main man: Steve Clarke has hit the ground running at West Brom

It was more about what that represented — a drop in standards. The litter was visible evidence that his players were taking small liberties.

Clarke called director of football Dan Ashworth from his office and delivered his speech to the Baggies’ first-team squad. It was short and to the point.

The players duly collected up the equipment and headed for the dressing-room.

A few days later, West Brom ended a 13-match failure to win in front of the television cameras against Southampton, turning around a two-match blip in an otherwise impressive opening to the campaign.

It would be impossible to say where Clarke picked up that nugget. It could have been Jose Mourinho…or Kenny Dalglish…or Ruud Gullit…or Gianfranco Zola. Or any number of other top coaches. It could have simply been something he spotted himself.

The time spent working at Chelsea, today’s opponents at the Hawthorns for Clarke’s Baggies, amounts to almost two decades as a player and coach.

Speak to any number of people in the game and the same attributes are fired back. ‘He’s intelligent, straight, a quick learner, dour on occasion, determined.’

Flying high: West Brom have started the season strongly

Flying high: West Brom have started the season strongly

Pat Nevin played behind Clarke for
club and country after his compatriot left Paisley. The winger, now a
respected pundit, maintains close links still with Chelsea where he kept
a close eye on Clarke the coach.

‘He was an intelligent player,” said Nevin, ‘under-stated, under-rated. And I get the impression from Chelsea he carried on in a similar fashion when he went into coaching.

‘I know he’s been frustrated for some time about not being a manager in his own right. I spoke to him before he left for West Ham with Gianfranco Zola.

‘The only surprise to me is that it has taken him this long. He’s always been a determined sort. Not ambitious because that implies a degree of selfishness.

‘But there certainly were times at Chelsea when I don’t think he received the credit he deserved.

‘For instance, I think Steve was absolutely instrumental in taking the club to the Champions League final four years ago while working under Avram Grant.

‘Jose (Mourinho) suggested that he stayed on and just kept things ticking over on the training ground.

‘He thought it would be best if there was no change. Steve kept training the same. It was Steve’s work, without a doubt.

Learning from the best: Clarke with Jose Mourinho at Chelsea

Learning from the best: Clarke with Jose Mourinho at Chelsea

‘I don’t think he received any recognition for it, though. I wouldn’t say that it was eating away at him. But I think he became frustrated. I can understand why.

‘Certainly, when I had a spell as a chief executive at Motherwell, he was exactly the type of person I would have employed as a manager.

‘But then, I had played with him and knew exactly what he would bring to the job.'

What Clarke has brought with him to the Hawthorns are the methods used — in the main — by Mourinho.

The Portuguese relied heavily on his sports scientists. It’s an area of the Black Country club that has been radically improved under director of football Ashworth.

Mourinho would consult his staff if statistics vital to any player’s continued performance showed sign of dropping.

Clarke does likewise. Some of the alterations — particularly in respect of his front players — have been done with this in mind.

‘I’ve always said that Jose was a big part of my development as a coach,' he said during his press conference this week.

Of course, the 49-year-old did not inherit a struggling team. Roy Hodgson hammered a pattern of play into the Baggies that they now follow almost in their sleep.

Forward thinking: Romelu Lukaku opted to join West Brom

Forward thinking: Romelu Lukaku opted to join West Brom

‘Why can’t we play more five-a-sides” asked one player late last season as the Baggies’ eyed a top-half finish.

‘If you want to end the season relegated, we’ll play five-a-sides,' came the response. West Brom’s players duly followed Hodgson’s methods.

Clarke’s haven’t changed too much from those that were laid down by his predecessor. On the Scot’s own admission, he did not see too much that needed fixing.

So he hasn’t. Initially, the players were unsure what to expect of the new head coach and his assistant, Kevin Keen.

The pattern of play remains pretty much intact. Paul Scharner’s departure, being replaced by Argentine Claudio Yacob, has added even more backbone to the unit.

In that respect, Clarke has been fortunate. But to those who say he hasn’t done much…well the addition of Romelu Lukaku should be enough of an answer.

The young Belgian had the choice of half-a-dozen of the Premier League’s clubs at which he could have spent the campaign on loan.

‘Do you know why Lukaku chose us’ a senior Baggies official asked me an hour after the opening-day defeat of Liverpool. 'It was Steve. The prospect of working with him. It was Steve that made the difference.’

And that’s what he’s doing at West Brom. Making a difference.

Just don’t expect him to shout it from the top of the Brummie Road End.

Daniel Sturridge finds life hard on the bench

Life's hard on the bench, admits Chelsea forward Sturridge as he prepares for England duty

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UPDATED:

22:21 GMT, 12 November 2012

Daniel Sturridge is rarely accused of lacking confidence but the last few months at Chelsea have started to sap even his sizeable reserves of self-belief.

Sturridge has started only one game this season – a Capital One Cup tie when Fernando Torres was suspended – and has played barely 71 minutes of Premier League football in three months, scoring one goal.

Yet he travels to Sweden as one of only two specialist centre forwards in the England squad, warning that players cannot be expected to produce form on demand.

In front of the cameras: Sturridge spoke to the press on Monday

In front of the cameras: Sturridge spoke to the press on Monday

‘If anyone says to you, “If you don’t play, you’re fine”, it’s a lie,’ said Sturridge. ‘I don’t believe it’s easy not to play and then switch it on like a light.

‘You can’t do that. You have to play regularly. You have to be able to replicate what you’ve been doing week in, week out.

‘Some players can come off the bench and play well. Some players cannot. Some players can have an impact and score. Some cannot. Everyone is different.

‘I prefer playing from the beginning. If I can’t, then I’ll work hard in training and not stress about whether I’m not playing or not.

‘I don’t need anyone to tell me that I’m great or that I am fantastic. I just need to play. I need the opportunity and that is when you get your own confidence.’

Second fiddle: Fernando Torres has been preferred to Sturridge all season

Second fiddle: Fernando Torres has been preferred to Sturridge all season

Sturridge is in the final year of his contract at Stamford Bridge and is likely to move on but will take with him inspiration from Didier Drogba, who left for Shanghai Shenhua in the summer.

‘I do believe in myself,’ said Sturridge. ‘Didier Drogba always said to me, “Studge, it doesn’t really matter about anything as long as you believe in yourself”. And that’s my main strength.

‘Didier told me that when I joined the club and he continued to tell me that throughout his time there. He believed in himself and nobody can knock him mentally. I’ve learned a lot from Didier in that sense.’

With Wayne Rooney and Jermain Defoe injured, Hodgson takes two centre forwards to Sweden in Sturridge and Danny Welbeck who often do not start for their club sides.

Belief: Sturridge is still confident he has the ability to succeed

Belief: Sturridge is still confident he has the ability to succeed

But he selected them ahead of Andy Carroll, a regular for West Ham, and other traditional ‘big-man’ options like Peter Crouch, Grant Holt and Bobby Zamora.

It indicates a desire to press on with smaller, quicker strikers while exposing once again the worryingly thin layer of elite talent at the manager’s disposal.

Welbeck has started nine times for club and country this season. Also travelling to Stockholm are uncapped youngsters Raheem Sterling (17) and Wilfried Zaha (20).

‘The England manager has made it clear that players do not have to start for their clubs to play for England,’ said Sturridge. ‘That is a huge leap of faith for players like myself who are not playing regular first-team football.

Part to play: Sturridge is expected to feature prominently against Sweden on Wednesday night

Part to play: Sturridge is expected to feature prominently against Sweden on Wednesday night

‘If the manager had not said that, it would be difficult for the likes of myself and Welbeck and others who are in a similar situation.

‘I’ve always been thankful for every opportunity I’ve had. Stuart Pearce gave me one with the Under 21s and I shook his hand and said thank you. I saw Andre Villas-Boas in a restaurant and shook his hand and said, “Thank you for believing in me”.

‘You don’t have to be strong and powerful to be a centre forward but you need belief and a knack for scoring goals.’

Ed Hawkins reveals truth behind spot-fixing scandal

EXCLUSIVE: The truth behind the amazing story that exposed cricket's dirty secrets

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UPDATED:

23:57 GMT, 11 November 2012

The sentencing in November 2011 of three Pakistani cricketers and their agent for their involvement in the Lord’s spot-fixing scandal a year earlier apparently brought to an end one of the most shocking episodes in the history of cricket corruption.

Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif, Mohammad Amir and Mazhar Majeed were all shown to be corruptible by their roles in the deliberate no-balls that had marred the third Test against England – and paid the price with jail terms. But could their actions, as the judge said, have actually defrauded bookmakers Is it possible to place a bet on the precise timing of a no-ball

In the second exclusive extract of his new book about corruption in cricket, Ed Hawkins re-examines the crucial details of the News of the World (NotW) sting, and explodes some of the myths behind the story that rocked the game…

Scandal: The News of the World published their allegations against three Pakistani players in August 2010

Scandal: The News of the World published their allegations against three Pakistani players in August 2010

The story of Pakistan’s tour of England in the summer of 2010 would have made good reading as a thriller. Intrigue, infamy, cash in suitcases, back-stabbing, even sex, thanks to Veena Malik, the former girlfriend of Asif having her say, and, finally, courtroom drama.

Butt, the Pakistan captain, Asif and Amir, the two fast bowlers, and Mazhar Majeed, the fixer, were each sentenced to prison for their part in bowling no-balls to order in the fourth Test at Lord’s in August of that year. The four men, who all blamed one another for the crime, had been charged with conspiracy to accept corrupt payments and conspiracy to cheat at gambling.

It was considered a disastrous day for cricket. It was, however, considered a great day for investigative journalism.

Hidden cameras showed Majeed talking to undercover journalist Mazher Mahmood, perhaps best known as the ‘Fake Sheik’.

Majeed was seen to propose three no-balls during the Lord’s Test, two to be bowled by Amir and one by Asif. For this information he was paid 150,000.

‘Caught!’ screamed the NotW headline under a ‘world exclusive’ banner. ‘Match-fixer pockets 150k as he rigs the England Test at Lord’s’. And ‘We expose betting scandal that will rock cricket’.

Butt received two years and six months, Asif one year, Amir six months and Majeed two years and eight months. The story that had everything was a bestseller. But did it really have everything The answer is, unquestionably, no.

Sentenced: Amir (left), Butt (centre) and Asif (right)

Sentenced: Amir (left), Butt (centre) and Asif (right)

In the backstreets of every Indian city, in outbuildings or bedrooms of crumbling apartments, never did a bookmaker cry ‘souda fok!’ – ‘all bets are off, it’s a fix’. In other words, there was no betting scam. There was no spot-fix.

It is the great irony of this tale. A story purported to be the latest in a litany of match-fixing scandals in the sport was far removed from the illegal Indian market where the ‘fix’ supposedly had its roots.

‘It seemed clear to me they that had been scammed,’ an Indian bookmaking contact told me. Recordings by the newspaper showing Majeed, a Croydon-based businessman, predicting when the no-balls were to be bowled would appear proof of match-fixing or spot-fixing to the layman.

But to anyone with a semblance of betting knowledge it was anything but. The NotW spent 150,000 and failed to get a bet on. The money paid was for Majeed to prove that he could control the Pakistan players.

Amid the media storm, not once was the question asked: if the newspaper had wanted to make money betting on the Indian market on those no-balls, could it have done so

Everyone in the Indian book-making world I have spoken to has confirmed it is not possible to bet on the timing of a no-ball.

Yet it was convenient for the media to ignore this point. It would have spoiled the story. The illegal Indian market is a monster. It is vast. It is unregulated. But it is structured and it is certainly not complacent.

No-ball: Amir oversteps at Lord's with Butt watching on

No-ball: Amir oversteps at Lord's with Butt watching on

No-ball: Amir oversteps at Lord's with Butt watching on

‘Do you think we’re fools’ one Indian bookie told me. ‘If someone says they want this no-ball bet for big monies and I’m Ladbrokes, I tell them to go away. No bookmaker in the world takes this bet.’

The reason would be that they suspected you had inside information. And it is no different in India.
You could argue that in the case of the Pakistan ‘spot-fixing’, it is irrelevant that one would not have been able to bet on a no-ball. The three Pakistan players were shown to be guilty of corrupt practices. They were cheating the game, their team-mates and the spectators.

And you would be absolutely right, but only if the court they were being tried in and the judge who would sentence them were aware that a no-ball is not a betting opportunity in India.

The court was not aware. The judge was not aware. This much is clear from the erroneous sentencing remarks by the Hon Mr Justice Cooke: ‘Bets could be placed on these no-balls in unlawful markets, mostly abroad, based on inside advance knowledge of what was going to happen…

Individuals in India were making 40,000–50,000 on each identified no-ball. On three no-balls, therefore, the bookmakers stood to lose 150,000 on each bet by a cheating punter.’

Butt, Asif, Amir and Majeed went to prison for charges that included ‘conspiracy to cheat at gambling’. If there was no bet placed, if there was no opportunity to even place that bet and therefore no one was defrauded, can anyone be guilty of such a charge

Mr Justice Cook said the NotW had ‘got what they bargained for’. Yet without their money, those no-balls would not have been bowled.

Media scrum: Amir arrives in court for the case

Media scrum: Amir arrives in court for the case

Nor would the no-balls have been bowled if Majeed was the fixing kingpin, as he was portrayed. The sting would surely have been drawn from the News of the World if Majeed was indeed the experienced fixer that he claimed to be.

In sales chatter to impress the undercover journalist, Majeed boasted of his knowledge and expertise in the field: ‘I’ve been doing this with the Pakistani team now for about two-and-a-half years, and we’ve made masses and masses of money. You can make absolute millions.’

Majeed said it would cost 400,000 to fix the result of a Twenty20 match, 450,000 for a one-day international and 1million to fix a Test match. There was no mention of how much a no-ball would cost because Majeed, correctly, did not believe one could bet on such an outcome.

Yet when the News of the World reporter was talking about placing bets on no-balls, Majeed, instead of hearing alarm bells ringing in his head, heard the ringing of the cash register.

Had money not been on his mind, he might have recognised he was being set up. Instead, he was focused on providing the no-balls that had been demanded, believing that if he could prove that Pakistan players were under his control, there would be more money to come: ‘I’m going to give you three no-balls, OK … right’

Majeed was true to his word. On the first day of the Lord’s Test, Amir bowled a no-ball from the first ball of the third over and Asif overstepped on the sixth ball of the 10th over. The third was not delivered because poor weather cut play short.

Outraged: England players react as Amir comes out to bat the day after the allegations

Outraged: England players react as Amir comes out to bat the day after the allegations

Keen to reassure his ‘sponsor’ that a third no-ball would still be delivered, Majeed rang the journalist that evening.

He told him that Amir would bowl a no-ball off the third ball of his third full over as he still had three balls to bowl the next morning following the disruption. Majeed confirmed this with Amir via text message.

However, for an unknown reason, Majeed attempted to get the ‘fix’ called off. He phoned the journalist, telling him that there ‘was no point doing the third now’. It is this volte-face that is crucial in exposing Majeed’s inexperience.

Shamed: Amir

Shamed: Amir

Alarmed at the prospect of his scoop losing some lustre, the journalist thinks quickly and tells Majeed that he must go through with the third no-ball because his ‘syndicate’ has already placed the bets.

This is important.

The ‘syndicate’ is claiming to have placed wagers on the timing of no-balls before the match had started. ‘So you can place money on the no-balls then’ Majeed asks. The journalist says yes. ‘What sort of monies’ says a surprised Majeed. This is the partially-sighted leading the blind.

If Majeed had been the shrewd, shady operator that he claimed to be – and the NotW had been only too willing to enhance this ‘reputation’ – then he would have immediately recognised that the journalist was lying.

Indeed, Majeed’s ignorance is stupefying. For a start he should have known that it was not possible for the syndicate to place these bets on a market that did not exist.

Secondly, a fixer well-connected to the Indian industry would have known that, even if such a market did exist, it would have been out of the question to have already placed such a wager before the Test match had started, as the reporter said his punters had done.

Someone asking for odds for a no-ball from a bowler’s third ball off his third full over on the second day would have been laughed at by any bookmaker in India – or anywhere else on the planet.

Adapted from BOOKIE GAMBLER FIXER SPY: A JOURNEY TO THE CORRUPT HEART OF CRICKET’S UNDERWORLD by Ed Hawkins, to be published by Bloomsbury on November 15 @ 16.99. Copyright 2012 Ed Hawkins To order a copy for 14.49 (incl p&p), call 0843 382 0000.

Footballer John Terry spotted browsing the shelves at a London spy shop

Feeling paranoid, JT Chelsea skipper browses surveillance gear at spy shopDefender visits specialist surveillance shop Spymaster in London
Products include night goggles, bulletproof jackets and secret cameras

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UPDATED:

13:13 GMT, 7 November 2012

Security is likely to be pretty tight at the sprawling mansion that is home to multi-millionaire footballer John Terry and his family.

But it seems the Chelsea defender is taking extra precautions these days, as he was spotted browsing the covert cameras and bugging devices on offer in a London spy shop.

Gadgets on sale at the Spymaster range from night-vision goggles and bullet-proof leather jackets, to a tiny video camera concealed in a box of tissues.

Paranoid Footballer John Terry browsing the gadgets at Spymaster in London

Paranoid Footballer John Terry browsing the gadgets at the Spymaster shop in London

Terry, 31, was said to have asked staff for a demonstration of some of the products on sale during his visit to the shop.

On its website Spymaster is described as the city's best-equipped spy shop 'providing for all your surveillance, counter-surveillance, personal protection and related security needs'.

It says Spymaster offers a 'discreet and confidential service'.

Alongside the document scanners and spy phones, the store also stocks Luminox watches, which are worn by military groups including the U.S. Airforce and the Navy SEALS.

Should he have been in the mood to indulge his inner James Bond further, Terry could have also picked up a handheld bug detector or a document scanner.

Coca Cola can with camera

Spy pen

Gadgets: Spymaster sells cameras and recording devices concealed within everyday items

'Discreet and confidential': Spymaster stocks covert cameras, bulletproof jackets and bugging devices

'Discreet and confidential': Spymaster stocks covert cameras, bulletproof jackets and bugging devices

Day job: The footballer in action for Chelsea against Shakhtar Donetsk in the Ukraine last month

Day job: The footballer in action for Chelsea against Shakhtar Donetsk in the Ukraine last month