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Australian Grand Prix 2013: All you need to know about the 2013 race in Melbourne

Australian Grand Prix guide: All you need to know about the 2013 race in Melbourne

pole position: Lewis Hamilton (McLaren) 1min 24.922secs

2012 winner: Jenson Button (McLaren)

2012 fastest lap: Jenson Button 1min 29.187s

Number of corners: 16 (6 left/10 right)

Winning start: Jenson Button won last year's Australian Grand Prix

Winning start: Jenson Button won last year's Australian Grand Prix

Winning start: Jenson Button won last year's Australian Grand Prix

Winning start: Jenson Button won last year's Australian Grand Prix

Tyre compounds to be used: supersoft/medium

Bumpiness: medium

Overtaking chance: low

Engine severity: high

Brake wear severity: high

Average lap speed: 200kph (124.274mph)

Full throttle per lap: 71 per cent

Gear changes per lap: 54 (race = 3132)

2012 winning strategy: 2 stops (laps 16, 36)

2012 total race pit stops: 41

2012 total 'normal' overtakes: 22

2012 total DRS overtakes: 12

Number of safety car deployments over last 10 years: 13

Congrats: Lewis Hamilton (right) has since changed teams to Mercedes

Congrats: Lewis Hamilton (right) has since changed teams to Mercedes

On 11 occasions from 17 Australian Grands Prix, the winning driver at Albert Park has gone on to become world champion.Pole position has accounted for eight of the 17 winners of this race, with six in the last nine years.The lowest starter to win was Eddie Irvine, who started 11th for Ferrari in 1999.Jenson Button has won three times in the last four years, leaving him one victory shy of equalling Michael Schumacher's record of four wins achieved in 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2004.The demise of HRT returns F1 to a 22-car grid for the first time since early in 2008. During that season the withdrawal of Super Aguri after four rounds reduced it to 20. It expanded to 24 in 2010.Kimi Raikkonen has now had 17 consecutive results in the points. Only Michael Schumacher (24), Sebastian Vettel (19) and Fernando Alonso (18) can boast a longer run.Red Bull start the season aiming for their fourth consecutive constructors' title. Only one team in F1 history has achieved the feat – Ferrari, with six, from 1999-2004.Sebastian Vettel also goes for his fourth consecutive crown, an achievement previously accomplished by just two other drivers – Juan Manuel Fangio (1954-57) and Schumacher (2000-2004).

Nathan Cleverly to get home advantage in world title defence against Robin Krasniqi

Cleverly to get home advantage in world title defence against Krasniqi

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UPDATED:

16:38 GMT, 19 December 2012

Coming home: Cleverly will not have to travel to Germany to defend his title

Coming home: Cleverly will not have to travel to Germany to defend his title

Nathan Cleverly has avoided a daunting trip to Germany to defend his WBO world light-heavyweight title against Robin Krasniqi.

Cleverly, 25, missed out on a mouthwatering clash with American legend Bernard Hopkins after being ordered to face his mandatory challenger.

The Welshman will face Krasniqi on home soil on March 16 at a venue yet to be confirmed.

‘This fight is very motivating for me because it’s been hanging over me for a while so I really want to get this guy out of the way,’ Cleverly said.

‘I’ve got to make sure I’m on my game and put him to the sword.
‘I know that after this, the big fights are out there for me.

'I am pleased with the final decision. Now I have a schedule and can concentrate fully on the preparation.'

Cleverly was originally scheduled to face Serbian-born German last February at the Royal Albert Hall but had to pull out through illness.

Krasniqi, 25, has not been defeated since losing two of his first three fights over six years ago. Since then he has won 36 consecutive bouts, stopping 14 of his opponents.

Megafight: The Welshman still hopes to face American legend Bernard Hopkins

Megafight: The Welshman still hopes to face American legend Bernard Hopkins

Billy Joe Saunders beats Nick Blackwell to keep Commonwealth middleweight title and win British belt

Classy Saunders beats Blackwell to add British belt to Commonwealth title

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UPDATED:

02:54 GMT, 16 December 2012

Billy Joe Saunders retained his Commonwealth middleweight title and added the vacant British belt to his growing collection with a unanimous points win over Nick Blackwell.

The former Olympian, who remains undefeated after 16 professional contests, was forced to dig deep during the middle rounds but his class was reflected by scores of 117-112, 116-113 and 115-114 on the judges' cards.

Blackwell, who was fighting for the British strap for the second time, provided a stern test for the 23-year-old, but faded in the second half of the fight.

Champion: Billy Joe Saunders celebrates with his belts after victory over Nick Blackwell

Champion: Billy Joe Saunders celebrates with his belts after victory over Nick Blackwell

Saunders, 22, was fighting for the fourth time in a busy 2012 but only once had he been pushed, when winning a unanimous decision over Bradley Pryce in June.

In winning the vacant Commonwealth strap in April, Tony Hill was brutally dispatched in just 30 seconds at the Royal Albert Hall.

Unbeaten Australian Jarrod Fletcher last slightly longer when he made the trip to London but only until the second round when he too was stopped.

Blackwell's only previous defeat meanwhile came against world title challenger Martin Murray who faces WBC champion Sergio Martinez in Argentina next spring.

The 22-year-old emerged via the unlicensed circuit, winning all 18 of his fights before turning professional in 2009.

Since losing to Murray last summer, Blackwell had stopped his four subsequent opponents, most recently Mikheil Khutsishvili in May.

After a tense opening to the first round, Saunders began to exert control, landing with several flurries while Blackwell struggled to manoeuvre himself into position with his jab.

Saunders' pressure punching looked to be
taking its toll but Blackwell began to find his range towards the end of
the third stanza as he took advantage of Saunders' low right hand to
land several effective jabs.

Growing in confidence, the Trowbridge fighter began to move downstairs with his left hand and by the fourth round, an evenly-matched contest had developed.

And as a thrilling fight reached the
halfway stage, Blackwell was producing the more eye-catching
combinations as Saunders was forced on to the ropes and his right eye
began to redden.

Resistance: Blackwell put up a strong defence but Saunders deserved to take the fight on points

Resistance: Blackwell put up a strong defence but Saunders deserved to take the fight on points

Saunders' rod-like right jab proved effective in keeping Blackwell at bay in the seventh but the challenger was intent on stalking his opponent around the ring and had no hesitation in trading toe-to-toe.

Having boxed just one round since March, Blackwell began to tire in the eighth session as Saunders regained control of the bout. Although the ninth round was punctuated by solid jabs from Blackwell, it was the champion who stretched his lead on the scorecards with ever-more punishing combinations.

Aside from sporadic attacks to the body, Blackwell was also second best in the tenth round and was repeatedly beaten to the punch in round 10 while missing with shots of his own. Saunders took his foot off the gas in the penultimate round, perhaps aware that hearing the final bell would assure him of victory.

But Blackwell threatened to spoil the party in the last round as a punishing body shot momentarily stopped Saunders in his tracks but a barnstorming final two minutes failed to deliver a knockout blow.

Saunders was pleased to have been taken 12 rounds.

'Nick was very, very game and those rounds will hold me in good stead for the future. I've moved on to the next level,' he said.

Earlier in the evening, Liam Smith and Steve O'Meara both played their part in an enthralling contest for the vacant Commonwealth light-middleweight title, with Liverpudlian Smith winning by unanimous decision.

One of four boxing brothers, the 24-year-old looked set for an early finish when a left hook to the body had O'Meara, 28, on the canvas as the bell went for the end of the opening session.

The home favourite beat the count and showed no ill-effects but Smith's superior work rate and punishing blows saw him open up a commanding lead.

Despite trailing by large margins, O'Meara was far from outclassed and had plenty in reserve to contribute to a thrilling final round in which both boxers went toe-to-toe.

But having been unable to land the knockout blow, O'Meara lost for the third time in his career by scores of 112-116, 110-118 and 112-116.

Tough test: Blackwell impressed in defeat as he took Saunders to the final bell

Tough test: Blackwell impressed in defeat as he took Saunders to the final bell

Tony Conquest lost his unbeaten record, and his WBO International cruiserweight belt, when he was knocked out in less than two minutes by Neil Dawson.

Conquest started brightly but just as the contest was warming up, he was floored by a sharp left-right combination to the head and failed to beat the referee's count.

Bradley Skeete delivered the best performance of his career to win the Southern Area welterweight title with a fourth-round stoppage of Chas Symonds.

Skeete struggled to a laboured points victory over journeyman Peter McDonagh in September but produced a vastly-improved showing against Symonds.

Boxing behind the jab, the 25-year-old floored his opponent in the second round courtesy of a vicious left hook to the body.

Symonds, 30, had no trouble beating the count but Skeete began to land his right hand with alarming regularity and by the fourth round, Symonds' left eye was almost closed shut.

The doctor cleared him to continue but yet another right hand delivered Symonds to the canvas for a second time and although he again rose quickly, the contest was waved off.

Crowd favourite Frank Buglioni enjoyed yet another early night when Ciaran Healy retired on his stool with an injured back at the end of the second round.

The rising star from Enfield enjoyed his fifth stoppage from seven fights – a left hook to the body doing the damage, sending the Irishman to the floor before his corner called it a day.

Finally, Mitchell Smith needed less than four rounds to stop Estonian Igor Chuev in his fifth super-featherweight contest.

Smith, 20, had his opponent on the canvas in the third session but Chuev beat the count and although his corner threw in the towel seconds later, the referee opted to continue the contest.

But he did wave it off towards the end of the next round as Smith extended his unbeaten record.

Jessica Ennis misses out on Female Athlete of the Year to Allyson Felix

Team GB golden girl Ennis pipped to Athlete of the Year by US sprinter Felix in Barcelona

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UPDATED:

13:31 GMT, 25 November 2012

Jessica Ennis has missed out on being named the 2012 Female Athlete of the Year after American sprinter Allyson Felix won the award.

Olympic heptathlon champion Ennis was on the three-strong final shortlist, but lost out to Felix, who won three gold medals at London 2012, at an IAAF ceremony in Barcelona this afternoon.

Felix, 27, won the 200 metres and the 4x100m and 4x400m titles in the summer.

Unlucky Jessica: Prince Albert of Monaco (left) stood next to, Usain Bolt (centre left) and US sprinter Allyson Felix (centre right) after she pipped Ennis to Female Athlete of the Year

Unlucky Jessica: Prince Albert of Monaco (left) stood next to, Usain Bolt (centre left) and US sprinter Allyson Felix (centre right) after she pipped Ennis to Female Athlete of the Year

New Zealand shot putter Valerie Adams had also been in contention.

Usain Bolt won the men’s award for the fourth time in the last five years.

He beat Olympic 800m champion David Rudisha and 110m hurdles gold medallist Aries Merritt.

The pair have both set world records this year, while Bolt successfully defended his three sprint titles.

'This means a lot to me as this was one of my hardest years,' Bolt, who had fitness concerns in the run-up to the Olympics, said on the IAAF website.

Looking sharp: US athlete Aries Merritt missed out on an award

Looking sharp: Usain Bolt picked up the men's award

Looking sharp: Usain Bolt (right) picked up the men's award as Aries Merritt (right) missed out

Beaten: Yohan Blake

Winner: Allyson Felix pipped Jessica Ennis in Barcelona

Winner: Allyson Felix (right) pipped Jessica Ennis in Barcelona and Yohan Blake (left) strikes his signature pose

'My coach doesn’t want us to discuss injuries, so I didn’t talk about it, so this means a lot.'

Felix said: 'It is pretty much one of the coolest awards I’ve ever received.

'Winning it means you are at the top of your sport, which is something we all strive for. To finally reach the goal during the journey of a long career is very special.'

Another win: Bolt picked up his fourth award in five years

Another win: Bolt picked up his fourth award in five years

Class act: Jessica Ennis shone in the London Games, winning the heptathlon gold

Class act: Jessica Ennis shone in the London Games, winning the heptathlon gold

'For me this is a great honor to win a fourth time. I really worked hard and I was really focused this year. This season was one of my toughest.

'I had my ups and downs, even though we don’t like to talk about them,' said Bolt, who thanked his coach and the fans at this summer’s Olympics.

'The London games were magnificent. Fans were there in the stadium from 10 in the morning, I had never seen anything like that.'

In 2003, Bolt and Felix won the Rising Star awards for the most promising young athletes of the year.

Bolt said: 'Nine years ago I was here with Allyson, now I am back, that means I am getting old, which is slightly worrying,'

'But I will continue to work hard.'

Brian Clough is still a son of Middlesbrough but Don Revie is forgotten

Clough is still a son of Boro… Revie is forgotten

By
Michael Walker

PUBLISHED:

21:30 GMT, 16 September 2012

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 16 September 2012

One o'clock, Friday, and at the cafe in Middlesbrough's Albert Park about 20 men have gathered for an afternoon stroll. But this is one with an enjoyable, educational difference.

It begins nearby, outside No 11 Valley Road. This is the house in which Brian Clough was born and raised. There is a green plaque notifying the proud fact.

The route then returns to Albert Park to take in the engaging statue of the young Clough there, boots over his shoulder, on the way to work.

Home favourite: Clough was born and raised in Middlesbrough

Home favourite: Clough was born and raised in Middlesbrough

Across the road from the park, where there is now an estate agents and a pawnbroker, there used to be Rea's cafe, where Clough met one of the great loves of his life, his wife Barbara, and where he talked intently with another, Peter Taylor.

From there it is the length of two pitches to where the old Ayresome Park stood. Clough scored 197 goals in 213 League games for Middlesbrough.

Tarnished figure: Most people didn't realise Revie was from Middlesbrough

Tarnished figure: Most people didn't realise Revie was from Middlesbrough

The treasured ground disappeared in 1997. There are still cobbles on Warwick Street. Down at the bottom of Ayresome Street, the walk then turns.

In the space of around a mile, we have reached a different part of Middlesbrough and soon there is Bell Street, quiet, modest and usually bypassed.

There is no plaque on this street, not even outside pebble- dashed No 20. But there should be. Because here, so close to where Brian Clough grew up and matured as a footballer, is where Don Revie was born.

In 1969, aged 41, Revie led Leeds United to the first league title in the club's history. In 1972, aged 37, Clough led Derby County to their first league title in the club's history.

In 1974, Revie led Leeds to the title again. In 1978, Clough led Nottingham Forest to the club's one and only league title in their history. In between, before and after, there was plenty more.

By the way…

Another Middlesbrough man was Harold Shepherdson, Alf Ramsey's assistant with England in 1966. Harold also has a street named after him: Shepherdson Way leads to the Riverside.

Not least was that Revie became manager of England – successor to Sir Alf Ramsey – at a time when the man who thought he should have that job, who always thought he should have that job, was Brian Clough.

A couple of reasons for Clough's self-confidence came in the shape of Forest's two European Cups, in 1979 and 1980. Clough did not get the England job, but Leeds needed a manager after Revie. They chose – for 44 infamous days – Clough.

That two of the greatest English managers of the 20th century should come from opposite sides of Ayresome Park makes this an exceptional slice of the landscape. That they were opposites in other ways – first rivals, then harsh enemies – is fascinating.

As is the fact that their home town celebrates only one of them. Clough has a plaque, a statue and a street named after him. Don Revie Most people in Middlesbrough don't even know Revie came from Middlesbrough.

In part it is because Revie left for Leicester City at 17 having never played for Boro. But as Roger Hermiston, author of Clough and Revie, explained: 'Not playing for Boro meant no legacy, but also Revie rarely mentioned Middlesbrough. That's understandable.

'Sometimes people put their past behind them. From the town, Revie became a somewhat tarnished figure, the way the England job ended. And they were different characters. As Austin Mitchell said, Clough was like JFK, Revie was like Richard Nixon.'

Hermiston was our guide on Friday, along with Rob Nichols, as part of 'Discover Middlesbrough'. 'But I have great admiration for Revie,' added Hermiston.

Don's mother died when he was 11. Pausing beside a remaining workhouse wall at the Holgate End of Ayresome Park, Hermiston added that 'the fear of ending up here was real for Revie and his father. Revie was two when Wall Street crashed and started the Depression. Fear of unemployment was always on the Revie shoulder. Maybe that explains his later obsession with money.'

Clough, too, liked money. But the walk emphasised his childhood happiness. He wanted to be Wilf Mannion and if not, then Len Hutton. Revie, it seems, wanted away. So many other names and facts stepped forward – in May 1940, Middlesbrough was the first English town to be bombed by the Germans. Living history – so engrossing it was an afterthought that neither Clough nor Revie ever managed Boro.

A club built on localism

York-born Steve McClaren is another Middlesbrough-England managerial connection. In his last league game as Boro boss, at Fulham in May 2006, McClaren named an all-English starting XI. Ross Turnbull, Andrew Davies, Matthew Bates, David Wheater, Andrew Taylor, James Morrison, Jason Kennedy, Lee Cattermole, Malcolm Christie, Danny Graham, Adam Johnson.

They lost 1-0 and none are at the club today. On Saturday Boro beat Ipswich 2-0. Nine of Tony Mowbray's starting XI were English, five of them were born in the north-east. As was Mowbray. Localism.

Sport for Peace 2012: Muhammed Ali honoured by celebrities

'An athlete and a peacemaker': Boxing great Ali honoured by sports stars and celebrities in London

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UPDATED:

00:45 GMT, 26 July 2012

Muhammad Ali was being honoured on Wednesday night by celebrities from the world of sport and showbusiness.

The 70-year-old former heavyweight boxing world champion, who also won an Olympic gold medal, was being celebrated at the Sports For Peace gala in central London.

Ali's younger brother, Rahaman Ali, 69, said: 'He's very happy and proud to be here.

Honoured: Muhammad Ali attends the Sports For Peace Fundraising Ball at The V&A

Honoured: Muhammad Ali attends the Sports For Peace Fundraising Ball at The V&A

'He was a part of the 1960 team, and he's glad to be here.

'He won in 1960, and he thinks the US team are going to be the champs this year.'

New friends: Muhammed Ali (left), who was lauded by sport and showbiz celebrities on Wednesday night, was photographed with footballer David Beckham on Tuesday

New friends: Muhammed Ali (left), who was lauded by sport and showbiz celebrities on Wednesday night, was photographed with footballer David Beckham on Tuesday

Ali picked up the gold medal for the United States in the Rome Olympics in 1960 in the light heavyweight class. He was then known as Cassius Clay.

Sports stars from around the world attended the gala evening at the Victoria and Albert Museum in central London.

Sea of stars: Lewis Hamilton turned out to attend the Sport for Peace event at the V&A Museum in Kensington

Sea of stars: Wladimir Klitschko turned out to attend the Sport for Peace event at the V&A Museum in Kensington

Sea of stars: Lewis Hamilton (left) and Wladimir Klitschko (right) turned out to support Ali at the Sport for Peace event at the V&A museum in Kensington

Former world and European champion, and 1988 Olympic silver medallist, Colin Jackson said: 'It's absolutely wonderful to be here.

'Any time we can celebrate anything with a sporting icon, it's just fantastic.

'When you just look around the people here, you can understand and magnitude of this man.'

Brotherly love: Muhammed's brother, Rahaman Ali (left), supported his sibling at the event

Brotherly love: Muhammed's brother, Rahaman Ali (left), supported his sibling at the event

Asked what Ali brought to sport, and the Olympics, the 45-year-old Welshman said: 'He brought excellence. He brought skill and maturity.

'He showed that the Games themselves are about fun and young people.

'We have all got family members and close friends like him, people with a cheeky personality and who are good at their job.

Showbiz on the roster: Rosario Dawson was one of many stars supporting the former heavyweight champion of the world

Showbiz on the roster: Bob Geldof was one of many stars supporting the former heavyweight champion of the world

Showbiz on the roster: Rosario Dawson (left) and Bob Geldof (right) were among a number of stars who turned up to support the former heavyweight champion of the world

'He showed sports stars that everyone can be like that.'

Former tennis star Boris Becker said: 'Muhammad Ali is the greatest of all time. The greatest living sportsman.

'To be in his presence one more time is a big honour and a privilege.

'He presented his sport all over the world. From an athlete he became a peacemaker, he became a global warrior and just a spokesperson for the right causes. He has had just an incredible life.'

Float like a butterfly... Ali (right) was one of the greatest boxers to have ever fought

Float like a butterfly… Ali (right) was one of the greatest boxers to have ever fought

Nathan Cleverly ready for biggest fight of his career

Cleverly to announce biggest fight of his career as world champion nears return

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UPDATED:

07:28 GMT, 15 July 2012

Nathan Cleverly is preparing for the biggest fight of his career ahead of his return to the ring in October.

The WBO light heavyweight champion has been out of action since his facile win over American Tommy Karpency in February.

A planned title defence against Robin Krasniqi at the Royal Albert Hall in April was called off after the Welshman took ill.

Big one: Nathan Cleverly is preparing to make the next defence of his title

Big one: Nathan Cleverly is preparing to make the next defence of his title

And although Cleverly was unable to confirm his next opponent, he told Sportsmail: 'It could be a unification fight.

'We're going to announce it next week and I’m liking the sound of this one.

'I can’t say where the fight is going to be but it’s going to be good. It's definitely going to be the biggest fight of my career.

Job done: Cleverly easily outpointed Tommy Karpency in Cardiff

Job done: Cleverly easily outpointed Tommy Karpency in Cardiff

'I've had a few months off freshening up. I've been on holiday and enjoying my life. Physically and mentally I've had a break. I went to Spain on two occasions, once to train and another with my friends.

'I'm in the gym and feeling the best I’ve ever felt to be honest'

Campbell Gillies could have reached the top, says Peter Scudamore

Trainer Scudamore hails Gillies as potential world beater after the rider's death in Greece

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UPDATED:

18:47 GMT, 26 June 2012

Peter Scudamore believes Campbell Gillies had an innate riding ability that could have carried him to the top of the jockey ranks.

The Cheltenham Festival-winning jockey, who would have been 22 on Wednesday, has died after a tragic swimming pool accident while on holiday in Greece.

The pinnacle of the Gillies embryonic career had come in March when he landed the Albert Bartlett Novices’ Hurdle at the Cheltenham Festival on Brindisi Breeze, who is trained in Scotland by Scudamore’s partner Lucinda Russell.

Horror: Gillies lost his life while on holiday with fellow jockeys in Greece

Horror: Gillies lost his life while on holiday with fellow jockeys in Greece

Eight-time champion jockey Scudamore, who along with Russell's No 1 rider Peter Buchanan, had been a mentor to Gillies.

He said: ‘Campbell had a wonderful
personality – he was a very intelligent young lad who was both funny and
charming. Although he was a tough little lad he was also very
sensitive. Everybody in the yard adored him and is devastated.

‘We were all immensely proud of his
achievements, the pinnacle of which was the success of Brindisi Breeze.
Their partnership emphasised everything about Campbell. He rode with
such confidence and determination.

‘At 21, he obviously still had things to learn but he had an ability and sense of timing that you can’t teach.

‘You didn’t give him orders, he had
an innate sense to be in the right position on a horse. Who knows how
far he would have gone but I truly believe, given the opportunities, he
had the ability to be an outstanding jockey.

‘Everything he did in life was
positive and he took that attitude with him on the racecourse. He was so
looking forward to his holiday and the joke was they’d only paid 100
for it. That was his sense of humour.

‘He created a dilemma for us. I
wanted to encourage him to go south and get more rides but I didn’t want
him snapped up for a big job because when Peter retires, we wanted him
here.’

Tragedy: Gillies savoured victory at Cheltenham this year

Tragedy: Gillies savoured victory at Cheltenham this year

A minute’s silence was observed at all four meetings on Tuesday in tribute to the Scottish rider.

Russell said: ‘We are immensely proud
of the achievements of Campbell. More than that he had a wonderful
charm that I believe came across to everyone who met him, and through
his media interviews.’

Champion jockey AP McCoy led the
tributes from weighing room colleagues, when he tweeted: ‘Very sad news
about Campbell Gillies a very good jockey but an even better bloke. All
our thoughts are with his family RIP.’

While Gold Cup winner Sam Thomas
said: ‘Saddening news about Campbell Gillies, a great pilot, a top guy
and most of all a true gentleman.’

Gillies, whose brother Finlay plays
rugby for Glasgow Warriors, first sprang to prominence due to his
association with the classy Lie Forrit, part-owned by his grandfather
and trained by Willie Amos.

Paying tribute: Peter Scudamore

Paying tribute: Peter Scudamore

He rode his first winner in the
2007-08 season and had 131 career winners including 38 last season. He
was in action as recently as Sunday at Hexham.

His uncle Rory McNeil issued a
statement on behalf of his mother Lesley, Finlay and sister Rita which
said ‘The whole family is devastated and trying to come to terms with
our loss.’

‘Campbell was dearly loved by one and
all, and this is shown by the tributes to him. We hope that at this
time we can be given the space and time to grieve.’

Brindisi Breeze was also killed in May after jumping out of his paddock and colliding with a lorry.

What seemed a devastating blow at time for the Russell stable has now been compounded in an unimaginable train of events.

Campbell, always courteous and
engaging, was on top of the world back at the Festival in March as he
talked so excitely about what he and his mount could achieve together.
In Brindisi Breeze, he had a partner potentially capable of projecting
his talents in the biggest races.

The season ahead was rich in promise
as he jostled with other promising young riders in the race to
ultimately succeed the likes of McCoy and Ruby Walsh.

To those professionally involved with
Campbell, the thought his life should be snuffed out so soon after that
March afternoon seems immensely cruel.

The extent of the agony being endured by those even closer to him is hard to imagine.

Campbell Gillies dies in holiday swimming pool incident

Racing in mourning as Cheltenham winner Gillies, 21, dies on holiday in Kavos 'swimming pool incident'

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UPDATED:

10:16 GMT, 26 June 2012

Campbell Gillies has lost his life on holiday in Kavos, Greece, just weeks after securing the biggest win of his racing career at the Cheltenham Festival.

He rode Brindisi Breeze in the Grade 1 Albert Bartlett Novices' Hurdle at Cheltenham in March but tragically died in 'swimming pool incident'.

He arrived on holiday on Monday with fellow jockeys Henry Brooke, Nathan Moscrop and Harry Haynes and was due to celebrate his 22nd birthday on Wednesday.

Horror: Gillies lost his life while on holiday with fellow jockeys in Greece

Horror: Gillies lost his life while on holiday with fellow jockeys in Greece

His Cheltenham winner Brindisi Breeze was also killed last month after he jumped out of a paddock and was hit by a lorry on a nearby road.

His friend and fellow jockey Alexander Voy took to Twitter to pass on his condolences after learning the news.

He said: 'I can't believe it. You
only have one best friend and now he's gone. I'll never forget you
@campbellgillies, love you pal xxx.'

Gillies, who was also associated with
the Willie Amos-trained Lie Forrit, primarily rode for Perth handler
Lucinda Russell after joining her team in 2007.

Gillies' agent Paul Brierley said: 'At the present time, all I can say is there has been an accident.'

And BBC racing presenter Clare Balding tweeted her sorrow after hearing of the jockey's death.

She said: 'So
sad to hear that jump jockey Campbell Gillies has died in an accident
on holiday. He was a lovely guy & a fine, brave jockey.'

Tragedy: Gillies savoured victory at Cheltenham this year

Tragedy: Gillies savoured victory at Cheltenham this year

Gillies – whose brother Finlay plays rugby for
Glasgow Warriors – won 131 races in Britain and enjoyed his best ever
campaign in 2011-12 with 38 winners, and had ridden four winners so far
this season.

A club statement from Warriors said: 'Glasgow Warriors are deeply saddened to learn of the sad passing of Campbell Gillies, brother of Warriors hooker Finlay.

'A promising young jockey, Campbell shot to prominence when he rode Brindisi Breeze to victory in the Albert Bartlett Novices' Hurdle on Gold Cup day at this year's Cheltenham Festival.

'The thoughts of everyone at Glasgow Warriors are with Finlay and his family at this terrible time.'

Champion jockey Tony McCoy said on Twitter: 'Very sad news about Campbell Gillies. A very good jockey but an even better bloke. All our thoughts are with his family RIP.'

Gold Cup winner Sam Thomas was also on Twitter. saying: 'Saddening news about Campbell Gillies, a great pilot, a top guy and most of all a true gentleman. My thoughts go out to all his family.'

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray says age is on his side

Age is on my side, claims Murray as British No 1 prepares for Wimbledon assault

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UPDATED:

15:21 GMT, 25 June 2012

Andy Murray will not be feeling the pressure of a ticking clock when he takes to the court on Tuesday for his opening match at his seventh Wimbledon.

The Scot's bid to become the first British man since Fred Perry in 1936 to win a grand slam singles title has become one of the nation's biggest sporting sagas, but optimism appears to be waning in some quarters.

Murray is now 25, no longer one of tennis' young guns, but Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal appear more invincible than ever at the major tournaments, sharing the last nine slams between them. Then there is Roger Federer, still hungry for more titles to add to his record tally of 16, while the likes of Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Tomas Berdych and Juan Martin Del Potro are closing on Murray.

In training: Murray prepares for his first-round clash with Nikolay Davydenko

In training: Murray prepares for his first-round clash with Nikolay Davydenko

Only four players older than the world No 4 have become first-time slam champions since 2000 – Gaston Gaudio and Albert Costa at the French Open, Thomas Johansson in Australia and most famously Goran Ivanisevic at Wimbledon in 2001 at the age of 29.

But Murray believes the trend in tennis is towards players reaching their peak later, and he sees no reason why he cannot be the same.

'I just play, and I also think tennis
has changed a lot. I know a lot about the history of the game and it has
completely changed,' said Murray.

Benchmark: The British No 1 is yet to taste Grand Slam success but reckons age is on his side

Benchmark: The British No 1 is yet to taste Grand Slam success but reckons age is on his side

'When I first made it into the top 10 there was me, Djokovic, Nadal, who were all 18 or 19 years old.

'Now there are maybe two or three
guys under 20 in the top 100. The average age of the top players is
much, much older than it used to be because the game has become much
more physical.

'It has
changed a lot so whereas before guys were playing their best tennis
when they were younger, I think it is starting to happen now that guys
are playing their best when they're older.'

Great Scot: Murray comes into the tournament with expectations lower than usual after early defeats at Queen's and Boodles

Great Scot: Murray comes into the tournament with expectations lower than usual after early defeats at Queen's and Boodles

The lack of teenagers making the same breakthrough Murray, Nadal and Djokovic did has been a big talking point in the game, but the next generation are finally making their mark. Bernard Tomic, the only teenager in the top 100, reached the quarter-finals at Wimbledon last year and is seeded 20th this time while big-serving Canadian Milos Raonic and Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov are two to watch out for at SW19.

Murray thinks it will be a while before anyone breaks out of the pack to challenge for the biggest prizes, though, saying: 'I don't see anyone breaking through and winning the title out of nowhere.

Support: Murray is the home favourite

Support: Murray is the home favourite

'Last year Tomic made the quarter-finals but he is already a very good player. He is in the top 30 in the world. There are a lot of tough, tough guys out there.'

Raonic is one of several dangerous outsiders lurking in Murray's section of the draw, and if the Scot is to at least match his achievement of the last three years in making the semi-finals, he is likely to get a lot of practice at returning big serves.

The Canadian is a potential fourth-round opponent, and before then Murray could already have played 6ft 10in Ivo Karlovic and 6ft 8in Kevin Anderson. Queen's champion Marin Cilic is another possible opponent, as is former US Open champion Del Potro, who Murray could face in the quarter-finals.

The world No 4 said ahead of his first-round match against Nikolay Davydenko: 'It's always a tough match when you play against big servers.

'I've had a good record against them in the past but it can be quite mentally challenging playing against them because you can't really lose focus on your own serve, even if it's just for a few points.

'It can be tough to break them. Big servers usually play better when they're ahead, as well. But it would be stupid for me to look past Davydenko. Although I'm sure many people will, I won't be making that mistake.'

There are five other British players in action tomorrow, with Jamie Baker handed the toughest challenge against three-time finalist Andy Roddick, who is fresh from victory at Eastbourne.

Laura Robson will play her first match as a top-100 player against 24th seed and former French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, while Elena Baltacha faces Karin Knapp, Anne Keothavong takes on Laura Pous-Tio and James Ward tackles Pablo Andujar.