Tag Archives: brazilians

England v Brazil: Greatest Brazilian players

Zico spraying passes in midfield, Pele's lethal finishing and Cafu's marauding runs from right back… ahead of England v Brazil, Sportsmail recalls the greatest Samba stars

PUBLISHED:

13:14 GMT, 5 February 2013

|

UPDATED:

16:04 GMT, 5 February 2013

As the next generation of Brazilian players prepare to take on England at Wembley tomorrow night. Sportsmail's writers reveal their favourite Samba stars.

From Pele to Zico; from Ronaldo to Neymar, the South American country has delivered world class players for decades.

Do you agree with our experts Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

GARRINCHA

JEFF POWELL: Garrincha
is the player who most Brazilians regard as being their greatest,
greater than Pele. They have a point. Pele was dynamic but Garrincha was
beautiful to behold, the most exquisite player on the ball and a
goalscorer with flourish as well as power. He was almost impossible to
read on the dribble as a consequence of the rickets which afflicted him
in his impoverished youth and made him virtually double jointed at the
knee. A bon viveur, he used to go back to his home town after Brazil
matches at the Maracana to drink with the boys and kickabout with the
kids. A genius and a true man of the people.

JOHN GREECHAN:
Born crippled and left with one crooked leg even after restorative
surgery, the little winger looked as if he was forever swaying in a
strong breeze. The little footage that survives shows, however, that he
most often left opponents twisting in the wind. Oh, and he was Pele’s
hero. Enough said.

ZICO

MARK ALFORD: What a name, what a player. He floated around the pitch in his sweat-stained golden shirt, socks rolled down to his ankles, spraying passes about like a Latino Glenn Hoddle. He scored 52 goals in 72 international appearances… FROM MIDFIELD! It wouldn’t have been the same if they’d called him by his real name, Arthur. Gooooooooooooal Ziiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiico.

Zico

Legend: Brazil's Zico leaps for joy after scoring against Scotland in the 1982 World Cup

Main man: Zico ran the show from midfield, scoring 52 goals in just 72 internationals for Brazil

LEE CLAYTON: My PE teacher at school – the brilliant and inspiring Phil Rider –
was nicknamed after him (well, he nicknamed himself!). He’d sign the
team sheet ‘Zico’ and seeing as I was usually sub, I was closest to the
‘sign-off’. It was the closest I got to being near Zico. That midfield
of Zico, Socrates and Falcao in 1982 was something magnificent. Roberto
Carlos is another sensation. He redefined playing at left back. I
interviewed Pele once and he was funny, charming and classy. And of the
modern team I like David Luiz. Can I keep going Sorry, I was only meant
to say one: so it’s Zico.

MATT BARLOW: Star of the first Brazilian team to come into my orbit and the
very essence of what Brazilian football seemed to be about: making
passes with the outside of the boot, bending the ball and scoring
sensational free-kicks with a No.10 on his back. That said, my abiding
memory of him is the penalty miss against France in Mexico 86.

PELE

MATT LAWLESS: His four goals at the tail end of 2009-10 season helped West Ham survive in the Premier League but no, Ilan is NOT my all-time favourite Brazilian. That honour goes to the unrivalled legend, Pele. Sadly, I never saw him play in the flesh yet his overhead kick goal in Escape to Victory will live long in my memory. Absolutely Brazil-liant!

JOHN EDWARDS: Ronaldinho, at his peak, was virtually unstoppable, but, overall, it has
to be Pele. Brazil circa 1970 boasted the greatest array of attacking
talent ever assembled, yet they all looked up to him. He was player of
the tournament in that year’s World Cup in Mexico, and he launched an
unsurpassable display of Brazilian brilliance with the opening goal in a
4-1 final win over Italy. As well as being the youngest player to
appear in a World Cup final, when he scored twice in a 5-2 win over
hosts Sweden in 1958 aged 17, he is the only holder of three World Cup
winner’s medals. Immense in every way.

STEVE CURRY: Pele stands out for me as a complete footballer who combined all the
natural gifts that have become associated with Brazilian footballers,
skill, grace, pace, freedom of expression and the ability to score great
goals. He was a wonderful player to watch live with his lithe movement –
a true match winner.

ROMARIO

MIKE ANSTEAD: Now this guy could finish. Toe pokes, curlers, dinks – Romario could do it all. And the ball usually ended up in the back of the net.

At the 1994 World Cup, he was unstoppable. Ronaldo, then a relatively-unknown 17-year-old with a goofy smile, was stuck on the bench watching the master in action as Brazil won the tournament for the first time since 1970.

Ronaldo would eventually take his crown as Brazil’s and Barcelona’s goal king. But Romario motored on, going on to score over 1,000 goals by the end of his career.

CAFU

LUKE BENEDICT: Not because he is the most capped Brazilian of all time, or because he played such a significant role in putting two of the five stars on the iconic shirt, but simply because of the way he controlled a football. With a single shoelace he could stop a spinning bullet and land it on a 5p coin. It was mesmeric.

SAMI MOKBEL: Pioneer of the modern day right-back. As good in the attacking
third as he was in his own box. Changed the conception of what was
needed to be a top-level full-back. Brilliant player.

Marauding: Cafu is the most capped Brazilian of all time and appeared in three World Cup finals, winning two

Marauding: Cafu is the most capped Brazilian of all time and appeared in three World Cup finals, winning two

RONALDO

PHIL GRADWELL: The original Ronaldo. The Nineties version was one of the best strikers of all time, combining frightening speed with a superb touch, immense power and the ability to score from all angles. This was best exemplified by his goal for Barcelona v Compostela in 1996, where he ran 60 yards, beat half the opposition and scored. The scorer of the most World Cup goals (15), even when his weight started becoming an issue he could still produce performances like the one for Real Madrid at Old Trafford in 2003. There’s only one Ronaldo…

ALEX HORLOCK: The first player who I was truly enamoured by as a child was a young striker who led the line for Barcelona back in 1996. Ronaldo was a colossus up front for a number of other clubs – and, of course, his country – but as an eight-year-old boy I was fascinated by the unstoppable striker who terrorised defences time and again. He was strong, quick, immensely skilful, a clinical finisher and his legs were the size of tree trunks. What more could you want

ROBERTO CARLOS

ADAM SHERGOLD: Everyone remembers the first time they saw that brilliant flash of Brazilian yellow – whether in person or on their TV screens. For me, it was that physics-defying free-kick of the millennium by Roberto Carlos against France at Le Tournoi in 1997.

Surely it was impossible to generate such a shot of such bend and strength to locate the net like a laser-guided missile – but Carlos managed it. He was also a player who redefined his role on the pitch – talk about defenders as frustrated strikers!

RIK SHARMA: Not as technically talented as some of the greatest Samba stars, but so unequivocally Brazilian in his willingness to attack. The former Real Madrid star was renowned for his thunderbolt shooting which, as well as worrying goalkeepers in real life, terrified my brother during countless football videogame sessions.

KAKA

ANDREW MAGEE: Fewer tricks and flicks than your typical Brazilian but still immaculate on the ball. His destruction of Man Utd in the Champions League semi final in 2007 sticks out, a potent combination of lethal finishing and graceful playmaking. He doesn’t run, he glides. Don’t believe me See his wonderful solo goal against Argentina where he even outpaces the great Lionel Messi.

NEYMAR

BRIAN LEE: It feels wrong going for any player other than Ronaldo but for me it’s Neymar. With his ridiculous hair and socks pulled up far too high it should be easy to dislike him but I’ve watched him live and have never seen quicker feet. There’s one goal on YouTube (against Flamengo and winner of the Puskas Award for 2011) that has everything. Pace, powerful running and a brilliant one-two. I’ve played it, slowed down, again and again and I’m still as confused as the defender he waltzed past before finishing.

JOSE LEANDRO FERREIRA

IAN LADYMAN: The team that Brazil took to the 1982 World Cup in Spain was the first that I really remember. I was 12 at the time and was captivated by the way they played the game. I was a right-back for my school team at the time – we won ONCE in five years – and decided I would model myself on the defender they called Leandro. Full of attacking intent, he spent more time in the opposition half than he did in his own and at times seemed to simply play as a second right winger. My PE teacher didn’t appreciate it when I tried to do the same. Leandro only played for one team – Flamengo – in a 12-year domestic career. I also only played for one team. For different reasons.

JUNINHO

COLIN YOUNG: Having watched him transform a small town and club and establish himself as Middlesbrough’s greatest ever player I’m going to say Juninho. He was quite simply a genius and absolute joy to watch.

JOSIMAR

DOMINIC KING: The 1986 World Cup is the first major tournament I really remember vividly. Mexico may have ended up belonging to Diego Maradona but, before the World Cup began, my Dad told me to make sure I watched Brazil when I could. The first game was against Northern Ireland and Josimar, making his debut at right-back, scored with an outrageous strike against Northern Ireland. He was the first Brazilian to grab my attention, so gets the vote.

Lucas Piazon blasts Chelsea teammates after Club World Cup disappointment

You're not bothered like us Brazilians! Piazon blasts Chelsea teammates as Cahill's out of Leeds clash after red card

|

UPDATED:

23:03 GMT, 16 December 2012

Chelsea teenager Lucas Piazon today launched a scathing attack on his team-mates for their ‘unacceptable’ lack of effort during the defeat by Corinthians.

The 18-year-old forward, voted the club’s young player of the year in May, said only his Brazilian compatriots demonstrated any will to win the Club World Cup.

Piazon, an unused substitute in Japan, was reported on Brazilian website UOL Esporte as saying: ‘We didn’t have desire to be champions. I think only David Luiz and Ramires, the Brazilians, showed willpower. That’s why they’re sad.

Scathing attack: Lucas Piazon blasted his Chelsea teammates for their 'unacceptable' lack of effort in the Club World Cup final with Corinthians

Scathing attack: Lucas Piazon blasted his Chelsea teammates for their 'unacceptable' lack of effort in the Club World Cup final with Corinthians

Smiling no more: The Brazilian (left), pictured arriving in Japan with compatriot Ramires, didn't get off the bench in the tournament

Smiling no more: The Brazilian (left), pictured arriving in Japan with compatriot Ramires, didn't get off the bench in the tournament

‘The team went to the pitch with no desire. It’s unacceptable. I noticed David was sad. He was one of the few players that showed something in the game.’

Both Ramires and Luiz, who was named as second best player of the tournament, were in tears after the game as the Brazilian side became the first South American team to win the Club World Cup for six years.

Benched: Piazon (second left) could only watch as Chelsea were beaten 1-0 by the South American champions Corinthians

Benched: Piazon (second left) could only watch as Chelsea were beaten 1-0 by the South American champions Corinthians

Piazon, the inspiration behind Chelsea’s FA Youth Cup win last season, has started both of the club’s Capital One Cup matches this season but it remains to be seen if he will feature in Wednesday’s quarter-final against Leeds — little more than 24 hours after the squad return to England.

Ruled out of the Leeds game is defender Gary Cahill, who was seething at the play-acting of Qatari-Brazilian Emerson, which led to the England defender being sent off in the 90th minute yesterday.

‘I am angry,’ said Cahill. ‘I’m disappointed in myself for my reaction but also because it’s OK for someone to lash out at you, but you do something back and it’s deemed a red card.

You're off: Gary Cahill (foreground) was sent off late in Chelsea's loss for kicking out at Corinthians' Emerson

You're off: Gary Cahill (foreground) was sent off late in Chelsea's loss for kicking out at Corinthians' Emerson

‘I tackled him, we tangled up and he lashed out with his arm and hit me in the face. I thought that was out of order but I reacted in a bad way. Looking back there are two different stories.

‘Someone’s smashed me in the face but I didn’t roll around on the floor for five minutes holding my head. I got up, reacted and tapped him in the shin. He felt the need to go down, roll around on the floor for about five times holding his face.

‘I suppose that’s the story of the game really. In the context of the game it was disappointing.

Overreaction: 'It wouldn't have been enough to knock over my one-year-old daughter' says Cahill (left) of the kick that got him sent off

Overreaction: 'It wouldn't have been enough to knock over my one-year-old daughter' says Cahill (left) of the kick that got him sent off

‘It was late on. It wasn’t as if it was in the 60th minute. I could have got him sent off if I’d rolled around for five minutes after he hit me. It probably is a red card but the reaction of the guy is totally out of order for what I did if you see the impact.

‘It wouldn’t have been enough to knock over my one-year-old daughter. I’m still angry.’

Cahill will automatically miss one game — against Leeds — and FIFA’s disciplinary department will decide this week whether it will be extended to more.

‘I have a heavy heart,’ added Luiz, a Corinthians fan as a boy, after the defeat. ‘I cried. I wanted to win. I dreamed one day of playing in the Club World Cup final. I say congratulations to Corinthians but I cannot be happy.

‘You can cry one night. Tomorrow is another day. Life continues. I say thanks to God for my life always, in good and bad moments.’

Luiz produced another excellent performance in central defence and added: ‘Three months ago, two months ago, other people spoke bad about David Luiz and tried to kill me but I have confidence in my life.

‘I think I played well. I just try to help Chelsea. I came to Chelsea two years ago and many people didn’t know who David Luiz was. In the first month, second month, I did a great job and won some titles. Some people like you, some don’t.

‘What I want to do is put my head in the pillow and say I worked hard, did my best and I can sleep.’

Frank Lampard returned to the side as captain and insisted nobody had underestimated the competition.

Defeated: David Luiz (foreground) looks on as he watches his boyhood club Corinthians celebrate winning the Club World Cup

Defeated: David Luiz (foreground) looks on as he watches his boyhood club Corinthians celebrate winning the Club World Cup

‘We’re disappointed,’ said Lampard. ‘It was certainly a meaningful competition.

‘There was a great crowd for the final. The Chelsea fans have followed us well and as a club we wanted to win it.

‘It was always going to be a tough game. They’re a physical team as well as one with ability.

Once you give Brazilian teams a goal they’re adept at sitting back and counter-attacking. It was difficult to break them down. We didn’t play at our best.’

Edu, the former Arsenal player and director of football at Corinthians is ready to take on Chelsea

Arsenal old boy Edu-cated in the Corinthian spirit and ready to take on Chelsea

|

UPDATED:

23:12 GMT, 14 December 2012

Among the bustle of the Corinthians camp here is a familiar figure. Tall, lean and tanned with an easy smile and elegant style is a man who played more than a hundred times for Arsenal.

Edu Gaspar spent four years at Highbury, winning the Premier League title twice and the FA Cup three times. His final game for the Gunners came as they collected their last trophy in the 2005 FA Cup final.

Though still only 34, he is director of football at Corinthians, the South American champions who will contest the world title with Chelsea on Sunday. It is a powerful role at Brazil’s richest club with huge power and he is in charge of highly desirable footballers; his phone is alive with interest in Paulinho.

On the ball: Edu Gaspar is now director of football at Corinthians

On the ball: Edu Gaspar is now director of football at Corinthians

Arsenal old boy Edu

Arsenal old boy Edu

BIG MATCH ESSENTIAL
Corinthians ended their long wait for a first South American title in July this year, beating Boca Juniors of Argentina 3-1 in the two-legged Copa Libertadores final. They were the first team since Boca in 1978 to win it without losing a game.

Managed by Tite, they are an industrious team who reflect their working-class heritage and rely upon mental toughness and organisation. Paulinho is the star attraction, but even he is renowned for his work ethic.

The Sao Paulo team — formed in 1910 and named after the English club Corinthians who travelled to Brazil that year — did win the inaugural FIFA Club World Cup in 2000 when they qualified as Brazilian champions. They beat Vasco da Gama in the final.

Corinthians fans are known as the Fiel — the Faithful — and revel in a Crazy Gang reputation. Up to 20,000 have travelled and there are 200,000 Brazilians living in Japan. ‘They’re not here to put pressure on us, they’re here to rejoice,’ said Tite.

They may contest the title of most popular club in Brazil with Rio’s Flamengo, but Corinthians have overtaken Flamengo and Sao Paulo to boast football’s most valuable brand in Brazil, valued at 310million by Forbes this year.

Sunday’s referee is Turkey’s Cuneyt Cakir, who was in charge when Chelsea lost 3-0 at Juventus — Roberto Di Matteo’s final game. He is also the ref who sent off John Terry in Barcelona in the Champions League semi-final second leg and booked Branislav Ivanovic, Ramires and Raul Meireles, getting all four banned from the final in Munich.

‘When a player says he wants to join another club or have another experience, I have to respect that,’ said Edu. ‘But if I see they are happy, it is easy to keep them.

‘Paulinho is happy, his family is happy, he is enjoying it and he is one of the most important footballers in Brazil, along with Neymar.

‘Brazilian football is strong and the economy is getting better. Our club is one of the richest in Brazil. We can keep good players like Paulinho. We can buy good players. That makes it an exciting time to be in Corinthians.’

Arsenal, Manchester City and Chelsea are among those linked with the 24-year-old Brazil star.

‘He is a modern midfielder,’ said Edu. ‘He scores a lot of goals, plays box-to-box and is never injured. He has a Brazilian way of playing but is also strong and plays hard, like you need in the Premier League.’

Edu is proud of the Corinthians fans, famed in Brazil football for their devotion. Some 20,000 have travelled to Japan, selling cars and quitting jobs to pay their way.

‘I was born in Corinthians,’ said Edu. ‘I started playing for Corinthians at five, I went to the first team, won important titles, was sold and then I came back and finished my career here and now I’m a director.

‘Corinthians is a club like no other in the world. Now, it is a rich club but it came from the poor people. Corinthians fans sell cars to come here, borrow money from the bank and lose jobs to take money from the government to come here.’

Once Edu was robbed at gunpoint at home in Sao Paulo and the intruders asked him to sign autographs. These days, he can smile about it as he mimes scribbling his name with a quaking hand. Recently, he stopped his car outside the club’s Pacaembu ground to pose with a supporter, who asked him for five Brazilian reals, worth about 1.50.

‘He was borrowing money from everybody and writing down exactly what he owed,’ said Edu.

‘He would write, “From Edu, I borrowed 10 reals; from another guy, I borrow five reals”. When he put the money all together, it was like that, a pile more than three centimetres high. He said, “This is not money for other things. This is money to go to Japan.”

‘I gave him some money, of course. I said, “You go there”. I haven’t seen him. That’s a shame. It would be fantastic to see this guy.’

Talent: Paulinho is highly-rated and sought after by teams including Sunday's opponents Chelsea

Talent: Paulinho is highly-rated and sought after by teams including Sunday's opponents Chelsea

Another Corinthians fan suffered a motorbike accident and was confined to a wheelchair. None of his friends could afford to be his helper, so he went to the club president and help came his way.

Others were invited to lodge for free with Japan-based fans. ‘They have opened their houses and Corinthians fans are sleeping on the floors,’ said Edu. ‘They sleep like sardines, 10 to a room.

‘We have to give something to the fans. We like to have open training so they can be next to the stars. Our gift to them. And, most importantly, play a good match.’

Determined: Edu wants his team to play a good match against Chelsea's stars, for the sake of the fans

Determined: Edu wants his team to play a good match against Chelsea's stars, for the sake of the fans

Monterrey 1 Chelsea 3 – match report

Monterrey 1 Chelsea 3: Blues stroll into Club World Cup final… but even the few fans who turned up abuse Benitez

|

UPDATED:

14:47 GMT, 13 December 2012

FINAL COUNTDOWN

Chelsea will now play Brazilian team Corinthians in Sunday's final. You can follow all the build up and action with Mail Online.

It will be England against Brazil in the Club World Cup final on Sunday after Chelsea brushed aside the somewhat flimsy challenge of Monterrey.

At least there will be some sort of atmosphere inside the 72,000-seater Yokohama Stadium to see Corinthians. The Brazilians have brought an estimated 20,000 fans from South America and will generate some noise and passion.

Chelsea’s semi-final against their Mexican opponents unfolded in a cold, still and often silent arena. Officially, there were 36,648 there, and they were removed from the pitch by the running track covered by green carpets.

Japaneasy: Chelsea cruised to a Club World Cup victory over Mexican side Monterrey in Yokohama

Japaneasy: Chelsea cruised to a Club World Cup victory over Mexican side Monterrey in Yokohama

Japaneasy: Chelsea cruised to a Club World Cup victory over Mexican side Monterrey in Yokohama

Japaneasy: Chelsea cruised to a Club World Cup victory over Mexican side Monterrey in Yokohama

MATCH FACTS

MONTERREY: OrOrozco, Perez (Osorio 58), Mier, Basanta, Chavez, Meza (Solis 83), Ayovi, Cardozo, Corona, Delgado (Carreno 83), De Nigris.

Goals: De Nigris 90+2.

CHELSEA: Cech, Azpilicueta, Cahill, Ivanovic, Cole, Mikel, Luiz (Lampard 63), Mata (Ferreira 74), Oscar, Hazard, Torres (Moses 79).

Goals: Mata 17, Torres 46, Chavez OG 48.

Attendance: 36,648

Referee: Carlos Vera (Ecuador)

Still, the European champions dealt well with the surreal surroundings in their tournament debut, starting at a healthy tempo, stealing an early lead through Juan Mata and crushing any thought of an unlikely comeback with two more three minutes after the interval.

Fernando Torres claimed the second, scoring for the third successive game, played a vital part in the third, an own goal, and there were other areas of encouragement for interim manager Rafa Benitez.

David Luiz looked comfortable in an unfamiliar midfield role, albeit it against tame opposition and Frank Lampard continued his recovery from injury with a substitute appearance shortly after an hour.

Number Juan: Chelsea took the lead on 17 minutes through Juan Mata's low drive

Number Juan: Chelsea took the lead on 17 minutes through Juan Mata's low drive

Number Juan: Chelsea took the lead on 17 minutes through Juan Mata's low drive

Thinking of you: Mata paid tribute to countryman Oriol Romeu, who was ruled out for the season recently

Thinking of you: Mata paid tribute to countryman Oriol Romeu, who was ruled out for the season recently

'YOU'RE NOT WELCOME HERE'

Despite them being fewer than 1,000 in number at the Yokohama International Stadium, Chelsea fans could still be heard taunting interim boss Rafael Benitez with cries for former boss Roberto Di Matteo.

There was also a little
discouragement for Benitez. About 900 Chelsea fans made the long trip
from London and they still jeered the manager, sang, 'we don’t want you
here' and climbed to their feet in the 16th minute for a burst of the
now-familiar Roberto di Matteo song.

Japanese fans looked on somewhat bewildered, especially as, no sooner had they all finished singing, than their team went ahead.

Mata scored the goal, the chance
created and served up on a plate by Ashley Cole, who was becoming used
to this role. He lost at ten-pin bowling in Yokohama on Tuesday and his
forfeit was to wait on his team-mates during dinner at the hotel.

Rough and tumble: Chelsea were made to work harder than expected by their Mexican counterparts

Rough and tumble: Chelsea were made to work harder than expected by their Mexican counterparts

Rough and tumble: Chelsea were made to work harder than expected by their Mexican counterparts

Rough and tumble: Chelsea were made to work harder than expected by their Mexican counterparts

Cole’s service did not impress in the
dining room but he produced the perfect assist for Mata’s 11th goal in
25 games this season. The Spain international has scored in his last
four games.

This put Chelsea in control and they could have scored more before the break had they not started to coast.

Monterrey were disappointing as a
creative force. They failed the threaten Petr Cech’s goal until a
glancing header from Aldo de Nigris flashed over in the 28th minute and
did not force a save from the goalkeeper until the 70th minute.

The Mexicans – champions of North and
Central America – were lacklustre at the back and easily sliced open.
Luiz, relishing the freedom of a midfield role, managed to do it twice
in the opening six minutes.

Bought to their knees: Fernando Torres' bright start to the second half finished off Monterrey's challenge

Bought to their knees: Fernando Torres' bright start to the second half finished off Monterrey's challenge

Bought to their knees: Fernando Torres' bright start to the second half finished off Monterrey's challenge

First, he burst down the middle of
the pitch, traded passes with Oscar and curled a shot which dropped
narrowly over from 25 yards. Then, he split the back-four with a
wonderful pass to Eden Hazard, who was under absolutely no pressure but
managed to miss the target.

His team drifted through to the break
but Benitez was able to retrain focus at half-time and Chelsea emerged
to kill the tie within three minutes of the restart. Torres struck
inside 17 seconds. It came with the help of a huge deflection but it was
his fifth in three games and went down well with the Japanese.

Darvin Chavez

Job done: Chelsea wrapped up victory when Darvin Chavez diverted the ball into his own goal

Job done: Chelsea wrapped up victory when Darvin Chavez diverted the ball into his own goal

There was no doubting the technique
involved in the third goal as Torres swerved a pass from left to right
with the outside of his right boot to the feet of Mata. Oddly, Mata
opted against shooting but as he searched for the return to Torres, the
ball was diverted into the net by hapless left-back Darvin Chavez.

Lampard came on for Luiz and went
close with virtually his first touch, clipping a right-footer wide from
the edge of the penalty box.

There were no contentious calls for
the goalline technology and the GoalRef ball which some of the Chelsea
player thought felt hard and heavy in training did not cause the
Londoners too many problems.

De Nigris pulled one back in stoppage
time but it will be England against Brazil in the Club World Cup final,
a decade after the nations met in Shizuoka in the quarter-finals of the
World Cup.

Time to smile: Rafael Benitez was relaxed on the touchline as his team earned their place in the final

Time to smile: Rafael Benitez was relaxed on the touchline as his team earned their place in the final

... and most of the local support got behind him, though those from London cheered for Di Matteo

… and most of the local support got behind him, though those from London cheered for Di Matteo

... and most of the local support got behind him, though those from London cheered for Di Matteo

Wallace signed for Chelsea – who is he?

No, he's not the one that likes Wensleydale… so just who is Chelsea's new signing Wallace

|

UPDATED:

14:29 GMT, 5 December 2012

Chelsea are no strangers to Brazilian flair and the latest Samba star to join the ranks is Wallace.

Like Oscar, who arrived in the summer and took England by storm, the Fluminense right-back is not well known outside of his own country.

So, what can Blues fans expect from the fifth Brazilian to join their squad Will he be more David Luiz or Emerson Thome

Scroll down for video

Flair: Wallace loves to roam forward from his defensive position

Flair: Wallace loves to roam forward from his defensive position

Stamford Bridge Samba stars

Here are the Brazilians who have left Chelsea:

Alex (86 Premier League apps)

Normally reliable and packing a thunderous free kick, Alex was well liked by everyone in SW6 – apart from Andre Villas-Boas.

The Portuguese manager alienated and then sold the defender, much to the chagrin of the Stamford Bridge faithful.

Juliano Belletti (54)

A cult hero, Belletti was adored by the fans. It helped that he had a penchant for scoring spectacular goals, with one fantastic strike in particular against Tottenham endearing him to the supporters.

Emerson Thome (21)

Only at the club for one year, but popular because of his willingness to put in a shift. Known as 'The Wall', Thome drew nods of approval with his uncompromising tackles.

Mineiro (1)

A bizarre, obscure Avram Grant signing who barely played for the team. He made one other appearance, in the League Cup against Burnley.

First things first – the 18-year-old who cost 5million will arrive for duty at the end of the season.

Wallace officially becomes a Chelsea player in January but will remain at Fluminense until next term.

Although he has been signed while Rafael Benitez is in charge, the deal was put in place while Roberto Di Matteo had the reins at the Bridge.

He made his debut for the first team this year, turning out 18 times to help them win the Brazilian league, the Rio State league and the Guanabara Cup.

He is likely to fit into the Chelsea squad behind Cesar Azpilicueta, with Branislav Ivanovic spending more time in his favoured centre-back position.

When Wallace does play he will get forward a lot – he's not shy of putting in crosses with either foot.

Fans will be glad to know Wallace is putting some research time in, to see how he'll fit in with his team-mates.

He said: 'I used to follow La Liga and its big clubs but now because I'm moving to Chelsea I'm following them more, after the Champions League triumph.

Solid as a rock: Alex was excellent for Chelsea

Solid as a rock: Alex was excellent for Chelsea

'I'm watching every single match apart from when I'm playing or concentrating with my team but I don't miss a chance to see their matches.

He also expects having compatriots Lucas Piazon, Ramires, Oscar and Luiz will help ease him into life in London.

'It's always helpful to have Brazilian colleagues playing by your side because normally they are settled down and can give you some advice and this is important,' he explained.

'Now that I'm moving to London I'll have to learn some English, but I am used to this and they can help me a lot.'

Shaky: David Luiz is not renowned for his defensive aptitude

Shaky: David Luiz is not renowned for his defensive aptitude

He played alongside Piazon for Brazil at the 2011 U17 World Cup in Mexico, finishing fourth.

Wallace has represented his country at U20 level and won the South American U17 Championship last year.

He is heading to Chelsea from the club which Deco, and fan favourite Juliano Belletti departed for in 2010.

It doesn't seem likely he will help Chelsea's defence become any more solid, but Chelsea fans are used to right backs who play similarly – Jose Bosingwa, anyone

12 of the greatest Wallaces the world has ever seen

William Wallace (Braveheart)

Mel Gibson

Danny Wallace (ex man Utd, not to be confused with the comedian, author and DJ)

Rod Wallace

Ray Wallace (Danny, Rod and Ray three are brothers)

Ian Wallace (signed by Brian Clough for Nottingham Forest)

Wallace, from Wallace and Gromit

Wallace, from Wallace and Gromit

Wallis Simpson

Gregg Wallace (Masterchef)

Jessie Wallace (plays Kat Moon in Eastenders)

Kat Moon

Ross Wallace (striker, Burnley)

Danny Wallace (Comedian, author and DJ)

Aisleyne Horgan-Wallace (Big Brother)

Judge Wallace for yourself

If he wants to fit in he should take his cues from Belletti…

Brazil World Cup 2014 posters for each host city – FIFA

Brazilian flair shines through in FIFA posters for each World Cup 2014 host city

|

UPDATED:

21:15 GMT, 26 November 2012

Posters have been released for each of the cities in Brazil which will host World Cup games in 2014.

They may not have finished building all of the stadiums, but a lot of care and attention has gone into designing these.

Each poster features something which ties in with the history or the nature of the city it is for.

Scroll down to see each of the posters for the 12 host cities and find out why each one was designed the way it is.

Meanwhile Brazilians have selected the
name 'Fuleco' for the three-banded armadillo mascot for the competition
after a three-month voting process that was branded undemocratic by
fans.

Controversial: The armadillo mascot was named Fuleco after a vote but many people were unimpressed with the selection of options on offer

Controversial: The armadillo mascot was named Fuleco after a vote but many people were unimpressed with the selection of options on offer

FIFA said more than 1.7 million people in Brazil took part in the controversial vote to select the name for the mascot.

Polls showed the vast majority of Brazilians were not pleased with the names picked for public voting and critics said organisers should let fans choose other names.

Fuleco comes from the Portuguese words 'futebol' (football) and 'ecologia' (ecology), and FIFA said it 'seamlessly represents the way in which the FIFA World Cup can combine the two to encourage people to behave in an environmentally friendly way.'

Football’s governing body said Fuleco received 48 percent of the vote, while 31 percent went for Zuzeco and 21 percent for Amijubi.

Organisers claimed fans could not send in suggestions because the names needed to fulfill several legal requirements involving trademarks and other rights.

THE NEW POSTERS FOR EACH HOST CITY OF THE 2014 WORLD CUP

Rio de Janeiro: A footballer balancing the ball on the back of his neck shows the city's deep love of the game.

Sao Paulo: The design portrays a bustling metropolis where thousands of people life, celebrate and breath football. The city has an infectious energy and football is in its blood, its buildings and in the air

Rio de Janeiro: A footballer balancing the ball on the back of his neck shows the city's deep love of the game. Each layer meanwhile stands for one aspect of Rio, the beach, the mountains, the Sugarloaf peak, the sea and the sky.

Sao Paulo: The design portrays a bustling metropolis where thousands of people life, celebrate and breath football. The city has an infectious energy and football is in its blood, its buildings and in the air.

Belo Horizonte: The city holds the Church of Sao Francisco de Assis, which is displayed in silhouette form on the poster, according to FIFA. The design's celebratory nature shows the welcome that footballers and fans will receive in the city

Brasilia: The background image represents the cathedral in the city, with an immense blue sky above it. Green at the bottom portrays the vast expanse of greenery the city has, while the various colours of the player show the city's multiculturality

Belo Horizonte: The city holds the Church of Sao Francisco de Assis, which is displayed in silhouette form on the poster, according to FIFA. The design's celebratory nature shows the welcome that footballers and fans will receive in the city.

Brasilia: The background image represents the cathedral in the city, with an immense blue sky above it. Green at the bottom portrays the vast expanse of greenery the city has in it, while the various colours of the player show the city's multiculturality.

Curitiba: A Brazilian pine tree is pictured because this type of tree covered much of the land in the area before the city was formed in the 17th century.

Manaus: This city is in the state of Amazonas, which is almost entirely covered by rainforest. The parrots sitting on top of the goal post are representative of that.

Curitiba: A Brazilian pine tree is pictured because this type of tree covered much of the land in the area before the city was formed in the 17th century. The pine rises high, stretching out its cones almost as if it is raising a toast to football.

Manaus: This city is in the state of Amazonas, which is almost entirely covered by rainforest. The parrots sitting on top of the goal post are representative of that, and signify the fact we cheer for great players, matches, goals, and for nature itself.

 Salvador: A city of wealth, culture and artchitectual heritage. It has stunning scenery and breathtaking views from up high in the towers of the city's other tourist attractions.

Fortaleza: The sunshine and beauty of the city's coastline, shown with a beach at the bottom on the poster, make it a special place. The city's major landmarks are shown in the football raised high above the Castelao Arena.

Salvador: A city of wealth, culture and architectural heritage. It has stunning scenery and breathtaking views from up high in the towers of the city's other tourist attractions. Perhaps views which might bring to the heart the same delight as the feeling when your team score.

Fortaleza: The sunshine and beauty of the city's coastline, shown with a beach at the bottom on the poster, make it a special place. The city's major landmarks are shown in the football raised high above the Castelao Arena. It is a city which is both modern but has not forgotten its roots.

Natal: The green comes from the forest, the blue from the crystal sea and the yellow from the hot sands. The silhouette of a man reaching out on a poster coloured like the Brazilian flag symbolises the country welcoming the world.

Cuiaba: The capital of the state of Mato Grosso is in the exact centre of South America and is considered the heart of the continent. The poster's bright colours shows the joy the World Cup will bring and the joyful nature of the locals.

Natal: The green comes from the forest, the blue from the crystal sea and the yellow from the hot sands. The silhouette of a man reaching out on a poster coloured like the Brazilian flag symbolises the country welcoming the world with open arms. The people of Natal are keen to give, to share, to host.

Cuiaba: The capital of the state of Mato Grosso is in the exact centre of South America and is considered the heart of the continent. The poster's bright colours shows the joy the World Cup will bring and the joyful nature of the locals. The silhouette of the whole state is displayed in the centre of the ball.

Porto Alegre: The capital city of Rio Grande do Sul has magnificent views over Lake Guaiba and on the right lies the Usina do Gasometro, the best place to see these from. The ball being kicked represents the cultural legacy being fired forward.

Recife: The poster shows the essence of a coastal city full of art, joy and movement. Frevo is the dance of the city and the man in the middle is a frevo dancer, whose moves also represent that of a skilled football player.

Porto Alegre: The capital city of Rio Grande do Sul has magnificent views over Lake Guaiba and on the right lies the Usina do Gasometro, the best place to see these from. The ball being kicked represents the cultural legacy being fired forward.

Recife: The poster shows the essence of a coastal city full of art, joy and movement. Frevo is the dance of the city and the man in the middle is a frevo dancer, whose moves also represent that of a skilled football player. There is a carnival feel to the design.

City scout Willian and Fernandinho after they hurt Chelsea

Get me those Brazilians! City scout Willian and Fernandinho after they cut Chelsea to pieces

|

UPDATED:

12:54 GMT, 9 November 2012

Manchester City are scouting the two Brazilians who almost brought Chelsea to their knees.

Attacking midfielder Willian, who scored twice, and his sidekick Fernandinho are both now being tracked by City following their dazzling performances at Stamford Bridge.

Willian has long sinced wanted a move to England and was close to joining Spurs in the summer.

Willian competes with Branislav Ivanovic of Chelsea

Willian competes with Branislav Ivanovic of Chelsea

But during this Champions League campaign, Fernandinho (full name Fernando Luis Roza) has also emerged as a serious talent.

City have had problems this season and look as if they need freshening up, although they are still third in the Barclays Premier League.

However, they have flopped badly in the Champions league with only two points from four games and are on the brink of going out.

Fernandinho gets to grips with Chelsea forward Eden Hazard

Fernandinho gets to grips with Chelsea forward Eden Hazard

Fernandinho joined league leaders Shakhtar Donetsk seven years ago and his influence has been growing this season. City are now on his trail.

They have already been made aware of Willian – full name Willian Borges da Silva – and are keen on competing with Spurs for his signature in January, even though he will be cup tied from the Champions League if they manage to get through the group.

Willian said this week: 'Chelsea and Spurs have made offers for me in the past. Who knows what will happen in the future

'Maybe they will come back. At the moment all I am thinking about is Shakhtar and helping them to qualify for the next round of the Champions League.

'But I have always thought that one day I want to play for a big club in England, Spain or Italy, so it's very important for me to play so well against such an important team as Chelsea.'

In a recent interview with MailOnline, he said: 'I would love to play in England. The league is one of the best and there are some great clubs here.'


Can you stop me Willian wriggles away from fellow Brazilian Ramires

Can you stop me Willian wriggles away from fellow Brazilian Ramires

Shoulder to shoulder: Fernandinho (left) challenges Chelsea's Juan Mata

Shoulder to shoulder: Fernandinho (left) challenges Chelsea's Juan Mata

Mark Clattenburg latest: Was John Obi Mikel called a "monkey"?

Did Clattenburg call Chelsea player a ‘monkey’… or in his north-east accent, did he say 'shut up, Mikel' (And how do the FA now prove that)

|

UPDATED:

10:16 GMT, 31 October 2012

Back so soon, lads

Chelsea and Manchester United lock horns again tonight in the Capital One League Cup – and you can follow the live action HERE

The future of referee Mark Clattenburg could come down to whether he used the word ‘monkey’ in his exchange with John Obi Mikel.

The Sun has reported that Nigerian Mikel, who did not hear the alleged racist slur, was told by two Chelsea team-mates – Brazilians Ramires and David Luiz – that he was a called ‘a monkey’ in the match against Manchester United on Sunday.

When Ramires told Mikel that he thought he’d been called ‘a monkey’, at least three members of the Chelsea playing and coaching staff asked: ‘Are you certain’.

In the spotlight: John Obi Mikel leaves Chelsea training on Tuesday as the row hangs over the club

In the spotlight: John Obi Mikel leaves Chelsea training on Tuesday as the row hangs over the club

GRAHAM POLL WRITES…

GRAHAM POLL, EX-REFEREE AND DAILY MAIL COLUMNIST.

Lee Mason enjoyed his 41st birthday
on Monday but his thoughts will have been dominated by his appointment
to referee Wednesday's Capital One Cup game between Chelsea and
Manchester United.

Click here to read more…

He was questioned by team-mates and
staff who asked if, with Clattenburg speaking with such a strong North
East accent, the official had said ‘shut up, Mikel’, rather than ‘shut
up, monkey’, which has been alleged.

David Luiz speaks very good English,
Ramires less so. They are both adamant they heard the slur, although
Clattenburg denies the claims and is supported by his two assistants.

The Metropolitan Police confirmed
they had acted on a ‘complaint’ from the Society of Black Lawyers after
the European champions accused Clattenburg of using racist comments. The
allegations are also the subject of a Football Association
investigation.

Clattenburg and his fellow
professionals were said to be shocked and angered by the claims as the
refereeing fraternity rallied around their colleague.

There were also suggestions of
seething resentment in some quarters at the way Chelsea had made their
complaint against Clattenburg public and a desire to see strong action
taken against them if the official was cleared.

That could take weeks or even months
after the police became involved in proceedings less than 24 hours after
the FA’s investigation began.

Chelsea themselves could yet make a
criminal complaint, having appointed an external legal team to conduct
their own probe, something which is expected to conclude on Wednesday.

And the FA may be forced to postpone
their inquiry if the police request they do so, something they came
under heavy fire for during the year-long John Terry scandal.

All smiles: Mikel was back with his team-mates in training amid the race row

All smiles: Mikel was back with his team-mates in training amid the race row

Eyes on the ball: Juan Mata (centre) and John Terry (right) during training on Tuesday morning

Eyes on the ball: Juan Mata (centre) and John Terry (right) during training on Tuesday morning

The police statement read: ‘An
investigation has been launched into alleged comments made during a
football match between Chelsea FC and Manchester United FC at Stamford
Bridge on 28 October 2012.

‘Officers from Hammersmith & Fulham borough are in liaison with Chelsea Football Club and the Football Association.’

The Metropolitan Police have became
embroiled in their second high-profile football racism case in 12 months
after the man behind the mooted black players’ breakaway union, Peter
Herbert, wrote to them demanding they investigate Clattenburg.

Herbert defended his intervention,
telling Sky Sports News: ‘What we don’t want is for it to be swept away
under the carpet. It must be subject to a full and proper investigation.
It is to lend some seriousness and some weight behind what is happening
in football.’

Herbert admitted his complaint was
based on reports rather than first-hand evidence but added: ‘We weren’t
there but we don’t need to be there in order to report an incident.

‘This appears to have had some
cogency and so it needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency. I think
the Met Police have huge resources, expertise, and I have no doubt that
this matter will be resolved and the truth will come out. If we’ve got
this completely wrong then, of course, the police will tell us.’

But Professional Footballers’
Association chief executive Gordon Taylor said: ‘Involving police or
waiting causes a massive festering of the issue, which has continued to
cause problems and is not good for the image of the game.

Focus: Juan Mata drives into Chelsea's Cobham HQ ahead of Wednesday's clash with United

Focus: Juan Mata drives into Chelsea's Cobham HQ ahead of Wednesday's clash with United

At the wheel: Fernando Torres was also among the players training on Tuesday morning

At the wheel: Fernando Torres was also among the players training on Tuesday morning

‘Football has got to be confident
enough to deal with it. I have said that to the House of Commons, the FA
Council. We need to grasp the nettle and show we are more than capable
of dealing with it.

‘I’m quite concerned that when this happened with the John Terry and Anton Ferdinand incident, the process got elongated.

‘This time, I want football to learn
from it and deal with it as transparently as possible. In football, the
penalties can be severe. In a court of law, the penalty for racial abuse
would be a small amount in comparison to what the FA could fine.’

Taylor welcomed the FA’s refusal to
halt their own investigation, citing the International Cricket Council’s
decision to rule on the Pakistan spot-fixing scandal before it went to
court.

Clattenburg, who vowed on Sunday to
co-operate fully with any investigation, was expected to be spoken to by
both police and the FA, possibly after submitting a written account
about what took place during Sunday’s game.

He has already filed what is known as
an ‘extraordinary incident report’, which is understood mainly to deal
with an alleged confrontation that took place in the referees’ room
after full-time.

Chelsea manager Roberto Di Matteo,
assistant manager Eddie Newton and chief executive Ron Gourlay were all
present as Mikel angrily accused Clattenburg of having abused him during
the match itself.

The referee, his assistants and
fourth official are understood to have been stunned by the claims, with
Michael McDonough, Simon Long and Michael Jones – who were miked up to
Clattenburg – denying hearing anything of that nature.

Trouble: John Obi Mikel stormed into Mark Clattenburg's room

Row: Chelsea teammates say John Obi Mikel was told to 'shut up you monkey' by referee Mark Clattenburg – a claim he vehemently denies

Centre of the storm: Referee Mark Clattenburg and Chelsea midfielder John Obi Mikel

Centre of the storm: Mystery surrounds what happened in altercations between Clattenburg, Mikel, and Mata on Sunday

Shocked: Juan Mata is unhappy with Clattenburg's alleged insult

Shocked: Juan Mata is unhappy with Clattenburg's alleged insult – the experienced referee is accused of calling him a 'Spanish t***'

The situation appears to have been
complicated by suggestions Mikel or Mata may not have either, with
reports claiming they were informed of the alleged abuse by team-mates.

Midfielder Oriol Romeu was quoted as having told a Spanish radio station that Mata had confirmed as much.

It is unclear whether Clattenburg
would elect to continue refereeing or take a break from the game while
any investigation was pending but he has accepted being stood down from
officiating in the coming week.

In the spotlight: Mark Clattenburg leaves his home near Newcastle on Monday

In the spotlight: Mark Clattenburg leaves his home near Newcastle on Monday

Grabbing a lift: Clattenburg jumped into a car with fellow ref Michael Oliver

Grabbing a lift: Clattenburg jumped into a car with fellow ref Michael Oliver

Football's chiefs are scared of using microphones on referees, claims Moore

Voice: Rugby ref Wayne Barnes wear the microphone

Voice: Rugby ref Wayne Barnes wear the microphone

Former England rugby union international Brian Moore claims football's authorities are fearful of the bad language that would be exposed by equipping referees with microphones that would relay on-pitch discussions to spectators.

Moore, 50, who played in the 1991 World Cup final, nevertheless believes such a step could help to clean up football's image.

The Ref! Link system has been successfully deployed in rugby, allowing fans an insight to discussions between players and officials during matches.

Moore said: 'Not only do you record these things but you put them on the Ref! Link so that the crowd including the children and the sponsors, most importantly, can hear what they say.'

Moore, a Chelsea supporter, said football's language would be toned down 'within six weeks' of such a scheme.

'But when you speak to people in football, a lot of them say “You can't do that”,' Moore told BBC Radio Five Live. 'But I say, “You can do it, you just won't”. And “can't” and “won't” are very different things.

'There's no technical reason or moral reason, it's just that they're afraid people will actually hear just how bad it is. If you want to change something… then you will do something. The solution is available.'

Moore understands why referees do not typically exercise their right to book players for swearing or other bad language.

'They would never be supported by the Premier League or the FA and they would be the ones who would never ref again,' Moore said. 'While they have the power to deal with it that way, I understand why they don't.'

VIDEO: Clattenburg and Mikel have words on the pitch…

DM.has('rcpv1930696868001','BCVideo');

Brazil players spread across Europe – analysis

Europe's gone nuts for Brazil: Samba stars spread out across continent

|

UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 24 October 2012

Brazilians dominated in the Champions League on Tuesday night. This is little wonder, when you consider how many Samba stars are playing in Europe. Here, Sportsmail looks at the Brazilian takeover…

Samba boys: Oscar and Ramires are two of Chelsea's Brazilians

Samba boys: Oscar and Ramires are two of Chelsea's Brazilians

Europe's gone nuts for Brazil

P.S.

Another Brazilian found the net on Tuesday — unfortunately for him, Jardel’s own goal was the winner for Spartak against Benfica.

Oops: Jardel (right) scored an own goal

Oops: Jardel (right) scored an own goal

The day England wore yellow against Poland

It wasn't like watching Brazil… the day England lost to Poland wearing yellow

|

UPDATED:

21:13 GMT, 14 October 2012

Perhaps the FA thought it would bring them as much success as the golden era of Brazil when they introduced a yellow kit in 1973.

The Brazilians had won their third World Cup in 12 years three years earlier. Or maybe they were trying to replicate the Arsenal side who won a league and FA Cup double in 1971.

England’s brief affair with yellow that summer was swiftly ended after two defeats and a draw.

Not going to plan: Bobby Moore and England lost 2-0 to Poland in 1974 when they wore yellow

Not going to plan: Bobby Moore and England lost 2-0 to Poland in 1974 when they wore yellow

The only competitive match they played in the strip was a 2-0 loss to Poland in a 1974 World Cup qualifier, with Alan Ball getting sent off and Bobby Moore looking lost. England failed to qualify for the tournament in West Germany.

Their third kit was first tried in a 1-1 draw with Czechoslovakia — that needed an 89th-minute Allan Clarke goal.

Golden strike: Jairzinho celebrates after his goal in Brazils 4-1 victory over Italy in the Mexico 70 World Cup final

Golden strike: Jairzinho celebrates after his goal in Brazils 4-1 victory over Italy in the Mexico 70 World Cup final

A 2-0 friendly loss to Italy was the final nail in the coffin. The yellow kit made a one-game return in an unofficial friendly against Team America in 1976 — England won, thanks to two goals from Kevin Keegan and one from Trevor Francis. They have not worn it since.