Tag Archives: bcci

BUMBLE"S TEST DIARY: I"ve done "a Trott" and was not proud of it, but I"m less of a fan of

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: I've done 'a Trott' and was not proud of it, but I'm less of a fan of Captain Beefheart

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UPDATED:

15:43 GMT, 16 December 2012

Trott's shot was legal but against the spirit of the game, I'm sure he regretted it – just like I did

Jonathan Trott smacking that Jadeja delivery for four was not the right thing to do, it was against the spirit of the game. I did it once, thought it was a bit of laugh, but I regretted it straight away. The laws of the game say Trott had every right to hit it but the best thing would have been for the umpire to call dead ball.

Trott's shot was legal: Jonathan Trott was within his rights to hit Jadeja's delivery

Trott's shot was legal: Jonathan Trott was within his rights to hit Jadeja's delivery

India and Kohli need to remember it was their decision not to have DRS

India also thought they had Trott caught behind but the pictures showed he had not hit the ball. The BCCI insist they do not want the Decision Review System, they say they want the umpire’s decision to be final – well, could they please tell their own players, especially Mr Virat Kohli I have no problem with Kohli talking to Trott, he stands on his two feet there, but why he is constantly engaging the umpires is beyond me. I’ve seen enough of Kohli now (in England and India) to have him down as a jumped-up little twerp…and he may be the next India captain! If he confronted me – like he did the umpires – in Civvy Street, he’d better have something to back it up.

Keep your mouth shut: Virat Kohli must learn to not harass umpires

Keep your mouth shut: Virat Kohli must learn to not harass umpires

Time to bring in the card system – just like in football

My suggestion to the ICC that we should have yellow and red cards will not go away. Spectators watching will have been left wondering what was going on (and we may have to wait until the end of the game for the match referee’s decision) but in my system Kohli would have got a yellow card and everyone in the ground (and watching at home) would have been in the know.

Visible warnings: Cricket needs red and yellow cards - just like football

Visible warnings: Cricket needs red and yellow cards – just like football

Trott and Bell need to push on after early blockathon

I was nervous when England started batting when they got their tactics wrong, opting for a blockathon, but at the end of the day’s play Trott and Ian Bell had moved things on. England need to bat until 20 minutes after lunch and they will have won the series. The final-day situation is an ideal opportunity for the likes of Trott and Bell to be selfish and play for themselves. Trott will be desperate for a century while Bell can turn round what has so far been a terrible tour.

Time to cash in: Ian Bell needs runs to make up for his poor tour so far

Time to cash in: Ian Bell needs runs to make up for his poor tour so far

Compton must start scoring of risk Ashes place

Nick Compton’s position intrigues me. He is going along OK but he has got to find a way of turning survival into scoring. He’ll get another chance in New Zealand but at times it can be a bit of an ordeal watching him bat. If you want an early indicator for the Ashes next summer, I think England want to elevate Joe Root to open alongside Alastair Cook and bring in Jonny Bairstow at No 6, which means Compton, Eoin Morgan and Samit Patel will miss out.

Joe Root

Nick Compton

Time for a change: Nick Compton needs to get runs or Joe Root should be promoted to open for the Ashes

Captain Beefheart He's absolute pants

I was given a Captain Beefheart CD by my boss at Sky. He said it’s ‘very difficult listening but once you’ve heard it once or twice you’ll love it’. I didn’t have the heart to ask him: ‘Who the heck is Captain Beefheart!’ After some quick research with a journalistic colleague, we’ve concluded that he’s ‘absolute pants!’.

Not a fan: Captain Beefheart did not appeal to Bumble's musical taste

Not a fan: Captain Beefheart did not appeal to Bumble's musical taste

England prepare for third Test in India with confidence

Broad pays the price as confident England seek to turn up heat on India

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 3 December 2012

What a difference a week makes. England, who had reached the point where they had begun questioning their own methods, go into Wednesday’s third Test here with one of the greatest series wins in modern times suddenly within their reach.

Now, after the extraordinary turnaround in Mumbai, it is India who have the problems, not an England side who arrested the decline which had seen them lose seven Tests this year with a stunning 10-wicket second Test success.

Serious questions would have been asked of England had they crashed to defeat No 8 in Mumbai. Certainly, it is unlikely they would have felt able to announce a big change to their coaching structure in the aftermath of another reverse. It would have looked as though Andy Flower was being demoted.

Back in the frame: Steven Finn is set to face India in the third Test

Back in the frame: Steven Finn is set to face India in the third Test

New row with BCCI

The ECB have said sorry to the Indian board after failing to get official clearance for the England Performance Programme’s trip to India.

Although arrangements for the visit were put in place back in the summer, they were not rubber-stamped at board level.

The Indians were irritated by the fact that the EPP’s game in Navi Mumbai provided Steven Finn with a chance to prove his fitness ahead of the third Test. The BCCI have accepted England’s apology.

Instead, England have been imbued with such confidence that they are set to make at least two changes to a winning team, acutely aware that they will need contributions from more than just the four outstanding performers from Mumbai if they are to make history here and in Nagpur.

Steven Finn declared himself fit and ready to make his first appearance of the series and that will surely mean England will drop their vice-captain and one of their most highly regarded players, Stuart Broad, for the first time in four years. Figures of 36-2-157-0 for the series have left Broad as vulnerable as at any time in his career.

David Saker, the England fast bowling coach, paved the way for the move with a well-directed verbal boot up Broad’s backside after Mumbai and the Twenty20 captain’s subsequent tweet suggesting he had been ill for a week was at odds with England’s insistence that he was fit going into the Test.

Clearly England believe Broad has not helped himself on this tour and they will not hesitate to bring in the extra pace and bounce of Finn, who had been earmarked for a leading role in their attack in India before he hurt his thigh on the very first day of the tour having bowled just four overs.

‘It was majorly disappointing,’ said
Finn after bowling six overs in practice at Eden Gardens. ‘I’ve never
had that feeling of something popping before. It was alien to me, scary
and frustrating. I had a great chance of playing in that first Test but
it wasn’t to be. Now I’ve had a bit of time out, had a good work-out
with the Performance Squad and I feel fresh. I’m in a good place.’

Dropped: Stuart Broad has paid the price for his poor performances

Dropped: Stuart Broad has paid the price for his poor performances

Finn talked like a man who was expecting to play when he reflected on England’s seismic victory secured at the Wankhede Stadium to level this four-match series without him. ‘It was difficult knowing the lads were there in Mumbai celebrating a win, being together, and I was on the other side of town with the Performance Squad watching it on TV. It was a strange feeling and one I didn’t particularly enjoy so I’m keen to get in on the act if that happens again.’

Ian Bell, another man apparently refreshed by time away, in his case to be with his baby son, will also return, with the only question being whether it is Jonny Bairstow or Samit Patel who makes way. Logic would suggest that Bairstow, who is still to convince against top-quality spin, should stand down but it is not a foregone conclusion, particularly as Patel’s bowling is less important now that Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar are the first names on the teamsheet.

England’s tinkering from a position of strength contrasts starkly with the pressure being felt by MS Dhoni, whose demand for another pitch that turns from ball one has been met with firm resistance from the Eden Gardens curator.

Prabir Mukharjee, the 83-year-old
groundsman, is clearly a man who likes to do things his way, but it
remains to be seen whether his determination to prepare a true surface
against the India captain’s wishes will help or hinder England. It is
usually that sort of low, slow, worn pitches in this part of the world
that bamboozles them.

Under pressure: Sachin Tendulkar

Under pressure: Sachin Tendulkar

What is beyond doubt is that India’s batsmen, with the exception of their new star Cheteshwar Pujara and one of their old ones in Virender Sehwag, need a score, not least the struggling megastar that is Sachin Tendulkar.

One legend of the game in Ricky Ponting bowed out on Monday and all of India is now speculating as to whether the Little Master will soon follow.

It has been suggested here that Tendulkar has told the Indian selectors that it is up to them when he finally stands down, in which case it will take a very brave man to tap him on the shoulder and say: ‘It’s time to go now Sachin, old son.’

More likely, the leading runscorer in the history of Test cricket will be allowed to go on for a little while yet, at least until he has made eight more appearances to reach the magical 200 mark. Sachin is known to love a landmark.

To justify that he needs to fare better against Panesar, who dismissed him in Mumbai both with a ball that turned square and one that did not turn at all. The latest instalment of the duel between Panesar and his hero will be a compelling one.

As indeed should be the whole Test. England are due to win a toss and will surely bat first if they do. The pressure would really be on Dhoni if England can make the running with big first-innings runs again.

Groundsman in the spotlight

Prabir Mukherjee , the 83-year-old groundsman at Eden Gardens, has become
the unlikely focus of attention in the build-up to tomorrow’s third Test after he branded as ‘immoral’ India captain MS Dhoni’s request for a pitch which turns from ball one.

Mukherjee threatened to take a month’s leave after the Indian board sent a member
of their grounds and pitches committee to Kolkata to ‘assist’ with preparation.

‘Why does Dhoni want a square turner on the first day’ he asked. ‘Then why are you
selling tickets for five days It’s immoral.’

He has barely been out of the headlines over the last few days, laughing off suggestions that the BCCI could prevent him from speaking to the media.

‘I am at the fag end of my life,’ he said. ‘They are threatening to suspend me if I talk about the pitch. That is the treatment I get after more than two decades of service.’

And Mukherjee has promised a pitch of pace and bounce, which he says will assist Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar as England look to repeat the famous victory at Mumbai.

That could further infuriate Dhoni, who called the Eden Gardens strip an ‘ugly
wicket’ when England played a one-day international here in October 2011.

India v England

Top spin at the Test: Hawk-Eye unpopular review show

Top spin at the Test: Hawk-Eye unpopular review show

By
Lawrence Booth

PUBLISHED:

23:30 GMT, 18 November 2012

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UPDATED:

23:30 GMT, 18 November 2012

Samit Patel England

The BCCI's dislike of the decision-review system cost both sides on the fourth day. Samit Patel (right) was unfortunate to be given out lbw to Umesh Yadav when replays showed he edged the ball, but India were denied the wicket of Matt Prior on 65 as he played forward to Pragyan Ojha. That followed Cook's survival on Saturday, when he missed a sweep off Ojha on 41. But Hawk-Eye's take on each delivery is easily available. On the BCCI website.

India v England – pictures

We are unable to carry live pictures from the First Test in Ahmedabad due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Setting a high standard

Alastair Cook has now scored five hundreds in 15 Tests in Asia, the most by an England batsman; Ken Barrington made four. Cook began his Test career in March 2006 with a debut century at Nagpur, and hit three figures at Galle, Chittagong and Dhaka. The last two were as stand-in captain in Bangladesh in 2010 – which means Cook is the first player to score tons in each of his first three Tests in charge.

Kevin's got to do something about this

Bowled cheaply for the second time in the match by Pragyan Ojha (right), Kevin Pietersen's comeback game following the texting furore has felt like old times: he has now fallen to a left-arm spinner on 25 occasions in Tests. And his double failure here has added to a bizarre year in which his six Tests in Asia have produced only one performance of note: his brilliant double of 151 and 42 not out in Colombo in April. Other than that, Pietersen has managed 119 runs at an average of under 12.

The International Olympic Committee has criticised the Indian board for refusing to allow photo-only agencies to cover the four-match series. 'The IOC strongly disagrees with these moves by the BCCI , which we believe are a direct attack on the freedom of the media to report from sporting events, and shows contempt for the sporting public,' said Kevan Gosper, chairman of the IOC press commission.

By the end of the fourth day, there had
been only six higher innings played by an England batsman in India than
Cook's 168 not out. Top of the list is Mike Gatting's 207 at Madras in
January 1985, when he put on 241 with Graeme Fowler, who made 201. Third
is Dennis Amiss's 179 at Delhi in 1976-77, followed by Graeme Hick's
178 (Mumbai, 1992-93), Tom Graveney's 172 (Mumbai, 1951- 52), and
Barrington's 172 (Kanpur, 1961-22).

Cheteshwar Pujara the new great Wall of India – Martin Samuel

Double centurion Pujara is the new great Wall of India

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UPDATED:

21:06 GMT, 16 November 2012

For India batsman Cheteshwar Pujara, there was only one problem with yesterday’s score of 206 not out. It was all over too soon.

/11/16/article-2234165-160EE6E6000005DC-58_468x286.jpg” width=”468″ height=”286″ alt=”Ton-derful: Pujara produced a magnificent innings” class=”blkBorder” />

Ton-derful: Pujara produced a magnificent innings

India v England – pictures

We are unable to carry live pictures from the First Test in Ahmedabad due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Not out on 98 overnight, he steered India through to the declaration with an innings marked by the focus and timing that identifies a world-class batsman.

Pujara was always in control. He punished the wayward balls, respected the good ones and recognised that his responsibility was to form a series of alliances with incoming batsmen that would take his team beyond 500.

Having ridden his luck on eight on the first day — when James Anderson lost the flight of a catching opportunity — Pujara never offered England a sniff thereafter and a star was born.

When he brought his 200 up, the appreciation of the locals sounded shrill, like teeny-boppers in awe of the latest pop idol. If Pujara is as good as he looks, he will be that and more in a land in which cricket tops the charts.

Star in the making: Pujara plays into the leg side for Mumbai 'A' against England earlier this month

Star in the making: Pujara plays into the leg side for Mumbai 'A' against England earlier this month

How do they keep doing it Not by accident, that is for sure. A production line of technically precise, classically styled and determined batsmen, with a full repertoire of shots, outstanding footwork and the concentration powers of sages is no fluke.

Pujara scored his first triple century for Saurashtra cricket club against regional rivals Baroda in an Under 14 game on the dusty flat plains of Gujarat state in India’s west. He was 12.

No English schoolboy gets to bat like that, even if he could. At 12, the majority of competitions insist on retirement at 25 or 30. Even those that have no top end in terms of scoring are limited-over affairs.

The idea that a precocious 12-year-old could bat through two days, learn what it was like to dwell Test-match hours, mentally and physically, at the crease is simply unthinkable in England.

But there is no correlation — and you would be a fool and a madman to see one — in a 24-year-old making his second score of more than 150 in six Tests and England, with a little bit of pressure applied, losing three wickets in 13 balls to conclude day two in a state of disarray.

Dedicated: Pujara lives and breathes cricket

Dedicated: Pujara lives and breathes cricket

Dedicated: Pujara lives and breathes cricket

Pujara was no Sachin Tendulkar, in the national team at 16, but he was a prodigy. At the age of 20, he made two triple centuries in one week for Saurashtra in the CK Nayudu Under 22 Trophy.

His 308 against Mumbai took nine hours, the 386 against Maharashtra lasted 11-and-a-half. Promoted to the first team — you have to wonder what kept them — his first score was 302 in a partnership of 520 with Ravindra Jadeja against Orissa, which remains the highest fifth-wicket stand in first-class cricket. You might say he’s got form.

In the subcontinent, Twenty20 is now king, we are told. Yet, no country cherishes the value of staying at the crease like India. Pujara talked of his wicket as a trophy and it is not one he doles out thoughtlessly to the undeserving.

England’s Samit Patel removed Yuvraj Singh with a waist-high full toss that would have been called a no-ball in that Under 14 game with Baroda. Pujara would have winced at the sight of it from beneath his helmet.

The master: Rahul Dravid was the original 'Wall'

The master: Rahul Dravid was the original 'Wall'

‘We had to put up a big total and we were losing quite a few wickets in the middle order, so it was important that I stayed,’ said Pujara. ‘Even when I got to 200 I wanted to go on, but our target was 500 and we achieved that.

‘Now the wicket is turning and turning quite big, so with the momentum we are building I think we can get them all out tomorrow, and finish the match in five days.

‘There’s nothing wrong with the wicket. We dealt with the conditions better than them, that’s all. I was very comfortable facing all their bowlers. Initially, my concern was Graeme Swann, because I didn’t face him before, but after a couple of overs I knew I could play him.’

Confident, yes, but he backed it up. /11/16/article-2234165-15D79BD9000005DC-1000_468x286.jpg” width=”468″ height=”286″ alt=”More to come: England will be fearing the worst” class=”blkBorder” />

More to come: England will be fearing the worst

Alastair Cook, a technically excellent teenage batsman whose power arrived later, would probably not make the Essex junior ranks now. They would instead nurture a boy with half his method and twice his strength and, down the line, England would be deprived of their captain.

Meanwhile, India have already found a replacement for the mighty Dravid and he has played an innings that may have the same psychological effect on England’s fortunes as Hashim Amla’s 311 for South Africa in the first Test last summer.

Previous best: Pujara raises his bat against New Zealand in August

Previous best: Pujara raises his bat against New Zealand in August

They make them different out here. Pujara, known as Chintu to his family (it means ‘sun’ in Hindi), was batting in nearby Bhavnagar when his mother, Reena, died seven years ago and he says he has no hobbies or interests in life beside cricket.

It was Reena who made him promise that he would play for India one day. ‘This was her dream,’ he said. ‘It was her obsession and she would have been ecstatic.’

His father Arvind, a railway worker, and uncle Bipin were also first-class cricketers with Saurashtra.

‘My dad is my friend, philosopher and guide,’ added Pujara. ‘I’ve had no personal coach except him. He taught me everything about cricket and sacrificed some of the precious years of his life for my growth.’

There is a story that in his second Test against South Africa in Durban, Pujara misjudged a pull shot off Lonwabo Tsotsobe and was caught, top edge, for 19. Back in the dressing room, Dravid looked at him coolly. ‘Do you often play shots like that’ he asked.

‘He told me I should go to my natural game rather than playing too many shots,’ Pujara recalled. ‘Play to your strength, he said, which is to hang around and wait for the loose ball.’

It sounds such pedestrian advice, but it is India’s secret. Hang around, wait for the loose ball, then hang around some more. From here, England play it Pujara’s way, or lose.