Bubba Watson: The pride and passion – Derek Lawrenson

The pride and passion of 'Blubber' Watson

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 9 April 2012

Have you all been down to your local pro shop to enquire about a pink driver yet Or on to the internet to check out the new Masters champion's natty all-white outfit

No doubt the charitable causes Gerry 'Bubba' Watson espouses in both instances have received a huge boost following his stunning triumph at Augusta National but if both are too garish for your tastes, here is something he has got that every wannabe should copy: passion.

Cry your eyes out: Watson is consoled by his mum after winning the Masters

Tears of joy: Watson is consoled by his mum after winning the Masters

Has this game ever thrown up a purer example of what can be achieved with desire Maybe not since Lee Trevino.

If you think it just too fanciful a notion that Watson's never had a golf lesson in his life, never even watched his swing on video, here is what JJ Dunn, pro at the club where he played as a teenager in Bagdad, Florida, told the Augusta Chronicle: 'Bubba knows nothing about the golf swing. Not one thing. He grew up with Boo Weekley who was a keen student but Bubba just wasn't interested.

Green with envy: Last year's winner Charl Schwartzel presents Bubba with the green jacket

Green with envy: Last year's winner Charl Schwartzel presents Bubba with the green jacket

'There's no teaching what he has; no substitute for it. It's almost freakish what he does to create such clubhead speed.'

Watson went to the same school as Weekley, who grew up on a golf course in a house on the corner of a dog-leg. Typical Bubba. He could not play the hole conventionally but would curve the ball right over Weekley's house.

Through the eye of the needle: Watson plays his second shot at the 10th during the sudden death play-off

Through the eye of the needle: Watson plays his second shot at the 10th during the sudden death play-off

Such a skill came in handy on the second hole of his sudden-death play-off against the great South African stylist, Louis Oosthuizen. A rare inaccurate drive had left him deep in the woods, 160 yards from the hole.

Eclipsing Oosthuizen's remarkable achievement of only the fourth albatross in Masters history for shot of the day took some doing but Watson managed it.

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Needing to hook a wedge 40 yards in the air to find the green, Watson somehow pulled it off to clinch victory. Watching, his great friend Rickie Fowler chuckled to himself.

'He was probably better off having to play a shot no-one else could play rather than just having to hit it straight,' he said.

Watson has a reputation for dissolving into tears when he wins and here he convulsed great uncontrollable sobs on to the shoulders of his mum, Molly.

The emotion was heightened because he and his wife Angie adopted their first child, one- month-old Caleb, a fortnight ago.

'When we were on our first date she told me she had to adopt,' said Watson. For the past four years they have been going through what felt like a never-ending process.

'We finally heard on the Tuesday of the Arnold Palmer Invitational that we'd been successful and on the Wednesday we said yes,' he said.

'The following Monday we picked him up. Winning the Masters means everything right now but I know it's not real life and I'm looking forward to enjoying that again. I haven't even changed a diaper yet.'

There is a lot of John Daly in the way Watson, 33, plays golf, with his ability to hit the ball miles and his gossamer touch around the greens.

But off the course they could hardly be more different. Watson does not drink, smoke and would not dream of missing church on Sundays.

He almost caused a diplomatic incident in France last year at the French Open when he wrote off its various cultural attractions and said he could not wait to get home, but that is Bubba.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

'I have no idea what to say because I never got this far in my dreams.'

At the green jacket ceremony, Bubba Watson sums up what it means to win the Masters in his own inimitable way.

His genius lies in his hands, not his head, and then there is that enormous heart.

'This is what he worked for his whole life,' said mum. 'He didn't party when he was young, he played his golf. His dad always told us this would happen.'

Dad Gerry died of throat cancer two years ago and drawing attention to charities looking for cures is why Watson uses that unique driver he wields to such devastating effect.

And so a Masters that never relented for a minute in terms of pulsating excitement had delivered a winner who added up to another shining example of the American dream.

'The Masters champ, you think I'm done, right' Watson said, smiling. 'I know I can't beat this but hopefully I'll keep crying.'

His tears are welcome any time.

BBC taking the Michael

The vast number of critical emails I woke up to yesterday indicates that the BBC had another belter at the Masters. Didn't we predict in this column last week that Michael Vaughan would be a calamity That's the problem.

Under fire: Vaughan attracted criticism for his calamitous display at The Masters

Under fire: Vaughan attracted criticism for his calamitous display at The Masters

You can see the flaws in their celebrity-obsessed approach a mile off and yet still they blunder on. What is wrong with these people Why won't they ever listen to their audience

Lee's time will come

Lee Westwood's caddie Billy Foster described his man's tied-third finish at the Masters as the 'same old story' and it was hard to argue with that.

Tied first in birdies, first in greens in regulation but the nearly man of the major championship scene had 19 – yes, 19 – more putts than Phil Mickelson, one of the men who finished alongside him.

So close: Westwood was two shots away from making the play-off

So close: Westwood was two shots away from making the play-off

All right, Mickelson is always going to have fewer putts because he is always going to miss more greens, but almost five putts per round is a staggering number.

Still, an Easter Sunday finish seems the right occasion to insist we keep the faith.

Westwood missed one putt of 12 inches and another from two feet, but he was still there at the end, outplaying everyone from tee to green.

He is so mentally strong you do feel that somewhere along the line he is just going to have a week where they go in and he will win by six.

Given he will be 39 by the time the US Open takes place in June, let us just hope it is soon.