Tag Archives: cameramen

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Southampton v Everton live

PREMIER LEAGUE LIVE: Southampton v Everton – as it happens from St Mary's

By
Joe Ridge

PUBLISHED:

04:00 GMT, 21 January 2013

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UPDATED:

20:05 GMT, 21 January 2013

Follow Sportsmail's coverage of the Barclays Premier League as Southampton host Everton at St Mary's to wrap up the weekend's fixtures. It's Mauricio Pochettino's first game in charge as Saints boss following the brutal sacking of Nigel Adkins and he faces a tough test with the Champions League chasing Toffees visiting the south coast.

Southampton 0 Everton 0

Southampton: Boruc; Clyne, Yoshida, Hooiveld, Shaw; Schneiderlin, Cork; Puncheon, Ramirez, Guly; Lambert.

Subs: K Davis, Richardson, Fox, S Davis, Chaplow, De Ridder, Rodriguez.

Everton: Howard; Coleman, Jagielka, Distin, Baines; Naismith, Neville, Osman, Pienaar; Fellaini; Jelavic.

Subs: Mucha, Duffy, Heitinga, Oviedo, Hitzlsperger, Mirallas, Anichebe.

4 mins: Close! Jagielka is inches away from turning the ball into his own net after Lambert breaks clear down the right and drills the ball across goal looking fro Guly at the back post.

3 mins: Plenty of early possession for Southampton who, as expected, start with Puncheon on the right, Guly on the left and Ramirez in the hole.

8.00pm: Chants of 'one Nigel Adkins' can be heard ringing around St Mary's at kick-off…

7.58pm: The players are out on the pitch and we're ready to go… No particularly loud booing can be heard though there's plenty of those white hankies around.

7.52pm: There are hordes of cameramen awaiting Pochettino's appearance through the tunnel… We're told there's plenty of Argentine journalists present at St Mary's too.

7.44pm: Southampton fans are planning on waving white handkerchiefs tonight in protest to owner Nicola Cortese's decision to appoint Pochettino. (White hankies are often waved to protest in Spanish-speaking countries by the way, the Saints faithful aren't going mad).

Gone but not forgotten: Ex-Southampton manager Nigel Adkins

Gone but not forgotten: Ex-Southampton manager Nigel Adkins

7.36pm: Everton boss David Moyes has just criticised Southampton's decision to sack Adkins in his pre-match interview. 'He's earned the right to be here,' said the Scot. 'I'm disappointed for Nigel and I would have liked to have seen him here tonight.'

7.30pm: So, Pochettino has brought back the big guns in Ramirez and Lambert – who were rested by his predecessor Nigel Adkins for the trip to Chelsea. You get the feeling Argentine knows he needs at least a point tonight otherwise the fans will be on his back straight away.

7.21pm: Everton make just one change from the side that drew 0-0 at home to Swansea with Steven Naismith coming in for Victor Anichebe.

7.20pm: The teams are in and Pochettino has made two changes from the team that started the 2-2 draw at Chelsea, with Rickie Lambert and Gaston Ramirez coming in for Steven Davis and Jay Rodriguez.

7.10pm: Good evening everyone and welcome to Sportsmail's live coverage of Southampton versus Everton in the Barclays Premier League. Tonight, of course, is the first game of Mauricio Pochettino's reign at Southampton. He's just given an interview to Sky Sports in Spanish through an interpreter … which I have to admit was rather surreal to witness following on from Nigel Adkins.

Going for the double: Everton defeated Southampton 3-1 at Goodison Park earlier in the season

Going for the double: Everton defeated Southampton 3-1 at Goodison Park earlier in the season

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Sir Alex Ferguson blames Manchester City for Mario Balotelli and Roberto Mancini getting caught fighting

It's your own fault we know about Balotelli and Mancini! Fergie blames Man City for letting snappers catch scrappers

By
David Kent

PUBLISHED:

11:28 GMT, 4 January 2013

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UPDATED:

11:45 GMT, 4 January 2013

Manchester City are to blame for allowing Mario Balotelli’s extraordinary confrontation with Roberto Mancini to be captured by photographers, according to Sir Alex Ferguson.

The finger of blame has been pointed towards the Italian striker for a 'horrific' challenge on team-mate Scott Sinclair, to which Mancini responded furiously.

Get a grip: Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini and striker Mario Balotelli had to be pulled apart

Get a grip: Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini and striker Mario Balotelli had to be pulled apart

Get a grip: Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini and striker Mario Balotelli had to be pulled apart

Fiery Italians: Mancini and Balotelli were snapped by photographers during their bust-up at training

Fiery Italians: Mancini and Balotelli were snapped by photographers during their bust-up at training

The whole episode was caught by snappers waiting next to the training ground, but Manchester United manager Fergie is at a loss as to why the club allow such free access.

Sir Alex said: 'You’re protecting the possibility of your success. Do the major companies tell their opponents what they’re doing I’m sure they don’t.

'Football has got the profile. Cameramen want to do training sessions which is ridiculous.

Stay away: The Manchester City coaches had to get between Mancini and Balotelli

Stay away: The Manchester City coaches had to get between Mancini and Balotelli

'It is very difficult to coach and do work related to a game because you don’t know where the information can go. Clubs like Real Madrid, the press were there every day, that’s stopped under Jose.

'A lot of clubs I know don't (allow it). How you can do your work and if you want to do tactical work, how do you do it with press around you

'Fortunately at our place we can protect against it to a certain degree. Sometimes a photographer tries to wander across the woods but now we've put those wolves in there they don’t come!'

Pointing the finger: Sir Alex Ferguson insists the blame lies with Man City after the Balotelli controversy

Pointing the finger: Sir Alex Ferguson insists the blame lies with Man City after the Balotelli controversy

Access all areas at Man City's training ground

Despite the criticism coming the way of the Manchester City manager, there is little he can do to combat the issue.

The footpaths on either side of the
Carrington training ground are public, meaning that anyone wanting to
watch a training session is free to.

The club has experimented with a
six-foot tarpaulin curtain around the edge of the ground, but that
hasn’t stopped photographers or members of the public who climb ladders
or trees in order to watch their heroes train.

Planning permission to extend the height
of the curtain has been sought but six foot is the limit without the
agreement of Trafford Metropolitan Borough Council.

In 18 months’ time the squad are set to
move their training to the new Etihad Campus training ground, but until
then it looks as though Mancini and his players will have to keep their
tempers under control.

Roberto Mancini could unsettle Manchester City

Rattled Mancini must know that bitter end to Ajax clash could unsettle City strugglers

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UPDATED:

23:44 GMT, 7 November 2012

The decision of referee Peter Rasmussen not to include details of Roberto Mancini's peculiar post-match behaviour in his report from Tuesday night's Champions League game at the Etihad Stadium has, by all accounts, left UEFA feeling a little baffled.

The European governing body were expecting to ban Manchester City manager Mancini for a game.

Instead, they were left with their hands tied on Wednesday when Rasmussen's match report arrived at their offices featuring not a mention of the Italian's furious march on to the field after his side's 2-2 draw with Ajax.

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Fury: Roberto Mancini squares up to Danish referee Peter Rasmussen after the final whistle

Fury: Roberto Mancini confronts Danish referee Peter Rasmussen after the final whistle

Fury: Roberto Mancini squares up to Danish referee Peter Rasmussen after the final whistle

Angry man: Balotelli shares his views with Rasmussen

Angry man: Balotelli shares his views with Rasmussen

This is despite the Danish referee
saying on Wednesday: 'It's the first time I have experienced such a
chaotic end of a match.'

Mancini will be relieved the incident has not been mentioned.

He would not have relished watching City's clash at home to Real Madrid later this month from a distance.

Nevertheless, memories of his antics
during and after Tuesday's game will remain vivid for a while and it is
hard not to wonder what impact his state of agitation is having on his
players.

Mancini is known not to read newspapers or listen much to what people say about him.

It's a habit he formed when managing in the goldfish bowl of Italian football and serves as self protection.

What the former Lazio and Inter coach must realise, however, is that his players do read newspapers and websites and watch TV.

So any suggestion that Mancini is not
a man fully in control at the moment will only be reinforced by images
from Tuesday of him berating referees, gesturing at TV cameramen and, of
course, arguing with his own players.

After the Ajax game, City defender Pablo Zabaleta was asked about this and gave a very diplomatic reply.

'Everyone was angry, not just the manager,' said Zabaleta, who was also seen berating the officials after the final whistle.

Getting shirty: Manchester City were furious at having a penalty waved away for Ricardo van Rhijn's foul on Mario Balotelli

Getting shirty: Manchester City were furious at having a penalty waved away for Ricardo van Rhijn's foul on Mario Balotelli

Getting shirty: Manchester City were furious at having a penalty waved away for Ricardo van Rhijn's foul on Mario Balotelli

'We were all asking why the referee didn't give a penalty and why the assistant lifted the flag in the air.

'Roberto is the manager and sometimes he has to shout and argue with the players. It's normal.

'I think it's not just Roberto. When
any manager sees you drop points in a crucial game they get very
passionate and angry. This is all that has happened.'

Zabaleta's post-match outburst was out of character. He is one of the game's more grounded and sensible individuals.

If every dressing room in Europe was populated by men like him, there would be little to write about apart from football.

Players will tell you, though, that many – especially the weak – take their lead from the coach.

If they believe he is rattled it unsettles them, too.

In a football club dressing room, perception is everything. To suggest Mancini is at war with his players would be untrue.

There is a faction, though, who are
grumbling away in the background – the identities of some of them would
shock you – and they will certainly have viewed their manager's
behaviour on Tuesday with interest.

Heated: Mancini had a spat with a cameraman too

Heated: Mancini had a spat with a cameraman too

Heated: Mancini had a spat with a cameraman too

Mancini is not the only manager to argue with officials at full time.

At Anfield last Sunday, Newcastle's
Alan Pardew marched on to the field at the end of the game to
remonstrate with Anthony Taylor about a decision he subsequently
declared to have been correct.

It was the sight of Mancini arguing animatedly with Edin Dzeko with a few minutes left on Tuesday that was more illuminating.

Dzeko had only been the field 20 minutes and was hardly to blame for the mess City were in.

Here the Bosnian was, though, copping an earful from his manager at close quarters on the touchline.

He was, it must be said, unimpressed
and the exchange between the two men perhaps gave something of an
insight into the Premier League champions' current malaise.

Dead and buried: It looked to be all over after Siem de Jong's second

Dead and buried: It looked to be all over after Siem de Jong's second

Fighting spirit: But City fought back after Yaya Toure made it 2-1

Fighting spirit: But City fought back after Yaya Toure made it 2-1

With Tottenham to come at home on
Saturday and then Aston Villa, Madrid and Chelsea after that, it looks
like a critical pre-Christmas period for City.

Mancini can only hope a couple of good results calm things down.

He hopes to have playmaker David Silva back soon and that will help.

Statistics show that City score more goals and create more chances when the Spaniard is in the team.

In the meantime, Mancini can only
hope Zabaleta's assertion that team spirit at the club remains intact is
borne out by results.

'Maybe one of the positives was that
the team showed this spirit,' said the Argentinian. 'It was not easy. We
conceded two goals very early but then the team did well.

'We showed spirit and tried to beat
them. That means the team maybe should have deserved three points.
Everybody here wants to find the answers, I can promise you that.'

Silva service

VIDEO: MADcini! City boss storms the pitch at the end of the match!

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Lee Westwood wins Nordea Masters for third time

Westwood holds off Fisher and Garcia to complete Swedish hat-trick

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UPDATED:

16:49 GMT, 9 June 2012

Lee Westwood claimed a commanding five-shot victory at the Nordea Masters in Stockholm on Saturday.

The Englishman, who led by three
overnight, carded a final-round three-under-par 69 to finish on 19 under
par for the tournament.

Victory: Lee Westwood and his son Sam pose with the trophy

Victory: Lee Westwood and his son Sam pose with the trophy

LEADERBOARD

Click here for the full Nordea Masters leaderboard

The world No 3 came under pressure from Sergio Garcia as the Spaniard put together a fine last round, but an eagle on the par-five 12th and a birdie at the 15th saw him home.

Another Englishman, Ross Fisher, was second on 14 under after a 71, while Garcia, who closed with a 67, finished on 13 under in a tie for third with Finland's Mikko Ilonen and Sweden's Peter Hanson.

More to follow.

Boost: Westwood enjoys his visits to Sweden

Boost: Westwood enjoys his visits to Sweden

Westwood followed by cameramen

Westwood followed by cameramen

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Roy Hodgson to return to Anfield – MERSEY BEAT

The return of Roy Hodgson – but what reception can he expect

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UPDATED:

18:02 GMT, 20 April 2012

Sunday will see one of those rare incidents in sport – the return of a former Liverpool manager to the Anfield dugouts.

On the few occasions it has happened in the past, it has always been the subject of great debate. The build-up to Blackburn Rovers visit to Anfield in December 1992, for instance, was all about Kenny Dalglish’s comeback, 18 months after he sensationally quit Liverpool.

When he emerged from the tunnel that afternoon, a posse of cameramen were waiting for him and an explosion of flashbulbs provided a signal to The Kop to give the club’s greatest player an ovation befitting his status.

Friends reunited: Roy Hodgson will be back at Anfield for this first time since being sacked in January last year. He'll be greeted by his replacement, Kenny Dalglish

Friends reunited: Roy Hodgson will be back at Anfield for this first time since being sacked in January last year. He'll be greeted by his replacement, Kenny Dalglish

More from Dominic King…

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30/03/12

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Meresy Beat: Liverpool must build on derby delight to bring REAL glory nights back to Anfield
16/03/12

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09/03/12

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02/03/12

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Mersey Beat: The month when belief was restored at Goodison Park
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VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

A few years later, Graeme Souness –
Dalglish’s successor – came back in charge of Southampton. Given the
acrimonious way his spell as Liverpool boss had ended, the reception was
not as warm as it had been for Dalglish but, as a European Cup
winning-captain of the club, the respect was clearly there.

Souness, who has never hidden his
affection for Liverpool, responded in the same way as Dalglish, emerging
from the tunnel, looking towards the Kop and lifting his right arm to
salute them in acknowledgment.

The only other man to experience what
it has been like to bring a team to Anfield in the last 50 years is
Gerard Houllier. It was always going to be an emotional night for the
Frenchman, who had led Liverpool to a unprecedented Cup treble in 2001,
when came back with Aston Villa and so it proved.

To watch Houllier stand in his
technical area and gaze at The Kop was to see a man who, like Souness
and Dalglish, had Liverpool in his heart and he was suitably humbled
when chants of 'Allez Allez! Gerard Houllier!' rang out towards the end
of a game that Liverpool won 3-0.

There was, of course, a degree of
irony about that chanting. The performance Liverpool produced that icy
December night in 2010 was the best of the Roy Hodgson reign but there
was never likely to be any acknowledgement of the man who had overseen
operations.

From the moment he walked into
Melwood on the morning of July 1, 2010, Hodgson was facing a battle to
win over the hearts and minds of supporters and the moment results
started to go against him, it became abundantly clear that it was battle
he would not win.

Hero's welcome: Kenny Dalglish was afforded a rapturous greeting when he returned to Anfield with Blackburn in 1992...

Hero's welcome: Kenny Dalglish was afforded a rapturous greeting when he returned to Anfield with Blackburn in 1992…

... but despite equalising, Rovers lost 2-1 with a goal by substitute Mark Walters

… but despite equalising, Rovers lost 2-1 with a goal by substitute Mark Walters

Some managers are perfect fits for a
club but Hodgson never spoke or acted as you would anticipate the man in
charge of Liverpool to. Consider this appraisal of a Europa League
qualifier against the Macedonian side FC Rabotnicki.

‘What a good result tomorrow night
will be will depend on how our opponents play, what pressure we find
ourselves under and what pressure we put on them. We will be trying to
win but I’m far from confident that will be the case.’

Happier times: Hodgson respected the opportunity and was honoured to be chosen as Liverpool boss

Happier times: Hodgson respected the opportunity and was honoured to be chosen as Liverpool boss

There were many, many more examples
of Hodgson not striking the right chord and no tears were shed when,
after 191 days in charge, Liverpool’s owners took the decision to end
his tenure in the wake of a capitulation at Blackburn.

Do not confuse the lack of
understanding about his environment with a lack of respect for the
position he held. That, absolutely, was not the case. Hodgson had his
shortcomings but he knew what a privilege it was to be appointed to the
role and was proud to have been given the chance.

Which it makes it intriguing to see
what reaction awaits him tomorrow, when he brings his West Bromwich
Albion team to town; as intriguing as it will be to see how he reacts
when – or if – he looks towards the Kop.

‘He is a man with real integrity and
dignity,’ said Dalglish earlier this week. ‘He tried his best for this
football club and I’m sure the supporters will respect that. I’m sure
Roy will get a warm reception.’

Only at 4pm on Sunday will we be able to tell if that prediction comes true.