Steven Pienaar signs for Everton from Tottenham

Pienaar heads back to Everton in 4.5m deal just 18 months after leaving for Spurs

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UPDATED:

17:34 GMT, 31 July 2012

Fantasy football 2012

Everton have confirmed the permanent return of Steven Pienaar from Tottenham for 4.5million on a four-year deal.

The South Africa international spent the second half of last season on loan at Goodison Park after failing to impress under then-Spurs boss Harry Redknapp.

He only signed for Tottenham last year for a reported 3million fee after spending four years, the first of which was on loan from Borussia Dortmund, with Everton.

On the move: Steven Pienaar in action for Spurs during pre-season this month

On the move: Steven Pienaar in action for Spurs during pre-season this month

Opportunities were limited for Pienaar at Tottenham, where he started just five Barclays Premier League matches.

But he excelled on his return to Everton, scoring four goals in 14 league games to help them finish seventh, with boss David Moyes stating at the beginning of the month one of his aims for the summer was to re-sign Pienaar.

'We are keen [on Pienaar] and I hope in time we would be able to conclude that deal,' he said.

'I don't know if the situation has changed (with Andre Villas-Boas coming in as new Spurs manager) but Steven has made it very clear he wants to come back here and my understanding is that hasn't changed.

Fans' favourite: Pienaar spent the second half of last season on loan with Everton

Fans' favourite: Pienaar spent the second half of last season on loan with Everton

'My next job in the coming weeks is to get Steven Pienaar here as well.'

Pienaar made no secret of his desire to return to Merseyside and Tim Cahill's move to Major League Soccer outfit the New York Red Bulls paved the way for the 30-year-old's comeback.

He told Everton's website: 'I am happy to be here. It took a few weeks to sort out but I am delighted to be back and excited to play for Everton.

'There was no doubt in my mind that I would be back here. At the end of the season I told the manager how I felt and I am happy now it is all done.'

London Olympics 2012 Great Britain 19 Sweden 41: Another harsh lesson dished out to men"s handball team

Great Britain 19 Sweden 41: Another harsh lesson dished out to men's handball team

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UPDATED:

17:33 GMT, 31 July 2012

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Great Britain's men slipped to another heavy defeat in Group A of the preliminary stage as they were unable to cope with a clinical Sweden in the Copper Box.

Having only been formed in 2006, Team GB were given a brutal welcome to their first ever Olympic Games by reigning gold medallists France, who handed out a 44-15 demolition on Sunday in their first match.

And their Scandinavian opponents, who are three-time silver medallists, offered no mercy as they inflicted more misery on Team GB, who for all their progress over the last six years, were given a frank reminder of how far they still have to go before they are competing on the world stage.

Handballing lesson: Sweden's Mattias Gustafsson scores

Handballing lesson: Sweden's Mattias Gustafsson scores

But, despite the severity of the loss, Dragan Djukic's side can take positives from Sebastian Prieto and Chris Mohr's performance and four goals from Steven Larsson, giving them something to take into Thursday's game with Argentina, which has been long-touted as a potential match to win.

The gulf in class did not seem immediately obvious as the host nation held their own for the opening exchanges and were level at 2-2 after three minutes, with Mark Hawkins scoring his first goal at the Olympics.

But then Sweden imposed themselves on the game and in combination with missed chances and sloppy passing from Team GB, they rattled off six successive goals to earn an 8-2 advantage after eight minutes.

Rallying cry: Sebastian Prieto celebrates after scoring

Rallying cry: Sebastian Prieto celebrates after scoring

Sebastian Prieto finally broke that
spell with a fine move from a free throw, which gave the partisan home
crowd reason to cheer, but that could not be used as a catalyst for a
comeback as four consecutive goals gave the Scandinavians a 12-3 lead,
which even at the quarter-way point of the match was impregnable.

While Sweden kept a sizeable lead in tact thanks to a percentage conversion rate in the 90s and the ability to construct fast breaks, Team GB did seem to improve and incisive attacking moves saw both Chris McDermott and Prieto bag nice goals.

Part of the host nation's problem was that star man Larsson, who represented Sweden at youth level, had failed to get into the game, but he announced his arrival against the country where he grew up with a fine lob finish.

Curtailed: Kim Ekdahl du Rietz gets to grips with Britain's pivot Christopher McDermott

Curtailed: Kim Ekdahl du Rietz gets to grips with Britain's pivot Christopher McDermott

But that and goals from Mohr were just fleeting glimpses of promise for Team GB and Sweden finished the first half having scored an incredible 24 of their 26 efforts on goal, which would have been enough to blow better teams than Team GB away, and gave them a 14-goal half-time lead.

The opening few minutes of the second half offered no respite for a beleaguered host nation, with Staffan Olsson's side throwing in six unanswered goals and at last missing several other opportunities.

A fast break from Seb Edgar woke the
Copper Box up from their slumber, but the cheers were all too rare as
Sweden held a 21-goal lead at the halfway point of the second half.

In a battle: Sweden's Fredrik Petersen tussles with Britain's Sebastien Edgar

In a battle: Sweden's Fredrik Petersen tussles with Britain's Sebastien Edgar

But the home crowd were given reward for their support soon after when Jesper Parker made two fine saves and then their side scored back-to-back goals for the first time in the game.

Sweden saw it out with ease, though, to record a 22-goal win, with right-wing Niclas Ekberg having an afternoon to remember by netting 13 goals, the best match haul of the tournament so far.

The defeat leaves GB rooted to the bottom of Group A with no points and an ugly goal difference, while Sweden sit top, with two wins from two.

London 2012 Olympics: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga beats Milos Raonic 25-23 in longest set

Tsonga wins longest set in Olympic history 25-23 to survive marathon with Milos

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UPDATED:

18:10 GMT, 31 July 2012

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Jo-Wilfried Tsonga defeated Milos Raonic after edging the longest set in Olympic tennis history on Tuesday.

Tsonga, of France, eventually won 6-3, 3-6, 25-23 in the second round at Wimbledon.

The fifth-seeded Tsonga of France leaped and roared when he won his fourth match point with a drop volley. Raonic of Canada congratulated Tsonga with a smile.

Sacre bleu: France's Jo-Wilfried Tsonga celebrates finally beating Canada's Milos Raonic at Wimbledon

Sacre bleu: France's Jo-Wilfried Tsonga celebrates finally beating Canada's Milos Raonic at Wimbledon

Tough nut to crack: Raonic pushed Tsonga all the way in the deciding set of their second-round match

Tough nut to crack: Raonic pushed Tsonga all the way in the deciding set of their second-round match

The previous record was 30 games, set in 2004 when Fernando Gonzalez defeated Taylor Dent 16-14 in the third set to win the bronze medal.

London 2012 Olympics: Water polo girls to renew old rivalry in… the Bashes!

GB and Australia's water polo girls to renew old rivalry in… the Bashes!

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UPDATED:

18:21 GMT, 31 July 2012

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‘We get loads of scratches, bruising, marks from grabbing. It is very physical,’ says British Olympian Fran Leighton. ‘It’s bad when you go on a night out and you’ve got a low top on and everybody looks at you like, “Beaten wife”.’

‘I’ve broken somebody’s nose. I was young,’ confesses Frankie Snell, while Ciara Gibson-/07/31/article-2181692-13E4B190000005DC-802_634x433.jpg” width=”634″ height=”433″ alt=”The wrestler: British water polo player Frankie Snell (bottom) in training for the Olympics” class=”blkBorder” />

The wrestler: British water polo player Frankie Snell (bottom) in training for the Olympics

Not only are players required to tread water for more or less 60 minutes, swim up and down the pool at sprint speed, and find the athleticism to push out of the water to shoot, but they also have to be mentally and physically prepared for rough-house tactics you would associate more with, say, rugby, martial arts, or Leeds United under Don Revie.

‘In the rule book it’s down as non-contact, which is the biggest joke I’ve heard,’ team captain Leighton laughs.

There are seven players on each team, including a goalkeeper, and the aim is simply to score more goals than the opposition. Referees patrol the side of the pool looking for infringements, but the action under water is difficult to police, meaning players use every advantage possible no matter how violent. What lies beneath, indeed.

No holds barred: The British women's water polo team build their strength up by grappling

No holds barred: The British women's water polo team build their strength up by grappling

That is why, as these exclusive pictures show, land training is equally important as pool work. Every week the GB squad, centralised in Manchester, practice grappling and wrestling moves at the city’s Aquatics Centre.

Centre-back Snell explains: ‘We look like ninjas as we wear these skin-tight black leotards to reduce the risk of bruising. The moves are called things like mount and thrust. The mount is someone lying on the ground and you’re literally straddling them, and the person underneath has to try to flip them over and get on top. So you’re really going for it, no boundaries.

‘We do it for about 30 seconds then after you’re exhausted because your whole body’s tense. We have managed to transfer it into the pool a little bit. Sometimes you have to when you’re playing someone twice the size. The knee in the back is a little trick I do if someone’s holding me and I can’t get away.’

Meet the team: The British water polo team face old rivals Australia on Wednesday night

Meet the team: The British water polo team face old rivals Australia on Wednesday night

Leighton, the team’s captain since 2004, adds: ‘The wrestling is more to work all the muscles in our arms and get strength in our shoulders, but some of the grabs we now use in the water.’

The 30-year-old says they have even had lessons from an ultimate fighter. ‘He’s come and shown us how to defend ourselves.’

Leighton’s boyfriend is former swimmer Alex Scotcher, who won Commonwealth gold in Melbourne, and she concedes her idea of aquatic sport was initially a shock to him. But she has won him over and he now plays too, for London Penguins.

She says: ‘If we go out as a group of girls we must look like a women’s refuge or something. There’s all these scratches, a black eye, a few bandages. The worst I’ve had is an elbow to the face which split my eye. The blood just went everywhere. I looked like that guy in Batman, Two-Face!’

What lies beneath: Water polo is a brutal sport under the water as players bend the rules

What lies beneath: Water polo is a brutal sport under the water as players bend the rules

Snell, 25, adds: ‘Usually you do shake hands afterwards, but if someone’s given me a deliberate punch or something like that it’s hard to be friendly.’

Winger Gibson-/07/31/article-2181692-144FD0C4000005DC-948_634x463.jpg” width=”634″ height=”463″ alt=”Hot ticket: The Water Polo Arena on the Olympic Park will be packed to the rafters on Wednesday” class=”blkBorder” />

Hot ticket: The Water Polo Arena on the Olympic Park will be packed to the rafters on Wednesday

The Olympic tournament structure encourages the women to dream. There are two groups of four and all progress to the quarter-finals, with finishing positions deciding the draw. Win the fourth match and they are into the semi-finals. In Beijing, Holland finished third in their group with two losses, but narrowly won their next three to take gold. They have not qualified this time.

The British squad are aware just how important that fourth game is. ‘It’s all or nothing,’ Leighton says. Indeed, ask Fekete what the aim is and he will reply: ‘To win.’

Britain narrowly lost their opener to Russia 7-6 on Monday and next up is Australia, on Wednesday at 7.40pm. The rivalry between these nations will be even fiercer because of a nasty incident Down Under at the start of the year. Alex Rutlidge had her ribs broken when an Australian player kicked her hard in the midriff.

‘That was deliberate,’ Snell says, mood darkened. ‘We’ve got the video. She grabbed hold of Alex and booted off her. Then we see Alex going under water. That was the first time I’d ever seen broken ribs.’

Rutlidge does not know the name of the player, but remembers her face. ‘It was quite vicious and she meant to hurt me but not to break anything. It put me out of action for a while. If I saw her again I wouldn’t say anything to her. What happens in the pool stays in the pool.’

Wednesday’s match promises to be hard-hitting. The Bashes, you might call it.

London 2012 Olympics: Great Britain 62 Brazil 67 in basketball

Great Britain 62 Brazil 67: Deng's magic fails to inspire hosts to basketball victory

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UPDATED:

18:08 GMT, 31 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Great Britain's men came within touching distance of an Olympic victory over Brazil but fell away at the end against the South Americans.

Like the women on Monday, Britain held a late lead – albeit narrow – but could not hold on down the stretch. The game had remained close throughout with the teams trading baskets and the lead all the way.

But after Luol Deng had given Britain a one-point lead with back-to-back three-pointers four minutes from the end, Brazil went on a 7-0 spurt to make it 63-57.

Leap of faith: Luol Deng jumps to score against Brazil in the Basketball Arena

Leap of faith: Luol Deng jumps to score against Brazil in the Basketball Arena

Nene was called for illegal goaltending against Joel Freeland to make it 63-59 with 64 seconds to go, but Tiago Splitter's lay-up extended Brazil's advantage.

Deng could only make one of three free throws to leave Britain five adrift with 30 seconds left and Marcelinho Huertas killed Britain off from the line.

The ugly opening few minutes will not want to be remembered by either team. Freeland had to leave the court almost immediately after taking a blow from Anderson Varejao and Brazil built a quick 4-0 lead.

Dan Clark, who has been battling ankle problems since before the Games began, entered and gave Britain a spark with six quick points and Pops Mensah-Bonsu made it 8-4.

Cut above: Without Deng, Great Britain would have been brushed aside

Cut above: Without Deng, Great Britain would have been brushed aside

Mike Lenzly then entered the game for his Olympic debut following a calf injury and made his mark with a three-pointer that increased the gap to 11-4. But the good news soon turned bad as he went down off the ball and had to be helped off the court and likely out of the Olympics.

There was more bad news for Britain when Brazil were guilty of blatant goaltending with the score 13-9, but the basket was not given. They kept fighting and Deng turned a steal into two easy points, only to then turn the ball over himself seconds later and give Varejao free passage to the basket.

Deng made it 24-19 from another steal but Brazil came back again and a careless pass from Mensah-Bonsu let Larry Taylor tie it 27-27 before the break.

The third quarter was a tight affair with neither team able to get much separation as they traded baskets and the lead.

Freeland made a pair of nice reverse jump-shots and Britain could be grateful for Splitter's poor free throw shooting as the two teams remained locked together.

Delight: Brazil's team celebrate at the end of their victory over the hosts Great Britain

Delight: Brazil's team celebrate at the end of their victory over the hosts Great Britain

Brazil began to edge clear towards the end of the quarter, though, with Varejao making it 48-43 with a lay-up after Robert Archibald could only split his free throws. Varejao then made it 50-43 to start the final stanza, but Clark countered with a three-pointer and Nate Reinking made it 50-48 to lift the crowd.

Moments later Reinking swished a three to put Britain back in front but Splitter and Huertas snatched the lead right back. Splitter's free throws made it 56-51 but Deng found his shooting range with back-to-back three-pointers to put Britain on top.

But just as quickly, Splitter regained the lead and Marquinhos Sousa's three had Brazil 61-57 up. A quick Brazil break then ended with Nene dunking the ball in and drawing the foul, with the game starting to get out of Britain's reach. Reinking and Mensah-Bonsu led Britain with 13 points each while Deng had 12. Splitter poured in 21 points for Brazil.

London 2012 Olympics: Laura Robson beaten by Maria Sharapova

Sharapova dumps brave Robson out of women's singles event at Wimbledon

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UPDATED:

17:42 GMT, 31 July 2012

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Laura Robson's Olympic singles campaign was brought to an end in the second round by Maria Sharapova despite a hugely impressive display by the 18-year-old under the Centre Court roof.

Robson, who will play in the mixed doubles with Andy Murray, traded blow for blow with the third seed in the first set in particular before going down 7-6 (7/5) 6-3.

The Londoner clearly went into the match as a big underdog but Sharapova would have been well aware of the threat she posed, having narrowly beaten the teenager by the same scoreline in the second round of Wimbledon last year.

Game over: Robson crashed out to Sharapova at Wimbledon

Game over: Robson crashed out to Sharapova at Wimbledon

Since then Robson has climbed into the
world's top 100 and yesterday beat top-30 player Lucie Safarova to seal
her spot in the second round.

She certainly possesses the power to
match Sharapova, which is no mean feat, and she took the game to her
illustrious opponent from the start.

Robson had a chance to break in the fourth game but could not take it, and Sharapova moved ahead in the next.

But the Russian faltered serving at
4-3, sending down a double fault on break point and allowing Robson to
level, to the delight of the patriotic crowd.

Uphill battle: Robson had her work cut out facing the Russian world No 3, Sharapova

Uphill battle: Robson had her work cut out facing the Russian world No 3, Sharapova

Uphill battle: Robson had her work cut out facing the Russian world No 3, Sharapova

Chants of 'Laura, Laura' rang around
the arena as Robson twice held serve to force a tie-break, and she
recovered from a double fault on the opening point to lead 3-1.

But a mark of how well Robson was
playing was that Sharapova's level was extremely high, and she kept her
nerve to set up set point, which she took with a searing return.

The British number three needed a good
start to the second set but Sharapova really had the bit between her
teeth now and although Robson saved three break points, she could not
save a fourth.

That made it 2-0 to the third seed but
Robson dug in and broke back for 3-4, only to lose her serve again
immediately – and this time there was no way back.

High spirits: The fans arrived in their droves to show their support, despite the occasional shower

High spirits: The fans arrived in their droves to show their support, despite the occasional shower

High spirits: The fans arrived in their droves to show their support, despite the occasional shower

London 2012 Olympics: GB women finish sixth in team gymnastics as United States claim gold

GB women miss out on medal as United States pip Russia to gymnastics team gold

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UPDATED:

18:14 GMT, 31 July 2012

Great Britain's women achieved their
best Olympic gymnastics team result in the post-war era after they
finished sixth in the team final at the North Greenwich Arena on
Tuesday.

The United States, silver medalists four years ago, won gold ahead of Russia with Romania claiming the bronze medal.

Britain's gymnast Jennifer Pinches performs on the beam

Impressive: Britain's Jennifer Pinches on the beam

Defending champions China were left distraught as they finished fourth by some margin.

Britain's women were unable to match the achievements of their male counterparts who won Olympic team bronze yesterday, but that was never expected against gymnastics powerhouses China, Russia, United States and Romania.

Beth Tweddle, Hannah Whelan, Imogen Cairns, Rebecca Tunney and Jennifer Pinches scored 170.495 to mark their best ever result in post-war Olympic competition, surpassing the seventh place in the Los Angeles Games in 1984.

Jennifer Pinches of Great Britain competes on the balance beam

Britain's only Olympic team medal was won at the 1928 Games with a squad of 12 gymnasts.

The result comes after GB narrowly missed out on a place in the final four years ago in Beijing where they finished ninth.

With three gymnasts competing on each piece of apparatus and all of the scores counting towards the overall total, there was no margin for error.

Great Britain's Beth Tweddle

High point: Great Britain's Beth Tweddle

Britain started on beam, just like in
qualification, with Cairns stepping up first and steadying nerves with a
clean and confident 13.500 routine.

Pinches then tumbled off the
apparatus to score 11.833, before European bronze beam medallist Whelan
put on an assured display to score 13.866.

The United States began on vault,
with world champion McKayla Maroney the pick of the bunch after she hit a
stunning stuck Amanar vault to score 16.233, as the 2008 silver
medallists rocketed into a huge early lead.

Focused: Imogen Cairns on the balance beam

Focused: Imogen Cairns on the balance beam

Britain then moved to the floor in
last place after their shaky start, Pinches putting her woes on the beam
behind her with a clean routine of 14.366.

Whelan's solid routine and Tweddle's
slightly shaky 14.166 interpretation of James Bond theme 'Live and Let
Die' moved them up a place into seventh.

Cairns then opened for Britain on
vault with a clean one-and-a-half twisting leap before Pinches scored
14.833 ahead of Tunney's first appearance in the team final on the
apparatus, scoring 14.866.

Sparkling: Jordyn Wieber on the vault

Sparkling: Jordyn Wieber on the vault

Tweddle's specialist piece of apparatus, the uneven bars, was left until last, just like in qualification.
The 27-year-old competed last as the strongest worker on the apparatus
for Britain, after fellow City of Liverpool gymnasts Whelan and Tunney.

Whelan looked confident with a slight
step on landing to score 14.00 before 15-year-old Tunney hit her
routine to earn 14.766 for her team.

Golden girls: The USA celebrate their gold medal in the women's artistic gymnastics

Golden girls: The USA celebrate their gold medal in the women's artistic gymnastics

Fall out: Russia's Kseniia Afanaseva after falling during her floor exercise

Fall out: Russia's Kseniia Afanaseva after falling during her floor exercise

Three-time world champion Tweddle
then stepped up to the apparatus and nailed her routine with a twisting
double-double finish to save the best until last with a score of 15.833 –
and move Britain up into sixth place ahead of Italy and Japan.

The United States, meanwhile, were
doing battle with Russia for gold, with Aly Raisman's world class floor
routine enough to seal the victory for the 2008 Olympic silver
medallists.

The golden girls: U.S. gymnasts, left to right, Jordyn Wieber, Gabrielle Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Alexandra Raisman, Kyla Ross raise their hands on the podium during the medal ceremony

The golden girls: (left to right) Jordyn Wieber, Gabrielle Douglas, McKayla Maroney, Alexandra Raisman, Kyla Ross

Salute: US coach John Geddert leads the celebrations

Salute: US coach John Geddert leads the celebrations

London 2012 Olympics: Ye Shiwen is not a drugs cheat, says Lord Coe, officials and family

Ye is not a drugs cheat! Lord Coe joins officials and family in backing Chinese sensation

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UPDATED:

18:56 GMT, 31 July 2012

[headerlinks

Both the Olympic and Ye Shiwen's own
family rallied around the Chinese swimming prodigy following suspicions
over her record-shattering performance in the pool.

Ye arguably has proven the sensation
of the Olympics so far after the 16-year-old won gold in the women's 400
metres individual medley on Saturday, taking five seconds off her
personal best and more than a second off the world record.

Record breaker: Ye Shiwen knocked five seconds off her personal best and broke the world record by more than a second as she stormed to gold in the 400m individual medley

Record breaker: Ye Shiwen knocked five seconds off her personal best and broke the world record by more than a second as she stormed to gold in the 400m individual medley

Beaten: Ryan Lochte, pictured, was slower than Ye over the last 50 metres of his own medley race

Beaten: Ryan Lochte, pictured, was slower than Ye over the last 50 metres of his own medley race

However, it is the fact she swam the
final 50m of the freestyle leg of the event in a faster time than men's
champion Ryan Lochte that has really raised eyebrows, with American
coach John Leonard branding her performance 'suspicious', 'disturbing'
and 'unbelievable' and making comparisons with previous doping cases.

Ye has insisted 'there is absolutely
no problem' with her dramatic improvement because the Chinese team
adhered rigorously to anti-doping policies.

Outspoken: Top US swimming coach John Leonard called the feat 'unbelievable'

Outspoken: Top US swimming coach John Leonard called the feat 'unbelievable'

London 2012 chairman Lord Coe said it would be 'very unfair to judge an athlete by a sudden breakthrough'.

He told ITV News: 'What you tend to forget is probably the 10 years of work that has already gone in to get to that point.

'You need to look back through her career. I think you've got to be very careful when you make judgments like that but, yes, it is an extraordinary breakthrough.'

British Olympic Association chairman Lord Moynihan said: 'We know how on top of the game WADA [World Anti-Doping Agency] are and WADA have passed her as clean. That's the end of the story.

'And it is regretable there is so much speculation out there.

'I don't like it. I think it is wrong. That athlete or, indeed, any athlete that has never tested positive is an athlete who should be supported by her federation and, indeed, everybody in the Olympic movement.

'Let us recognise that there is an extraordinary swimmer out there who deserves the recognition of her talent in these Games.'

The International Olympics Committee told Ye's critics to 'get real'.

'These are the world's best athletes competing at the very highest level,' IOC communications director Mark Adams said.

'We have seen all sorts of records broken already all over the place.'

He added: 'It is inevitably a sad result of the fact that there are people who dope and who cheat.

'But I equally think it's very sad if we can't applaud a great
performance. Let's always give the benefit of the doubt to athletes.'

Proud: Ye said her success was due to her training since she was identified as a potential champion

Proud: Ye said her success was due to her training since she was identified as a potential champion

Medal winners: Ye Shiwen shows off the gold alongside the United States' Elizabeth Beisel, left, and compatriot Li Xuanxu following the final

Medal winners: Ye Shiwen shows off the gold alongside the United States' Elizabeth Beisel, left, and compatriot Li Xuanxu following the final

Ye's father, Ye Qingsong, told Chinese news portal Tencent that he
accepted it was 'normal for people to be suspicious' but added: 'The
western media has always been arrogant, and suspicious of Chinese
people.'

Jiang Zhixue, who leads anti-doping work at China's General
Administration of Sport, told the country's state news agency Xinhua: 'I
think it is not proper to single Chinese swimmers out once they produce
good results. Some people are just biased.

'We never questioned Michael Phelps when he bagged eight gold medals in Beijing.'

Jiang said China's swimming team had made breakthroughs due to scientific training and sheer hard work.

He added: 'The Chinese athletes, including the swimmers, have undergone nearly 100 drug tests since they arrived here.

'Many were also tested by the international federations and the British
anti-doping agency. I can tell you that, so far, there was not a single
positive case.'

Deputy anti-doping chief Zhao Jian claimed Leonard 'thinks too much',
pointing out China had come down hard on doping since a spate of
problems in the 1990s.

Adams insisted this morning London 2012 had 'a very, very strong drug
testing programme and we are very confident that, if there are cheats,
we will catch them, as we already have done'.

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt added that the Games had 'some of the most
rigorous, if not the most rigorous, anti-doping procedures in place for
any Olympics'.

'We've been absolutely determined to make sure that this is the cleanest Olympics ever,' he told the BBC.

In a final, the first five athletes are tested compulsorily along with two others, the IOC said.

Some 1,706 tests have been carried out so far, including 1,344 urine tests and 362 blood tests, the IOC added.

Profile of Ye Shiwen

Profile of Ryan Lochte

London 2012 Olympics: Michael Phelps equals record medal tally in 200m butterfly

Phelps beaten to 200m butterfly gold by Le Clos… but equals record medal tally

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UPDATED:

19:06 GMT, 31 July 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
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MEDALS TABLE

Michael Phelps joy at equalling the all-time Olympic medal tally was tainted by being pipped right at the death of the 200m butterfly final by South African Chad Le Clos.

The 27-year-old started the evening with 14 gold, one silver and two bronze medals over three Olympic Games since 2004.

His second place was sufficient to see him move alongside Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina, whose record had stood since 1964.

Pipped to the post: Phelps narrowly missed out on the gold medal

Pipped to the post: Phelps narrowly missed out on the gold medal

However, the American has always
maintained he is not interested in medal counts and will be furious with
himself after le Clos beat him on the touch.

Gold standard: Le Clos was the big winner - taking gold in the 200m butterfly

Gold standard: Le Clos was the big winner – taking gold in the 200m butterfly

London 2012 Olympics weightlifting: Maiya Maneza wins women"s 63kg gold

Kazakhstan's Maneza breaks Olympic record to clinch women's 63kg gold

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UPDATED:

16:45 GMT, 31 July 2012

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MEDALS TABLE

Maiya Maneza turned the women's 63kg into a personal pursuit for Olympic and world records after clinching gold for Kazakhstan.

All the talk going into the competition was of a duel between Maneza and Russia's Svetlana Tsarukaeva, with the two lifters going head-to-head for the previous three world championships.

Weigh to go: Kazakhstan's Maiya Maneza celebrates after winning gold in the women's 63kg weightlifting competition

Weigh to go: Kazakhstan's Maiya Maneza celebrates after winning gold in the women's 63kg weightlifting competition

Tsarukaeva led at the interval after a snatch of 112kg compared to Maneza's 110kg, but the Russian's clean and jerk predictably let her down and 125kg (total 237kg) was only enough for silver.

Maneza clinched gold with her first clean and jerk attempt at 135kg – equalling the Olympic record – before she set about trying to take her own world record of 143kg.

Lift off: Maneza broke the Olympic record en route to winning the gold medal

Lift off: Maneza broke the Olympic record en route to winning the gold medal

Two failed lifts at 144kg meant it was not to be, but a 245kg total was enough for another Olympic record.

Both Maneza and Tsarukaeva failed to total in Beijing four years ago.

Canada's Christine Girard (236kg) edged bronze ahead of Turkey's Sibel Simsek, making up for her agonising fourth place at the 2008 Olympics.

Golden girl: Maneza attempted to break the world record but after two failed attempts her total was enough to win the competition

Golden girl: Maneza attempted to break the world record but after two failed attempts her total was enough to win the competition