ICC recommend universal DRS use

At last! India could be forced into using DRS as ICC recommend universal use

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UPDATED:

18:31 GMT, 25 June 2012

The International Cricket Council chief executives' committee have recommended universal application of the Decision Review System.

An ICC statement released on Monday confirmed that the committee (CEC) had made the recommendation – which has to be ratified by the ICC board – after being satisfied with the technology enhancements provided by new Hotspot cameras and the results of independent research on ball tracking.

New and improved: The ICC are happy with Hotspot

New and improved: The ICC are happy with Hotspot

The Decision Review System (DRS) has caused controversy, with India being firmly against it and refusing to use it in last summer's Test series against England.

Nonetheless, the CEC are recommending that, subject to members' ability to finance and obtain the required technology, DRS should be mandatory for all Tests and one-day internationals.

ICC chief executive Haroon Lorgat said: 'We have made good progress in independently testing ball tracking and the new enhancements has resulted in the CEC unanimously supporting the ICC cricket committee's recommendation to universally apply the DRS in all Test matches and ODIs.'

Ratified: The ICC are also happy with the result of an independent review of the ball-tracking system

Ratified: The ICC are also happy with the result of an independent review of the ball-tracking system

The CEC also reconfirmed the necessity for all member boards to have in place and implement domestic anti-corruption codes – stressing in particular the need for the Bangladesh Cricket Board and Sri Lanka Cricket to incorporate such codes – and said it did not object to the principle of a six-match Twenty20 international series between Pakistan and Australia, who are set to clash in the United Arab Emirates in August.

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) had requested support for the six-match format, requiring special dispensation from the CEC and then the ICC board as current regulations permit only three T20s in a series.

Monday's statement confirmed that 'because of the extreme daytime heat in the UAE at that time of the year, the CEC raised no objections to the principle of a six-match T20 series replacing the scheduled series of three ODIs and three T20s should the PCB elect to make that switch.'

The CEC meeting forms part of this week's ICC annual conference in Kuala Lumpur. The recommendations now go forward for consideration by the ICC board, which meets on Tuesday and Wednesday.