Tag Archives: broken

Jose Maria Olazabal in Ryder Cup captain"s buggy at Spanish Open

Olazabal has best drive at Spanish Open with signed Ryder Cup captain's buggy

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

15:01 GMT, 17 April 2013

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UPDATED:

16:55 GMT, 17 April 2013

Jose Maria Olazabal has a cool set of wheels at the Spanish Open with the former Ryder Cup captain cruising around in his skipper's buggy.

Olazabal masterminded Europe's win over the United States at Medinah last year and all 12 of his players signed the front of his cart.

Sergio Garcia and Francesco Molinari are the only two of Olazabal's troops teeing it up in Valencia this week – the former the bookies' favourite and the latter the defending champion.

Home hopes: Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and Sergio Garcia at Parador de El Saler for the Spanish Open

Home hopes: Jose Maria Olazabal (right) and Sergio Garcia at Parador de El Saler for the Spanish Open

Garcia, who finished in a tie for eighth at The Masters on Sunday, was all smiles as he hitched a lift with Olazabal during Wednesday's practice at Parador de El Saler.

Meanwhile, Miguel Angel Jimenez will put his recovery from a broken leg to the test on his return to action in Valencia.

Jimenez, who surpassed Des Smyth as the oldest winner on the European Tour when he lifted the Hong Kong Open aged 48 years and 318 days last November, suffered the injury a month later while skiing near his home in Malaga.

'My leg is improving daily,' the 49-year-old told reporters. 'I work out every morning in the gym and I'm actually a little ahead of schedule on my rehab. I am not one hundred per cent fit, but I want to test myself and see how I feel.

Good to be back: Miguel Angel Jimenez is making his return to action after recovering from a broken leg

Good to be back: Miguel Angel Jimenez is making his return to action after recovering from a broken leg

'I can't wait to be back on Tour with my friends and I'd hate to miss the chance of playing at El Saler.'

Jimenez made his tour debut in the Spanish Open 30 years ago and will be making his 599th career appearance this week.

'Javier Arana's wonderful design blends beautifully with its natural surroundings, both in the pine trees area and in the dunes area. For me it's the best course in Spain and I love all the holes,' Jimenez added.

'It's a beautiful layout with a strong finish; the 17th is a good par three towards the dunes and the 18th is spectacular. Once you play at El Saler you get hooked. It's such an enjoyable course that you keep wanting to come back.

'I have many fond memories of El Saler. We used to play many tournaments in the 80's and I won an Under-25 event in 1986. We also played two or three Campeonatos de Levante, and later on a few European Tour events. The last I played was the 2003 Seve Trophy.'

Different ball game: Garcia and his dad Victor watch former tennis ace Juan Carlos Ferrero during the pro-am

Different ball game: Garcia and his dad Victor watch former tennis ace Juan Carlos Ferrero during the pro-am

Arsenal suffer a blow as their target David Villa is offered a new Barcelona contract

Arsenal blow as target Villa will be offered new Barcelona deal

By
Thom Drake

PUBLISHED:

13:42 GMT, 17 March 2013

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UPDATED:

12:06 GMT, 18 March 2013

Arsenal could miss out on signing David Villa after Barcelona have offered him a new contract.

The striker is due to be a free agent in 14 months time, with several English clubs sniffing around to see if they can get him for a reduced price.

However, Barcelona feel he still has a very important role at the club and staying in Spain may be his best chance of competing for a place in the national side.

Natural: David Villa scored in Barcelona's 4-0 win against AC Milan

Natural: David Villa scored in Barcelona's 4-0 win against AC Milan

Arsenal's striking problems have been well documented of late, with Arsene Wenger allowing Theo Walcott some time up front before switching back to Olivier Giroud for the most recent games.

Forward Marouane Chamakh is currently on-loan at West Ham after failing to convince his manager that he has much of a future at the club.

As for Villa, Spain's record goalscorer has been out of favour at the Nou Campafter returning at the start of the season from eight months out with a broken leg.

Rival: Alexis Sanchez is Villa's biggest competition in the team

Rival: Alexis Sanchez is Villa's biggest competition in the team

The 31-year-old joined Barcelona from Valencia in 2010 for a fee of 35million, and is reportedly on a deal worth 7m a year.

If first-team football is what Villa wants, then he may wait until the summer and consider his future before signing any new contract.

Record: Villa is Spain's top goalscorer with 53 goals in 86 games

Record: Villa is Spain's top goalscorer with 53 goals in 86 games

Paolo Di Canio has resigned as Swindon manager after his position became "untenable"

Di Canio resigns as Swindon manager after his position became 'untenable'

By
Joe Ridge and Ralph Ellis

PUBLISHED:

19:28 GMT, 18 February 2013

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UPDATED:

22:13 GMT, 18 February 2013


Gone: Paulo Di Canio

Gone: Paulo Di Canio

Paolo Di Canio’s turbulent 18 months as manager of Swindon came to an end on Monday night when the fiery Italian walked out.

Di Canio, who won promotion in his first season, revealed he had resigned a week ago but gave the club’s prospective new owners seven days to get the green light from the Football League for their takeover.

When a 5pm deadline came and went last night with the deal — lined up to prevent the club going into administration — still uncertain, Di Canio decided it was time to go.

The 44-year-old had been threatening to walk out for more than a fortnight after star midfielder Matt Ritchie was sold to Bournemouth for 500,000 without his approval.

The statement said: 'In my previous press statement on 1st
February, I said that I was considering my future, as my position with
the club had become untenable, after I found out that Matt Ritchie had
been sold without my consent.

'As I had previously stated, there
have been a number of broken promises made by the club over the time
that I have been Manager of Swindon Town. Despite these problems, I have
delivered everything and more that was asked of me, by achieving
promotion last year as Champions and competing this season for promotion
to the Championship and being just 3 points from top place a year
earlier than expected.

'I did not resign immediately, nor
publicise my resignation after I had formally confirmed it, as I did not
want to jeopardise the negotiations for the sale of the club and I
wanted to listen to what the proposed new owners plans were.'

Hero: Swindon fans had done everything they could to keep Di Canio

Hero: Swindon fans had done everything they could to keep Di Canio

Di Canio won 44 of the 75 league games he was in charge at Swindon, and his resignation will spark interest from bigger clubs who are looking for a new manager.

The statement continued: 'Following discussions, my representatives put forward a proposal that
would secure my future at the club until at least the end of the season
and quite possibly beyond as well. This proposal actually reduced the
Clubs contractual liabilities to me in the interest of saving Swindon
Town FC. At a meeting last Friday the proposed new owners accepted and
said they were very happy with the new terms.

'I entered into a temporary arrangement with the proposed new owners
to continue in my role as Manager but all this was agreed subject to
Football League approval for the purchase of the Club being granted by
5:00pm on Monday 18th February.

Money: Off-field financial problems have begun to dog Swindon

Money: Off-field financial problems have begun to dog Swindon

'At the time of issuing this statement, I have had no further contact
from the proposed new owners and I have been told that unfortunately
Football League approval has not been granted yet and therefore my
temporary arrangement has ended and my resignation stands.

'This is all I wish to say for the time being other than to thank my
Technical Staff and the players for their fantastic professional
behaviour and attitude in achieving what they have done up to today,
also thanks to the Swindon Town supporters for the incredible support
they have shown me and the team throughout my time as Manager.

'I wish the best of luck to the supporters, the players and my Technical Staff for the future.'

Undermined: Di Canio felt the sale of Matt Richie was the last straw

Undermined: Di Canio felt the sale of Matt Richie was the last straw

Swindon currently sit sixth in League
One, just two points off the automatic promotion places — but Di Canio
wanted more backing to reach the Championship. Instead, he lost his top
player and his plans to recruit more were shelved.

Swindon’s owners put the club up for
sale in mid-January, revealing they had debts of around 13million and
warning they might have to go into administration.

That fear was eased when a consortium
agreed a deal to take over, but so far its leader, Oxford-based
businessman Jed McCrory, who bought Southern League club Banbury Town
six months ago, does not have Football League backing for his plans.

Di Canio’s position will be of
interest to West Ham, where he is the fans’ favourite to take over if
the club fail to agree a contract with Sam Allardyce when his deal runs
out in June.

Sports Personality: Andy Murray deserves the award – Martin Samuel

It's been the greatest sporting year we've seen, but there can be only one winner, so… It must be Murray

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UPDATED:

00:39 GMT, 15 December 2012

It is what you have to leave out that tells you what a year it has been. There is no room, for instance, to tell the story about standing at the back of the 16th green at Royal Lytham and St Annes, chatting amiably with course marshals about what a disappointing day of golf it had been.

There isn’t time to recount that we agreed Adam Scott had been given the easiest ride of any Open champion because the pursuing pack had not put him under pressure at all; or how, 15 minutes later, coming off the back of the 17th, Scott was a broken man and Ernie Els on the brink of one of the most astonishing victories in the history of major golf.

There is no space for such details because, at the very moment Els was profiting from one of the most spectacular implosions in a sport that rather specialises in them, Bradley Wiggins was successfully completing his own procession along the Champs-Elysees, to be the first British winner of the Tour de France.

Le Gentleman called for the excited throng, tens of thousands deep and hanging on his every word, to be quiet. ‘We’re just going to draw the raffle now,’ he told them. Yes, it was that sort of year.

Enlarge

The best of the lot: Andy Murray memorably won the US Open title in November

The best of the lot: Andy Murray memorably won the US Open title in November

In British sport, 2012 will be talked
about like a 1990 Burgundy or a 1959 Bordeaux. We will drink this
cellar of special memories dry. 2012 was the year it came together; a
home Olympics and so many moments in orbit around it, that the year in
review seems almost mythical or magical, like Brigadoon, the mysterious
Scottish village that appears one day in every 100 years.

And
there was a night, a very special night in the Olympic Stadium when, in
the time it takes to play the first half of a football match, Britain
won more track-and-field gold medals than in the previous two Olympics
combined.

Glorious: Bradley Wiggins celebrates his Tour de France success in Paris

Glorious: Bradley Wiggins celebrates his Tour de France success in Paris

Greg Rutherford won the men’s long jump, Jessica Ennis the heptathlon and Mo Farah the 10,000 metres, each victory tearing the traditional narrative of plucky failure apart. A week later, Farah returned to do it again in the 5,000m.

Usain Bolt, the most famous athlete on the planet, celebrated his own victories by doing the Mobot, Farah’s M-shaped celebration invented by Clare Balding and christened by James Corden during a knockabout appearance on the sports quiz A League Of Their Own. Like Wiggo’s raffle joke, there seemed something very British about a gold medallist whose trademark was cooked up irreverently on the hoof.

It felt like us. It felt like modern Britain. The public go to the polls this weekend to decide the Sports Personality of the Year and the shortlist is a perfect cross-section of male and female, black and white, dis- and abled, yet there is not a hint of pre-determined correctness about it. This really was that sort of year.

Unforgettable: Mo Farah crosses the line to win the 5,000m at the London Olympics, and later Usain Bolt copied his famous celebration

Unforgettable: Mo Farah crosses the line to win the 5,000m at the London Olympics, and later Usain Bolt copied his famous celebration

Mo Farah and Usain Bolt at London Olympics

It was a coming together year, an
I-was-there year, a year for cliches about telling the grandkids and
remembering where you were when and keeping little scrapbooks, or
souvenirs, or at the very least crystallising memories, and it was a
year so good that sometimes we slip and forget how good it has been.

Football,
for instance, has had a terrible year, what with the racism and the
coin-throwing and the greatest finish to a title race in recent memory,
and the first London side winning the European Cup against
insurmountable odds on a penalty shootout and then Spain played the best
football anyone had seen for the first half of the European
Championship final and Chelsea are now one game from being world
champions and . . . and . . .

I’m
sorry, I’ll rephrase that. Football has had a great year, despite the
racism and the coin-throwing, because — well, like I said: Manchester
City, Chelsea in Munich, Spain and then there was this chap Lionel
Messi, who some of you might know.

What drama: Sergio Aguero scores the goal that won Manchester City the title

What drama: Sergio Aguero scores the goal that won Manchester City the title

And
Andy Murray! Hell’s bells, we nearly forgot Andy Murray, who came
closer to winning a Wimbledon men’s singles final than any British man
since the nation was represented in tennis by people called Bunny. Then
he won the gold medal at the Olympics, but we barely mention that now
because on September 10, Murray won the US Open, so we no longer have to
pretend Olympic gold is the pinnacle of his career and neither does he.

We
can return Olympic tennis to its rightful place and remember the
extremes of physical endurance that were required to overcome Novak
Djokovic in New York in Britain’s first men’s singles Grand Slam win in
76 years.

That an opponent who was believed to
have taken the sport to a new level of relentless, brutal athleticism
simply could not take any more remains arguably the sporting achievement
of the year.
Yet nothing
illustrates the pain and determination it took Murray to get there more
perfectly than a 20-minute vignette in defeat several months earlier.

It
went like this: Murray’s serve 15-0, 30-0, 40-0, 40-15, 40-30, deuce,
advantage Murray, deuce, advantage Federer, deuce, advantage Federer,
deuce, advantage Federer, deuce, advantage Murray, deuce, advantage
Murray, deuce, advantage Federer, deuce, advantage Federer, deuce,
advantage Murray, deuce, advantage Federer, game Federer. Third set, game six, Wimbledon final. Federer breaks Murray’s serve. But look what he had to do.

Finest hour: Murray in action during his US Open final showdown against Novak Djokovic in September

Finest hour: Murray in action during his US Open final showdown against Novak Djokovic in September

Revisited with hindsight, it truly was a matter of time before Murray won a Slam. Seeing what he put Federer through, of course he would later survive, victorious, the longest US Open final in history.

Is Murray the Sports Personality of the Year He’s mine. Wiggins would be a worthy winner, too, so would Farah and Ennis and Sir Chris Hoy and David Weir and, well just about any name on the shortlist and then some. The coward’s way out, a special 2012 award each, certainly had appeal. Yet it was not a matter of national debate that no Briton had won the Tour de France.

Nobody was button-holing Farah in the
street, asking urgently when the dominance of east Africans in
long-distance running would be at an end. Every
time Ennis lost it was not held up as symbolic of wider British failure
in modern life. That is what makes Murray different. He was dragging 76
years of British sporting gloom everywhere he went. No wonder those
shoulders occasionally slumped.

Hero: Ian Poulter was brilliant at the Ryder Cup at Medinah in September

Hero: Ian Poulter was brilliant at the Ryder Cup at Medinah in September

To
be there in New York when he finally cut that burden loose, to see
Murray on the balcony of the British Residence, the newly crowned king
of New York, felt like being present at the audiences granted by
heavyweight champions of the world in presidential suites in Las Vegas.
Murray, a boxing obsessive, would enjoy the comparison.

Like Wiggins, he is a man apart. Road cyclists from Kilburn High Road do not beat the French at their own game. What makes Wiggins unique is also what separates Murray, originating from a part of the world in which the weather is more conducive to bad chests than good tennis.

It applies to Farah, too. He is
Somali by birth, which is presumed to make him good at distance running;
except Somalia has no pedigree in the sport. What Farah has achieved
comes from growing up distance running in his miserable, wet, cold
northern hemisphere country, pounding the track when every human urge
must have been ordering him to get inside and into the warm. These are
remarkable people: champions and more.

What
else, what else in 2012 There was a horse, and what a horse. You can’t
give the SPOTY award to an equine candidate, so Frankel is not on the
BBC’s list, but by any measure of pure achievement, he should be. He
had personality, he had class, he had 14 wins in 14 races and nine of
those were Group Ones. He was the greatest quadruped athlete of his time
and some would say of any time. Cheering him home was a privilege for
more than just his supporters in the betting ring.

Memorable: Tom Queally celebrates after Frankel won his final race at Ascot

Memorable: Tom Queally celebrates after Frankel won his final race at Ascot

As was being in Medinah the night Europe’s golfers retained the Ryder Cup against all presumption, logic and gambling instinct. It was a win that defied explanation — like Liverpool in Istanbul in 2005 — except to say that in Ian Poulter, European golf has its Steven Gerrard figure. For AC Milan’s 3-0 half-time lead, read United States 10-4 up by Saturday afternoon on home soil. Poulter made five birdies to give Europe a chink of light that evening and the rest is history.

Except this time it truly is history.
All of it. All of them. The Olympians, the Paralympians, the golfers,
the horse, the footballers, watching Alastair Cook make another
subcontinent ton, watching England thump the All Blacks, watching West
Ham United win promotion on a tiny television screen erected by the nice
people from Sky in the lot outside the Allianz Arena before the
Champions League final, watching Hoy become Britain’s greatest Olympian,
and a personal favourite: that mad, mad look when Katherine Copeland
knew she had won rowing gold for Britain, and turned to her partner
Sophie Hosking.

‘We’re going to be on a stamp,’ she said.

It was that kind of year. Very special. Very British.

Special: Katherine Copeland and Sophie Hoskins celebrate Olympic rowing gold

Special: Katherine Copeland and Sophie Hoskins celebrate Olympic rowing gold


The contenders for Sports Personality

Joey Barton plays for Marseille behind closed doors

Barton blasts 'farmer's field' after Marseille beat Bastia behind closed doors

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UPDATED:

00:13 GMT, 13 December 2012

Joey Barton helped Marseille to a 2-1 win against Bastia last night – but there was no-one in the stands to see it.

Bastia were forced to play the match behind closed doors after their clash with Ajaccio in October descended into chaos.

The Corsican derby was stopped for five minutes after fans of both teams started fighting and threw fireworks following a mass brawl on the pitch.

Helping hand: Joey Barton's Marseille beat Bastia to continue to keep in touch with the league leaders

Helping hand: Joey Barton's Marseille beat Bastia to continue to keep in touch with the league leaders

Mathieu Valbuena deservedly put Marseille ahead with a
superb volley from just inside the box in the 15th minute.

Andre Ayew doubled the lead from the penalty spot on 70
minutes after goalkeeper Landry Bonnefoi had fouled his younger brother Jordan.

Empty: Bastia were forced to play behind closed doors after trouble in their match with Ajaccio

Empty: Bastia were forced to play behind closed doors after trouble in their match with Ajaccio

Locked out: Fans were forced to watch the match on a big screen outside the ground

Locked out: Fans were forced to watch the match on a big screen outside the ground

Anthony Modeste scored a late goal but Bastia did not go on
to worry the visitors, who clinched their sixth away league win and also
welcomed back striker Andre-Pierre Gignac six weeks after he suffered a broken
foot.

Barton later tweeted: 'Great 3 points on that farmers field. No fans in the stadium but loads outside throwing fireworks. Freezing cold showers as well.'

Marseille are third in Ligue One, level on points with Paris Saint-Germain.

Taking aim: Wahbi Khazri of Bastia (left) lines up a shot during his side's defeat

Taking aim: Wahbi Khazri of Bastia (left) lines up a shot during his side's defeat

Bacary Sagna heading for Arsenal exit as France right back feels "disrespected" by new offer

Sagna heading for Arsenal exit as 'disrespected' France right back fumes at club's offer

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UPDATED:

22:45 GMT, 5 December 2012

Bacary Sagna looks set to be the next high-profile Arsenal player to walk away from the club.

The France right back feels ‘disrespected’ by the Gunners’ offer of a 12-month extension to his deal that expires in 2014. He has told team-mates he expects to leave at the end of the season.

On the move: Bacary Sagna wants to leave Arsenal

On the move: Bacary Sagna wants to leave Arsenal

Injury fears: Sagna

Injury fears: Sagna

Arsenal are refusing to improve his current wage of 60,000 a week. Given this will be the defender’s final big contract — he is 30 in February — he is looking for a substantial salary increase.

The club’s decision not to offer a long-term deal is thought to be connected to fears over his injury record, having suffered two broken legs in a year.

Sagna angered Wenger this season after
publicly criticising the club for selling Robin van Persie and Alex
Song during the summer.

Theo Walcott has also told Arsenal he is unwilling to sign a five-year deal worth 75,000 a week.

Craig Gordon, the 9m goalkeeper who is available on a free transfer

Good Gord! He once cost Sunderland boss Roy Keane 9m… but the keeper is STILL available on a free going into December

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UPDATED:

14:07 GMT, 27 November 2012

Craig Gordon, remember him

The most expensive British goalkeeper, Scotland international and credited with one of the greatest saves ever.

And currently without a club and available on a free transfer.

For hire: Scotland keeper Craig Gordon is a free agent

For hire: Scotland keeper Craig Gordon is a free agent

Available for hire… other free transfers

Ricardo Gardner (Bolton)

Darius Vassell (Aston Villa, Manchester City, England)

Delroy Facey (Bolton, Hull, West Brom)

Salif Diao (Monaco, Liverpool, Stoke)

Owen Hargreaves (Bayern Munich, Manchester United, Manchester City)

The 29-year-old was released by Sunderland at the end of last season after a succession of injuries.

It marked a remarkable fall from grace for Gordon, who was one hailed as 'untouchable' by former Sunderland boss Roy Keane.

After sealing his 9million switch from Hearts, Keane likened it to when Brian Clough signed England legend Peter Shilton for Nottingham Forest.

But Gordon's impact at Sunderland was restricted by injury.

Safe hands: Gordon is Britain's most expensive keeper

Safe hands: Gordon is Britain's most expensive keeper

A knee injury midway through his second season with the Black Cats left him sidelined for several months.

And, only four months into the following season, a broken arm kept him out for another three months.

Further injury woes struck when Gordon broke the same arm in pre-season training in 2010.

He returned to produce the save of the season against Bolton when he denied Zat Knight from point-blank range.

But in April 2011, Gordon underwent knee surgery which kept him out for another eight months.

Gordon's great save

Everton are among a host of clubs who could offer Gordon way back into the game.

But he wants to prove his fitness before relaunching his career.

'I'm just trying to get back fully fit with that before I start looking for a club,' he told BBC Scotland's Sportscene.

'I've still had a few niggling problems with my knee injury, which I've had on and off for quite some time now.'

Real Madrid"s secret weapon designed by an Englishman

Real Madrid's secret weapon that Mourinho hopes will bring down Manchester City… and it is designed by and Englishman

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UPDATED:

01:45 GMT, 21 November 2012

Aqua man: A mock up of Cristiano Ronaldo wearing the suit

Aqua man: A mock up of Cristiano Ronaldo wearing the suit

Jose Mourinho calls it Real Madrid’s secret weapon, the Spanish press label it the club’s ‘fourth kit’

It will not be visible to the Manchester City players at the Etihad on Wednesday but Cristiano Ronaldo and co can attest to its effectiveness. What’s more, it’s been designed by an Englishman.

Terry Nelson, a youth player at Liverpool when the club were conquering Europe in the late 70s, has created a buoyancy suit which allows players to train in the water even when injuries have stopped them running on land.

The TNAR Mk X6 – to give its full title – is a body suit made from nylon, lycra and strategically-placed foam padding, which lifts the wearer into the necessary position for exercise in the swimming pool.

Users float, meaning there is no impact on the ground and pressure is relieved from aches and pains that might otherwise curtail a session on an unforgiving pitch.

‘I designed it for training in the water so your feet don’t touch the floor,’ Nelson, 50 told Sportsmail. ‘The suit keeps you upright in the correct biomechanical running position. Anyone who’s got an injury can now run and train and sprint and do all the things they can’t do on land.’

Nelson came up with the idea two years ago after growing tired of floatation bands he used when training with a broken metatarsal. He made contact with Real Madrid through the British Embassy in Spain 18 months ago and the club’s medical staff subsequently helped develop it.

Mourinho gave the thumbs up for players to use the suits in May and they have been worn since the start of the season.

‘I worked with the medical staff and the physios rather than the manager but the manager’s got to like the suits. Ronaldo and Kaka and all the players were there for my talks. You see them using the suits and you have a little chat.

‘Football players can be very particular. They want to play, they don’t really want to go in the pool. But the feedback we get from the manager is that they like wearing the suits, it gives them a feel good factor.’

He added: ‘It brings the players back quicker from injury. They don’t have to rest, they can run very early in their recovery. If you think of Ronaldo, for example, he’s on 300,000 a week. If he comes back two weeks earlier then that’s a lot of money saved by the club.

How it works: The suit helps players train in the water

How it works: The suit helps players train in the water

How it works: The suit helps players train in the water

‘The suit is nylon on lycra with foam pads inside. We call it an exosuit. It’s an extension of muscles groups in your body. It’s like a six pack at the front. On the back, the pads are placed to represent muscle groups in your back, giving support. It’s bigger surface are rather than weight, so that makes it harder to run in the pool but it doesn’t injure you.

‘When Wayne Rooney broke his metatarsal, he wouldn’t have been able to put anything on that foot. Now Wayne could take that cast off his leg, get off his crutches and run. That’s what Real Madrid do.’

Diego Maradona was given a training session by Nelson in Dubai before he lost his job and the Argentinian was so enamoured he wrote a letter of endorsement to Liverpool, who have now also ordered the kit.

‘He’s got very bad knees, he waddles when he walks,’ said Nelson. ‘But in the pool he was sprinting like he did for Argentina. It took him back 20 years. It changed his life.’

Fan: Former Argentina manager Diego Maradona is a fan of the suit

Fan: Former Argentina manager Diego Maradona is a fan of the suit

The next time an injured England player joins up with the squad at Burton he will be given a suit to train in too as the Football Association have bought 25.

TERRY NELSON’S UPLIFTING STORY IN HIS OWN WORDS

The suit comes from a lot of illness and injury. I played for Liverpool for three and a half years between 1977 and 1981. But that ended through a groin injury.

After a couple of years I went into the Paratroopers but that was ended by kidney failure. My military career was over. I had a transplant and entered the British athletics championships for people with transplants in 1993 and won gold for the 5000m.

Before the following world championships I broke my foot badly with a metatarsal injury so I couldn’t train. But I ordered these floatation belts from the United States and ran in the pool for six weeks. My foot healed and I went to Canada and won gold again.

Then I fell ill, my transplant failed. I spent 12 years in hospital six days a week on kidney dialysis. In those six days to keep myself well, my heart good, I was in a wheelchair I used to go to the pool and jog in the water. It was like groundhog day.

I had my second transplant and I’m really well now. I spent two years in the United States learning technical skills then came back but the belt wasn’t enough. That’s when I developed the suit.

I had my leg amputated below the knee in December last year – it was connected to the kidney failure – so I’ve got a carbon fibre leg now and I still run in the pool. It hasn’t stopped me.

All my experience I pass on to the players – don’t get down, you can train.

Bizarrely, Hollywood has called as well. A boxing connection put Mickey Rourke in touch and he is having one made so he can train for an upcoming movie role, with Nelson flying out to Bel Air to assist.

Nelson designed the suit after a lifetime of injuries and illness. He had to quit Liverpool and say goodbye to fellow youth-team members Sammy Lee and Dave Watson in 1981 after sustaining a groin injury.

He joined the paratroopers but was forced to end his career after being diagnosed with kidney failure. After a transplant he won gold at world championships open specifically for those in his situation and during this time discovered the US-manufactured floatation bands.

But his transplant failed and he spent 12 years in hospital on dialysis before having a second successful operation. His son would push his wheelchair to the pool so he could keep his heart in check.

Once out and healthy, he determined to make a product which could not only enable footballers to keep training when injured but also lift their spirits.

‘They have a freedom,’ said Nelson. ‘It rejuvenates their mind as well, because players can get very down if they can’t run.

‘But the suit’s not just for injuries, it can be used when fit. It’s a conditioning suit too.

‘Let’s say we have a player coming to the end of their career – rather than going out on a wet windy training ground, a couple of sessions in the pool helps keep the player’s knees in better condition. And the career could last longer as there’s no impact.’

Roberto Mancini might feel the last thing Madrid’s galaxy of stars need is a special suit of armour.

P.S. At least one Manchester City player owns a suit. Diego Maradona is a big fan and he ordered a dozen for friends and family, including son-in-law Sergio Aguero.

Ben Watson does not require surgery on broken leg

Watson boost for Wigan with news midfielder does not require surgery on broken leg

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UPDATED:

14:19 GMT, 19 November 2012

Wigan have been boosted by the news Ben Watson’s fractured shin is not as serious as first feared and he will not need surgery.

The 27-year-old spent two nights at the Royal Liverpool Hospital but has now returned home to begin his recovery from the injury, which he suffered in an innocuous-looking clash with Raheem Sterling in Wigan’s 3-0 defeat by Liverpool on Saturday.

Watson will need to wear a cast for a few weeks but the club are optimistic he will be able to resume training in the New Year.

Down and out: Watson broke his leg during the clash at Anfield

Down and out: Watson broke his leg during the clash at Anfield

The midfielder has been in and out of the side this season but had started the last three Barclays Premier League games and he will be missed, according to manager Roberto Martinez.

The Spaniard told www.wiganlatics.co.uk: 'It’s not as bad as it could have been, that’s for certain. It’s still a very serious injury and we need to ensure that Ben is given all the time that he needs to make a full recovery.

'The good news is that he won’t be out for as long as we initially thought and, with the character that Ben has, he will be able to deal with such an injury.

'Ben has just started to put his stamp on the team and he will be missed in the group because of the type of lad he is.'

No surgery required: Watsion will be back sooner than first thought

No surgery required: Watsion will be back sooner than first thought

Raheem Sterling apologises to Ben Watson after collision leads to broken leg at Anfield

Sterling says sorry to Watson for breaking his leg in freak collision

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UPDATED:

18:47 GMT, 17 November 2012

Raheem Sterling has apologised to Ben Watson for the challenge which resulted in a broken leg for the Wigan man during Liverpool's 3-0 win at Anfield.

In a freak collision, 27-year-old Watson was caught just above the shin by the knee of the Reds winger as they jumped for a ball in the first half.

'To Ben Watson I didn't realise it was
serious as that ill be praying for a speedy recovery mate ill have you
in my prayers every day #sorry,' Sterling tweeted.

Treatment: Ben Watson receives attention at Anfield

Treatment: Ben Watson receives attention at Anfield

Hobbling off: Watson leaves the field, to be replaced by David Jones

Hobbling off: Watson leaves the field, to be replaced by David Jones

Watson received lengthy treatment on
the pitch before declining the use of a stretcher and hobbled off
assisted by Wigan medical staff – and he may require surgery.

Despite further attention down by the
touchline the midfielder struggled to put any weight on his right leg
and was eventually taken down the tunnel.

Wigan manager Roberto Martinez confirmed the injury after the defeat – and absolved Sterling from any blame.

Apology: Raheem Sterling was quick to say sorry for the tackle that resulted in a broken leg for Ben Watson

Apology: Raheem Sterling was quick to say sorry for the tackle that resulted in a broken leg for Ben Watson

No blame: Roberto Martinez called the incident an accident on a grim day for Wigan

No blame: Roberto Martinez called the incident an accident on a grim day for Wigan

'I haven't seen the challenge back, but I don't think any of the players were looking at each other,' he said.

'Both were looking at the ball – it's a real accident. It's a nasty collision.'

'It is a broken leg and we are going to miss him,' the Spaniard continued, 'he has a fracture and we are going to assess him now because maybe he will require surgery.

'We will see what the extent of the breakage is and what treatment he needs. We are really disappointed because he was at a good level.'