Tag Archives: broadcasting

John McCririck taken to hospital after collapsing at Cheltenham Festival

Racing pundit McCririck taken to hospital after collapsing at Cheltenham Festival

By
Louise Eccles

PUBLISHED:

18:49 GMT, 12 March 2013

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UPDATED:

20:40 GMT, 12 March 2013

Television pundit John McCririck has been taken to hospital after collapsing at Cheltenham Festival.

The 72-year-old will spend the night at Cheltenham General Hospital where he will undergo tests but his condition is not said to be serious.

McCririck isn't presenting Channel 4's coverage of the four-day festival for the first time in 30 years after it was revealed in January that he wouldn't be part of the corporation's broadcasting team.

His wife blamed his collapse on the stress of being sacked by Channel 4. McCririck is currently suing the channel for 3m for ageism and loss of earnings.

Taken to hospital: John McCririck collapsed on day one of the Cheltenham Festival

Taken to hospital: John McCririck collapsed on day one of the Cheltenham Festival

Taken to hospital: John McCririck collapsed on day one of the Cheltenham Festival

The 72-year-old – who was dropped by
Channel 4 in favour of a new racing team headed by Clare Balding –
called his wife before the last race today to say he felt unwell.

As he walked to meet her, he
apparently took a turn for the worse and had to be treated at the edge
of the parade ring by paramedics. He was then taken to hospital in an
ambulance.

Prior to his collapse, McCririck was
seen sitting in the media centre alone, looking glum. He rose
periodically to smoke a cigar on the balcony outside.

The commentator claims he was axed by
Channel 4 for being too old. In a statement issued in January, he said:
‘After 29 years with Channel 4 Racing, on a rolling annual contract, I
have been sacked without any consultation or cogent explanation. I am
72. For loss of future earnings, unfair career damaging, public
humiliation, stress and mental anguish, I will be seeking 500,000.

John McCririck

John McCririck's wife

Ill: McCririck complained to his wife about feeling unwell before taking a turn for the worse

‘Ageism is illegal. For tens of
thousands of employees it has become the feared scourge of our society.
This litigation should prove to be a watershed.

‘There’s no upper limit to the amount of damages employment tribunals can award under the Equality Act 2010.

‘I am seeking a further exemplary,
punitive 2.5m, part of which will be donated to charitable
organisations helping to prevent negative prejudice in the workplace.’

Channel 4 denied the allegations and said they would ‘vigorously’ defend the claim.

Marcus Townend: Broadcast challenge for new kings Channel 4

Marcus Townend: Channel 4 face one helluva broadcast challenge in replacing the BBC

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 25 December 2012

How ironic that the final BBC racing broadcast at abandoned Chepstow will not even manage to make it out of the starting stalls.

Leaving the sport with not even a whimper seems appropriate for an organisation whose divorce from racing has been coming for a long time.

The faces in front of camera soldiered on but the BBC television executives above them steadily lost interest, their mood not helped by the period when they were paying for their dwindling rights and Channel 4 was being handed cheques by the sport to keep its cameras rolling.

Changing of the guard: Clare Balding will be the new face of Channel 4 racing

Changing of the guard: Clare Balding will be the new face of Channel 4 racing

The landscape was transformed when bookmakers were allowed to start advertising on television and suddenly a live broadcast from Sandown became much more than merely an expensive, work-intensive option to another repeat of The Sound of Music.

Channel 4’s interest surged. Make no mistake, they have not signed a four-year deal for the terrestrial racing rights simply because they are in love with the sport.
It would be easy to drift away on sentimental memories but the truth is that the new

Channel 4 racing coverage has the potential to innovate and excite.

When cricket took the same journey from BBC to Channel 4, the station impressed with its refreshing new approach.

No show: Chepstow races which was due to the the last meet shown on the BBC has been postponed due to the weather

No show: Chepstow races which was due to the the last meet shown on the BBC has been postponed due to the weather

A re-jigged team of pundits line up under the leadership of the BBC’s transferred Clare Balding —not a bad signing given her current standing in the post-Olympics world of sports broadcasting. The new squad could have been more radical but it will be the attitude and tone set by their masters that is all important and early mission statements look promising.

Channel 4 looks enthused by their new venture and that, in contrast to the BBC’s attitude, has the capacity to shine through on screen.
Of course, adverts for the first time during the Grand National or at Royal Ascot will grate but longer programmes and less races will make the shows feel less like a mad dash through betting opportunities.

The BBC has a huge archive of racing memories — Red Rum at the 1977 Sports Personality of the Year show; Bing Crosby appearing on Grandstand on the day in the 1970s when the chaser Uncle Bing won and Frankie Dettori’s magnificent seven at Ascot in 1996.

But the baton has been passed on and it might not be a bad thing. A challenge has been set Channel 4. We will see in the coming weeks and months how well it does.

Test Match Special faces axe as Indian officials demand extra 50,000 from BBC

It's just not cricket: Test Match Special faces axe for first time in 40 years as Indian officials demand extra 50,000 from BBC

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UPDATED:

23:33 GMT, 27 October 2012

English cricket lovers face being
deprived of overseas commentary from BBC Radio's iconic Test Match
Special programme for the first time in almost 40 years because greedy
Indian administrators are holding them to ransom.

The Board of Control for Cricket in
India (BCCI) has broken with convention by demanding the BBC pays an
extra 50,000 to cover the costs of broadcast facilities during the
upcoming Test series between England and India – while Sky Television
has been told it must pay almost 500,000.

Both broadcasters insist the fees
were not mentioned by the BCCI when the agreements to cover the series
were finalised six weeks ago, when Sky also signed a deal to cover Test
cricket in India for the next six years.

No Indian summer: the TMS team may not be able to broadcast from India

No Indian summer: The TMS team may not be able to broadcast from India

It now looks increasingly likely that Test Match Special, considered by many to be the soundtrack to the game since its inception in 1957, will fall quiet this winter, depriving hundreds of thousands of devoted fans of commentary from Jonathan Agnew, Geoffrey Boycott, Michael Vaughan and Phil Tufnell.

It will be the first time fans have faced radio silence for an overseas tour since the BBC covered England's 1976-77 trip to India.

A BBC spokesman confirmed: 'We are continuing talks with the relevant authorities in India about what we regard as unreasonable demands for facility fees.'

If the row is not resolved, Sky intends to graft the words of Sir Ian Botham, David Gower, Mike Atherton and Nasser Hussain, commentating in a West London studio, on to pictures fed by Indian host broadcaster Star Sports.

But the BBC is unlikely to follow Sky's example.

Watching from home Sky's broadcasting team may produce coverage in England

Watching from home Sky's broadcasting team may produce coverage in England

Cricket lovers face being deprived of overseas commentary from BBC Radio's Test Match Special programme which is anchored by Jonathan Agnew, right

Cricket lovers face being deprived of overseas commentary from BBC Radio's Test Match Special programme which is anchored by Jonathan Agnew, right

A Test Match Special insider said: 'Even though we would have every right to broadcast the Indian series from the moon because we've paid for the rights, doing so from the UK in this instance might make the public feel, to all intents and purposes, that we are no different from the Test Match Sofa website, whose commentators are based in South London.'

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) officials have requested a more flexible approach from their Indian counterparts at the BCCI.

But an ECB source confirmed yesterday that no progress had been made to break the deadlock and all parties concede time is running out for a compromise to be reached in time for the first Test in Ahmedabad on November 15.

A defiant BCCI official said: 'It is not as if they have only asked for a commentary box. They have demanded a full control room, just like the one our host broadcaster has at every venue.

'If you have to create an additional space of 2,000 sq ft, fully air-conditioned, it will bear a lot of cost. And neither the BCCI nor any of our affiliated units who would be hosting the match would bear the additional cost.'

Sad news: Jimmy Anderson in action for England

Sad news: Jimmy Anderson in action for England

An ECB source confirmed yesterday that no progress had been made to break the deadlock and all parties concede time is running out for a compromise to be reached ahead of the first Test in Ahmedabad on November 15

An ECB source confirmed yesterday that no progress had been made to break the deadlock and all parties concede time is running out for a compromise to be reached ahead of the first Test in Ahmedabad on November 15

England fast bowler James Anderson spoke for generations of devotees when he said listening to the BBC's all-night radio broadcasts from overseas was a major part of his cricketing education.

'I first became interested in England cricket listening to the TMS commentary from the 1986-87 Ashes series Down Under. I was about five at the time and it was all incredibly exciting,' he said.

'When I was growing up, Test cricket from abroad was available on Sky but we didn't have it at home, so when the 1992 World Cup was played in Australia I used to set my alarm clock to get up in the middle of the night and glue myself to the radio.'

Anderson added: 'TMS has always been a massive part of cricket in England and it would be a great shame if it went off air this winter.'

Inquest into death of Peter Roebuck

Inquest into death of former Somerset captain Roebuck adjourned

The inquest into the death of cricket writer and former Somerset captain Peter Roebuck was opened and adjourned on Wednesday.

Roebuck, 55, had been covering the
Test series between the Proteas and Australia in Cape Town, South
Africa, in November last year when it is understood he jumped from his
hotel room window.

Roebuck was reportedly questioned by police about an allegation of sexual assault prior to his death.

Apparent suicide: Peter Roebuck

In his prime: Roebuck in action during a match

Inquest adjourned: Roebuck in his second career (left) in his prime (right)

Today the Coroner for Cheshire, Nicholas Rheinberg, formally opened the inquest at Warrington Coroner's Court and then adjourned the case for a date yet to be fixed.

The inquest heard that Roebuck's family ordered a second post mortem to take place in South Africa and that Rheinberg then ordered a third post mortem which took place last Monday at Liverpool Royal Hospital.

Detective Inspector Dougie Shaw said the initial findings of the UK post mortem found injuries of 'severe blunt force trauma consistent with a fall from height'.

Shaw said the circumstances surrounding the death were still 'unclear' and that police were still trying to gather information from the South African authorities.

A spokesman for Cheshire Police said: 'The South African authorities have reported that Mr Peter Michael Roebuck, of Neston, Cheshire, died after falling from a building in Cape Town, South Africa, in November 2011.

'Whilst the full findings of the post mortem are still to be established, at this stage the indication is that Mr Roebuck did have injuries consistent with a fall.

'Cheshire Police are now conducting inquiries on behalf of HM Coroner into the circumstances of Mr Roebuck's death.'

Roebuck, who had been working for the Sydney Morning Herald and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, captained Somerset and opened the batting for much of the 1980s and passed 1,000 runs nine times in 12 seasons.

He was born in Oxford and moved to Australia and South Africa following his retirement.

Roebuck became a respected columnist for the Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and Cricinfo alongside his commentary duties.

His uniquely opinionated brand of journalism made him one of the game's best-known media men.

He travelled regularly with the Australia cricket team and split the rest of his year living between Sydney and Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

In 2001, Roebuck was handed a four-month suspended jail sentence after admitting charges of common assault against three South African teenagers, who he had caned following a coaching session.

At the time of the fall in November last year, Captain Frederick van Wyk of Cape Town Police told reporters the death was being treated as a suicide.

The South African Police Service said there was nothing to suggest foul play had been involved but that a lengthy process would need to take place before a formal cause of death could be conveyed.