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London 2012 Olympics: Team GB men miss medals in 4x400m

More relay misery as Great Britain just miss medals in 4x400m

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UPDATED:

20:48 GMT, 10 August 2012

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Great Britain finished an agonising fourth in the 4×400 metres final at the Olympic Stadium as a courageous anchor-leg run from Martyn Rooney just came up short.

Rooney attacked round the final bend and on the home straight past Russia's Pavel Trenikhin and was closing on Trinidad's Deon Lendore, but was held off.

The host quartet, which also included Conrad Williams, Jack Green and Dai Greene, finished in two minutes 59.53 seconds.

All gold: Ramon Miller of the Bahamas beats American Angelo Taylor to the line

All gold: Ramon Miller of the Bahamas beats American Angelo Taylor to the line

Bahamas won in 2mins 56.72secs, with the United States second and Trinidad third, 0.31s ahead of Britain.

South Africa, with Oscar Pistorius on the fourth leg, finished eighth.

More to follow..

Angelo Dundee dead: Muhammad Ali"s legendary trainer dies at 90

The Greatest trainer: Ali's legendary cornerman Angelo Dundee dies at the age of 90

Angelo Dundee – the man who trained Muhammad Ali to glory – has died at the age of 90.

Dundee is believed to have died of a heart attack on Wednesday evening after suffering from a blood clot in recent weeks which saw him hospitalised in Florida before being moved to a healthcare centre.

Perfect pairing: Angelo Dundee played a key role for Muhammad Ali

Perfect pairing: Angelo Dundee played a key role for Muhammad Ali

Dundee will be largely remembered as Ali's trainer, guiding the heavyweight from his early days as a professional right through a career which saw the boxer become 'The Greatest' by winning the world heavyweight three three times and engaging in numerous epic fights.

'Angelo died surrounded by family and friends,' his family said in a statement.

'He was very happy that he got to celebrate Ali's (70th) birthday earlier this year and also that he got to go to the Hall of Fame. He still had much to do, but, led a full and extraordinary life.'

His son Jim told the Miami Herald: 'He was recuperating and coming along quite well. He was already making plans to (go) to Las Vegas for another event in two weeks.

'Thankfully, the whole family was with him. We have lost a great man. My dad led a wonderful life. Sadly, many of the great people from that generation are gone. This is the end of an era.'

Dundee will be remembered in England for his role in Ali's defeat of British icon Henry Cooper at Wembley in 1963.

Farewell: Dundee during a recent interview at 5th Street Gym in Miami

Farewell: Dundee during a recent interview at 5th Street Gym in Miami

Cooper
floored Ali – then still using his birth name of Cassius Clay – at the
end of the fourth round in London with a trademark left hook which
scrambled the American's senses. Ali was saved first by the bell,
however, and then by Dundee, who breached the rules by helping him to
the corner.

Dundee then illegally used smelling salts to help his fighter regain his senses and made a small tear in one of Ali's gloves, forcing a welcome delay while a new pair were sought.

Ali then went out and beat Cooper on a cuts stoppage in the very next round.

Philadelphia-born Dundee's achievements were not limited to Ali's glory, though.

He played a significant role in the
successes of the likes of Willie Pastrano, Jose Napoles, Jimmy Ellis,
George Foreman and, famously, 'Sugar' Ray Leonard. Dundee trained 15
world champions in total.

Deadly duo: Dundee with Ali before his fight with Trevor Berbick in 1981

Deadly duo: Dundee with Ali before his fight with Trevor Berbick in 1981

One of the more indelible memories of Dundee's career came in 1981 when he loudly exhorted Leonard in the late stages of a world championship unification fight against Thomas Hearns.

After famously telling the fighter 'You're blowing it, son,' Leonard came back out to register a thrilling knockout after having been dominated in preceding rounds.

'He saved Ray Leonard in the Hearns fight. He saved Ali (against Joe Frazier) in Manila,' said boxing promoter Bob Arum, who worked with Dundee countless times over the years.

'To motivate (a fighter) takes a special skill and there aren't many people that can do it. In the (more than 45 years) I've been in boxing, he is the greatest cornerman by far of anyone that I've ever witnessed.'

Dundee's work spanned six decades and he was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1992, cementing his legacy as an invaluable asset to some of the most decorated boxers of all time.

'Ali was this unbelievable figure, and a guy who symbolised an entire era of American culture and was idolised around the world,' Arum added. 'And through all those times, the person at his side was Dundee. For that, he will always be remembered.'

Dundee, whose wife died in 2010, is survived by a son and daughter, six grandchildren and a great grandchild.

How Dundee became a legend in boxing circles

1921: August 30 – Born Angelo Mirena in Philadelphia.

1955: Helps Carmen Basilio win the world welterweight title against Tony DeMarco.

1960: Begins training one-fight novice Muhammad Ali, then still using his birth name Cassius Clay.

1964: Plays a crucial role in Ali avoiding defeat to Henry Cooper in London, illegally helping his fighter to the corner and using smelling salts after he was knocked down by a left hook. Allegedly tears a hole in one of Ali's gloves to buy more time for his fighter to recover.

1965: Ali defeats Sonny Liston to become world heavyweight champion.

1971: Ali, back from boxing exile, loses for the first time to Joe Frazier at New York's Madison Square Garden.

1974: January 28 – Helps Ali avenge Frazier defeat, winning points decision in rematch.
October 30 – Ali shocks George Foreman in the Rumble in the Jungle, playing 'rope a dope' before stopping the heavy-hitting younger man in the eighth.

1975: Ali beats Frazier in the 'Thrilla in Manila' with an epic 14th-round stoppage victory.

1977: 'Sugar' Ray Leonard turns professional with Dundee in his corner.

1979: Leonard wins WBC welterweight title by beating Wilfred Benitez.

1980: Leonard loses to Roberto Duran.

1981: Leonard beats great rival Thomas Hearns in 'fight of the year', stopping the Detroit man in the 14th round. Dundee famously rallies his charge, warning him “You're blowing it, son!” before Leonard scores the knockout.
Ali retires following ignominious defeat by Trevor Berbick.

1987: Leonard returns to the ring to beat Marvin Hagler for the WBC middleweight belt.

1988: Dundee and Leonard split for the fighter's latest comeback, against Donnie Lalonde.

1992: Inducted into prestigious International Boxing Hall of Fame.

1994: Works Foreman's corner as the veteran knocks out Michael Moorer to regain the world heavyweight title.

2012: January – Attends Ali's 70th birthday celebrations in Louisville, Kentucky.
February 1 – Dies of a heart attack in Florida.

Angelo Dundee dies

The Greatest trainer: Ali's legendary cornerman Angelo Dundee dies at the age of 90

Angelo Dundee – the man who trained Muhammad Ali to glory – has died at the age of 90.

Dundee is believed to have died of a heart attack on Wednesday evening after suffering from a blood clot in recent weeks which saw him hospitalised in Florida before being moved to a healthcare centre.

Perfect pairing: Angelo Dundee played a key role for Muhammad Ali

Perfect pairing: Angelo Dundee played a key role for Muhammad Ali

Dundee will be largely remembered as Ali's trainer, guiding the heavyweight from his early days as a professional right through a career which saw the boxer become 'The Greatest' by winning the world heavyweight three three times and engaging in numerous epic fights.

His son Jim told the Miami Herald: 'He was recuperating and coming along quite well. He was already making plans to (go) to Las Vegas for another event in two weeks.

'Thankfully, the whole family was with him. We have lost a great man. My dad led a wonderful life. Sadly, many of the great people from that generation are gone. This is the end of an era.'

Farewell: Dundee during a recent interview at 5th Street Gym in Miami

Farewell: Dundee during a recent interview at 5th Street Gym in Miami

Dundee will be remembered in England for his role in Ali's defeat of British icon Henry Cooper at Wembley in 1963.

Cooper floored Ali – then still using his birth name of Cassius Clay – at the end of the fourth round in London with a trademark left hook which scrambled the American's senses. Ali was saved first by the bell, however, and then by Dundee, who breached the rules by helping him to the corner.

Dundee then illegally used smelling salts to help his fighter regain his senses and made a small tear in one of Ali's gloves, forcing a welcome delay while a new pair were sought.

Ali then went out and beat Cooper on a cuts stoppage in the very next round.

Deadly duo: Dundee with Ali before his fight with Trevor Berbick in 1981

Deadly duo: Dundee with Ali before his fight with Trevor Berbick in 1981

Philadelphia-born Dundee's achievements were not limited to Ali's glory, though.

He played a significant role in the successes of the likes of Willie Pastrano, Jose Napoles, Jimmy Ellis, George Foreman and, famously, 'Sugar' Ray Leonard.

Dundee, whose wife died in 2010, is survived by a son and daughter, six grandchildren and a great grandchild.

How Dundee became a legend in boxing circles

1921: August 30 – Born Angelo Mirena in Philadelphia.

1955: Helps Carmen Basilio win the world welterweight title against Tony DeMarco.

1960: Begins training one-fight novice Muhammad Ali, then still using his birth name Cassius Clay.

1964: Plays a crucial role in Ali avoiding defeat to Henry Cooper in London, illegally helping his fighter to the corner and using smelling salts after he was knocked down by a left hook. Allegedly tears a hole in one of Ali's gloves to buy more time for his fighter to recover.

1965: Ali defeats Sonny Liston to become world heavyweight champion.

1971: Ali, back from boxing exile, loses for the first time to Joe Frazier at New York's Madison Square Garden.

1974: January 28 – Helps Ali avenge Frazier defeat, winning points decision in rematch.
October 30 – Ali shocks George Foreman in the Rumble in the Jungle, playing 'rope a dope' before stopping the heavy-hitting younger man in the eighth.

1975: Ali beats Frazier in the 'Thrilla in Manila' with an epic 14th-round stoppage victory.

1977: 'Sugar' Ray Leonard turns professional with Dundee in his corner.

1979: Leonard wins WBC welterweight title by beating Wilfred Benitez.

1980: Leonard loses to Roberto Duran.

1981: Leonard beats great rival Thomas Hearns in 'fight of the year', stopping the Detroit man in the 14th round. Dundee famously rallies his charge, warning him “You're blowing it, son!” before Leonard scores the knockout.
Ali retires following ignominious defeat by Trevor Berbick.

1987: Leonard returns to the ring to beat Marvin Hagler for the WBC middleweight belt.

1988: Dundee and Leonard split for the fighter's latest comeback, against Donnie Lalonde.

1992: Inducted into prestigious International Boxing Hall of Fame.

1994: Works Foreman's corner as the veteran knocks out Michael Moorer to regain the world heavyweight title.

2012: January – Attends Ali's 70th birthday celebrations in Louisville, Kentucky.
February 1 – Dies of a heart attack in Florida.

Muhammad Ali at 70: The Greatest is still fighting – Jeff Powell

Even at 70, The Greatest is still fighting the good fight

Every one of the 350 people who gathered at the Muhammad Ali Center for the great man’s 70th birthday dinner party had a personal story to tell.

We exchanged recollections as we wished him well. He nodded as he rummaged through his memories, the mind apparently as bright as ever even though that lyrical Louisville Lip has been silenced by Parkinson’s.

The Greatest has done with talking. We all do it for him.

The Greatest: Muhammad Ali welcomes guests to his 70th birthday party

The Greatest: Muhammad Ali welcomes guests to his 70th birthday party

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VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

His legendary trainer Angelo Dundee, now 90, bustled up in his wheel-chair, recollected how the last time they spoke Ali had said how much he missed the gym, the training, the fighting.

Dundee told him: ‘If you’re thinking of a come-back I’ll have to ask them to put in elevators at ringside so I can get up to your corner.’

They produced a limited edition t-shirt on Saturday night which proclaims: 1942 – The Greatest Year Of All Time.

No argument from the rest of us who, like Ali, were born that year.

None of us are getting any younger but we are linked in time and coincidence.

Can it really be 39 years ago this week that I first got to know him quite well

He spent the evening before his 33rd birthday at the Royal Albert Hall, having flown to London to watch the British champion he was to fight a month later in Las Vegas.

Joe Bugner duly warmed up by beating one Rudi Lubbers and as Ali hurried out I chased after him to seek his opinion of the performance.

‘I’m in a hurry,’ he said. ‘But jump in my limousine and I’ll tell you how Mr Bugner will be defeated by The Greatest.’

That he did, as we drove to his hotel. Ever hungry for an audience, he invited me up to his suite where he held court for hours, only pausing in his brilliant monologue as we toasted his birthday at midnight.

Masterclass: Ali, as promised, comfortably beat Joe Bugner in Las Vegas

Masterclass: Ali, as promised, comfortably beat Joe Bugner in Las Vegas

Then he said: ‘Stick with me and you too can be The Greatest.’

He had a habit of foretelling the round in which his challengers would fall – our ‘Enery Cooper included – so he is entitled to get the odd prediction wrong.

There is only one Greatest. But what Ali has done, in all his overwhelming self-belief, is convince all who cross his path to endeavour to be the best we can.

That January night in 1973 we looked we looked out from a penthouse in the London Hilton across Hyde Park.

Dream team: Ali at his 70th birthday party with his trainer Angelo Dundee

Dream team: Ali at his 70th birthday party with his trainer Angelo Dundee

Last Saturday here in Louisville the view from atop his Center was of a freezing Ohio River.

The supreme athlete, the ultimate world heavyweight champion, is a somewhat frail figure now but he remains a magnetic presence. Still the Pied Piper as thousands flock to his public appearances and cheer him from the streets where he grew up.

There can be no denying that he Is in the final stages of his disease. But he is still fighting the good fight.

Praise me: Ali was never afraid to proclaim his greatness to the world

Praise me: Ali was never afraid to proclaim his greatness to the world

There is no telling how long he has left. What I do know is that these last 39 years have been enlivened beyond measure by encounters with Muhammad Ali.

Simply, they have flown by. As fast as the quickest hands in heavyweight history.