Tag Archives: breaststroke

Michael Jamieson wins 200m breaststroke silver at World Short-Course Championships in Istanbul

Jamieson follows up Olympic silver with second-placed finish at World Short-Course Championships

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UPDATED:

00:19 GMT, 15 December 2012

Michael Jamieson displayed all the hunger and desire that drove him to Olympic silver as he banished the memory of a 'hopeless' morning swim to finish second in the 200 metres breaststroke at the World Short-Course Championships in Istanbul.

It was Great Britain's third medal of the five-day competition after Hannah Miley and Jemma Lowe had claimed gold and bronze respectively on the first day at the Sinan Erdem Dome.

It was also hard-fought given the 24-year-old had only squeezed into the final as the slowest qualifier.

Jamieson was the slowest qualifier for the final after a disappointing morning

Jamieson was the slowest qualifier for the final after a disappointing morning

The Bath ITC swimmer's frustration was clear this morning but that is symptomatic of the hunger that helped drive him on when he was living in Paris without funding in an attic room so small he could stand in the middle and touch both walls and with a shower that doubled as a wardrobe.

Coming into the race it was his team-mate Andrew Willis who stood out, a new English record seeing him qualify fourth.

Tonight's line-up was loaded with quality and the pair needed to be at their best to be in the mix and with 50m to go, Jamieson was second and Willis third.

The Scot dug in, holding off the fast-finishing Russian Viatcheslav Sinkevich to lower his own British record to two minutes 03.00 seconds and claim the silver.

The Scot added World Short-Course silver to his Olympic silver medal

The Scot added World Short-Course silver to his Olympic silver medal

It also took more than three seconds off the time he had swum this morning, one he had described as 'hopeless'.

Willis was overhauled to finish fifth in 2:03.29, 0.21secs off the podium.

Jamieson said: 'It just goes to show the power of psychology.

'To be honest, after I came out of that heat I didn't even want to swim the final after seeing the result, I was just so annoyed.

'But I just went back and dressed myself down a bit – it goes to show you can race best times unrested.

'I just went it for it tonight – it was a bonus to get in so I just decided to go for it from the start.

'I didn't want to lose I guess.'

Britain's Lizzie Symonds finished fifth in the 200m backstroke

Britain's Lizzie Symonds finished fifth in the 200m backstroke

USA's Ryan Lochte was in a league of his own as he broke his 200m medley world record

USA's Ryan Lochte was in a league of his own as he broke his 200m medley world record

The race was won in a new championship record of 2:01.35 by Hungary's Daniel Gyurta, who set a world record in holding off Jamieson at the Olympics, although that was subsequently lowered by Akihiro Yamaguchi, fourth here.

Jamieson added: 'I'm getting there – I've got a collection of silver medals, the next stage is to change the colour of that.

'But Dan (Gyurta) is untouchable just now – it's about time someone closed that gap on him, I'd love to see his medal cabinet, it seems to be growing all the time.

'But fair play to him, he's been the man to beat in the last few years and he is running away with titles at the minute.'

Jamieson and Willis train alongside each other and the latter said: “There is definitely part of me that wants to be keeping up with him or beating him at the same time.

'I think deep down we're pretty competitive against each other in training and it's great, at the same time to have someone to push you.

'He is a great swimmer, he's got the medals coming in now and that is what I should be learning from.'

Another Bath swimmer, Lizzie Simmonds, was fifth in the 200m backstroke in 2:04.55.

The 21-year-old was fourth in London, after which she moved from Loughborough to embark upon a completely different training programme.

The women's 4x100m medley relay finished fourth in a British record of 3:51.85.

Jaz Carlin was fifth in the 400m freestyle (4:02.45) and Sophie Allen finished sixth in the 100m individual medley (59.03).

Ryan Lochte, the 11-time Olympic medallist, was a world apart as he lowered his own world record in the 200m individual medley to 1:49.63.

London 2012 Olympics: Tom Daley will bounce back from abuse – Ruta Meilutyte

Daley will bounce back from Twitter abuse to star at Games, says Plymouth pal Ruta

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UPDATED:

13:39 GMT, 4 August 2012

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Olympic swimming champion Ruta Meilutyte is sure her friend Tom Daley will bounce back from the abuse he received on Twitter.

A 17-year-old youth was arrested and issued with a harassment warning on Tuesday after the British teenage diver received an abusive message about his late father on the micro-blogging site.

Meilutyte shot to fame this week when she won the women's 100m breaststroke at the age of 15.

Olympians: Plymouth College students Tom Daley and Ruta Meilutyte (right)

Olympians: Plymouth College students Tom Daley and Ruta Meilutyte (right)

Agony: Daley after the men's synchronised 10m platform final

Glory: Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte poses with her gold medal

Agony and ecstasy: Daley and Meilutyte have had mixed Games so far

The Lithuanian, who attends the same training facility as Daley in Plymouth, has been following the diver's progress throughout the Olympics and is sure he will be able to block out the furore when he returns to action next week in the 10-metre individual platform.

'He is strong so those tweets won't mean anything to him,' Meilutyte said.
'There are always horrible people who will comment on things they don't know about. It's just unfortunate.

'I personally only have one parent (Meilutyte's mother died in a car accident 11 years ago) so I am kind of in a similar position to him so he's a big inspiration to me.'

Daley is currently in Southend preparing for his next appearance at the Games on Friday.

London 2012 Olympics: Great Britain"s medals

Great Britain's medal haul: All the golds, silvers and bronzes from the Olympics

PUBLISHED:

15:06 GMT, 3 August 2012

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UPDATED:

17:38 GMT, 3 August 2012

Each day we'll keep you updated with all the latest medals for Team GB – plus all the pictures of the medallists in our gallery below…

GOLD

Day five, Helen Glover and Heather Stanning, rowing, women's pair.
Day five, Bradley Wiggins, cycling, men's time trial.
Day six, Etienne Stott and Tim Baillie, canoe slalom, C2.
Day six, Peter Wilson, shooting, men's double trap.
Day six, Chris Hoy, Philip Hindes and Jason Kenny, cycling, men's team sprint.
Day seven, Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins, rowing, women's double sculls.
Day seven, Ed Clancy, Geraint Thomas, Steven Burke and Peter Kennaugh, cycling, men's team pursuit.

SILVER

Day two, Lizzie Armitstead, cycling, women's road race.
Day four, Tina Cook, William Fox-Pitt, Mary King, Zara Phillips, Nicola
Wilson, eventing equestrian, team.
Day five, Michael Jamieson, swimming, men's 200m breaststroke.
Day six, Peter Chambers, Rob Williams, Richard Chambers, Chris Bartley, rowing, lightweight men's four.
Day six, David Florence and Richard Hounslow, canoe slalom, C2.
Day six, Gemma Gibbons, judo, women's -78kg.

BRONZE

Day two, Rebecca Adlington, swimming, women's 400m freestyle.
Day three, Louis Smith, Max Whitlock, Daniel Purvis, Sam Oldham and Kristian Thomas, gymnastics, men's team.
Day five, Alex Partridge, James Foad, Tom Ransley, Richard Egington, Mohamed Sbihi, Greg Searle, Matthew Langridge, Constantine Louloudis, Phelan Hill, rowing, men's eight.
Day five, Chris Froome, cycling, men's time trial.
Day seven, George Nash and William Satch, rowing, men's pair.
Day seven, Alan Campbell, rowing, men's single sculls.
Day seven, Karina Bryant, judo, women's +78kg.

Great Britain's medal winners

BRONZE: Alan Campbell, men's single sculls
BRONZE: Alan Campbell, men's single sculls

BRONZE: Alan Campbell, men's single sculls

GOLD: Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins women's double sculls

BRONZE: William Satch and George Nash, men's pair rowing

GOLD: (L-R) Sir Chris Hoy, Jason Kenny and Philip Hindes, men's team sprint track cycling

GOLD: Tim Baillie (L) and Etienne Stott, men's canoe double

SILVER: David Florence and Richard Hounslow, men's canoe double

GOLD: Peter Wilson, double trap shooting

SILVER: Gemma Gibbons, women's -78kg Judo

SILVER: Chris Bartley, Richard Chambers, Rob Williams and Peter Chambers, lightweight men's four

SILVER: Michael Jamieson, men's 200m breaststroke

BRONZE: Christopher Froome, men's individual time trial

GOLD: Bradley Wiggins, men's individual time trial

GOLD: Helen Glover (left) and Heather Stanning, womens pair rowing

BRONZE: James Foad, Tom Ransley, Richard Egington, Matt Langridge, Alex Partridge, Mo Sbihi, Phelan Hill, Greg Searle and Constantine Louloudis, mens eight rowing

SILVER: (from left) Nicola Wilson, Zara Phillips, William Fox-Pitt, Mary King and Kristina Cook,team eventing

SILVER: Lizzie Armitstead, women's road race

BRONZE: Sam Oldham, Kristian Thomas, Max Whitlock, Louis Smith and Daniel Purvis, men's artistic gymnastics

BRONZE: Karina Bryant, +78kg Judo

BRONZE: Rebecca Adlington, 400m freestyle

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Great Britain's medal winners

BRONZE: Alan Campbell, men's single sculls

GOLD: Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins women's double sculls

BRONZE: William Satch and George Nash, men's pair rowing

GOLD: (L-R) Sir Chris Hoy, Jason Kenny and Philip Hindes, men's team sprint track cycling

GOLD: Tim Baillie (L) and Etienne Stott, men's canoe double

SILVER: David Florence and Richard Hounslow, men's canoe double

GOLD: Peter Wilson, double trap shooting

SILVER: Gemma Gibbons, women's -78kg Judo

SILVER: Chris Bartley, Richard Chambers, Rob Williams and Peter Chambers, lightweight men's four

SILVER: Michael Jamieson, men's 200m breaststroke

BRONZE: Christopher Froome, men's individual time trial

GOLD: Bradley Wiggins, men's individual time trial

GOLD: Helen Glover (left) and Heather Stanning, womens pair rowing

BRONZE: James Foad, Tom Ransley, Richard Egington, Matt Langridge, Alex Partridge, Mo Sbihi, Phelan Hill, Greg Searle and Constantine Louloudis, mens eight rowing

SILVER: (from left) Nicola Wilson, Zara Phillips, William Fox-Pitt, Mary King and Kristina Cook,team eventing

SILVER: Lizzie Armitstead, women's road race

BRONZE: Sam Oldham, Kristian Thomas, Max Whitlock, Louis Smith and Daniel Purvis, men's artistic gymnastics

BRONZE: Karina Bryant, +78kg Judo

BRONZE: Rebecca Adlington, 400m freestyle

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LONDON OLYMPICS 2012: Rebecca Adlington ready to make history

Rebecca ready to make history with another Olympic triumph

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UPDATED:

22:32 GMT, 2 August 2012

Even Rebecca Adlington, so reluctant until now to discuss her pursuit of a third Olympic title, recognises the importance of Friday night.

She spoke of ‘history’ on Thursday, and acknowledged it is ‘all about Friday night’. Not just for her but for British swimming at these Games.

After the failure thus far of her female team-mates to turn talent into something tangible, Adlington represents Great Britain’s last realistic chance of taking gold — in her best event, the 800m freestyle.

Water star she is: Adlington will go for gold again on Friday

Water star she is: Adlington will go for gold again on Friday

She also has the chance to become the first British swimmer to successfully defend an Olympic title. There is this real sense that the golden girl of Beijing needs to give the fans who have made the Aquatics Centre such a special venue what they have really been craving all along.

Night after night, the swimming has provided a terrific spectacle. From Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte to Ye Shiwen, Ruta Meilutyte and Yannick Agnel, it has not between without its drama or controversy.

But a bronze for Adlington, 23, in the 400m freestyle and a surprise silver for Michael Jamieson in the 200m breaststroke is all the GB team have to show for their efforts.

They love you, Rebecca: Adlington waves to the crowd after winning her 800m freestyle heat

They love you, Rebecca: Adlington waves to the crowd after winning her 800m freestyle heat

So Adlington’s battle for gold with Dane Lotte Friis is vital and could be a classic. ‘Me and Lotte are friends because we’ve been racing each other since the European juniors in 2004,’ said Adlington.

‘It’s always been us two. It’s been one of us and then the other the next year, but hopefully that doesn’t mean it’s her turn this time after I won the world’s in 2011.’

Before that Friis took the 2009 world title in Rome on a day when Adlington came fourth. But the Briton is expectant, adding: ‘Hopefully I can make history.’

If she does, the Aquatics Centre will erupt like never before.

London 2012 Olympcis: Plymouth schoolgirl Ruta Meilutyte wins swimming gold for Lithuania

Plymouth schoolgirl wins swimming gold… but it's for Lithuania

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UPDATED:

08:36 GMT, 31 July 2012

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After losing his wife and the mother of his three children, Saulius Meilutis decided to move his family from Lithuania to England for a better life.

He had two sons, both now at university, and a young daughter with a special gift for swimming.

That daughter is 15-year-old Ruta Meilutyte, and here in London she is taking the Olympics by storm. On Monday she set a new European record for the 100 metres breaststroke, swimming the fastest time in the world this year to secure her place in the final. /07/30/article-2181300-144C330C000005DC-453_634x395.jpg” width=”634″ height=”395″ alt=”Golden girl: Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte celebrates winning the women's 100m breaststroke ” class=”blkBorder” />

Golden girl: Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte celebrates winning the women's 100m breaststroke

But in her semi-final she was half a second quicker than Soni, the pre-Games favourite for gold and the Olympic champion over 200m four years ago, with a time of 1:05.21. Last night she was a fraction slower, touching in 1:05.47sec before dissolving in tears at the medal ceremony.

Prominent members of the American media were among the first to raise an eyebrow and draw comparisons with the 16-year-old Chinese swimming sensation, Ye Shiwen.

Even her English coach expressed his surprise a few hours before last night’s final.

John Rudd, the director of swimming at Plymouth College and the head coach at Plymouth Leander swimming club, told Sportsmail yesterday he expected her to swim 1:06. ‘When she swam 1:05 in the heat yesterday, I thought, “OK, we may have to re-evaluate what we are looking to achieve here”,’ he said.

Medal of honour: Meilutyte holds her gold medal

Medal of honour: Meilutyte holds her gold medal

‘It has no effect on Ruta. She didn’t know she had set a European record. She is just treating this like the Devon Championships. But she’s a major talent and hugely focused and professional for her age.’

She arrived in England with her family three years ago and was immediately enrolled at Plymouth College — the same school as British diving star Tom Daley.

Her father earns a modest salary as a carer, with her school fees covered by a sports scholarship from the school and a grant from the Lithuanian Olympic Federation.

Rudd is here in London as an official member of the Lithuanian coaching staff, so that he can remain at the side of his outstanding young athlete.

Plymouth College Olympians: Tom Daley with Ruta Meilutyte (right)

Plymouth College Olympians: Tom Daley with Ruta Meilutyte (right)

He is quick to dismiss talk of her performances being down to anything other than hard graft and ability. ‘Ruta has grown up in the last year,’ he said. ‘The physical change between 14 and 15 has, like with lots of kids, been significant. She’s filled out a lot since she won the Youth Olympics.

‘Hey look, there are some people about who don’t like getting beaten. Everyone has their good days and bad days, and if the Americans are having a bad day, I’m afraid that is hard luck.’

Rudd tells the story of an immensely gifted 15-year-old who simply lives for swimming and whose improvement is on a curve of improvement regarded as acceptable in coaching circles. Meilutyte is not obliterating world records and swimming faster than the men.

‘I have four Olympians in my group but Ruta has actually raised the bar in terms of professionalism,’ said Rudd. ‘Swimming is the most important thing in her life, and she doesn’t have that British trait of not being prepared to put the work in for what she wants.

Happy family: Meilutyte with her father, grandmother and two brothers

Happy family: Meilutyte with her father, grandmother and two brothers

‘She has a natural gift, but she is psychologically as well as physically strong. She is not fazed by any of this at all. She has a process mind. It’s like “sleep, eat, train, study”. She has friends but she doesn’t touch alcohol and she is the one who will be home by 10 o’clock.’

According to reports in Lithuania, her mother was killed when she was hit by a car when Ruta was just four years old.

‘Ruta cherishes every day of her life,’ said Rudd. ‘Her father has brought her up with the help of her grandmother, who is here after getting on a plane for the first time in her life.

‘They are humble people. There is no silver spoon in Ruta’s mouth. She has a fantastic sense of humour but she appreciates what she has and she works hard for what she achieves.’

Last night that hard work most certainly paid off. After a rival false-started, Meilutyte led from the start, turning in first place and holding off a late surge from Soni.

It was so close she had to check the scoreboard to see if she had won, and her face was a picture of stunned amazement when the one appeared alongside her name.

Even after Daley’s failure yesterday, Plymouth College still had an Olympic gold medal to cherish.

London 2012 Olympcis: Plymouth schoolgirl Saulius Meilutis wins swimming gold for Lithuania

Plymouth schoolgirl wins swimming gold… but it's for Lithuania

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UPDATED:

21:41 GMT, 30 July 2012

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After losing his wife and the mother of his three children, Saulius Meilutis decided to move his family from Lithuania to England for a better life.

He had two sons, both now at university, and a young daughter with a special gift for swimming.

That daughter is 15-year-old Ruta Meilutyte, and here in London she is taking the Olympics by storm. On Monday she set a new European record for the 100 metres breaststroke, swimming the fastest time in the world this year to secure her place in the final. /07/30/article-2181300-144C330C000005DC-453_634x395.jpg” width=”634″ height=”395″ alt=”Golden girl: Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte celebrates winning the women's 100m breaststroke ” class=”blkBorder” />

Golden girl: Lithuania's Ruta Meilutyte celebrates winning the women's 100m breaststroke

But in her semi-final she was half a second quicker than Soni, the pre-Games favourite for gold and the Olympic champion over 200m four years ago, with a time of 1:05.21. Last night she was a fraction slower, touching in 1:05.47sec before dissolving in tears at the medal ceremony.

Prominent members of the American media were among the first to raise an eyebrow and draw comparisons with the 16-year-old Chinese swimming sensation, Ye Shiwen.

Even her English coach expressed his surprise a few hours before last night’s final.

John Rudd, the director of swimming at Plymouth College and the head coach at Plymouth Leander swimming club, told Sportsmail yesterday he expected her to swim 1:06. ‘When she swam 1:05 in the heat yesterday, I thought, “OK, we may have to re-evaluate what we are looking to achieve here”,’ he said.

Medal of honour: Meilutyte holds her gold medal

Medal of honour: Meilutyte holds her gold medal

‘It has no effect on Ruta. She didn’t know she had set a European record. She is just treating this like the Devon Championships. But she’s a major talent and hugely focused and professional for her age.’

She arrived in England with her family three years ago and was immediately enrolled at Plymouth College — the same school as British diving star Tom Daley.

Her father earns a modest salary as a carer, with her school fees covered by a sports scholarship from the school and a grant from the Lithuanian Olympic Federation.

Rudd is here in London as an official member of the Lithuanian coaching staff, so that he can remain at the side of his outstanding young athlete.

Plymouth College Olympians: Tom Daley with Ruta Meilutyte (right)

Plymouth College Olympians: Tom Daley with Ruta Meilutyte (right)

He is quick to dismiss talk of her performances being down to anything other than hard graft and ability. ‘Ruta has grown up in the last year,’ he said. ‘The physical change between 14 and 15 has, like with lots of kids, been significant. She’s filled out a lot since she won the Youth Olympics.

‘Hey look, there are some people about who don’t like getting beaten. Everyone has their good days and bad days, and if the Americans are having a bad day, I’m afraid that is hard luck.’

Rudd tells the story of an immensely gifted 15-year-old who simply lives for swimming and whose improvement is on a curve of improvement regarded as acceptable in coaching circles. Meilutyte is not obliterating world records and swimming faster than the men.

‘I have four Olympians in my group but Ruta has actually raised the bar in terms of professionalism,’ said Rudd. ‘Swimming is the most important thing in her life, and she doesn’t have that British trait of not being prepared to put the work in for what she wants.

Happy family: Meilutyte with her father, grandmother and two brothers

Happy family: Meilutyte with her father, grandmother and two brothers

‘She has a natural gift, but she is psychologically as well as physically strong. She is not fazed by any of this at all. She has a process mind. It’s like “sleep, eat, train, study”. She has friends but she doesn’t touch alcohol and she is the one who will be home by 10 o’clock.’

According to reports in Lithuania, her mother was killed when she was hit by a car when Ruta was just four years old.

‘Ruta cherishes every day of her life,’ said Rudd. ‘Her father has brought her up with the help of her grandmother, who is here after getting on a plane for the first time in her life.

‘They are humble people. There is no silver spoon in Ruta’s mouth. She has a fantastic sense of humour but she appreciates what she has and she works hard for what she achieves.’

Last night that hard work most certainly paid off. After a rival false-started, Meilutyte led from the start, turning in first place and holding off a late surge from Soni.

It was so close she had to check the scoreboard to see if she had won, and her face was a picture of stunned amazement when the one appeared alongside her name.

Even after Daley’s failure yesterday, Plymouth College still had an Olympic gold medal to cherish.

Alexander Dale Oen found dead in bathroom

Norwegian Olympic star Dale Oen found dead in bathroom just three months before Games

PUBLISHED:

12:36 GMT, 1 May 2012

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UPDATED:

12:50 GMT, 1 May 2012

Tragedy: Alexander Dale Oen with his gold medal after winning the men's 100m breaststroke at the World Championships in Shanghai

Tragedy: Alexander Dale Oen with his gold medal after winning the men's 100m breaststroke at the World Championships in Shanghai

Norway's world 100m breaststroke champion Alexander Dale Oen has tragically died.

Dale Oen, who was 26, was in Arizona at a training camp where he is reported to have had a cardiac arrest in the shower.

The Norwegian team is holding the
camp in Flagstaff ahead of the Olympics, and the federation said Dale
Oen had only take part in a light training session on Monday, as well as
playing some golf that day.

But team-mates became worried when
the swimmer spent an unusually long time in the shower, and entered his
bathroom when he failed to respond to their knocks on the door.

He was taken to the Flagstaff Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

Dale Oen won the 100m breaststroke at the World Championships in Shanghai last July, three years after claiming Olympic silver in Beijing.

He was one of Norway's top hopes for success at this summer's Olympic Games in London.

Per Rune Eknes, the president of the Norwegian Swimming Federation, said: 'This is just awful, especially for the family and close friends, and also the sport of swimming.'

Norway Coach Petter Loevberg added: 'We’re all in shock. This is an out-of-the-body experience for the whole team over here. Our thoughts primarily go to his family who have lost Alexander way too early.'

Superstar: Dale Oen was tipped for glory at London 2012

Superstar: Dale Oen was tipped for glory at London 2012

Dale Oen's triumph in Shanghai came
just three days after the massacre in Norway by right-wing extremist
Anders Breivik that killed 77 people.

Dale Oen dedicated the win to the
victims of that massacre, pointing to the Norwegian flag on his cap
after the finish to send a message to his countrymen back home.

'We need to stay united,' he said
after the race. 'Everyone back home now is of course paralysed with what
happened but it was important for me to symbolise that even though I’m
here in China, I’m able to feel the same emotions.'

The federation said they found Dale Oen 'laying partly on the floor, partly on the edge of his bathtub.'

Team doctor Ola Roensen said he immediately began performing CPR until an ambulance arrived.

Roensen said:
'Everything was done according to procedure, and we tried everything,
so it is immensely sad that we were not able to resuscitate him. It is
hard to accept.'

London 2012 Olympics: Fran Halsall qualifies for 100m freestyle

Halsall's pretty in pink as she secures her Olympic spot in the 100m freestyle

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UPDATED:

21:12 GMT, 8 March 2012

Former world silver medallist Fran Halsall was the centre of attention at the Olympic trials on Thursday night after she won the 100 metres freestyle leading from the front in a bright pink suit.

Halsall was inside Commonwealth record pace at the halfway stage and although she could not maintain that, her time of 53.57 seconds was well within that required with fellow Loughborough ITC swimmer Amy Smith joining her on the Great Britain team.

Joe Roebuck qualified in his third event when he won the 200m individual medley with Commonwealth champion James Goddard also booking a slot.

Thumbs up: Fran Halsall secured her place in the Olympics for the 100m freestyle

Thumbs up: Fran Halsall secured her place in the Olympics for the 100m freestyle

Stacey Tadd made it on to the team in the 200m breaststroke.

Halsall's time sent her to the top of the world rankings although this has limited significance considering Britain are the first major nation to hold their trials.

Once Australia's equivalent begin next week, it will become clearer where home swimmers stand.

The 21-year-old said: 'I'm a bit disappointed with the time if I'm honest, I thought I'd go a bit faster than that tonight.

'But I've never gone that fast in Britain before and its the fastest I've ever been at this time of year so I can only take good things from that.

Going for gold: Joseph Roebuck (centre) with James Goddard (right) and Ieuan Lloyd

Going for gold: Joseph Roebuck (centre) with James Goddard (right) and Ieuan Lloyd

'My coach always says 'Fran, you never really turn up until the summer' so hopefully I'll be able to go faster come the Games. Now I am on the team I can just totally focus on that.

The Southport-born swimmer did not have it all her own way with Smith much improved in 54.01 and for Halsall that also bodes well for the sprint freestyle

'She swam really well tonight, all the girls are really bringing it down so it's looking really good for the relay on the first day, it's making me all excited.'

Of her Arena suit, she said: 'I think I get a 10 for fashion tonight' before claiming her father could now identify her in the pool.

Making a splash: Goddard in the 200m Medley

Making a splash: Goddard in the 200m Medley

Smith said: 'It's the first Olympics I've qualified for and I'm absolutely over the moon but I would have loved to have done a 53. I'm a bit speechless to be honest to know that I'll be racing against the best girls in the world.'

Goddard was under Commonwealth record pace at the final turn in the individual medley tonight but he visibly tired and was caught by Roebuck, finishing 0.26 behind the Loughborough ITC swimmer's time of 1:58.16.

Roebuck added the 200m event to the longer medley and 200m butterfly slots he had already booked.

He said: 'It's been great this week. Tonight was all about making the team.'

Goddard is concentrating on the medley after a shoulder injury forced him to give up the 200m backstroke. The 28-year-old was fourth by 0.10 behind European record holder Laszlo Cseh at last year's World Championships in Shanghai.

However, Goddard tonight revealed he had had to overcome illnesses, the details of which he did not disclose.

He said: 'It's not something I really want to talk about right now. I might talk about it closer to the Olympics but I've not had the best preparation.

'I've had some illnesses I will probably talk about in the future but right now I am just relieved and happy to have made the team.'

Goddard added: 'I'm really excited about the time I've done here. I didn't expect to go that quick considering my preparation, so really chuffed and relieved.'

Tadd held off the fast-finishing Renshaw in the 200m breaststroke.

The 23-year-old attacked from the outset but 15-year-old Renshaw, the baby of the team in Shanghai, paced her race well and appeared poised to touch first. However, Tadd held on to touch in 2:26.63, within the qualifying time, with Renshaw 0.18 adrift.

Nineteen-year-old Calum Jarvis won the 200m backstroke ahead of Marco Loughran and Chris Walker-Hebborn. However, his time of 1:59.48 was exactly a second outside Olympic qualification.

Hannah Miley records another faster time of the year to show Olympic pedigree in 200m medley

Miley records another faster time of the year to show Olympic pedigree in 200m medley

Hannah Miley put on another impressive display at the Olympic Aquatics Centre, recording the fastest time in the world this year for the second time in a matter of days.

In what is supposed to be her slightly weaker event, the 200m individual medley, the 22-year-old pilot’s daughter touched in 2min 10.77sec — a time quicker than she managed last season and one that will certainly make her rivals take note.

Miley: fastest time in 2012

Miley: fastest time in 2012

Miley, who trains in a 25metre pool in Aberdeenshire, is a supreme breaststroke swimmer and surged past the field on the third leg of the four-lap race.

She had such a commanding lead by the time she reached the turn that she was able to cruise home in the final freestyle lap at the British Gas Championships.

‘I recently watched an interview from 2006 when I stated that the breaststroke was my weakest stroke,’ said Miley. ‘We have worked on it since then.’

On her way: Miley

On her way: Miley

Sophie Allen smashed her personal best to join Miley in qualifying for the Olympics.

Her time of 2:11.71 was the third fastest in the world this year and lifted her to second in the British all-time list. Joseph Roebuck recorded the year’s fastest 200m butterfly time with 1:55.94.

London 2012 Olympics: Why the Aquatics Centre pool should be a record-breaker

The need for speed: Why the Aquatics Centre pool should be a record-breaker

The British Championships take place this weekend at the Aquatics Centre in Stratford where the trials for places at this summer's Olympics get under way to decide who makes the grade.

Here Sportsmail takes you inside the venue and explains the technology behind the state-of-the-art facility and why it will be one of the fastest pools in the world.

Aquatics Centre: The science behind the venue

Aquatics Centre: The science behind the venue

THERE WILL BE HEARTBREAK…

Of the key battles this week, four events look like they will provide the most drama. Only two spaces for London 2012 are available for each race.

Women's fly 100m

Fran Halsall, Ellen Gandy, Jemma Lowe – Halsall looks least likely to qualify in her weakest event. Lowe reached the final at the World Championships in Shanghai and Gandy managed fifth.

Women's fly 200m

Gandy, Lowe, Jess Dickons – Gandy narrowly missed out on gold in Shanghai, Lowe finished seventh and Dickons won gold at the World University Games.

Women’s free style 400m

Rebecca Adlington, Jo Jackson, Jazz Carlin – Adlington will surely qualify and Wales' Carlin will hope to edge second place ahead of Jackson, the 2008 Olympic bronze medallist, whose form has varied.

Men's Breaststroke 100m and 200m

Michael Jamieson, Andrew Willis, Kris Gilchrist – Three friends train at a club in Bath but one will have to miss out for eachevent. Too close to call.