Tag Archives: bantamweight

Carl Frampton to fight Kiko Martinez in Belfast on February 9

Frampton out to finally nail down rival Martinez at the third time of asking

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UPDATED:

14:33 GMT, 12 December 2012

Hands up: Carl Frampton will bid to beat Kiko Martinez in Belfast on February 9

Hands up: Carl Frampton will bid to beat Kiko Martinez in Belfast on February 9

Carl Frampton will hope to make it third time lucky when he takes on European super-bantamweight champion Kiko Martinez in Belfast on February 9.

The Northern Irishman has twice seen a clash with the Spaniard called off, most recently in September when Frampton instead stopped Canadian Steve Molitor inside six rounds.

The 25-year-old is unbeaten in 15 fights and will also put his Commonwealth title on the line at the Odyssey Arena.

'He's pulled out on me twice so I
have a score to settle with him there,' said Frampton. 'It’'s a great
fight for the fans and one that I have craved for a long time. I had too
much for Steve Molitor and he was a step-up, so I am confident I can
beat Kiko and do so in style.

'Martinez
pulling out in September was a blessing in disguise really as I have
been able to mature and learn even more and on February in front of
another packed crowd at home, I’m looking to make another statement
ahead at the start of a big year.'

Martinez has not fought since July but is now working with middleweight world champion Sergio Martinez's promotional company.

And the 26-year-old intends to silence the home crowd and halt Frampton's planned march towards world honours.

'I
do not read much into Carl beating Molitor as he took the fight at late
notice and that’s his only fight of 2012,' he said. 'I will beat him by
KO – there’s no alternative outcome.

'It
is not my fault that we have not been able to do this fight so far.
There have been many circumstances around that but I know that the
Belfast fans will come out and support Carl as always and it will be an
electric atmosphere.'

Frampton’s
manager Barry McGuigan added: 'We’re pleased this fight is going to
happen. I’ve always said that Kiko is a danger from first bell to last
and I believe it’s a harder fight than Molitor. Styles make fights and
this one is going to be a barn-burner, and the team is confident that
Carl will win, and win in style.'

Meanwhile,
Martin Lindsay will lock horns with Lee Selby on the undercard for the
British and Commonwealth featherweight titles, a fight which was also
originally scheduled for September before Selby fell ill.

London 2102 Olympics: Mo Farah and Usain Bolt give golden ending to Games

Golden greats: Mo stuns the world by doing long-distance double as sprint king Bolt sets new record

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UPDATED:

23:57 GMT, 11 August 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

Mo Farah and Usain Bolt provided an extraordinary finale to the track programme of the Olympic Games with a fourth athletics gold medal for Britain and a relay world record for Jamaica.

With the curtain coming down on a universally acclaimed London Games on Sunday, Farah held his nerve in a final lap of the 5,000m to become the seventh man in history to win the 5,000m-10,000m double — and dedicated his two medals to his twin girls, who are due to be born in 12 days.

Bolt, in what may be his farewell to the Olympics, then anchored a Jamaican quartet of Nesta Carter, Michael Frater and Yohan Blake to break their own world record with 36.84sec in the 4x100m, beating the Americans, who also broke the old world record in 37.04sec.

Trading places: Mo Farah celebrates with Usain Bolt's trademark Lightening Strike while the Jamaican sprinter copies the Brit's Mo-Bot celebration

Trading places: Mo Farah celebrates with Usain Bolt's trademark Lightening Strike while the Jamaican sprinter copies the Brit's Mo-Bot celebration

In the record books: Bolt poses on the podium after winning the men's 4X100 relay

In the record books: Bolt poses on the podium after winning the men's 4X100 relay

Boxer Luke Campbell added to the British gold haul, realising his lifetime dream as he floored Ireland’s John Joe Nevin on his way to a 14-11 victory and the Olympic bantamweight title at ExCeL on Saturday night.

Earlier Ed McKeever had powered to victory in the men’s 200m kayak canoeing, the 28-year-old dominating the K1 single final with Spaniard Saul Craviotto Rivero taking silver and Canada’s Mark de Jonge bronze.

Farah received the loudest acclaim of the night as he sprinted for gold and said: ‘The crowd were amazing. They made an incredible noise. These medals are for my two girls, who haven’t been born yet, hopefully. They could arrive any time in the next 12 days. It’s amazing.

Boxing to gold: Luke Campbell won gold in the boxing ring

Boxing to gold: Luke Campbell won gold in the boxing ring

'They’re twins so there’s one for each.’

As for his short-term future on the track, Farah said: 'I don’t know what’s going on. I’m taking one race at a time. The Olympics doesn’t come round often. It's all worked out well.

'I’m just amazed. Two gold medals — who would have thought that

'I just want to thank everyone who’s supported me. All my coaches from previous years and all the people who’ve been involved in my life. I can’t thank everybody enough.

Paddle power: Ed Mckeever celebrates after winning the gold medal in the kayak single 200-meter men's final

Paddle power: Ed Mckeever celebrates after winning the gold medal in the kayak single 200-meter men's final

'I want to say particularly to my wife, with her carrying twins, it hasn’t been easy but I didn’t want to know about it.

'If anything happens she promised she wouldn’t let me know so I’m glad it all worked out well.’

He added: ‘It’s been a long journey, grafting and grafting, but anything is possible.'

London 2012 Olympics: Luke Campbell beats rival John Joe Nevin to claim bantamweight gold

Campbell beats rival Nevin to claim Olympic bantamweight gold

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UPDATED:

20:13 GMT, 11 August 2012

Great Britain's Luke Campbell beat Ireland's John Joe Nevin to claim Olympic bantamweight gold at ExCeL.

More to follow

On the attack: Luke Campbell (left) against Ireland's John Joe Nevin

On the attack: Luke Campbell (left) against Ireland's John Joe Nevin

London 2012 Olympics: Luke Campbell guarantees boxing medal

Bantamweight Campbell into last four to ensure boxing medal for Great Britain

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UPDATED:

20:27 GMT, 5 August 2012

Luke Campbell has guaranteed himself a bronze medal at least after defeating Detelin Dalakliev in the quarter-finals.

The Hull bantamweight was behind on the scorecards going into the final round but had his opponent on the canvas as he turned it around.

More to follow…

Boxing clever: Great Britain's Luke Campbell will win at least a bronze medal

Boxing clever: Great Britain's Luke Campbell will win at least a bronze medal

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray prepares for giant Ivo Karlovic

Murray's mountain: Andy has the tools to down giant Karlovic

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UPDATED:

21:38 GMT, 27 June 2012

When Andy Murray steps out to face Ivo Karlovic, at least he will not be facing quite such an intimidation factor as the man the giant Croatian ate for his tea on Wednesday, the relatively diminutive Dudi Sela.

The 5ft 9in Israeli was giving away a full 13 inches to 6ft 10in Karlovic, and so often could only flail away in despair as a total of 26 aces were pumped past him, the bantamweight brushed aside by the Super Heavy in straight sets.

Murray’s reach and exceptional reflexes will mean that he is likely to get more change out of what is thrown at him from the other end, but an uncomfortable session in the coconut shy beckons nonetheless. The British No1 will have much to lose, his deputy James Ward less so when he takes on American Mardy Fish.

Ivan idea: Coach Lendl gets Murray thinking big for Karlovic clash

Ivan idea: Coach Lendl gets Murray thinking big for Karlovic clash

Murray’s match will be very different to his opening encounter against Nikolay Davydenko, and the 25-year-old Scot will need to show all the composure displayed on Tuesday, and the confidence gleaned from it, to get through without mishap.

He is mentally prepared for a match-up that was only confirmed early yesterday evening when Karlovic finished off Sela from two sets up to win 6-4, 6-4, 7-6.

‘The momentum was with me the whole match against Davydenko, but that isn’t going to happen this time,’ said Murray, who had young Brit Oliver Golding trying to bomb him with serves on Wednesday.

‘There will be some ups and downs and there will be times when I do not touch the ball for a couple of games, so I am not necessarily going to get much rhythm. I have to make sure that mentally I am there for every single point because he can miss a bit and you need to be there to capitalise on it. It’s the sort of match that can come down to a few points.’

Working on his strenght: Murray during practice at Wimbledon

Working on his strenght: Murray during practice at Wimbledon

In Murray’s favour is that he tends to handle the big men well, partly through his return and his skill at keeping the ball low. In his three previous matches against Karlovic, he has won each time, although four of the eight sets they have played have gone to tiebreaks.

The 32-year-old is not a one-trick giant as he can hit the ball reasonably well off the ground and likes to volley, but it is the serve which is his defining feature. In his 21 (mainly best-of-three) matches in 2012 it has delivered 305 aces, which is a lot of free points.

But he is only 59 in the world and loses more often than he wins, against players of lesser calibre than Murray. This has led him to a sardonic accommodation with the vagaries of a pro’s life, which he often expresses with humour via his Twitter account.

Serving up a treat: Murray is second on Centre Court on Thursday

Serving up a treat: Murray is second on Centre Court on Thursday

Upon losing in the first round last month at Roland Garros, he tweeted of his Paris experience: ‘I came, I saw, I iced my shoulder, I ate croissant, I called the travel agency.’

Karlovic, who battles a considerable stammer, speaks in few words and when asked who in the game has best returned his serve smiled: ‘I aced everybody.’

His quickest ever was recorded at 156 mph. He will be happy if the roof is pulled over, entirely possible, so the elements do not interfere with his service delivery.

‘Everything should be indoors,’ he pronounced.

Ward must have a realistic chance of springing an upset, at least more of a chance than the massive ranking deficit he faces against Fish would suggest.

Bringing down the giant: Murray faces Ivo Karlovic

Bringing down the giant: Murray faces Ivo Karlovic

The world No 173, who lives across the road from Euston station, takes on the all-American ranked 12, but Fish’s recent health issues and lack of matches give the London cabbie’s son a chance of making a real name for himself.

Fish’s first-round win was his first since April, due to the time he has spent having a heart condition treated.

The 30-year-old Californian initially feared he might die when his heart started beating wildly as he tried to go to sleep. He was found to have arrhythmia, treatable with an operation, and this is his first tournament back.

When he missed his obligatory post-match media duties following the first round there were fears he had suffered a reaction, though he explained yesterday that this was due to an adverse stomach reaction to painkillers he had been taking for his shoulder.

Tall order: Ivo Karlovic stands in the way of Murray and a place in the third round

Tall order: Ivo Karlovic stands in the way of Murray and a place in the third round

He admitted that he is still anxious about his condition: ‘During the day I don’t have any issues. It’s just when I don’t feel perfect and don’t feel exactly the way I like to be feeling, that’s when I get into a little bit of trouble.

‘It’s the confidence part, me convincing myself that everything is fine.’

This is probably not the best way to enter a best-of-five set match, but the biggest physical disadvantage he might have is purely the lack of mileage in his legs and the absence of recent match experience.

Ward is coming in on the back of a victory over world No 36 Pablo Andujar and has shown before that he can do damage on grass, notably last year when he reached the semi-finals of the AEGON Championships at Queen’s Club.

There he beat the likes of Stanislas Wawrinka, but has been unable to build upon that and make the longed-for move up into the top 100. If he could snatch the first set and ensure that proceedings will be stretched out then he might really be in business.

Jeff Powell: Boxing back to hitting the right notes

In Manchester, El Paso and the Philippines – boxing was back hitting the right notes

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UPDATED:

22:58 GMT, 18 June 2012

No doubt to the surprise of many in the outside world, boxing matches took place as normal and according to schedule at the weekend.

Scott Quigg and Rendall Munroe ended up with a technical draw, rather than the interim WBA super-bantamweight belt round one of their waists, at a packed Manchester Velodrome.

An accidental clash of heads in the third round gashed Munroe above an eye, leaving him unable to continue and both men agreeing to a rematch.

First blood: Rendall Munroe suffered a cut after a clash with Scott Quigg

First blood: Rendall Munroe suffered a cut after a clash with Scott Quigg

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In El Paso, Texas, Julio Cesar Chavez Jnr successfully defended his WBC world middleweight title by stopping 'Irish' Andy Lee in the seventh round, thereby setting up a mouthwatering September showdown with linear champion Sergio Martinez.

As Mark Twain would have said, it seems that reports of the death of pugilism have been exaggerated.

Boxing's obituaries notices were posted after Manny Pacquiao was subjected to the biggest robbery in Las Vegas since the Ocean's 11 movie.

But then they usually are when the judges at ringside get it so wrong that they might have been standing outside the building.

So should football be shut down when the referee fails to award an obvious penalty

The abolitionists scream 'fix' whenever there is a furore in boxing but what we saw in Vegas was nothing better or worse than incompetence.

Football cries out for goal-line technology but there is no such remedy in the prize ring.

Scoring fights is a question of judgement, often subjective, while to err is human.

Ironically, it may be just as well that there is no such hi-tech remedy for the hard old game. Controversy fuels public interest.

Pacquiao returned home to his familiar hero's welcome in the Philippines, even though the only eight-division world champion was adjudged to have lost for the first time in seven years.

Same again: Scott Quigg (left) and Rendall Munroe are facing a rematch

Same again: Scott Quigg (left) and Rendall Munroe are facing a rematch

And while the man who was supposed to have beaten him, American Tim Bradley, argued that all we critics of that decision should watch a video replay with the pro-Pacquiao commentary turned off, the PacMan took it with a dignified shrug.

A conspicuously reborn Catholic, Pacquiao led his fans and fellow worshipers in prayers of acceptance for a verdict denounced, also, by 91 per cent of the respondents to an HBO network poll in America.

Then, even as he was being showered with confetti by well-wishers in Manilla, he urged the crowds to cut short the tributes and join him in helping the thousands of families in his home province of Sarangani who have been made homeless by devastating floods.

The rematch can wait while this Congressman attends to humanitarian business.

Big winner: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr successfully defended his title at the weekend

Big winner: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr successfully defended his title at the weekend

But when it does take place be sure the arena will be sold out, with the pay-TV sales going through the roof. Revenge is a dish best tasted at the box office.

Meanwhile, the show goes on, even widening its appeal as it does so.

The west country, more specifically Clevedon in Somerset, will be the unusual venue for a fairly big fight when British heavyweight hope Tyson Fury returns to action on July 7.

The opponent will be New York's Italian Stallion, Vinny Maddalone.

Fury will be hoping to move closer to a world title clash with one of the Klitschkos, as will his domestic rival David Price in a bout to be announced shortly.

Nothing could be better timed to restore dignity to boxing than the London Olympics.

Helping hands: Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao and his mum Dionisia greet residents affected by flashfloods in Glan, Sarangani province

Helping hands: Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao and his mum Dionisia greet residents affected by flashfloods in Glan, Sarangani province

Britain – for whom Amir Khan was the only gloved representative in Athens eight years ago – has 10 fighters competing in the 2012 Games, seven men and three women.

No fewer than seven of them are expected to be among the top three seeds in their weight classes.

But just as we can anticipate medals, so it is certain there will be disputes arising from the even more convoluted amateur scoring system.

Bring It on.

Our old friend controversy is expected to fill West Ham's football ground on July 14 for the dubious financial rewarding of David Haye and Dereck Chisora for their shameful brawl at a media conference in Munich.

If that not-so-big heavyweight fight cum faux-grudge match can't kill the game, nothing can.

Maybe, instead of trying to move forward into a future of some complex scoring technology, boxing should go back to the brutal days of the fight to the finish.

Jail means jail for Mayweather

Floyd Mayweather, having been given a token three-month sentence for battering his ex-girlfriend in front of their children, pleaded for a transfer from prison to house arrest, claiming the food and cramped conditions inside his solitary cell are eroding his fighting fitness.

Presumably he expected the multi-million dollar impact of his fights on the Las Vegas economy to sway this appeal in his favour.

Request: Floyd Mayweather wanted a transfer from prison to house arrest

Request: Floyd Mayweather wanted a transfer from prison to house arrest

But this time the judge was having none of it, asking whether he imagined he was being sent to the Four Seasons hotel on the Strip and reminding him that the water in the county jail is clean.

A small victory for justice over pampered celebrity – and no doubt Mr Money will look remarkably healthy when he returns to the ring this autumn.

Teofilo taken too soon

Teofilo Stevenson turned his back on the fortune he could have earned for fighting Muhammad Ali in the 70s by staying amateur, saying he preferred the affection of millions of his fellow Cubans to defection to the US.

Sadly, this triple gold medal-winning Olympian has died at just 60.

He'll be missed: Cuban legend Teofilo Stevenson

He'll be missed: Cuban legend Teofilo Stevenson

Oddly, despite the economic hardship and heavy food, Cubans enjoy a higher-than-American average life expectancy of more than 77.

But add hero-worship celebrity to the cigars and the cuba-libres in Havana and there are casualties.

Stevenson's big heart simply gave out.

London 2012 Olympics: Boxer Isaac Dogboe punches Games ticket

Boxer Dogboe punches Games ticket with silver in Casablanca

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UPDATED:

20:51 GMT, 6 May 2012

Punching his ticket: Isaac Dogboe

Punching his ticket: Isaac Dogboe

South London boxer Isaac Dogboe, 17, won silver at the African Olympic qualification tournament in Casablanca to book his place at London 2012.

The bantamweight was narrowly edged out by Moroccan veteran Aboubaker Seddik Lbida in Sunday's final but will now fight for Ghana at the Games later this year.

Chris Eubank Jnr beats Jason Ball

Eubank Jnr comes through tough test with narrow points win over Ball

Chris Eubank Jnr maintained his unbeaten record with a narrow points win over Jason Ball in Sheffield.

Eubank, 22, was given a fright in what was just his second professional bout as Ball finished the stronger.

But the Brighton fighter, who is following in the footsteps of his famous father, was awarded a 58-56 victory on the scorecards.

Boxing clever: Chris Eubank Jnr (left) beat Jason Ball in Sheffield

Boxing clever: Chris Eubank Jnr (left) beat Jason Ball in Sheffield

'I did what I had to do and came away with the win. I only used my left hand,' said Eubank Jnr.

'In training a few days ago I jarred my right and knew I wasn't going to be able to use it tonight. But I'm not going to pull out of fights with injuries.'

Eubank Senior, who supported his son from ringside, said: 'For him to beat a fighter of his experience with only one hand is exceptional. I'm happy.'

On the same bill, Kid Galahad beat Jason Booth for the vacant WBC Intercontinental super-bantamweight title.

Scott Quigg beats Jamie Arthur

Quigg gets up off the canvas to stop Arthur and retain British super-bantamweight title

Scott Quigg recovered from a
fourth-round knockdown to stop Jamie Arthur in the eighth to make a
successful first defence of his British super-bantamweight title.

Both men started tentatively at the
Reebok Stadium in Bolton but the fight came to life in the fourth
session when Quigg was floored by a left hand from the Welshman.

Arthur, 32, who was returning to the
ring after a year out, tried to finish the fight there and then but
Quigg showed his resilience.

Belt up: Scott Quigg shows off his British title after defeating Jamie Arthur

Belt up: Scott Quigg shows off his British title after defeating Jamie Arthur

And the 23-year-old from Bury upped the pace in the next round and began to dominate with Arthur momentarily rocked by a crashing right hand.

Quigg had his opponent pinned to the ropes from the sixth as the body shots began to reign in.

A clash of heads saw Arthur cut below his right eye in the following round as the fight drew towards its inevitable conclusion.

A left hook to the body had Arthur in trouble and as he spun away, referee Mark Green called a halt to proceedings.

Quigg, who is is now undefeated in 24 professional fights, said: 'I thought I caught him with a good body shot and he's turned his back.

'I've said all along that he's a dangerous fighter and he showed that in the fourth round.

'Everything went to plan except for me getting caught with a daft shot.

'I wasn’t hurt, though, I just got caught square on and went over but it was more embarrassing then anything. When I got up my head was clear. He threw the kitchen sink at me after that and I don’t think one shot landed.

'It’s up to the ref to decide when to
stop it and he couldn’t give him a count because he was still on his
feet, but he turned his back and you could tell he was in pain.

Getting stuck in: Quigg (left) takes the fight to Arthur in Bolton

Getting stuck in: Quigg (left) takes the fight to Arthur in Bolton

'I was getting to him and catching him with some big shots and it was only a matter of time before I finished it.

'If he thinks he didn’t get a fair chance and he wants a rematch then I’ll gladly give it to him.'

Quigg also confirmed he is ready to take on Commonwealth champion Carl Frampton in a mouthwatering unification fight.

'It’s the fight everyone wants to see so we need to sit down and discuss it,' he added.

'He’s got another fight coming up in March and if he wins and I keep winning, then we’re going to meet.

'The fights building up so what’s the point of it being for the just the British and Commonwealth titles It could be for a bigger title like the European as well for money.

'When it happens it should be in a big arena so we can build it up by him going his way and me going mine, but if the fight happens next then that’s fine by me because I know I’ll win.

'I’ll fight him wherever. I’ll go to Ireland as easily as he’ll fight me over here. I respect him and I’m sure he respects me and when we get it on it’s just about proving who’s the best.'

Scott Quigg gets up off the canvas to stop Jamie Arthur and retain champ"s belt

Quigg gets up off the canvas to stop Arthur and retain champ's belt

Scott Quigg recovered from a
fourth-round knockdown to stop Jamie Arthur in the eighth to make a
successful first defence of his British super-bantamweight title.

Both men started tentatively at the
Reebok Stadium in Bolton but the fight came to life in the fourth
session when Quigg was floored by a left hand from the Welshman.

Arthur, 32, who was returning to the
ring after a year out, tried to finish the fight there and then but
Quigg showed his resilience.

Belt up: Scott Quigg shows off his British title after defeating Jamie Arthur

Belt up: Scott Quigg shows off his British title after defeating Jamie Arthur

And the 23-year-old from Bury upped the pace in the next round and began to dominate with Arthur momentarily rocked by a crashing right hand.

Quigg had his opponent pinned to the ropes from the sixth as the body shots began to reign in.

A clash of heads saw Arthur cut below his right eye in the following round as the fight drew towards its inevitable conclusion.

A left hook to the body had Arthur in trouble and as he spun away, referee Mark Green called a halt to proceedings.

Quigg, who is is now undefeated in 24 professional fights, said: 'I thought I caught him with a good body shot and he's turned his back.

'I've said all along that he's a dangerous fighter and he showed that in the fourth round.'

Arthur meanwhile felt the bout was stopped too soon.

He said: 'It was a good shot but I was off balance so I'm disappointed. I had him down in the fourth and it was turning into a barnstormer of a fight.'