Tag Archives: bremner

Luis Suarez banned for 10 games for bite on Chelsea"s Branislav Ivanovic

10 GAMES! Liverpool in the jaws of despair as Suarez slapped with huge ban for vicious bite on Ivanovic

11 MATCHES

Paolo Di Canio (Sheffield Wednesday): pushing over referee Paul Alcock in 1998

10 MATCHES

Kevin Keegan (Liverpool) and Billy Bremner (Leeds): fighting in the Charity Shield in 1974

David Putton (Southampton): pushing referee Alan Wiley in 2005

NINE MATCHES

Paul Davis (Arsenal): punching Glenn Cockerill in 1998

Steve Walsh (Leicester) discipline in 1987

Frank Sinclair (West Brom): clashing heads with the referee in 1992

EIGHT MATCHES

Luis Suarez (Liverpool): racially abusing Patrice Evra in 2011

Ben Thatcher (Manchester City): elbowing Pedro Mendes in 2006

Mark Dennis (QPR): banned in 1987 for picking up his 11th career red card

Liverpool themselves were left shocked by the decision, which sees Suarez banned for two games more than he received after being found guilty of racially abusing Patrice Evra in 2011.

The club's managing director Ian Ayre said: 'Both the club and player are shocked and disappointed at the severity of today's Independent Regulatory Commission decision.

'We await the written reasons tomorrow before making any further comment.'

The latest setback for Suarez means that since 2011, he has been banned for 26 matches, beyond the usual yellow and red cards.

He was hit with seven games at Ajax for biting Otman Bakkal, eight for the Evra incident, one more for flipping the middle finger at Fulham fans, and now 10 for biting again.

The tribunal took past behaviour and previous cases into consideration before reaching a
conclusion on Suarez, who was banned for seven games after he bit PSV
Eindhoven’s Otman Bakkal in November 2010.

Tottenham’s Jermain Defoe escaped a
long ban and fine in October 2006 as he was booked after biting Javier
Mascherano, then of West Ham. Had Suarez been booked last Sunday, the FA
would have still had the power to take him to task as the rules have
changed since then.

Having accepted the FA’s charge,
Suarez was already set to miss the trip to
Newcastle on Saturday, the Merseyside derby at Anfield on May 5 and
Liverpool’s visit to Fulham on May 12.

Liverpool were condemned for their stance over Suarez, having already been rebuked for failing to administer
their own suspension. The matter has been taken so seriously that the
Prime Minister entered the debate on Monday.

Follows him: Suarez's clash with Patrice Evra in 2011 resulted in an eight-game ban for the Liverpool man

Follows him: Suarez's clash with Patrice Evra in 2011 resulted in an eight-game ban for the Liverpool man

Follows him: Suarez's clash with Patrice Evra in 2011 resulted in an eight-game ban for the Liverpool man

GAMES SUAREZ WILL MISS

Luis Suarez will not play again for Liverpool this season. He will miss the trip to Newcastle this Saturday, the Merseyside derby at Anfield on May 5, and matches against Fulham and QPR.

Next season's fixtures are yet to be published, but it is expected that Liverpool will have seven games – six in the Premier League and one in the League Cup – by the end of September.

Suarez was fined an undisclosed amount – thought to be two weeks’ wages, a figure that equates to more than
200,000 – on Monday morning. He insisted that the money be donated to
the Hillsborough Families Support Group.

The 26-year-old was warned by Ayre that he was on his last chance at Anfield. The
Uruguay striker was found guilty by the FA in December 2011 of using
racially abusive language to Patrice Evra.

Liverpool have stressed that Suarez,
who has been strongly linked with Bayern Munich, will not be sold this
summer and have vowed to work with him to improve his behaviour.

Previous worst: (L-R) Duncan Ferguson, Ben Thatcher, Paolo Di Canio and Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan

Previous worst: (L-R) Duncan Ferguson, Ben Thatcher, Paolo Di Canio and Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan

Previous worst: (L-R) Duncan Ferguson, Ben Thatcher, Paolo Di Canio and Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan

Previous worst: (L-R) Duncan Ferguson, Ben Thatcher, Paolo Di Canio and Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan

Previous worst: (L-R) Duncan Ferguson, Ben Thatcher, Paolo Di Canio and Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan

VIDEO Liverpool's Managing Director on Suarez controversy

Liverpool to stand by Suarez

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Look, ref: Ivanovic shows his arm to referee Kevin Friend following the biting incident at Anfield yesterday

Look, ref: Ivanovic shows his arm to referee Kevin Friend following the biting incident at Anfield yesterday

Luis Suarez appears to bite Chelsea's Branislav Ivanovic

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Previous: Suarez bites Otman Bakkal of PSV while playing for Ajax

Previous: Suarez bites Otman Bakkal of PSV while playing for Ajax

Repeat The PSV star was as perplexed as Ivanovic by Suarez's behaviour

Repeat The PSV star was as perplexed as Ivanovic by Suarez's behaviour

It's not the first time Suarez has used his teeth

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OTHER SUAREZ CONTROVERSIES

Liverpool forward Luis Suarez is back in the spotlight after appearing to bite Chelsea defender Branislav Ivanovic on the arm during the 2-2 draw with Chelsea at Anfield, going on to score a late equaliser.

Here are some of the previous controversies surrounding the Uruguayan forward.

February 2007: Suarez made his international debut for Uruguay against Colombia but was sent off in the final minutes after being shown a second yellow card for dissent.

November 2007: Joined Ajax from Uruguayan side Nacional but he was later suspended by the Dutch giants after a half-time dressing-room altercation with team-mate Albert Luque.

July 2010: During the 2010 World Cup quarter-finals, Suarez prevented Ghana's Dominic Adiyiah from scoring in the final minute with a deliberate handball on the line and was subsequently sent off. A penalty was awarded but missed by Asamoah Gyan and footage showed Suarez celebrating on the sidelines. Uruguay eventually went through to the last four on penalties.

November 2010: Suarez was handed a seven-match ban by the Dutch FA and fined by his club for biting PSV Eindhoven midfielder Otman Bakkal during an Eredivisie match.

October 2011: Following his move to Liverpool in January 2011, he was involved in a tackle with Everton's Jack Rodwell and goes down with apparent minimal contact. Rodwell was then sent off.

October 2011: Suarez was alleged to have racially abused Manchester United's Patrice Evra during a Premier League match. Suarez was later found guilty by an independent regulatory commission and banned for eight matches and fined 40,000.

December 2011: Was seen making an offensive gesture towards Fulham fans. At this time he had already been charged by the Football Association over the racism incident, although not yet punished, but was handed a further one-match ban for the gesture.

February 2012: United and Liverpool met again at Old Trafford, but more controversy blew up as Suarez refused to shake Evra's hand before kick-off.

October 2012: Celebrated a goal against Everton by diving in front of Toffees boss David Moyes who had earlier claimed that 'divers' such as Suarez were putting fans off the English game.

January 2013: Handles the ball prior to scoring Liverpool's winner in the FA Cup third round tie at Mansfield.

April 2013: Bites Branislav Ivanovic on the arm but
escapes punishment on the pitch as the referee fails to see it, and
scores Liverpool's equaliser seven minutes into stoppage time as they
draw 2-2 with Chelsea at Anfield. Fined by club the following day and
charged with violent conduct by the FA. Subsequently handed a 10-match
ban by an independent regulatory commission.

Leeds v Chelsea classic clashes: It"s the neutrals" nightmare… but tonight"s tie is set to be another belter

Classic Leeds-Chelsea clashes: It's the neutrals' nightmare… but tonight's tie is set to be another belter

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UPDATED:

13:49 GMT, 19 December 2012

No one likes them, but we don't care… on this evidence tonight's clash between bitter rivals Leeds and Chelsea is set to be a classic.

It's a fixture which can lay claim to being a neutral's nightmare – you don't know who you'd rather see lose – but down the years these two titans have produced some memorable moments on the field.

Here Sportsmail picks some of our favourite moments between the Whites and the Blues, they're not necessarily the best matches but we defy you to not come over all misty-eyed at the nostalgia…

1970 – Chelsea 2-5 Leeds: 'Terry Cooper starts the goal riot'

Don Revie's famous Leeds United were 2-1 down at half-time but scored three goals in seven minutes in a remarkable turnaround that commentator Kenneth Wolstenholme described as a 'truly wonderful victory' which began when Terry Cooper started the 'goal riot'.

Check out the pitch and this rather special punditry from Johnny Giles and Sir Bobby Charlton…

1970 – FA Cup Final: Chelsea 2-2 Leeds… Replay: Chelsea 2-1 Leeds watched by 28million

It takes a special kind of fan – but most Leeds and Chelsea supporters – to appreciate the on-field brutality of the replay at Old Trafford, which was watched by a TV audience of 28 million.

Referee Eric Jennings let so much go that Hugh McIlvanney wrote: ‘At
times, it appeared that Mr Jennings would give a free-kick only on
production of a death certificate.’ There was one booking. David Elleray ‘re-refereed’ the game years later and said there should have been six reds and 20 yellows.

The Leeds great, Peter Lorimer, remarked that Chelsea ‘kicked everything above grass’. No foul was given for Eddie McCreadie’s kung-fu kick on Billy Bremner’s head. ‘It was just the way the game was played back then,’ Paul Madeley said on Monday, from Yorkshire. Fantastic stuff.

Winner: David Webb (left) heads home to win the 1970 FA Cup for Chelsea in the re0play at Old Trafford against Leeds as Terry Cooper (No 3) attempts to challenge

Winner: David Webb (left) heads home to win the 1970 FA Cup for Chelsea in the re0play at Old Trafford against Leeds as Terry Cooper (No 3) attempts to challenge

1972 – Chelsea 4-0 Leeds… but only because Lorimer was in goal

Way before the days teams could call a multi-million-pound goalkeeper off the bench, Leeds' David Harvey had to go off injured. Peter Lorimer left his right-wing posting to put the No 1 jersey on and Chelsea made hay.

It was very much a case of 'first-half good, second half not so good' for Hot-Shot Lorimer, who came over all Gary Sprake near the end.

Keep a special eye out for Peter Osgood's simply amazing sideburns – eat your heart out Bradley Wiggins – and the famous Leeds sock tassels. Classic.

Tassels and tussles: Leeds captain Billy Bremner tackles Chelsea's Steve Kember during the 1972 clash at Stamford Bridge as Johnny Giles looks on

Tassels and tussles: Leeds captain Billy Bremner tackles Chelsea's Steve Kember during the 1972 clash at Stamford Bridge as Johnny Giles looks on

1994 – Leeds 2-3 Chelsea… Whelan scores with a bicycle kick… yes, really… And Lukic gifts Chelsea win with a clanger… yes, again!

John Spencer, remember him He won this thriller for Chelsea at a sold-out Elland Road. The match had everything: A masterly performance from Gary McAllister, a Noel Whelan overhead kick, another John Lukic howler and some grand old names from the past: Philemon Masinga, Dmitri Kharine anyone

JOHN LUKIC

JOHN SPENCER

Long Johns: John Lukic (left) made a mistake in 1994 to allow John Spencer (right) to pounce for Chelsea

Bonus goals… Viduka (2008) Gudjohnsen (2003)

VIDEO: Top-class Mark Viduka finish (but take note of John Terry's awful positioning)…

MARK VIDUKA

Eidur Gudjohnsen

Goal-getters: Mark Viduka (left) and Eidur Gudjohnsen (right) became cult heroes at their clubs

Wowsers, Gudjohnsen's sensational overhead kick in January 2003 – it's no Ibra effort…

Leeds v Chelsea: A history of hatred

Leeds against Chelsea stands for the lingering hatred that is the North-South divide in the flesh

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UPDATED:

22:42 GMT, 17 December 2012

Fifteen minutes into their Barclays Premier League game at Sunderland 10 days ago, the 3,000 Chelsea fans broke into a chant. Their side were 1-0 up, after a great Fernando Torres volley.

They did not chant about Torres, though.

It was the minute before these fans sang about Roberto Di Matteo, so it was not his moment. On the touchline Rafa Benitez paced and pointed. It was the first Chelsea game after their Champions League exit; there were plenty of issues to occupy Blues thoughts.

Just the ticket: David Webb heads in the winning goal for Chelsea in the brutal 1970 FA Cup Final replay

Just the ticket: David Webb heads in the winning goal for Chelsea in the brutal 1970 FA Cup Final replay

Up for the cup: Ron Harris and John Hollins parade the trophy after the match

Up for the cup: Ron Harris and John Hollins parade the trophy after the match

Leeds, too, have issues. One of them is a collective yearning about slipping off the radar, so perhaps there is strange reassurance taken from remaining on Chelsea’s. Which is why there is so much anticipation about tomorrow night at Elland Road. For the first time in eight-and-a-half years, Leeds United play Chelsea. It is the League Cup quarter-final, but it is more than that: it is the resumption of one of English football’s most fierce rivalries.

Given that around 200 miles separate Elland Road from Stamford Bridge, this is no local derby. Yet it carries that intensity and has done for decades. This is an accepted fact in English football, yet why

It can be vicious: witness the 1970 FA Cup final replay, when referee Eric Jennings let so much go that Hugh McIlvanney wrote: ‘At times, it appeared that Mr Jennings would give a free-kick only on production of a death certificate.’

There was one booking. David Elleray ‘re-refereed’ the game years later and said there should have been six reds and 20 yellows.

Oi, ref! Ken Burns being shouted at by Leeds players Jimmy Greenhoff, Billy Bremner, Johnny Giles and Willie Bell

Oi, ref! Ken Burns being shouted at by Leeds players Jimmy Greenhoff, Billy Bremner, Johnny Giles and Willie Bell

Rout: Chelsea's Mickey Thomas is mobbed by fans after his team's 5-0 win over their rivals in 1984

Rout: Chelsea's Mickey Thomas is mobbed by fans after his team's 5-0 win over their rivals in 1984

But what did Chelsea’s supporters sing ‘We all hate Leeds and Leeds.’ It was to the tune of The Dam Busters.

In
the Midlands, Leeds United had just lost 2-1 at Derby County to sit
14th in the Championship. They were separated by 31 places from Chelsea,
in a different division.

Leeds
United have played Stockport County in League One more recently than
faced Chelsea in the top flight. But what is the first song frequently
heard from the Leeds Kop It contains the phrase: ‘Shoot the Chelsea
scum.’ That former Chelsea chairman Ken Bates is Leeds chairman does not
seem irrelevant.

Paul Reaney

Jack Charlton (right) hugs Leeds player Peter Lorimer

Famous faces: Paul Reaney (left) and Jack Charlton (right) hugging Peter Lorimer

The Leeds great, Peter Lorimer, who was never mistaken for an angel, remarked that Chelsea ‘kicked everything above grass’. No foul was given for Eddie McCreadie’s kung-fu kick on Billy Bremner’s head. ‘It was just the way the game was played back then,’ Paul Madeley said on Monday, from Yorkshire.

Then there was the last game of the 1983-84 season. Chelsea beat Leeds 5-0 at Stamford Bridge to win the old Second Division, prompting a riot as Leeds fans dismantled the scoreboard and police scurried to keep fans apart.

Yet the 1960s source of this rivalry would seem to be in sport. In 1963, Chelsea were promoted to the old First Division; in 1964, Leeds were promoted. They were coming teams brimming with talent and by 1965, both finished in the top three, behind title-winners Manchester United.

Chelsea and Leeds had become challengers, and the tension derived from just that, the challenge. Yet there was something else to this. It is fairly amazing to note that Chelsea have never bought a senior Leeds player, not one; Leeds did not sign a Chelsea player until Tony Dorigo moved to Elland Road in 1991.

Reviewing the two teams of the mid-1960s through to that volcanic 1970 Cup final, another pattern emerges: this was the North-South divide made flesh.

Both Leeds and Chelsea had Scotsmen and Irishmen in their sides but when it came to Englishmen, of the recognised great Don Revie XI, only Paul Reaney was born south of Coventry, and he grew up in Yorkshire. Jack Charlton, Madeley, Norman Hunter, Terry Cooper and Mick Jones were all Northern men, like Middlesbrough-born Revie.

As for Chelsea, their London contingent was considerable — Peter Bonetti, Ron Harris, Alan Hudson, Marvin Hinton, David Webb and Peter Houseman were all Londoners. John Hollins and Peter Osgood both came from the Home Counties.

‘From within the dressing room, of course, we were rivals and the lads would be really up for any games against Chelsea and Liverpool at that time, but off the pitch, we were all quite friendly,’ Madeley added.

‘Having said that, there was the extra North-South dimension with Chelsea, which did add a bit more fuel to the fire.’

Across the divide: Ken Bates, then chairman of Chelsea, appeals to the fans to keep off the pitch after winning promotion to Division One in 1984

Across the divide: Ken Bates, then chairman of Chelsea, appeals to the fans to keep off the pitch after winning promotion to Division One in 1984

Changing times: Roman Abramovich (right) is now the owner of Chelsea

Changing times: Roman Abramovich (right) is now the owner of Chelsea

Hollins, with 593 appearances, is as Chelsea as they come. He recalled the origin of this modern fixation. ‘In the early 60s we were an up-and-coming very young side. Leeds were the same, but a little ahead of us,’ he explained. ‘We were young, cheeky, London, Chelsea.

‘In one of my first seasons, we were unbeaten in our first 10 games and top of the league. We were running people off the pitch.

‘I remember a game at Leeds in the season of 1964-65, around this time of year — it was always this time of year at Leeds. It was tense. The game should not have been played because the pitch was iced up. We didn’t have the studs you have now. We changed ours before kick-off — we went for the leather type with little nails in them. So did they.

True blue: Hollins recalled several feisty clashes with Leeds

True blue: Hollins recalled several feisty clashes with Leeds

‘All of a sudden you had a good grip on the pitch, you could turn and play. The thing is, if you did catch anyone with a stud, you could rip a sock or something. It finished 2-2, I think. That was a day we thought, “Dirty b******s, wait ’til you come back to our place”.

‘Then, there was the semi-final of the FA Cup at Villa Park in 1967. We won 1-0. Leeds had a goal disallowed, a shot from Lorimer. The referee said the wall wasn’t back the full 10 yards! That really got them. The word “hatred” came up then, and we were at each other all the time on the pitch. We knew who to hit.’

That was April 1967. In, October Leeds got revenge, beating Chelsea 7-0 at Elland Road.

‘Leeds started like a house on fire, remembering what had gone on before,’ Hollins said. ‘They did to us what they did to Southampton that famous time. We couldn’t get near them. Bremner was their engine, their spark, brave as a lion.’

Bitterness was gathering. Hollins saw it personified in two men — Charlton and Osgood.

Tricky: Peter Osgood escaped Charlton and scored this diving header in the contentious 1970 FA Cup Final replay

Tricky: Peter Osgood escaped Charlton and scored this diving header in the contentious 1970 FA Cup Final replay

‘That was personal. Ossie used to elbow him, knock him, try to get him annoyed. Ossie was one of the best at that.

‘He enjoyed Leeds games; he got at them. And that header in the replay in Manchester was his best goal ever, I think that was his favourite goal.

‘He didn’t like Jack Charlton. At one point in the final, Ossie and Jack had a fight off the ball. The ref just waved play on.’

On Wednesday, there will be fewer Yorkshiremen and Londoners on the pitch, but the officials will need to be vigilant. The police are on alert.

But beneath the tension is a football match. As Hollins added: ‘I remember, after the first game at Wembley in 1970, we all shook hands, we never swapped shirts then.

‘I helped carry Billy Bremner off the pitch because he had cramp. Then I got cramp. We were good mates, too. It was just when the white or blue shirt went on…’

Wayne Bridge smoking on night out

Career going up in smoke Unwanted by Man City, 90,000-a-week Bridge enjoys a night out on the town… with a cheeky pack of cigarettes

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UPDATED:

12:57 GMT, 15 November 2012

If Wayne Bridge has been worried about his career going up in smoke since Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini sent him out on loan to Brighton – he's not letting it show.

The City left back – who still earns a reported 90,000 a week (or about 4.7million a year) – was pictured holding a cigarette on a night out after the Twilight premiere with his girlfriend Frankie Sandford, a pop star in band The Saturdays.

Show me the way to go home: Wayne Bridge, holding his packet of cigarettes, climbs into a taxi as

Show me the way to go home: Wayne Bridge, holding his packet of cigarettes, climbs into a taxi as

Helping hand: Frankie Sandford's sister Victoria (just about) made sure Bridge stayed on his feet

Helping hand: Frankie Sandford's sister Victoria (just about) made sure Bridge stayed on his feet

The pair went to dinner at Pan-Asian restaurant Novikov on a glamorous double date with Vanessa White and Gary Salter, before the 32-year-old emerged looking a tad worse for wear.

He clambered into a taxi carrying a packet of Marlboro cigarettes but appeared Wayne was more composed by the time they left Mahiki at 2.30am.

Newcastle looked at Bridge at the start of the summer until it became clear the money involved was out of their reach.

The other half: Bridge's missus Frankie Sandford

Night out: Bridge certainly looked as if he enjoyed himself

Out on the town: Frankie Sandford (left) and Bridge hit the capital on Wednesday night

Two clubs from Turkey contacted City, and one from Russia but Bridge has ended up at Brighton & Hove Albion.

During the summer Mancini said: 'It would be better for him if he finds a good solution in the Championship. It's important he can find a good solution for the next four months.'

Bridge, who has scored twice in 14 games for Gus Poyet's club, is not the first footballer to indulge in a spot of smoking.

Glory days: Billy Bremner (right) has a smoke in his hotel room with Leeds team-mate Jack Charlton

Glory days: Billy Bremner (right) has a smoke in his hotel room with Leeds team-mate Jack Charlton

Newcastle legend Jackie Milburn
revealed in his autobiography that, prior to the 1951 FA Cup final
against Blackpool, he went to the bathroom at Wembley to have a smoke
and found four of his team-mates had beat him to it.

After his pre-match puff, he promptly went out and scored both goals in a 2-0 Newcastle win.

More
recently, Manchester United strikers Wayne Rooney, Dimitar Berbatov,
and Federico Macheda have all been spotted with cigarettes in hand at
various times when out or on holiday.

Back in the day: Smoking was more popular when Jackie Milburn was banging them in for Newcastle

Back in the day: Smoking was more popular when Jackie Milburn was banging them in for Newcastle

Puffing away: Mario Balotelli

Ash-ley: Cole likes a smoke

Lighting up the game: Mario Balotelli (left) and Ashley Cole have been known to enjoy a smoke

El Hadji Diouf wants to become a Leeds legend

Charlton, Bremner… El Hadji Diouf wants to become Leeds great by firing club back to top-flight

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UPDATED:

10:38 GMT, 3 September 2012

Fantasy football 2012

Leeds United striker El Hadji Diouf is hoping to become one of the club's greats by firing the Championship side back into the top-flight.

The controversial Senegalese footballer signed for Neil Warnock's side on a short-term contract that will see him remain in Yorkshire until January at least.

Legendary El Hadji Diouf (right) believes he will become a Leeds great if he helps them to the Premier League

Legendary El Hadji Diouf (right) believes he will become a Leeds great if he helps them to the Premier League

The 31-year-old says that if he can help Leeds return to the Premier League he'll become a legend at a club with a rich history of truly great players like Jack Charlton and Billy Bremner.

The former Liverpool and Bolton striker, who scored in Leeds' thrilling 3-3 draw with Blackburn Rovers, said he turned down lucrative deals to move abroad in favour of battling for promotion in the npower Championship.

Diouf, who signed a 5,000 a week contract on Saturday, told the Yorkshire Post: 'It’s not about money or anything like that. It’s about the challenge.’

‘I could have gone to Qatar, Dubai or somewhere else but the challenge is bigger here. If I help get Leeds into the Premier League then I’ll be a legend. That’s the best I can do.

‘Leeds United – everyone knows them around the world. Why wouldn’t you want to help this club to be in the Premier League next season’

If promoted, Leeds will return to the Premier League for the first time since their relegation in 2004 under manager Eddie Gray.

The striker has signed a short-term contract with Leeds until January

The striker has signed a short-term contract with Leeds until January

Jack Taylor dies age 82 – Jeff Powell looks back on his life

Jack Taylor, the fearless man in black: Jeff Powell looks back at the charismatic referee's life

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UPDATED:

22:22 GMT, 27 July 2012

Jack Taylor, a referee so firm and fearless that they should have made a template in which to cast the officials of today, died on Friday at the age of 82.

Typically of the large, charismatic, man from Wolverhampton, Taylor’s most controversial moments came in the biggest match of a career spanning an extraordinary 33 years.

In 1974, in the very first minute, Taylor blew for the first penalty to be awarded in a World Cup final.

Final man: Jack Taylor the 1974 World Cup final

Final man: Jack Taylor the 1974 World Cup final

And that was in Munich, against West
Germany, in defiance of the angry thousands. Holland’s Johan Cruyff had
been pulled down and Johan Neeskens converted. West Germany captain
Franz Beckenbauer told Taylor: ‘You are an Englishman.’

Twenty-five minutes later, the
official penalised the Dutch in like manner and Paul Breitner equalised.
At half-time, Taylor was confronted by Cruyff, who accused him of
levelling it up and was booked for his pains.

Taylor strenuously denied there was
any element of compensation in the decision, just as he always explained
his verdicts frankly to the media after matches whether the authorities
liked it or not.

West Germany went on to win the World
Cup, Taylor to referee more than 1,000 English league games and 100
international matches.

His other honours included the 1966 FA Cup final and the 1971 European Cup final at Wembley in which Ajax beat Panathinaikos.

Jack the giant brooked no argument on the pitch, famously keeping the fiery likes of Billy Bremner under firm control.

World Cup ref: Jack Taylor took charge of over 1000 games

World Cup ref: Jack Taylor took charge of over 1000 games

Taylor, a true gentleman

Born: Wolverhampton, April 21, 1930.

Career: 33 years, refereeing more than 1,000 games and 100 internationals in 60 countries.

Most memorable match: 1974 World Cup final between Germany and Holland, where he awarded two penalties.

Favourite anecdote: After being struck by a coin thrown from the crowd at Luton, Eric Morecambe visited him to ask if he was OK and to see if he was going to report his club. When Jack said no, the comedian replied: ‘Good, now can I have my penny back’

It would have been interesting to see
him deal with the frothing likes of Joey Barton. There would have been
only one winner there, with Taylor standing over the little upstart and
making him look ridiculous.

Yesterday Football League chairman
Greg Clarke said: ‘Jack Taylor set the benchmark for refereeing, not
just in this country but across the world and in later life he applied
the same levels of integrity, commitment and sheer love of the game to
his other roles.

‘Very few people in football can match
the contribution he made and fewer still have managed to do it whilst
retaining the respect and admiration of absolutely everyone they have
come into contact with.’

Taylor was a man for the big occasion
and it is so characteristic of him that he should pass away hours before
the flame was lit last night at the opening ceremony for the London
2012 Olympic Games.

Football in general and refereeing
associations here and around the world will be lighting a candle to the
archetypal man in black.

Jonny Howson reveals delight at joining Norwich

Howson reveals delight at completing 2m switch to high-flying Canaries

Jonny Howson admitted he can't wait to taste Barclays Premier League football after completing his 2million move to Norwich.

The midfielder has agreed a three-and-a-half-year contract with the Canaries, who are seeking to secure their top-flight status.

Done deal: Jonny Howson poses with the Norwich shirt

Done deal: Jonny Howson poses with the Norwich shirt

Howson arrives from Leeds with a big reputation, although he revealed his pain at leaving his boyhood club.

The
23-year-old said: 'The reason is Premier League. I am going to a very
good club with good support, but at the same time I know I'm leaving a
club I've loved from being a young boy.

'That's
not going to change. Everyone at Leeds is wanting Premier League
football. The ambition is always there, but that is not guaranteed.'

Sad to go: Howson was a favourite at Championship side Leeds

Sad to go: Howson was a favourite at Championship side Leeds

Howson made his Leeds debut against Hull in 2006, before becoming the club's youngest captain since Billy Bremner when he was given the armband as a 19-year-old in 2009.

Delighted Norwich boss Paul Lambert said: 'I think he has been brilliant for Leeds – how he has played but also being their captain brings its own demands. It's a fantastic club Leeds.

'I think he can add goals to our midfield which I think we need and he can do that. He'll get better as a player the higher the level he goes up. If he does that and everything goes well, he'll be a great player for us.'